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Extinct or Renamed Counties

Arapahoe (KS)
Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory was created Aug 30, 1855 within what are now Colorado borders. A probate judge was appointed, but the plan for holding court was left to his discretion. Arapahoe County was attached to Marshall County, Kansas for business purposes. The county was never organized and a county seat was never established. On Feb 7, 1859, the following daughter counties were created from parts of the old Arapahoe (1855) County, Kansas:

Broderick (KS)
Broderick County, Kansas Territory (modern Pueblo County, eastern Fremont and Custer, and southern El Paso counties, Colorado

El Paso (KS)
El Paso County, Kansas Territory (northwestern El Paso, southern Douglas and Teller counites, Colorado)

Fremont (KS)
Fremont County, Kansas Territory (southern Park and Chaffee, Fremont, northern Custer and Saguache counties, Colorado)

Montana (KS)
Montana County, Kansas Territory (southern Boulder, Jefferson, Gilpin, Clear Creek, Denver, northern Douglas and Park, western quarters of Arapahoe and Adams counties, Colorado)

Oro (KS)
Oro County, Kansas Territory (central Adams, Araphahoe, and Elbert and northwestern El Paso counties, Colorado)

Carbonate (KS)
Extinct

Greenwood
Extinct

Guadalupe
Feb 28, 1861 The United States Congress created Colorado Territory from parts of 4 other territories (Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico and Utah)

Nov 1, 1861 The Colorado Assembly created Guadalupe County an orginal Colorado county partly from land previously part of Taos County in New Mexico Territory, and partly from unsettled lands previously claimed as part of Washington County in Utah Territory.

Nov 7, 1861 Six days later the Assembly changed the name from Guadalupe County to Conejos County.

Mora (NM)
Mora County, New Mexico was created Feb 1, 1860 from the eastern part of Taos County, New Mexico. The northern parts of Mora and Taos counties, formerly New Mexico Terriroty, were transferred to the newly created Colorao Territory on Feb 28, 1861 where they eventually were turned into parts of new Colorado territories.

Mora County became extreme west Baca, southwest Bent, southern Custer, Huerfano, Las Animas, southern Otero, and souther Pueblo counties.
Taos County became Alamosa, extreme southeast tip of Archuleta, Conejos, Costilla, central Hinsdale, northeast Mineral, Rio Grande, souther Saguache, and far east central San Juan countites.

North Park
North Park, a valley consistsing of present day Jackson County, Colorado was enumerated with Grand County in the 1880 and 1885 federal censuses. In 1886 the Supreme Court ruled it was actually part of Larimer County since 1861.

Peketon (KS)
Peketon County, Kansas Territory was the new name applied to the former Washington (old) County, Kansas. The new name was first given Feb 21, 1860 to the large county in the southwest corner of present day Kansas and southeastern corner of present day Colorado (formerly eastern border of Taos County, New Mexico Territory and Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory). The previous name, Washington County, has been given to another county in northeastern Kansas in Feb 1857.

Kansas: Peketon County borders included parts of these Kansas modern counties: Barber, Barton, Clark, Comanche, Edwards, Fort, Grant, Gray, Greeley, Hamiliton, Harper, Harvey, Haskell, Hodgeman, Kearney, Kingman, Kiowa, Lane, the southwest corner of Marion, the southern part of McPherson, Meade, Morton, Ness, Pawnee, Pratt, Reno, Rice, Russell, Scott, Sedgwich, Seward, Stafford, Stanton, Stevens, nearly all of Sumner and Wichita.

Colorado: Peketon County borders included parts of these Colorado modern counties: Baca, Bent, Kiowa and Prowers.

Peketon County was never organized, no county seat was established, and her territory was given to Maion County in 1867.


Taos (NM)
The southern part of present day Colorado east of the Continental Divide was the northern part of Taos County, New Mexico Territory from its creation in New Mexico Territory in 1846 until 1861 when it was one of the 4 pieces of other territories used to create the new Colorado Territory.

Sep 22, 1846 Taos County was established as one of the 7 original New Mexico counites under Kearny's Code of Laws for the occupied Mexican territory.

Jan 9, 1852 All New Mexico counites were redefined. Taos County was extended west to the California border including land in present day Arizona and Nevada.

Feb 1, 1860 Mora County, New Mexico Territory was erected from the eastern part of Taos County including part in present day southern Colorado.

Feb 28, 1861 The northern parts of Taos and Mora counties, formerly New Mexico Territory, were transferred to the newly created Colorado Territory.

Uncompahgre
Uncompahgre County (extinct) was a short lived county of southern Colorado, it existed for only 3 days.

Feb 27, 1883 Uncompahgre County was created from Gunnison, Montrose and Ouary counties in Colorado.

Mar 2, 1883 Uncompahgre County was renamed Ouray County, Colorado. Ouray County in effect, regained the area (and more) than it lost to the creation of Uncompahgre 2 days earlier.

Washington (KS old)
The old Washington County, Kansas was created Aug 30, 1855 in the southwest corner of present day Kansas and southeastern corner of present day Colorado (formerly eastern border of Taos County, New Mexico Territory and Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory).

Kansas: The old Washington County borders included parts of these Kansas modern counties: Barber, Barton, Clark, Comanche, Edwards, Fort, Grant, Gray, Greeley, Hamiliton, Harper, Harvey, Haskell, Hodgeman, Kearney, Kingman, Kiowa, Lane, the southwest corner of Marion, the southern part of McPherson, Meade, Morton, Ness, Pawnee, Pratt, Reno, Rice, Russell, Scott, Sedgwich, Seward, Stafford, Stanton, Stevens, nearly all of Sumner and Wichita.

Colorado: The old Washington County borders included parts of these Colorado modern counties: Baca, Bent, Kiowa and Prowers.

This older Washington County was never organized, no county seat was established.

 


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