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Bond County, Illinois

History of Bond and Montgomery Counties Illinois 1882
Transcribed and Contributed by ©Norma Hass

Biographies 




[Mulberry Grove Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 46] M. F. BOOK, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, is a native of Lawrence County, Penn.; was born January 21, 1841, the second son born to his parents, who were John C. and Mary W. (DICK) BOOK. She was born February 18, 1821, in Mercer County, Penn. He was born in the same county and State October 16, 1816, son of Michael BOOK, of Washington County, Penn., a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in Pennsylvania. John C. BOOK emigrated west to this State in 1874, and died August, 1878. Our subject was brought up to farm labor, working for his father on the home estate. August 27, 1861, he volunteered his services in the defense of his country, was enrolled with Company D, One Hundredth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He participated in many hard fought and bloody battles, some of which were James Island, N. C., Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Jackson, Miss., siege of Knoxville, battle of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor, where he was three times wounded and from the effects of said wounds he was discharged in February, 1865, and returned home to his family. May 16, 1861, he became the husband of Elizabeth A DAVIS, born in Mercer County, Penn., daughter of Daniel and Sarah DAVIS. In November, 1871, he emigrated to this county and purchased land where he now resides, having about one hundred acres. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and a stanch Republican.

G. C. BRUNSON, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, was born in the Empire State, in Chautauqua County, December 15, 1818; is the sixth child and fourth son born to Abel BRUNSON, a native of Oneida County. The mother of our subject was Sallie LOVE, daughter of John LOVE. The subject of these lines was reared under the paternal roof until of age, and in fact he remained with him until he attained his thirty-fifth year, at which time he determined to cast his fortunes with the Buckeye State, locating in Ashtabula County, on the Western Reserve. Here he remained until the fall of 1863, when he came to this State, purchasing eighty acres in this township, and twenty acres in Fayette County. He has since been a constant resident of this township and associated with its interests. He has now 190 acres of land, and has improved the same, and brought it to its present state of progress, having a new house, good fences, and the surroundings are in keeping with the average of improvements in the county. while in Ashtabula County, he married Mrs. BUGBY, a native of that State. Her maiden name was Betsey WHITTAKER. By this marriage he has one child, Dwight W., who resides with his parents on the farm, and has the principal charge of the same. It may be said of Mr. BRUNSON that he is a self made man. He received nothing from his parents by way of legacy or endowment, and started out in the world upon his own foundation, and by close application to his business, he has at length secured a competence for himself and family, having given his attention to farming as a business. He is a member of the Christian Church.


Charles E. DEE, miller, Mulberry [Page 47] Grove, is the pioneer miller in the town of Mulberry Grove, and a truly self made man. He is a native of Vermont, born in 1837, near the town of Georgia; son of Hiram and Mary (WALKER) DEE. The DEE family are of Scotch and German ancestry. Hiram DEE was born in Vermont October 17, 1812; son of Washington DEE and Lucy COOLEY. Hiram DEE was married in Vermont May 7, 1835, to Mary Maria WALKER, who was also a Vermonter, born July 12, 1813, daughter of Lewis WALKER and Mary POTTER, who raised a family of ten children, Mary being the ninth in order of birth. Our subject removed in the fall of 1843 with his parents to Des Moines County, Iowa, within nine miles of Burlington. Here the family remained seven years. Then they moved to this State and located at St. Jacobs, in Madison County. While here Mr. DEE died March 5, 1863, from disease contracted while in the army. He was for many years a member of the Methodist Church, and was an old line Whig, and later a stanch Republican. His wife yet survives him and resides with Charles E., who took his father's place as the head of the family, and had charge of the same. After coming to maturity he engaged in farming, and subsequently accumulated enough means to enable him to purchase a threshing machine, which he run for twelve years in connection with his farming. In 1869, he came to Mulberry Grove. His first enterprise was to build a saw-mill. In 1870, he built the flouring-mill, and for several years ran the saw machinery in connection with the grist part. He was first associated in partnership with E. W. DEE. This lasted until 1873, when our subject purchased his partner's interest, and since has run the same on his own account, and is doing an excellent business. August 4, 1870, he married Sarah B., daughter of William RILEY, of this township. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and has two children - George E., born November 7, 1873, and Charlie, born April 8, 1881.

Capt. Isaac N. ENLOE, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, is a son of James ENLOE, one of the old settlers in Bond County. He was born on the homestead on Section 3, March 7, 1836, the second son, and eldest one now living. Capt. ENLOE has always been a resident of the township where he was born, remaining at home until he commenced doing business for himself. November 12, 1857, he married Sophronia V., daughter of Esq. Joseph HENSLEY, of Mercer County, whose wife was Elizabeth McGUIRE. The year following his marriage, he located on the farm he now owns, consisting of 124 acres in Section 4, all of which he improved. August 13, 1861, he volunteered as private in Company C, Twenty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; first promoted to Fourth Corporal, than to First Duty Sergeant, afterward to Orderly Sergeant, and finally was commissioned Captain of the Company, which he had charge of until July 29, 1865. During his service he was engaged in New Madrid, the advance on Corinth, Jackson, Miss., Resaca and all the battles in which his command was engaged until August 15, 1864, when he was wounded, being shot by a sharp-shooter, and was disabled until January, 1865, since which time he has been engaged in farming. In politics, a Republican of the staunchest sort; he cast the first Republican vote in Mulberry voting precinct. He is a member of the Christian Church at Greenville. He has five children - Alice, wife of George BERRYMAN, of Greenville; Solon A., James S., Lois and Joe Foy.

James ENLOE, retired farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, has been a resident of the [Page 48] State since 1816, and of Bond County from 1818 to 1882. He was a son of Asahel ENLOE, who was a native of York District of South Carolina, where our subject was born October 27, 1803. The grandsire was Isaac ENLOE, of Scotch parentage, and served in the war of the revolution. Our subject came to Madison County, Ill., with his father in 1816, the next year making a crop there, and in 1818, came to what is now Bond County. Asahel (his father) purchased land where Greenville now stands. The cemetery now embraces a portion of said purchase. He was a scholarly man for his time, and taught school for many years, and was appointed Surveyor of the county by Gov. Bond, and held his office well on to forty years. He was for many years a member of the Presbyterian Church, being a Clerk and Chorister for years. He was a valued member of the community, esteemed by all who knew him as an upright man and Christian gentleman. His remains now repose in the cemetery in Greenville on the grounds that he first purchased. His wife was Sarah STEWART, a native of Ireland. She bore him ten children, five sons and five daughters - Mary, Violet, Cynthia, Ezekial, James, Hannah, Louisa, Enoch, Nathaniel and Isaac. James, our subject, made his father's house his home in his early manhood, and in 1825, began for himself, and worked out by the month and job. January 1, 1829, he married Sarah BRADFORD, sister of Judge BRADFORD, of Greenville. She was born in Kentucky March 19, 1816, and died November 22, 1871, having born twelve children. Eleven of the number lived to be grown - Nancy Ann, Mary E., William B., Isaac N., Violet R., Samuel G., Emery L., Harriet N., Louisa I., James S., Cynthia E. and Zontonia E. In 1832, Mr. ENLOE located on the farm he now owns, and has since remained; has 300 acres of land. Since 1835, he has been a member of the Presbyterian Church. He has always been a true Republican, and never missed an election.

Samuel G. ENLOE, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove. One of the Commissioners of Bond County, elected November, 1881, is S. G. ENLOE, who was born on the homestead March 30, 1840. He is the second son of James and Sarah (BRADFORD) ENLOE. Samuel received the advantages afforded by the schools of his neighborhood. At the outbreak of the war, he donned the blue, enlisting as private in May, 1861, in Company D, Twenty-second Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Soon after he was transferred to Company F, One Hundredth and Thirtieth Regiment, with which he served until April, 1865, when he was commissioned as First Lieutenant in Company B, in the same Regiment, in which capacity he served until the close of the war. He was mustered out in August, 1865, and returned home in September of the same year. During his association with the army, he participated in the following engagements: Fort Gibson, Miss., Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, Siege of Mobile, and after his transfer to New Orleans he served in all the battles in which his regiment was engaged in Louisiana, and on Can River. Upon his return home he began improving his farm, upon which he located after his marriage November 30, 1871, to Elizabeth V. MARTIN, born in Rockingham County, N. C., daughter of J. H. MARTIN and Rachel PROCTOR, now of Montgomery County, this State. In politics, Mr. ENLOE is a Republican, and in November, 1881, he was elected County Commissioner. His farm consists of 115 acres. He has one child, Ernest R.

Moses ELAM, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove. Among the substantial citizens of Bond County none are more highly respected than the above. He was born October 25, [Page 49] 1821, in Rutherford County, N. C., and emigrated to Fayette County with his parents when a mere lad. Here he remained about fifteen years. December 23, 1841, he married Martha F. ELAM, who was born Jan. 12, 1827, a native of Virginia, daughter of Daniel ELAM and Mary GRAVES, who emigrated from Virginia to Maury County, Tenn., about the year 1828, where they remained until the year 1831, when they removed to Bond County, stopping near Greenville, but remained a short time, and located permanently in Fayette County, where they remained until their death. Their deaths occurred in 1862 and 1854 respectively. They raised a family of six children, four of whom are now living, of whom Thomas resides in Arkansas; Mary J., Mrs. Elisha MATTHEWS, of this county. Susan became the wife of William CHEESEMAN, of Henry County, Mo. After Mr. ELAM's marriage he remained in Fayette County three years, and then moved across the line into Mulberry Grove, and engaged in merchandising, continuing twelve years. October, 1856, he located on the farm he now owns, situated in Section 26, and has since been engaged in farming, and has been successful, having nearly six hundred acres of land, 320 here, and 212 in Fayette, and besides assisted his children in making a start in life. He has five children -Moses, Thomas E., Melvina, Jenkins and Richard, all residents of this county. Melvina married Rev. Thomas VANCE, of the Christian Church. The father of our subject was William ELAM, born and married in Virginia, and son of Alexander ELAM, a native of Virginia, and of English descent. The mother of our subject was Patience, daughter of Philip HURT, who removed from Virginia to North Carolina, where they remained sixteen years. Mr. ELAM is a member of the Christian Church.

