Biographies Header

Jennie Moore Giddings
Jennie Moore Giddings
Transcribed by Debbie Gibson

MT. STERLING WOMAN TOOK LIFE WITH LYE.

MRS. JENNIE GIDDINGS, AGED 49, COMMITTED SUICIDE ON MONDAY
Mt. Sterling, Ill., May 3 – Mrs. Jennie Giddings, aged 48, committed suicide at her home here Monday afternoon by swallowing a quantity of lye. She was doing a family washing at the time and it was while her daughter was in the yard that she swallowed the lye. She was in a dying condition when found. Mrs. Giddings was a widow woman and her inability to make a living for her children by washing is given the cause of her act.
Transcribed from: The Quincy Whig, Thursday, May 04, 1911

BECAME TIRED OF SUPPORTING HIM
Her name is Mrs. Jennie Giddings, but she now calls herself Mrs. Jennie Moore, having become tired of her husband's name, as well as of his conduct. They have been making their home on a little farm place about four and one half miles from Durham, Missouri, whence the disgusted wife, accompanied by her two girls, aged 7 and 11 years, respectively, yesterday walked to Maywood. At the latter place, a purse was made up to enable them to come to Quincy on the "O. K." train, the trainmen contributing to the purse. The woman and children arrived last night and called to the police station and she told her story to Sergt. Harvey and he and Officer Barry and Scharnhorst made up arse to get the trio lodgings and breakfast at a hotel. The woman says that she has supported her husband for nineteen years, that he will not work, and now she has resolved to go out of work herself. She says that she has nearly gotten a son through college by her own labor. This morning she has turned over to Police Matron Dix. Mrs. Moore said she has lived nine years in Clayton, this county, having worked for excellent people there, and Mrs. Dix sent her to Clayton that afternoon.
Transcribed from: The Quincy Daily Journal, Tuesday, November 20, 1900

MRS. GIDDINGS' STORY OF WANT
WENT TO CLAYTON WITH HER CHILDREN
HUSBAND WOULD NOT PROVIDE FOR HER.
SHE WAS FEARFUL THAT HE WOULD FOLLOW HER TO CLAYTON AND MAKE TROUBLE, BUT THE MARSHAL WILL STOP HIM.

Mrs. Jennie Giddings, the woman who, with her two children, started to walk from Durham to Quincy Monday, as related in The Whig of yesterday, went to Clayton last evening. She took her two little girls with her. She has friends in Clayton, having formerly been employed there by Mrs. McBratney, and says that she can make a living for herself and children there. The girls are bright children, and would be a source of pride to any mother. Lulu is 11 years old, and Bertha is 7, and both of them show careful training. There is a son, a boy of 18, but he has remained with his father near Durham.

Mrs. Giddings tells a pitiful story of want, starvation, and sacrifice, which only a mother can make. Her husband is a worthless lout, and compelled her to do a man's work about the farm, while he remained in doors at the fire. When she left him he threatened to have her arrested if she went into Durham, but she and the two children walked around the town, striking the railroad track some distance this way. They started to walk to Quincy, and some distance down the track met an officer , who stopped them. He asked Mrs. Giddings where they were going and she told him. After a few minutes conversation the officer broke into a laugh, and she asked him what he was laughing about, "I was told that you were crazy," he said, "and to apprehend you on sight, but you do not appear to be as insane as the one who told me." He allowed them to proceed, and they walked to Maywood, where they were offered a ride on the train to Quincy, and accepted it. "It is a wonder to me that I am not crazy." said Mrs. Giddings in relating the incident. "I have had so much grief and worry that sometimes I do not know what I am doing."

Mrs. Giddings was bent on staying in Quincy, but when informed yesterday that there was little chance for her here she decided to go to Clayton. She did not have enough money to pay the railroad fare, and the police took up a collection, which netted enough to buy tickets for herself and two children. She was grateful for the kindness shown her, and her eyes repeatedly filled with tears. She has left her husband before because he would not make a living for her, and had gone to work, taken in washing and done other work. All the money she earned she spent on the education of her son, who has remained with his father. She is fearful now that her husband will follow her to Clayton and make trouble for her. Her fears were dissipated by Police Matron Dix, who told her to see the marshal at Clayton and with him take steps to keep him away, and the woman departed on the evening train with an approach to happiness in her heart.
Transcribed from: The Quincy Daily Whig, Wednesday, November 21, 1900

P.C. Giddings, of Durham, Mo., was in the city yesterday.

Transcribed from: The Quincy Daily Whig, Friday, December 28, 1900. 


 Copyright © Genealogy Trails 2013 All Rights Reserved
with Full Rights Reserved for Original Contributor