E. V. GASKINS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Mulberry Grove. "Son", as he is best known, was born in Greenville November 29, 1841. He is the only son and sole heir of Judge Enrico GASKINS, a native of Norfolk, Va., born June 14, 1812, and son of Spencer GASKINS. Enrico, the father of "Son", was a hatter by trade, and came West to Greenville in 1835, where he set up in business, continuing the same for several years, and afterward became prominently identified with its business interests. He was Clerk of the Court about twenty years, and eight years County Judge. He was a thorough and correct business man. In 1859, he entered land in Town 6, Range 2, and purchased other lands adjoining the same, which land is now owned and occupied by E. V. Mr. GASKIN was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity; also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he was a stanch Republican, and in every sense of the word a representative man and valued member of the commonwealth. His marriage with Mrs. Sarah CONN, relict of Dr. CONN, was crowned with the birth of three children; but one of the number is now living, E. V. He located on the farm in 1872. His death occurred February 18, 1879. Mrs. GASKIN's maiden name was HALL, daughter of Joshua and Charlotte (STRIDER) HALL. She was born June 18, 1814, in Jefferson County, Va., and came West with her parents to this county in 1833. E. V. has been located on the farm since his father's location here in 1872. In 1863, he married Charlotte, born in this county, daughter of John S. HALL. He has one daughter, Lena, aged sixteen. For four years Mr. E. V. GASKIN was a resident of Mulberry Grove, being engaged while here in merchandising. Since his location here on the farm, he has been engaged in farming, and is giving his attention to the breeding of fine cattle and horses, of which he has the best [Page 50] stock. He has 600 acres of land, located on Section 23, with a new house and comfortable surroundings.

J. J. HARPER, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove. The HARPER family rank among the pioneer families in Town 5 Range 2. They were natives of Tennessee, and located where J. M. HARPER now resides. The subject of these lines is a descendant of this family. He was born May 28, 1838, on the farm he now owns, on Section 22. He is the second son of Thomas HARPER, who was born in Maury County, Tenn., and emigrated to this county in the year 1829. The mother of our subject was Priscilla SEGRAVES, daughter of Bennett SEGRAVES, likewise one of the earliest settlers in this township. But two children were born to Thomas HARPER and his wife, whose names were Robert and Jefferson J. The latter was young when his father died. His mother died in 1867. J. J. succeeded his father on the homestead, where he has since lived. February 10, 1859, he married Milley E. BROWN, born in Fayette County, daughter of James and Dorcas BROWN, both natives of Tennessee. Mr. HARPER has a farm of 170 acres. He has two children - James T. and Alice.

J. P. LILLIGH, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove. Clarion County, Penn., sent some good farmers and citizens to Bond County, among whom is the above, who was born in February, 1841, being the eldest son of Jacob LILLIGH and Catharine MAHLE. Jacob LILLIGH was born in Lancaster County, Penn.; son of Jacob, a native of Germany. The family emigrated West to this locality in the spring of 1865. J. P. married in Pennsylvania Hannah CORNISH in 1854. She was a daughter of Henry CORNISH. She died in 1872, leaving two children - Addison and Kate. His last marriage was to Miss Nancy BUCHANNON, a native of this county. She was a daughter of John BUCHANNON, who was one of the early settlers of the county. When Mr. LILLIGH first came here he purchased eighty acres of land, and has since added to the same until he has now 500 acres. For twenty years he been a member of the German Baptist Church, with which his parents have long been identified. He has by his last marriage tow children living -Minnie and Grace. He has improved the farm greatly since his location here, having built all the substantial improvements on the same.

Henry LILLIGH, farmer, P. O. Woburn, is the second son of Jacob LILLIGH. Henry was born May 1, 1849, and emigrated to this county with the family in 1865. In 1872, he married Harriet MOREY, daughter of Hiram MOREY, one of the old-time settlers in this county. After his marriage, he located in Mulberry Grove, where he engaged in the mercantile business, where he continued until 1875, when he located on the farm he now owns. He is an excellent farmer, and has been successful. He has 280 acres of land, forty of which is timber. His farm is well improved, and is very productive. He is a member of German Baptist Church, and has recently been promoted to the rank of minister in his church. He has four children - Ida Marian, Mary Louisa, Emmet Wilburn and Edward Earl.

J. MATTINLY, physician, Mulberry Grove, specialist of the eye and ear, also of the treatment and cure of cancers, who first saw the light of day July 7, 1813, in Lincoln County, Tenn.; son of Rollin, born March 10, 1788, in North Carolina, who was a son of Richard MATTINLY, whose children were David, James, John, Rollin and Waring. The mother, Nancy LUTTRELL, was born March 31, 1793, and died May 13, 1881; she was the daughter of Michael LUTTRE, a Revolutionary soldier, and who lived to be almost a centena [Page 51] rian, the family being remarkable for their longevity. Our subject removed with his father to Alabama, in Jackson County, when he was a lad of tender years, where they resided until the year 1830, when they came to Marion County, this State, where his father died September 6, 1866. Very much credit is due the subject of our sketch, as he was thrown upon his own resources at an early age, leaving home without shoes or sufficient clothing to shield him from the inclement weather, and unable to read the simplest sentence in a newspaper. He hired out at $6 per month, and assisted in maintaining the family in the meantime. For five years he drove stage, and during that time he made use of his spare time in improving his mind, being resolved, that as his temporal affairs were being advanced, that his mind should receive its share also. He came to this township in 1839, and was married the same year to Mary A. HUBBARD, who died in 1840, leaving one son, David Rollin. His second and last wife was Sarah TATE, born in Stokes County, N. C., September 9, 1809, daughter of Samuel TATE, born in Stokes County, N. C., in 1776, and died April 23, 1842, and Sarah (FAULKNER) TATE, born in Wake County, N. C., in 1775, and died in 1853. She bore him three children, two of whom are living - Lizzie, wife of John T. BUCHANNON, Annie and Sarah E. Soon after he came to this place, he entered a piece of land and began farming, which he continued until 1860. In the meantime he was reading scientific works, medicine being his favorite. February, 1861, he began practice in Greenville. Since April 10, 1862, he has been located here in Mulberry Grove, giving especial attention to the treatment of the eye and ear, as well as cancer, treating them with success. He has 200 acres of land, and considerable town property. The Doctor has done much to impress upon the minds of the people the necessity of the knowledge of phrenology and sexual science among the people.

E. W. OLIVER, physician, Mulberry Grove, is a North Carolinian by birth, born in Rockingham County, February 10, 1844; son of Elijah OLIVER, born in Rockingham County, N. C., about 1805, and died January 5, 1881, whose father was Peter, who was a resident of North Carolina at the time of the battle of Bunker Hill. The mother of the Doctor was Annie, daughter of Enoch AXTON, born in Rockingham county, N. C., about 1805, and died in 1863. In 1861, he left North Carolina for Indiana, where he remained a short time; then came to Charlestown, Coles Co., this State, where he remained some length of time. He was, early in life, left to his own resources, with a limited education, in North Carolina. The nearest school from his father's house was three miles and a half; hence his advantages for schooling were not encouraging. After his coming to Illinois, he, by close application to his studies, succeeded in acquiring such qualifications that enabled him to teach the district school of the neighborhood, which he did for several terms. During this time he took up the study of medicine. In 1870, he gave the subject his earnest attention. He continued the same until his graduation, receiving his diploma at Keokuk, Iowa, February 17, 1874, in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at which time he came to Woburn, Town 6, Range 2, and engaged in the practice of his profession, where he remained until September, 1881, when he came to Mulberry Grove, where he has since been identified, and is having a liberal patronage of people. He was educated to the old-school system, but he ignores to some extent some of the medicine commonly used in that system, calomel, for instance, and in its stead makes use of other remedies [Page 52] equally as effective. In 1871, he married Virginia A. JETT, born in Montgomery county, Ill., July 8, 1850, daughter of Washington A. JETT, who died about 1856, and Sarah WRIGHT. By her he had five children - the first still born, Albert W., William E. (dead), Essie W., and Harry J. He is a member of the Christian Church and of the Masonic order. He has but two sisters living - Sarah and Rachel, the former of Virginia, the latter in Rockingham County, N. C.

James C. PINNEO, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Smithboro, is a native of Newark, N. J., and was born July 17, 1839. He is the youngest of the family. His father is James B. PINNEO, one of the prominent and well-known business men of that locality (New Jersey). He was born in Milford, in the State of Connecticut; son of Bezaleel PINNEO, a Presbyterian minister. Our subject is a near relative of the grammarian, whose works are so well known in the Eastern States. Eliza, the mother of James C., was a daughter of Samuel LYMAN, of Goshen, Conn., of Puritanical stock. The family of Bezaleel, consisted of seven children, four sons and three daughters, of whom James B. was the eldest. The subject of these lines received good school advantages, and of a good business education. He first came West in October, 1861, and for some time was in Government employ, being connected with the Quartermaster's Department, and afterward engaged in trading and in commercial pursuits in St. Louis and elsewhere. In 1869, he made the purchase of the farm he now owns, situated on Section 9, and moved on his property the following year. His residence is built upon a gentle eminence, which he has improved by planting shrubbery and evergreens, and on either side of the drive are beautiful maples, which give the place a refined appearance. Mr. PINNEO has put all the improvements on the farm that now appear, in the way of building, and very much of the fencing, and has spent much labor and money executing his designs, and has an excellent farm, which is adjacent to Smithboro Post Office and Henderson Station, and four miles from the county seat. June 9, 1870, he married Miss Minnie GRAY, born in Stamford, Conn., daughter of William E. GRAY and Sarah ADAMS, the latter a sister of Stonewall ADAMS. The parents of Mrs. GRAY emigrated West in 1858. Her father was a prominent builder and contractor in the West and North. Mr. PINNEO has one child - Saida L. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

John RILEY, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, was born December 4, 1828, in Town 5, Range 3, in Bond County, and in 1835 removed with his parents to Town 6, where he lived until about the year 1868, when he removed to this township, where he has since lived. The father of our subject was named Barnabas RILEY, who was born in Georgia, and emigrated North to this State in this county in 1818. He stayed one year, when he went South to Kentucky, but returned to this county the following year, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1849. His wife survived him until 1876. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was for many years a member of the M. E. Church for many a long term of years, and leading light in the same, being Class-Leader and Steward for many years. John, our subject, was raised to agricultural pursuits, his father being a farmer. He worked as carpenter and builder, but gave his attention to farming principally. He raised a family of nine children, whose names were James, William, John, Elizabeth, Minerva, Samuel M., Barnabas, Sarah and Mary. March, 1850, he married Jane C. STEELE, a native of this State, and daughter of Andrew STEELE. She died [Page 53] in 1866, leaving one child, which died young. His present wife was Mrs. Elizabeth J. KINGSBURY, daughter of Richard WITHERS, of Collinsville, this State. Mr. WITHER's wife was Edna JOHNSON, her father being Mr. JOHNSON, one of the first settlers in Madison County. By his last wife Mr. RILEY has three children - Evaline S., Anna E. and John E. Mr. RILEY is a Republican, and filled the office of County Commissioner one term, and since 1846 has been a member of the M. E. Church. He has 155 acres of land. His brother William served in the late war, and was a member of the Twenty-second Illinois, and was badly wounded, and is now on the pension list.

J. H. SPRADLING, farmer and merchant, P. O. Mulberry Grove, was born August 1, 1828, in Maury county, Tenn.; son of James SPRADLING, who was born in Tennessee April 9, 1796, and died April 11, 1867, who served in the war of 1812, and married Frances T. OLIVER, who was born in Virginia March 25, 1789, and died December 7, 1869, and by her raised a family of three children. The eldest was Amarantha P.; J. H. and Frances J. were the other two. Amarantha is now the wife of James RILEY, and Frances J. married John SEGREST, both of this township. Our subject emigrated to this locality with his parents when he was quite young, his father making a purchase on Section 25, Town 6, Range 2 west. He entered the land from the Government, and engaged in farming, and spent the remainder of his days on the farm. He was a stanch Democrat, and highly esteemed by his fellow-citizens, and was affiliated with the Methodist Church, and lived a life in harmony with his profession. His death occurred in April, 1866, having attained one year over his "threescore and ten". J. H. having attained the years of manhood, succeeded his father as a husbandman. December 30, 1849, he wedded Cynthia A., his wife, who was born in Hancock County, Ind., February 20, 1832, daughter of William, born in North Carolina September 4, 1807, and Eliza (SNODGRASS) JACKSON, he being a native of North Carolina, and she of Indiana, daughter of James SNODGRASS. John JACKSON, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. SPRADLING, was for many years a resident of Carolina, and removed with his family to Indiana. His son, William JACKSON, removed to this county, locating in Town 5, Range 2, near Fairview, when the county was partially settled, Mrs. SPRADLING being about ten years of age when she came with her father. The family consisted of her father, three brothers and herself. The mother died in Indiana. Since Mr. PRADLING's marriage, he has been a resident of the township. Since 1870, he has been a resident of the Grove, and been engaged in merchandising, his stock consisting of hardware, grass seed and agricultural implements. He has about three hundred and twenty-six acres, eight-six being in the county adjoining, and all of which he yet carries on. He has seven children -John F.; Eliza P., Mrs. Joseph CALL; William H. who resides in Pocahontas; Albert M., George L., Laura B and Harry W. Mr. SPRADLING is a good Republican, and a member of the Christian Church.

L. J. SEGRAVES, farmer, P. O. Pleasant Mound, is the oldest living settler in the township, having been a constant resident here since the spring of 1828. He was born March 11, 1816, in Maury county, Tenn., and emigrated to this locality, as stated above. His father was Bennett SEGRAVES, a native of Georgia, born July 21, 1791, and when a young man moved to Tennessee, where he married Margaret LOCKHART, who was born December 25, 1797, in Davidson County, Tenn., and died September 22, 1844, daughter of [Page 54] Thomas and Martha LOCKHART. He (Bennett) died July 29, 1868. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Jacob SEGRAVES, of Scotch descent, a Revolutionary soldier. He remained and raised a large family, among whom were Vincent, Bennett, Daniel, Isaac and Sarah, who were his offspring by his first wife. By his second wife he had Jacob, William, Henry Jackson, John, Jane, Polly and Malinda, none of whom are living. Bennett SEGRAVES was in the war of 1812, and a Democrat all his life, and a substantial member of the community, and passed to his rest July 7, 1868, having raised to maturity the following children - Priscilla, who married Thomas L. HOOPER, Lockhart J., Sarah J. E., wife of James WIDGER; Nancy D., wife of John GEORGE;' Martha, Mrs. William HENNINGER; Love married Mr. STEELE; Mary H., wife of Wilson T. HAYS; Rebecca never married; Nelson B.; Margaret C., Mrs. BOOKER; Lucinda P., Mrs. John WHITLEY. Of those living are Sarah, Margaret, Lucinda, Mary, Lockhart J., who was married January 6, 1843, to Diana, born in Tioga County, Penn., March 10, 1826, daughter of Gilbert, born October 12, 1793, and Lucinda (IVES) VANGORDEN, born October 22, 1797, and died April 5, 1867. He was a native of New York, and she of Pennsylvania. They came West to Michigan in 1836, and to this county in 1840. Mr.SEGRAVES has but one child, John Bird, who married Letta JOHNSON. He resides on a portion of the homestead farm. He has three daughters -Lillie E., Lucinda G. and Della. Mr. SEGRAVES has 207 acres of land, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mrs. SEGRAVES is a member of the Baptist Church. The children born them deceased are Maria Lucinda, who died July 7, 1871, aged twenty-three years, eleven months and nine days; Mary Eveline died in 1852, aged fourteen months.

John WATTS, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove, takes first rank among the substantial farmers and stanch men of Bond County, and began in the world poor, having served his father until twenty-four years of age, giving him the entire benefit of his labor and earnings in the meanwhile. He was born February 17. 1808, in York State; eldest son of William WATTS, a native of Massachusetts. His wife was Susanna HODGE, who bore him ten children, eight of whom grew up. When a lad of eight years, our subject removed with his parents to Franklin County, Ohio, remaining there until after attaining his manhood, when he removed to Madison County, where he lived until the fall of 1858, when he came to Illinois and located in this township, and purchased 205 acres, fifty of which were somewhat improved. Since that time he has been a constant resident of the township, and been identified with its temporal and religious interests, having joined the M. E. Church soon after his location here, and been a consistent member of the same. In temporal matters, he has been successful, having acquired and owned at one time about six hundred acres of land, a large portion of which he has since sold and divided out among his children, reserving 268 acres for himself. After leaving his father at twenty-four years of age, he was married to Wealthy BABCOCK, a native of Pennsylvania, daughter of Nathaniel BABCOCK and Rachel ROGERS. Of a family of seven children born him, six grew up -Susanna, Catharine, Lina, Jasper, Lucy J. and Rosilla. Susanna is the wife of William GOFF, of this township; Lina resides in Town 5, Range 2, and is the wife of Cyrus WALKER; Catharine married John SELLERS and moved to Kansas City; Jasper resides in this county; Rosilla and Lucy J. both married and raised families, but have since deceased.


[Pocahontas Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 55] Jacob CRICHFIELD, deceased. The grandfather of the above was an Englishman by birth. His given name was Robert, and he served on board of a British man-of-war. When near the Massachusetts coast, he with several others, premeditated their departure, got permission to go out rowing in the jolly boat, and while out made good their escape. Soon after landing, they met a Quaker, who judging them to be deserters, said to them, "Thee must change thy clothes and thy names, or thee will be caught." Acting upon this piece of useful information, Robert (it is not known what his surname was) changed his to CRICHFIELD. He had three sons born him, whose names were Benjamin, Absalom and William, all of whom served in the war of the Revolution, after which Benjamin settled in Romney, Va., William in Somerset County, Penn. Absalom never married. He was a musician; the others were farmers. The descendants who came here to Illinois were children of William, who settled in Pennsylvania. He had a family of twelve children, all of whom came to maturity. Among this number were Joseph and Jacob, who came to this county. Joseph emigrated to this region of country at the time of the war of 1812. His wife was among the number who sought refuge in the old fort which stood in this township, of which history gives an account. Jacob, his brother, came West to Bond County, arriving here April 4, 1839, fixing his location on Section 25, in Town 4, Range 4, in Millersburg Precinct, where he remained until his death June 8, 1846. His wife's maiden name prior to her marriage was Johanna JELLISON, daughter of Robert JELLISON, an Englishman. She died in 1850. Mr. CRICHFIELD was a member of the M. E. Church, and his house was the home for the ministers. Four children were born him - Edith E., Hannah S., William M. and Freeborn. Of this number Edith died unmarried. Hannah married J. H. GILMORE, and settled in Greenville. She died in 1873. William M. and Freeborn both served in the war as true and valiant soldiers: William M. enlisted in June, 1861, in Company E, Twenty-second Regiment, and served three years, and participated in all the battles in which his company took part. F. G. enlisted in August, 1862, in Company E, One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He also served three years. April 11, 1865, William M. married Emma WILDS, who was born in Hamilton, Ohio, daughter of Ralph WILDS and Lucinda JACKSON. He has three children - Lilian, Dale S. and Grace E.

Tobias FILE, farmer, P. O. Baden Baden, came to Bond County with his parents in 1818, and located with them in Old Ripley Precinct. He was born March 20, 1810, in Cabarras County, on Rock River, N. C. His father was Henry FILE, and his mother's maiden name was REEP. To Henry FILE was born the following family: George, Daniel, Moses, Tobias, and Sallie. Sallie resides in Litchfield, and is the wife of Isaac BILYEW. She and Tobias are the only ones living of the family. All of the above settled in Bond County and have descendants. Tobias remained with his father until he was grown. His boyhood was spent on the farm, and he [Page 56] assisted his father in clearing up the land. His school advantages were of the most limited character, and he has had to plod his way through life without having any substantial school benefits. In January, 1830, he married Sarah GILLESPIE, a native of Tennessee, daughter of John GILLESPIE and Nancy McFERRON. Mr. FILE located in Millersburg Precinct, where he now resides, in 1837, and has since remained. His wife died in 1850, having borne him seven children, six of whom are living - Samuel, William, Nancy J., Tobias, Jacob and George. He married Fannie COOK for his second wife, who died leaving no issue. His third and last wife was Mrs. Hannah BAKER. Mr. FILE has 400 acres of land, and since 1832 has been a member of the M. E. Church, and has always been one of the substantial citizens of the commonwealth.

John H. GORDON, physician, Pocahontas, is among the worthy and successful practitioners of medicine in Bond County. He was born October 29, 1842, in Huntsville, Ala.; is of a family of seven sons, all of whom were doctors, sons of Dr. James and Mary (SANDERSON) GORDON. When a babe, he removed with his parents to Spring Hill, Miss., and left there prior to 1850. He was educated at the best schools at Russellville, Ark., and began the study of his profession before seventeen, and began practice ere he attained his majority. In 1864, he received the benefits of the St. Louis Medical College. His practice was attended with the most favorable encouragement, which kept him busy, and his graduation at the Missouri Medical College was not completed until 1874. He began practice in Millersburg, this township, in 1864, and two years later he came to Pocahontas, where he has since lived, and been engaged in his profession. At the time he came here there were eight physicians, including himself, in a town not exceeding five hundred inhabitants. In 1868, he associated with his brother, J. T. GORDON, under the firm name of J. H. GORDON & Brother, which copartnership lasted until 1870. He then purchased his brother's interest, and continued alone until 1873, at which time he took in as partner his brother W. P., and continued together until 1878, when he subsequently associated with Dr. A. R. CLINTON, January, 1878, which partnership was dissolved in the summer of 1879. Since this time he has been running it alone and has an excellent practice. December 15, 1861, he married Emily TORRENCE, born in North Carolina, but raised in Arkansas. She is a daughter of John T. TORRENCE and Jane LINCH. The Doctor has eleven children born to him, five of whom are living -William E., Charles C., Lewis L., Kate and George D. The others died in infancy, except Nancy J., who died December 3, 1877, aged ten years. The Doctor has been a member of the M. E. Church since he was fifteen years of age. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M., of this place. He makes a specialty of female complaints, in the treatment of which he is successful.

John W. HARNED, farmer, P. O. Pocahontas, was born in Red River County, Tex., January 26, 1819; son of William and Hannah (BOYER) HARNED, he born in 1792, a Methodist preacher, left the Yuba River, Cal., October 8, 1850, and was never afterward heard of. His wife was born in Pennsylvania, in 1792, and died in November, 1850. They were the parents of eleven children, seven boys and four girls. The only education our subject ever had was received in a log cabin, in the Red River bottoms, where he attended school for a short time. He first worked on the farm of Williamson PLANT, Bond County, and has been in the farming business ever since. In Bond County Febru-[Page 57] ary 2, 1842, he married Mary M. NELSON, born in Bond County August 16, 1820, daughter of William and Mary (McLEAN) NELSON. He has nine children - William C., Henry C., Joseph, Nelson, Melvina, John B., Eda R., Louis, James M. and Jennie. Mr. HARNED is a member of the Methodist Church, and his wife has been connected with the old "Gilead" Cumberland Presbyterian Church for forty-five years. He spent the first ten years of his life in what is now Texas, but which was then part of Mexico, and owing to his constant association with neighboring Indian tribes, he could speak the Choctaw language much better than English. His father was bitterly opposed to slavery; and, during his residence in the South, suffered many persecutions on account of his abolitionist principles. He stood by the side of LOVEJOY when he was shot. He built a hotel in Alton, Ill., in 1833, where our subject met LINCOLN, DOUGLAS, and many others of the noted men in the early history of our country. Mr. HARNED was well acquainted with the famous Black Hawk, chief of the Fox Indians.

James S. JOHNSTON, farmer, P. O. Pocahontas. The above gentleman first beheld the light of day July 20, 1827, in Cincinnati, Ohio; second son of Campbell JOHNSON, a native of Londonderry, Ireland, where he was born about the year 1793, and came to America in 1808, in company with his brother James, with whom he worked several years as carpenters. Prior to the war of 1812, they engaged in the manufacture of nails at Pittsburgh, and shipped their products down the river on flat-boats, and were en route for the Lower Mississippi at the time of the battle of New Orleans. About the year 1818, he went to Cincinnati and engaged in a general mercantile business, remaining here until the year 1832, when he moved to Clermont County, Ohio, and purchased a farm, upon which he died in 1842. He was a Presbyterian, and a stanch Jackson Democrat. His wife's maiden name was Jerusha SANDFORD, who died in 1852, having borne five children who came to maturity - John, James S., Nancy C., Hannah H. and Robert A. John served in the Mexican war, and is now a lawyer in Cincinnati. Nancy C. resides in the same place, and is the wife of Thomas SHERLOCK. Hannah H. never married. Robert A. also resides in Cincinnati, and is now serving his second term as Common Pleas Judge. James remained at home until his marriage, when he attained twenty-two years of age. His wife was Melvina SIMPKINS, of Clermont County, daughter of David SIMPKINS, as an Ohioan. After the marriage of our subject, he engaged in merchandising at Belfast, Ohio, where he continued until the spring of 1857, when he came to Bond County, locating where he now resides, on Section 33, in Ripley Township, Town 4, Range 5, where he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has about four hundred acres of land, and has given considerable attention to sheep raising, and particularly to fruit culture, having one of the largest and finest orchards in the county, embracing nearly sixty acres. He has a good knowledge of law, and does considerable local practice. He is a Democrat, and in the affairs of his county and township he bears his proportionate part. He has six children - Mary, Nancy C., Cora, Campbell D., Lucinda and Hattie.

Henry H. METCALF, Greenville, is a descendant of one of the early settlers, whose name was Baalam METCALF, who was born in April, 1806, in Jackson county, Ga. He emigrated to Bond County in the spring of 1829, making his first location on the northeast quarter of Section 14, in Beaver Creek Township, Town 4, Range 3. He afterward removed to Greenville, where he remained [Page 58] some time, then came to this township, and remained from 1854 until his death December 15, 1871. He was a stanch old Whig, and after the formation of the Republican party he became affiliated with it, and was true to its principles as long as he exercised his right of suffrage. He took a deal of interest in the affairs of his county, and for several years was Justice of the Peace, and meted out justice to the settlers to their satisfaction. His wife's maiden name was Emeline BROWN, daughter of Thomas, whose wife was a HILL; both families came from the Carolinas. Henry H. was the only son, and has always been a resident of Bond County, except the time spent in the army, which he entered at the age of seventeen, enlisting in the spring of 1861 in Company E, Twenty-second Illinois Infantry, and served until July, 1864, and took part in many of the prominent engagements in which his regiment was in, some of which were Charleston, Mo., Stone River, Resaca, Corinth, Mission Ridge and Chickamauga. September, 1866, he married Ellen HILLIARD, daughter of J. C. HILLIARD and Jane DEWEY. For several years, Mr. METCALF was engaged in teaching. He located on his farm in 1869, and has 150 acres. He has five children - Jane E., Ralph E., Jennie E., Hugh and Allen. He is a member of the M. E. Church. He was elected Justice of the Peace in the fall of 1881.

John NEATHAMMER, farmer, P. O. Pocahontas, was born in bond County, February 20, 1847; son of John and Mary (HECHNIGHT) NEATHAMMER, he born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1808. He followed the occupation of a farmer, and died in 1859. His wife was born in Tennessee, and died in 1851. They were the parents of five children, four boys and one girl. Our subject received an ordinary education and began the business of life as a farmer in Bond County. In Bond County, in 1870, he married Ollie SEAFELDT, born in St. Louis in 1850, daughter of Julius and Mina SEAFELDT, of Pocahontas. Mr. NEATHAMMER is in politics a Republican, and is a member of the A. O. U. W. During the war, he served two years in Company E, Third Illinois Cavalry (Capt. McLANE), and took part in the engagements at Memphis and Nashville. He has three children - Mary, Mina and Julius.

Learner Blackman PLANT, Pocahontas. Cotemporaneous with the earliest settlement of Bond County was the coming of the PLANT family to Pocahontas Township, whose advent to this locality was shortly after the war of 1812. The subject of these lines was born in this township April 12, 1819; is the eldest son of Robert PLANT and Nancy PATTERSON, to whom three children were raised to maturity, L. B. being the eldest. Elizabeth, who married George PATTERSON, and America, wife of Henry EPPSTINE. Robert PLANT died in 1852, highly esteemed by his friends and neighbors. Learner B. remained with his father until he married, which was in December 5, 1839, to Rebecca DUNCAN, a native of Madison County, daughter of Joseph. After his marriage, he removed where Stubblefield Station now is, and engaged in farming. In 1858, he located on the farm he now owns, in the northwest part of the township. Before dividing among his children, he had over four hundred acres of land, reserving the larger portion, upon which he lives. He has five children - Joseph, L. D., Sarah E., Henry C. and Mary A.

James S. RIDGWAY, Pocahontas, was born in Scioto County, Ohio, August 27, 1831; eldest son of William RIDGWAY, born on the east shore of Maryland and emigrated westward to Scioto County, where he married Nancy BETHARDS. Both families, RIDGWAYs and BETHARDS, are of English stock. Our sub-[Page 59] ject came to this county with his father in the fall of 1841, and settled in Ripley Township. He remained here about five years, and then settled on Section 29; remained there until his death, December 11, 1868. In early days a Democrat, and in 1856 a Republican. He raised to maturity a family of four children - James S., William, Mary and George W. Of this number James S. is the only one living in this county. William died in early manhood. Mary became the wife of W. S. WAIT. Geo. W. resides in Kansas. James S. remained with his father until his marriage. He has been twice married, and by his last wife he has four children - Nancy, Benjamin, William and Ralph. He began improving the farm in 1855, locating on it after his marriage in 1860, and has since remained. He has about four hundred acres of land in Section 27, and is quite extensively engaged in general farming. He is Democratic in politics. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Theodore L. SCHNEIDER, farmer, P. O. Pocahontas, was born in Darmstadt, Germany, August 23, 1829; son of Lewis and Mary (HOCHE) SCHNEIDER, he a carpenter and cabinet-maker by trade. He died in Germany, as did also his wife. They were the parents of five children, three boys and two girls. Our subject attended school in Darmstadt until he arrived at his sixteenth year, when he chose the trade of his father, and learned it with him. In Bond County, in August, 1853, he married Anna BROWN, born in Ohio December 25, 1829, daughter of John and Nancy BROWN. Mr. SCHNEIDER has followed the occupation of a farmer, and has also worked at his trade in Bond County. He has filled the office of School Director for fifteen years, and is at present County Commissioner. He is a member of the German Reformed Church, and connected with the Masonic fraternity. In politics, he is a Republican. His farm of 460 acres is one of the best in Pocahontas Precinct. He has seven children - John L., Nancy Ann, Henry M., William C., Benjamin F., Simon I and Martha S.

John Lewis SEHNERT, hotel, saloon and general business, Pierron. Among the principal business men of Oakdale is John L. SEHNERT. He was born June 23, 1850, in Hesse-Darmstadt, and is the third child of a family of five. His father, Peter SEHNERT, was married to the mother of John in the Fatherland. Her maiden name, prior to her marriage, was Anna E. WEISCHANT. Peter SEHNERT was born in Hesse-Darmstadt September 20, 1820, and died in 1881. His wife yet survives him. John Lewis was but a babe when his parents emigrated to America. Their first place of living, soon after their arrival, was in Bloomington, McLean County, where the family remained two or three years, and in 1857 came to Greenville, where he lived about ten years, when he located in Madison County, where he spent the remainder of his days. He raised a family of four children. The eldest was Mary, who married Ulrich GAFFNER, and lives in Town 5, Range 2. Lizzie, the second daughter, married Michael MAUGERS. John L. and John Peter are the sons. John Lewis was raised a farmer, and has learned the machinist's trade and has had much practical experience in running machinery. November 10, 1874, he married Miss Franciska SPENGEL, a native of Madison County, daughter of Sebastian SPENGEL. Mr. SEHNERT removed to Pierron in February, 1881, and engaged in business. He is proprietor of the Oakdale House, and provides amply for the entertainment of both man and beast. He farms some, and has a steam thresher (road engine) which he operates during the fall and winter season. He [Page 60] has three children born him -George, Sebastian and Margaret. George and Sebastian are still living.

W. S. WAIT, farmer, P. O. Pocahontas, was born in 1828, in Cambridge, Mass., the eldest son of William S. and Sarah (NEWHALL) WAIT. He came with his parents to this county when a lad of few years, being about the year 1834 or 1835, and since that time has been a constant resident of the county. In 1854, he began running a saw-mill near Greenville, which he moved to his place in 1857, to which he added a grist-mill, being the first permanent mill of the kind ever run in the place. He engaged in the stock business, buying and selling, which he carries on in conjunction with his farming. He has been twice married. First, in 1859, to Mary RIDGWAY, who died soon after, leaving no living issue. In May, 1877, he married Adele RAVOLD, a native of France, who has borne him three children. Mr. WAIT has been successful in business. He has about seven hundred acres of land. He is not a member of any church organization, but is affiliated with the I. O. O. F. of this place.


[Beaver Creek Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 61] Henry BASS. In a list of some of the most prominent agriculturists and self-made men of Bond County, the name of Henry BASS, of Greenville City, occupies a prominent place. He was born in Fayette County, Ill., April 22, 1833, and was the sixth child of the family of twelve children of Guilford BASS and Mary Ann (PROCTOR) BASS. Guilford BASS was a native of North Carolina, and removed from there to Kentucky for a time, thence to Tennessee, thence to Fayette County in 1832, locating northeast of Vandalia about twelve miles. There he remained until his death, in 1845. His wife survived until 1872, when she also departed this life, leaving ten sons and two daughters to mourn her departure. But tow of these, William and our subject, are now residents of Bond County. Henry left home at the age of fourteen. He came to Bond County, sought and found employment on a farm, receiving only $7 for a hard month's work, and saved sufficient means to make a part payment on his first purchase of 100 acres of Bond County land, in Beaver Creek Precinct. In August, 1856, he made a second purchase of 100 acres, which he still owns, and to which he has since added, owning at one time 1,500 acres. Mr. BASS married Nancy GOODSON, daughter of Spencer GOODSON, a native of Kentucky, a farmer and blacksmith, and came to Illinois when a young man. With the exception of a four years' stay in Missouri, he has been a resident of Illinois, and now of Christian County. They have six sons and two daughters - William H., Abbie, George, Edward, Walter, Louis, Leoni and Leonard. Abbie is now Mrs. C. C. SQUIRES, of Beaver Creek Township. Mr. and Mrs. BASS are members of the Baptist Church of Smith Grove. Their home is in Beaver Creek Precinct, Town 4, Section 20. Guilford and Charles S. are deceased. Guilford died November 14, 1856, and Charles S. August 31, 1866, at one year and eighteen days old.

Rev. J. J. BLIZZARD, farmer, P. O. Dudleyville, is a descendant and grandson of James BLIZZARD, one of the earliest settlers in the township. James BLIZZARD was born in Scotland, and emigrated to Kentucky at an early day, where he remained until the winter of 1817 and 1818, when he came to what is now Bond County, locating in this township, on Section 3, one-fourth of a mile west of Dudleyville, and remained there as long as he lived. He was an upright, Christian man, and his house was used for church purposes as early as 1820. Here the pioneer preachers were entertained, and the hardy settlers worshipped under his roof until a more suitable place could be obtained. His son James succeeded him; he was born in 1801, August 4, and was but a lad of sixteen when his father came here. He remained with him until October 9, 1823, when he married Fannie McCORD, daughter of Robert McCORD, one of the pioneers of Bond County. Shortly after his marriage, he located on Section 4, where he settled and raised a family of six children - William M., Mary J., Anna D., J. J., Robert B. and Harriet A. Of this number, but three are living - William M., J. J., and Harriet A., who resides in Saline County, Mo., wife of James W. GOWER. William M. and J. J. reside in this township. James BLIZZARD died October 2, 1861. They were for many years members of the M. E. Church, and were highly esteemed by all who knew them [Page 62] for their many virtues. John J., whose name heads this sketch, was born November 8, 1829, on the northeast quarter of Section 4, where he was reared to manhood, and received a common school education. May 29, 1851, he married Catharine McADAMS, born in this county, daughter of Jesse McADAMS and Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, which couple came to this locality from Logan County, Ky., in 1828. In the fall of 1852, Mr. BLIZZARD located where he now resides, and has been engaged in farming pursuits, having 260 acres of land. He has served as Justice of the Peace for several years; was elected in 1859, and is now meting out justice to the people in this part of the township. At fifteen years of age, he was converted, and since has been an effective worker in the M. E. Church, both as a layman and minister, in which capacity he has officiated for over a score of years. He has eight children - James C., Lucy E., H. W., Sarah E., John J., Jr., Jesse W., Mary C., Edward S., Fannie A. and Lois S. Rollin C. DEWEY, deceased. The DEWEY family came to Bond County about the year 1837. Nelson, the father of the above, married Lois SCRIBNER, and emigrated from Vermont with his family to Bond County, locating on the northwest part of Beaver Creek Township, and remained here the remainder of his days. His death occurred January, 1850, his wife August, 1847. Rollin, the eldest child, was born in Vermont April 8, 1827. His brothers and sisters were Clay, Jonathan, Judson, Peter, Thomas, Theron, Mary E., Ann, Judith, Jane and Artie, all of whom lived to be grown except Thomas. January 8, 1852, Rollin married Elmira C. SHELTON, a native of Virginia, daughter of Absalom and Mary (BELCHER, daughter of Godfrey BELCHER) SHELTON, who came West to this State, to Clinton, in 1832, and raised five sons and one daughter. Soon after the marriage of Rollin DEWEY and wife, they located on the farm where the family have since remained. His death occurred July 5, 1870. Eight children were born them - Frederick M., Mary E., Henry A., Virginia, Rose, Lois A. and Katie A. The other died young. Of the above, Mary E. is the wife of W. E. TAYLOR. The estate consists of 440 acres, upon which the family live, the farm being conducted by the elder brother, Frederick M.

Henry GERKE, farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek. Among the German representatives of Bond County, none are more deserving of credit than Mr. GERKE. He came to this township in 1856. His earthly possessions were wrapped up in a handkerchief which he carried under his arm as he walked across the prairie from St. Louis, where he landed upon his coming from his native home in Hanover, now Prussia, where he was born November 23, 1836, being the eldest son of his parents, Henry and Maria C. (DORREE) GERKE, whom he left in the old country at the age of twenty, and embarked for the land of the free and the home of the workingman. When Mr. GERKE came to this locality he had nothing to commence with but his hands. At first he worked out by the month for two years, and saved enough money to buy him a team and such things necessary to go to farming, and for four years he rented land and saved money enough to purchase forty acres where he now resides, and he has since added to the same until he now has 200 acres. He was among the number who assisted in building the German Methodist Church in this township, and was one of the first Trustees. February 5, 1867, he married Catharine, born November 4, 1838, in St. Gallen, Switzerland, daughter of Matthias HOFFMAN and Anna STRICKER, who moved with their family to Clinton County in 1845, and raised the following children: John, Jacob, Henry, Mrs. GERKE, Matthias and John Wesley. Henry lives in Cedar County, Mo., John W. in California. The others are deceased. Mr. GERKE has but one sister - Anna, now the [Page 63] wife of F. UTLANT. Mr. GERKE has three children - Edward Lincoln, born November 10, Henry Ward, born November 22, 1872, Annie, June 20, 1875.

Capt. U. B. HARRIS, retired farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek. Among the representative men of Bond County is Capt. U. B. HARRIS, who was born on Section 27, in this township. He first beheld the light of day February 10, 1833, the youngest of a family of seven children. His father's name was John HARRIS, a native of Logan County, Ky., son of Rev. William HARRIS, on of the pioneer ministers of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of that locality. The HARRIS family ware of Irish extraction. John HARRIS, the father of our subject, came to Bond County in the fall of 1824, with the GOODSON family. He first settled on Government land, and afterward purchased of the same and remained a citizen of the county until his death, July 4, 1832, about seven months prior to the birth of his last child, Urban B. The mother of our subject was Nancy GOODMAN, born in Kentucky, daughter of William and Sarah (MAXEY) GOODMAN. The names of the brothers and sisters of our subject were William C., Rice E., both ministers of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; Amanda J., wife of William MURRAY; Nancy E., wife of Harmon L. FIELD; Sarah A. and John H. The two latter died at an early age. All of the above are now deceased except Rev. Rice E., who went out as Chaplain in the Thirty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He has not been heard from since 1876. Urban B. remained with his mother until twelve years of age, when he left home to do for himself. He had none to rely upon but himself. He obtained a good common-school education, and for several years was engaged in teaching. In 1862, he raised a company of men and was commissioned Captain of Company E, One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served thirty-three months, when, on account of impaired health he was mustered out, February, 1864, at New Orleans, and returned home. During his term of service he participated in all the principal battles in which his command was engaged. The principal engagements were Magnolia and Champion Hiss, Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson (Miss.) and afterward was with Bank's division on Red River. Upon his return home he located at Millersburg, where he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits, where he remained until March, 1867, when he came to Beaver Creek and embarked in the mercantile business under the firm name of GOODSON & HARRIS. After a partnership of two years he purchased his partner's interest, and continued the business himself until 1880, when he gave up the business to his son, who is now conducting the same. February 1, 1853, he married Elizabeth A. GREGORY, daughter of John and Sarah GREGORY. This marriage has been crowned with the birth of seven children, four of whom are living: Margaret, wife of Thomas J. HULL; Luther J., Jonn F., and Shaw L. The others died in infancy. He has been Township Treasurer of sixteen years. In 1867, he was elected County Commissioner and served four years. In 1876, he was again elected, and re-elected in 1879, and has since filled that position with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his friends. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and Elder of the same, of which body his parents were also members. His father was a Whig. U. B. having, since the party came into existence, been affiliated with the Republican party, and is a stanch supporter of the same.

S. J. HUNTER, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Dudleyville. Samuel Jefferson HUNTER was born in Bond County. He first beheld the light of nature March 13, 1827, in Greenville Precinct. He was the third son of David HUNTER, who was born January 1, 1801, [Page 64] in Davidson County, Tenn., son of John HUNTER, an Irishman by birth, who immigrated from his native country to Tennessee and raised a family and emigrated to Bond County about the year 1824, and settled near Shoal Creek, and remained here until his death. He raised a family of seven sons, all of whom came to man's estate, viz.: William, Thomas, John, Joseph, James, Samuel and David, all of whom settled in Bond County. David HUNTER, the father of S. J., was married in Tennessee to Elizabeth COPELAND, and removed to this county about two years prior to his father's coming. He remained in the county until his death, which occurred in the winter of 1875, his wife in 1855. Seven children were born to them, who were John B., Samuel J., Thomas N., Rebecca I., Susan A., George W. and Joseph J., all living at the present date, save George W. and Susan A. The father of the above was a Democrat all his life; a soldier in the black Hawk war, and was for years a member of the Methodist Church. Samuel J., the only one of the name in this township, was brought up on the farm, where he lived until his marriage, which occurred January 30, 1850, to Sarah YOUNG, a native of Bond County, daughter of William YOUNG. After Mr. HUNTER's marriage, he located near Greenville and engaged in farming, and has since been a resident of the county. He located on the farm he now owns, consisting of 510 acres, in 1857. He has children, viz.: Laura F., Hattie A., William R., Harry A., Benjamin A., Hugh E., Archie A. and Pearl. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since about 1862. D. B. HAWLEY, farmer, P. O. Dudleyville. Of the enterprising farmers in Bond County, Mr. HAWLEY ranks among the first. He was born February 2, 1831, in Trumbull County, Ohio; is the second son and third child born to his father, Milton HAWLEY, who was born 1802, in Western New York. His ancestors were of English stock. Milton HAWLEY came West to Trumbull County, and there married Mary TAFT, and removed to Madison County in 1836, and remained there until 1843, when he came to Okaw Township, and entered 1,800 acres of land. He was a man of energy, and was well read in law, and had excellent business qualifications. In politics, he was formerly a Whig; but, later in life, he came out with the Republican party, and was a strong anti-slavery man, and withal generous and kind-hearted. His death occurred 1867; his wife 1865. He raised a family of ten children, seven sons and three daughters. Celia, the eldest, married J. G. WRIGHT, and resides in this township; Luther C., eldest son, resides in California; Delevan, Bement, Roman M., Virginia, Julius A., Victoria A. and John H., and D. B., the subject of these lines, Who remained under the parental roof until March 9, 1854, when he married Susan STEELE, born in Madison County, daughter of John W. STEELE and Catharine RUSSELL. Mr. HAWLEY came to this farm in 1862, and has since resided there. He has nearly 200 arches of excellent land, which he farms in a neat and tasty manner. He has put all the principal improvements on the same, and keeps his fences and buildings in excellent repair. Has the following children: Catharine A., Mrs. Samuel ANDERSON; Harriet L., in California, wife of J. M. REEVES; Lucy A., Susan E., Laura A., Edwin B., John M., William W. and Patience V.

John H. HESTON, P. O. Dudleyville, born May 30, 1812, in Bucks County, Penn., being the eldest of eight children. His father was Amos HESTON, who was likewise a Pennsylvanian, born about the year 1774, and died in 1869, aged ninety-six. His father's name was Samuel HESTON, whose ancestors came with William PENN, and settled in Pennsylvania. Samuel served in the Revolutionary war. His wife was a PRICE, prior to her marriage, Amos, being the fruit of this marriage; he, Amos, married Letitia HAGERMAN, daughter of Barnett [Page 65] HAGERMAN, who also served in the Revolution. His wife's maiden name was GROOM. The HESTONs and HAGERMANs are both of Quaker stock. None of either family came West, save J. H. and his uncle David, who came to this county as early as 1815, and remained here until 1834, when he moved to Leavenworth, Kan. Our subject came West to Muskingum County, Ohio, during his minority, afterward went to Franklin County. On April 17, 1834, he enlisted in the regular army as private, and served through the Florida and Mexican wars, and served until November, 1848, when he resigned with rank of Captain. July, 1849, he married Catharine P. RAREY, born in Franklin County, Ohio, daughter of Rev. Charles RAREY and Mary KRAMER. Charles RAREY was a pioneer of Franklin County, and cut timber where the city of Columbus now stands. He was a son of John RAREY, a native of Germany. Mr. HESTON came to Bond County in the spring of 1852, and settled where he now resides. He has put nearly all the improvements thereon. He has since been engaged in farming pursuits, and been a large wheat raiser. Has 360 acres of land, and well improved. He has seven children - Joseph S., Sarah and Mary (twins), De Witt and twin that died, Hattie M., Steve A. D. and John C.; Sarah, wife of Wallace E. SMITH; Mary, wife of L. MEAHEIMER; Joseph S. in Kansas. Mr. HESTON is self-made; his brothers and sisters were Jesse G., Morris, Mary A., Jenks S., Sarah, Samuel and Watson. Jenks and Samuel were killed in the late war.


William G. McCASLIN, farmer, P. O. Dudleyville. Cotemporaneous with the early history of Bond County, was the advent of the McCASLIN family to this township. The head of the family was James McCASLIN, a native of the Emerald Isle. He emigrated to North Carolina at a very early day. While here he married a Scotch lady, and subsequently removed to Caldwell County, Ky., where eight children were born to him. According to the order of their birth, were as follows: Hugh, James, Gray, John O, Jane, Martha, Mary and Rachel. With this family, he came to Bond County, and settled in Beaver Creek Township, on Section 11. Of this number mentioned, but one is now living - Hugh, who was the eldest, and he resides in Montgomery County. John Oliver, the father of our subject, was born about the year 1807, and married Mary MILLS, daughter of William MILLS and Mary PLANT. Both families were early settlers in the county. This marriage was blessed with the birth of the following children, viz., William G, Elizabeth, Mary J., James W., John W., George W. Ellen and Rebecca were the ones that grew to manhood and womanhood. The father died September, 1859. He was a Whig, and a Presbyterian in faith. The mother was a Methodist. She died August, 1879. William Gray was born on the farm where he now lives July 13, 1829, and where he was reared to manhood. In March, 1852, he married Mary J. STEELE, born in Morgan County, this State. She was a daughter of John Walker STEELE and Catharine RUSSELL, both of old and substantial families in old Morgan County. to Mr. and Mrs. McCASLIN have been born twelve children, eleven of them now survive, whose names are John Walker, Catharine I., Clara A., James A., Harriet M., Uretta C. B., Warren E., William H., Mary F., Alonzo O., Hezekiah C. Catharine, wife of Samuel FLOYD, resides in Okaw; Clara resides in Clinton county, wife of J. E. WISE; Harriet resides in Okaw, wife of Jackson HUFF. Mr. McCASLIN has spent his life in farming pursuits, having 280 acres of land. He is agent for Sharp's Stump and Grub Puller, a very desirable and useful implement to farmers having stumpy land to till.

Felix G. POTTS, farmer, P. O. Greenville. Of the early settlers of Bond County, Stranger or "Stringer" POTTS was among those who came in during the winter of 1830. He was born about the year 1797, in Rutherford County, Tenn., son of Daniel POTTS. "Stringer" [Page 66] ran way from his father when a lad, and joined Gen. JACKSON's command, and participated in the battle of New Orleans. He married Anna, daughter of Amos WINSET, and by this union twelve children were born, viz.: Daniel, Zephaniah, Henry, Elizabeth, Amos, John W., Millie, Robert, Lucinda, Felix G., William and Stranger. Of this number, nine of the eldest were born in Tennessee; of this number are living - Daniel and Wesley, reside in California; Henry, in Highland, Madison Co.,; Amos resides in Clinton County; Millie in Moultrie County, wife of M. MILLER. Stranger POTTS emigrated to Bond County, locating in Pocahontas Township, in the winter of 1830, but soon after came to this township, and remained here until his death, which occurred in February, 1838, his wife dying the year previous. Felix G. was born April 18, 1829, and was left fatherless at an early age. He went to live with Andrew MILLS, of this township, and remained with him until grown; he then hired out, and then laid the foundation of his present possessions. He had a very limited education, yet he worked hard and patiently. In August, 1852, he married Margaret A. BROWN, daughter of James BROWN, from Tennessee. Mr. POTTS has nine children - Louisa Jane, Mary, James, Henry, Martha Ellen, Nancy, Henrietta, Millie and Marion. He has 540 acres, all accumulated by his own industry.

John THOMEN, farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek, has been identified with Bond County since September, 1843. He was born Feb. 5, 1829, in Canton Basle, Switzerland, son of John and Ursilla (DEDWILLER) THOMEN. The family left the old country in May, 1843, and, after a long voyage on the ocean, they reached the American shore, and, in September of the same year, they located in Bond County. His father entered land on Section 27, in Beaver Creek Township, and resided on the same until his death; his father died in 1869, his mother in 1856. They raised a family of three children, viz.: Elizabeth (wife of George BERNRIDER), John and Anna B. (who married Edward FRY). Our subject remained with his parents until after he attained his manhood. October 25, 1855, he married Susan E. DIZERENS, a native of Switzerland. Mr. THOMEN has been a member of the German Methodist Church since its organization, and was one of the first members that assisted and was comprised in the first organization. He has 80 acres of land; his residence is located on the northwest quarter of Section 27.

Martin L. ULMER, farmer, P. O. Baden Baden, is the eldest son of George ULMER and Priscilla TISHHOUSER. George ULMER was born March 14, 1823, in Canton Graupenten, Switzerland, son of Martin and Anna ULMER, who came to Bond County with his son George in 1839, locating in the west part of the township. His children were George, Lena, Martha, Peter, Casper and Paul - all dead except George, Casper and Lena. None of the name are now residing in the township except Martin L., who was born here February 25, 1853, and was married February 29, 1876, to Sarah A. STUBBLEFIELD, daughter of William STUBBLEFIELD and Susan BRAY. After he married, he located on the homestead. He came to this farm in 1881, and built the residence he now occupies. He has 190 acres. He has two children - Mary Ellen and Edward Clyde; Ida May, an infant, died in 1877. To George ULMER, his father, were born Anna E. (wife of C. GAFFNER), M. L., Rosa (wife of William DAGGETT), W. Edward and George F. In 1876, George ULMER, father of Martin L., removed to St. Clair County, and there resides. William STUBBLEFIELD, father of Mrs. ULMER, was born in Madison County March 15, 1873. William, Jr., married Susan BRAY, who was born February 7, 1813, in Randolph County, N. C., daughter of William and Bettie (McCASLIN) BRAY; she is yet living, and with her daughter, [Page 67] Mr. ULMER. The family came her in the spring of 1829, and settled east of Greenville. To William STUBBLEFIELD, Jr., were born eleven children; six were raised, four of whom went into the army - James, Henry, Samuel and Fielden; James and Henry died there. The STUBBLEFIELD family are likewise among the early settlers of Bond County. Mr. ULMER is a Baptist.

August H. UTLAUT, farmer, P. O. Baden Baden, was born, February 18, 1853, near Edwardsville, in Madison County. His father, Eberhart UTLAUT, was born, January 2, 1798, in Europe, and came to Madison County in the fall of 1852, and six years later, came to this county, locating in Beaver Creek Township, and purchased 150 acres of land, and has since remained and is living, being now in his eighty-fifth year. August being the only child (now living), has always remained with his father and lived on the homestead. He was married, October 17, 1872, to Anne GERKE, who was born January 1, 1852, only daughter of her parents and sister of Henry GERKE, of this township. Mr. UTLAUT has now 200 acres of land; has two children - Minnie Julia and Frederick William; is a member of the M. E. Church.

Dr. J. A. WARREN, P. O. Beaver Creek, ranks among the substantial and successful practitioners of materia medica in Bond County. He was born, December 5, 1836, in Marion County, this State, and was raised in Randolph County, where he removed, with his parents, when small. His father was Alfred WARREN, who emigrated from Tennessee to Marion County in 1817, with his father, John WARREN, a native of the Carolinas. John WARREN's wife was Frances S. NELSON, born in Virginia, daughter of Bezaleel NELSON. Both were Virginia families, and removed first to Tennessee, thence to Illinois during its early settlement, and thus became identified with its interests as farmers and agriculturists. The subject of these lines was raised to farm labor, attending school during the winter and applied himself to the farm in the summer, and finally engaged in teaching, which vocation he followed for several years, still alternating upon the farm. In 1865, he began the study of medicine, his father dying the following year. In 1868, he commenced the practice of his profession at Keysport, and came to this place in 1870 and has since continued. He received his diploma at Cincinnati in 1873. He has a large practice and has been uniformly successful, and has the confidence of his patrons. In 1869, he married Jennie A. born in Randolph County, this State, daughter of Maj. A. M. WILSON and Susan YOUNG. Is a member of the A. F. & A. M.

Samuel G. WHITE, farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek, is a native of Bond County, where he was born September 1, 1833, being the third son and sixth child that was born to his father, Samuel WHITE, a native of North Carolina, of Irish extraction, born 1794, and when twenty-two years of age he came to what is now Greenville, and remained in the county until his death. He was a tanner by trade and built the first institution of the kind ever made in Greenville. He was also a farmer, and followed this vocation up to the time of his death. He raised a family of eight children, the eldest being Mare E., who married John P. SHIELDS, now of Kansas; E. B., in Greenville; John, now deceased; Letitia J., married William DONNELL; John T. Barr; Samuel G.; James was drowned at Batesville in 1862, on the Arkansas River; William C., the youngest. Samuel G. remained at home, under the parental roof, until he attained several years past his manhood. He was married, in 1862, to Martha J. HULL, daughter of Benjamin HULL. After Mr. WHITE's marriage, he lived in the vicinity of Greenville, and engaged in farming. In 1878, he came to Beaver Creek, and purchased a farm of 120 acres in the southeast corner of Section 36, where he now resides, having lived all his life in Bond, save three years spent in Clinton County, Mo. His father [Page 68] was a Whig and Presbyterian in belief and practice. Samuel G. is a good farmer and is partial to good stock; has three children -Carrie C., Benjamin and Ida.

Warren E. WISE, farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek, is the eldest son born to D. W. WISE by his marriage to Evaline BLAZE. Warren E. was born January 22, 1856, in Wise Town, and was raised to farming pursuits. March 4, 1877, he married Mary MYATT, born in this township, daughter of Wesley MYATT and Mildred McNEIL. Soon after his marriage, he located in this township, and has since lived here. He removed to the farm he now owns in the fall of 1881. His farm consists of 249 acres on Section 19; has two children - Mildred E. and Edward L. D. W. WISE, deceased, was one of the prominent business men of Bond County, and during his life was a valuable factor in the representative business interests of Bond County. He was born January 15, 1816, at Hebron, in New Hampshire, son of David WISE and Eliza HOYT. In 1842, Mr. WISE came West to Illinois, locating first in St. Clair County, where he lived until 1848, when he came to Bond County, where he remained until his death. He was four times married. His first wife was a BARNES; his second wife was Mary McCRACKEN; third wife was Harriet STEWART, who bore him two children - Joseph and James. The former was killed by lightning. James resides in Okaw, and is engaged in farming. He married his last and fourth wife in 1855 (March); she was Evaline BLAZE, born in Botetourt County, Va., daughter of William BLAZE and Catharine INGLEHART, who came West in 1842, and located in Clinton County, and to Bond in 1845. Mr. WISE laid out Beaver Creek, and for several years was engaged in merchandising there and was a very successful business man, and was identified with the religious interests of the county. At first was a member of the Baptist Church; later in life was a Methodist. His death occurred January 17, 1871, having 1,500 acres of land at his death. In politics, he was liberal, and was early a representative business man of Bond County, and highly esteemed by all who knew him or had any business relations with him. By his last wife he had seven children -Warren, George, Catharine, Mary, Grant, Della, and David. Mrs. WISE has in her own right 280 acres of land. She is the only one living of her brothers and sisters, seven of them, she being the youngest.

George W. WISE, farmer, P. O. Beaver Creek, is the second son of D. W. WISE by his last marriage. He was born on the homestead March 3, 1858, where he remained until he embarked upon his own responsibility to do for himself. He was united by marriage in September, 1880, to Miss Maggie WREN, born in bond County, daughter of Dr. Edward WREN. Since his marriage he has been a resident of the farm he now owns, consisting of 150 acres on the northeast quarter of Section 27, where he has built a new residence, and is well situated in life, and prospects for the future. He has one child - George.


[Fairview Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 69] Josiah BAITS, farmer, P. O. Pleasant Mound, has been identified with Bond County since 1840. He was born September 26, 1826, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the youngest child of his parents. His father was Daniel BAITS, a native of Vermont, a soldier in the war of 1812, and married Hannah JEWETT, a native of Connecticut, a daughter of Benjamin JEWETT, who served in the French and Indian war and Revolution. The paternal grandfather of our subject was David, who served as an officer in the Revolution. The subject of these lines is one of the self-made men of Bond County. By the death of his father he was thrown upon his own resources, and had the care of the family upon his hands for several years. He left Cincinnati when young, assisting in digging the Miami Canal, and for a time assisted the Engineer Corps in their labors. When the canal was completed, he drove horses on the tow-path, and afterward worked on the boat and served as steersman, and otherwise made himself useful. About the age of sixteen, he commenced learning the boat and ship carpenter's trade, and continued at the same about four years. In 1840, he came to this township, where he has since lived, except three years spent in Minnesota prior to his marriage. October 3, 1847, he married Amanda M. EDWARDS, born December 1, 1825, of Scioto County, Ohio, daughter of Charles EDWARDS, born July 26, 1806, in Mercer County, Penn., and emigrated to Ohio when thirteen years of age. He was a son of David EDWARDS, whose wife was Catharine GEORGE, daughter of Jacob GEORGE, of Germany. Charles EDWARDS married Margaret BUFFINGTON, who was born in Meigs County, Ohio, April 14, 1806, daughter of Joseph BUFFINGTON, of Pennsylvania. His wife was Chloe HARVEY, from Indiana. The EDWARDS family came West in December, 1841, and located in this township. Charles EDWARDS died July 19, 1875. In 1848, Mr. BAITS located forty acres he had purchased on Section 35, northeast quarter, for which he paid $2.25. Upon this he located and remained on the same until January, 1881, when he located where he now resides, having 334 acres in all, 294 in this township, the remainder, forty acres, is located in Fayette County. To Mr. and Mrs. BAITS have been born eight children, five sons and three daughters - Winfield S. (now a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church), Harriet L. (wife of William L. WELLS, of Jewett County, Kan.; Margaret B. (married Marcus L. WHITEWORTH), Anson Z., Amanda M., Charles D., Josiah J. and Eli B. Since 1867, he has been a member of the M. E. Church.

Ira BEANBLOSSOM, farmer, P. O. Pleasant Mound; is the only surviving male member in this township of the BEANBLOSSOM family. The above was born in Miami county, Ohio, November 1, 1847, and emigrated to this county with his parents in April, 1856, who located on Section 23, where they lived until 1859, when they moved to southwest quarter of Section 34. His father was Peter BEANBLOSSOM, who was born in July, 1822, son of John, who was born December 18, 1792, in Rowan County, N. C., and emigrated to this county in 1856, remaining here two years, then returned to Miami County, but stayed a short time, and returned again to Bond County, where he abode until 1865. He returned then to Miami County, where he is yet living, now ninety years of age. He had a brother, George BEAN-[Page 70] BLOSSOM, who came to this county in 1830, locating in this township. He was a minister of the German Baptist Church, and one of the first members of that order and church in this township. He remained here until 1858, when he moved to Macoupin County, where he died about 1867. The mother of our subject was Barbara BRANDT, born in Perry County, Penn., December 16, 1822, but raised in Ohio; she was a daughter of Abraham BRANDT. The father of our subject was a millwright and carpenter, which vocation he followed to some extent after he became identified with this county. He also was engaged in farming. He met with accidental death in February, 1862, while repairing a wheel in Mr. BOURNER's mill, his head coming in contact with some of the machinery which crushed him in such a manner that he lived but a few hours after. He was a member of the German Baptist Church. He had the following children born to him: Ira, Levi, Simon, Martin, Abraham and Martha. Levi resides in Norton County, Kan.; Simon in Jewett County, same State. Martin, also a resident of that State; Abe, in Montgomery County, Ohio. Martha married John SAPP, of this county. January 1, 1869, our subject married Sarah E. KELLOGG, a native of Crawford County, daughter of Oliver and Mary (WELCH) KELLOGG. He located in this township in 1873. He was of English extraction. To Ira BEANBLOSSOM have been born five children - Ira, Edwin, Frances, Addie, John C. and Ella May. Is a member of the German Baptist Church.

William DAVIS, Jr., farmer, P. O. Pleasant Mound, first saw the light of day January 19, 1830, at Old Ripley, now New Berlin, in Bond County. He was the eldest son of William DAVIS, a native of New Hampshire, born April 4, 1796, son of Jonas DAVIS. William DAVIS was married in Massachusetts, to Lucy MAYO, daughter of Thomas and Amy MAYO, and emigrated to Bond County in November, 1829, locating at Old Ripley, where he remained one year, and moved to Greenville, making this his place of residence until the spring of 1838, when he located on the northwest quarter of Section 23. About the year 1853, he returned to Greenville, where he spent the remainder of his days. His death occurred September 13, 1881. For years he was identified with the New School Presbyterian Church. Politically, he was a Whig; later, Republican. Ten children were born to him, seven of whom came to the years of maturity, viz., William, Mary A., Caroline, Adelaide, George, Amy, and John. William, our subject, was married May 1, 1851, to Margaret S. TAYLOR, born in Vandalia, Ill., daughter of John H. TAYLOR. She died 1879, having borne nine children, five are living, viz., Lucy M., wife of A. CABLE; Hannah, a teacher; Mary E., wife of Alvin H. JACKSON; John T. and Amy, at home. Farming has been the business of his life. His farm consists of eighty acres. Since the spring of 1866, he has been a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is an official member.

Benjamin F. MAYO, farmer, P. O. Greenville, is among the substantial citizens of Bond County. He was born July 5, 1810, in Boston, Mass., and emigrated to Bond County in the year 1834, arriving at Greenville in August the same year, and since that date has been a constant resident of this county. He is a descendant of an English family, he being of the tenth generation descended there from. His father was Thomas MAYO, who died when B. F. was a mere lad. He was the son of Joseph MAYO, who was a Revolutionary soldier. Thomas MAYO married Amy DAVIS, who was born in Roxbury, Mass. She, too, came from Puritanical stock. By the death of his father our subject was early in life thrown upon his own individual resources, but being energetic and imbibing that spirit inherent to Yankeedom, his course was soon marked out. He first laid the foundation for a sure thing in point of [Page 71] trades, and he spent seven years in learning three trades - painter and glazier, carriage making and trimming. He also became familiar with the use of carpenter's tools. Thus armed with three trades he felt sure that he could always get employment at one or the other. About this time the West presented to him advantages which induced him to remove thither, which he did, starting with $600 in money, but taking very sick at Smithland, on the Ohio River, on his way here, part of his money was spent; but he came on, and upon his arrival in Greenville he made himself useful in the practice of his trades. In 1838, he married Lavinia JEWETT, who died 1853. The same year of his marriage he located on the north half of Section 15. He purchased a squatter's claim and then entered the land. He remained on the farm until 1874, when he sold out and located on Section 22, where he now resides. In his farming he has been successful, having acquired a competence for himself and good farms for his sons. Seven children were born to him by his first wife, four of whom are living - Eugenia E., wife of Mr. A. CLUMP, in Jefferson County, Mo.; Alonzo J., in Mount Vernon County, same State; Henry and Edwin, at home. In 1854, Mr. MAYO married Elizabeth DEITCH, a native of Bedford County, Penn., daughter of Daniel and Christina (HOUSER) DEITCH, who came West to Wayne County, Ind., in 1830, remaining here until 1852, when they removed to Fayette County, this State. they raised a family of six children, five of the number living - John and Alexander reside in Wayne County, Ind., Catharine married Zenas EVANS, and resides in Kansas; Susan resides in Thayer County, Neb., wife of Joseph MATCHETT. Mr. MAYO has always stood aloof from any association with lodges or church organizations, having never associated himself with any, yet is not hostile toward any sect of people or denomination, but has lived a life that has been conducive to morality and worthy of imitation.

John RENCH, farmer, P. O. Pleasant Mound, one of the members of the early families is Mr. RENCH, who was born November 5, 1824, in Darke County, Ohio. He is a son of Joseph RENCH, who was born in Lancaster County, Penn., July 13, 1785. When a lad he removed with his father to Ohio, where he was afterward married, August 21, 1811, to Rhoda COATES, born December 29, 1789. To them were born twelve children - Delilah, William, Peter, Mary, Catharine, Daniel, Joseph, John, David, Rhoda, Jacob and Aaron. All of whom lived to be grown and married before there was a death in the family. Joseph RENCH moved with his family from Ohio in the spring of 1837, and entered land in the northeast quarter of Section 26; also entered other lands in the township near by, and resided on the same until his death which occurred September 7, 1856. He was one of the early members of the German Baptist Church, and helped to organize the same. His wife died February 12, 1877. Of the children born to them are Daniel, who lives in Virden, Macoupin County; Catharine, now Mrs. Abe WAGGONER, or Keokuk, Iowa; David and Peter, in Fairview, and Rhoda (Mrs. SUTTON), the others deceased. Our subject was raised on the farm and remained with his father until his marriage, November 26, 1849, to Mary F. DIXON, born October 25, 1829, in Madison County, Tenn., daughter of Alexander and Sallie STALLINGS, both natives of North Carolina. He died in Texas. Mrs. RENCH came with her mother to Fayette, in 1836. After marriage he located on the farm on which he now lives. Ten children crowned this union, seven of whom are living - Thomas J., Eveline, Almira, Nancy, John L., Martha E. and Ida M. Eveline is the wife of John HUNTER, in Greenville, Deputy Sheriff of this county. The subject of this sketch is a member of the German Baptist Church, and a respected member of the community in which he resides.


[LaGrange Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 72] Capt. Thomas M. DAVIS, farmer, P. O. Greenville, born in Trigg County, Ky., the fifth child who grew up that was born to Jonathan DAVIS, a Virginian, of Albemarle County. Jonathan came to Trigg County when a young man, and married, in Bryan County, Margaret McLEAN, of Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas McLEAN. The father of our subject was an early settler in this county; he came in 1817, to what is now Old Ripley; here he lived four years. He was a millwright by occupation, and built the first mill in the precinct, and perhaps was the first in the county. The site is now known as Brown's Mill. Jonathan died here in 1821, and his remains now lie interred in the Brown Graveyard, he being the second one buried in it - the first was Dr. BAKER. After the death of his father, our subject returned with his mother to Kentucky, where he remained until 1835, when he returned to this State; went first to Montgomery County, where he married Jane WILLIAMS, who died in 1840, leaving no children. He came to this county in 1837, where he has since remained. His second wife was Mrs. Jane SMITH, born in Trigg County, Ky., daughter of Samuel SCOTT; she died in 1876, leaving but one child - William D. - who resides with his father on the farm. In August, 1861, Mr. DAVIS raised a company, which was lettered D, Third Illinois Cavalry, and served two years. In the battle of Pea Ridge, he had his horse shot from under him, yet himself escaped uninjured. After his return home, he resumed farming. Since 1839, he has been a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and was made Elder at the time of the organization of the Maple Grove Society here. His wife died in 1876. He has about 400 acres of land, and is a thorough and energetic farmer. His son William D. was born in 1842, and married Gabriella, daughter of Rev. William HAMILTON and Phebe STAHL, of Kentucky, who came to this State about the year 1846. To William D. have been born seven children, but there are but three living - Horace E., Luella A. and Orra M. In the winter of 1881-82, they lost three children by that dire disease, diphtheria, all within the short space of eleven days. William G. was aged fifteen, John T. aged twelve, and George W. nearly two years of age. Capt. DAVIS had one brother - James-who emigrated to this State very early, and was for many years prominently identified with the county. He first taught school for several years, and for a time carried on a store here in the township, and afterward in Greenville. Subsequently, he was appointed, under Taylor's administration, to the office of Register of the Land Office at Vandalia. He was elected as a member of the Constitutional Convention. He afterward located at Hillsboro and engaged in the practice of law; was elected to the Legislature, and afterward to the State Senate, and died in 1868.

John S. DENNY, farmer, P. O. Greenville, was born in this township, on Section 33, Town 6, Range 3, August 13, 1827, son of John DENNY, who was born in Lincoln County, N. C., about the year 1793, and of Irish descent. He emigrated to this locality in 1817, before it became a State. He was married about the year 1820, to Sarah MOORE, a Virginian, born near Wheeling, daughter of Samuel MOORE, an early settler, who married a lady by the name of SHEPHERD. John DENNY, the father of our subject, settled first in Town 7, Range 3, and [Page 73] cleared up a farm and remained on the same until 1851, when he removed to his son's and died in Greenville, in November, 1870; his wife died about the year 1868. He was an excellent citizen, and for many years was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and an Elder in the same. In politics he was a Whig; after the dissolution of that party he became a Republican, which he remained until his death. The eldest child born to him was James, who died at twenty-two, William at the age of seventeen, Zimriporter in infancy; next in order came John S.; Alfred N.; Shepherd died in 1878, in this county. Alfred was a minister of the Presbyterian Church; he left no issue. John S. received good school advantages, and afterward graduated at McKendree College, in the scientific course in 1854. He began teaching at the age of twenty, and continued as a teacher of the young idea for quite a term of years. In 1859, he was brought out as a candidate by the Republican party for County Treasurer, then moved to Greenfield in 1860, and was twice re-elected. In 1865, he was elected County Clerk, and served twelve years in this capacity. In 1877, he returned to his farm and was elected County Commissioner, and served as such three years, making in all twenty-one years in public service. In 1854, he married Marietta MEARS, of Morgan County, daughter of James and Mary (McCORD) MEARS. By this marriage seven children were born; but two are living - Charles Irving and Effie May. His last wife was Dorcas, born in Missouri, daughter of James ROSEBROUGH. He has been a member of the Presbyterian Church for thirty-six years. His farm consists of 230 acres, situated on Section 28; residence on the northwest quarter of the section.

George H. DONNELL, school teacher, Greenville, son of Thomas S. and Catharine J. (PAISLEY) DONNELL; was born in Bond County, December 7, 1853. His father, who was a farmer, was born in Greenville, Bond County. His mother, who is still living, is a native of Montgomery County. Our subject, one of a family of five, received his early training in the school at Greenville, Ill., finishing at the Northern Indiana Normal and Business College. He also pursued his studies at Hillsboro for a year. Mr. DONNELL chose for himself the profession of a teacher, his first charge being the school at Cherry Grove, in LaGrange Precinct. He has followed the profession ever since, and is at present teacher of the common school in New Berlin. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In politics, a Republican.

Newton A. HUGHEY, farmer, P. O. Greenville; is a native of Missouri. He was born October 8, 1838, in Perry County. His father was Milus HUGHEY, born March 5, 1811, in Rowan County, N. C., and was married November 2, 1837, to Staty Regina PARKS, born November, 1818, daughter of Joseph PARKS, of North Carolina. Milus removed with his father Henry HUGHEY, to Perry County, Mo., about the year 1825, when a lad. Here the family settled. Henry HUGHEY was born May 25, 1785. He married Elizabeth GILLEN, born January 20, 1788. The fruits of this union were John, Stanhope, Newton A., Jane, Mary and Milus, all of whom attained to man and womanhood, and settled in Missouri. Henry HUGHEY died December 25, 1831; his wife, January 26, 1845. Milus HUGHEY was a farmer, and for many years was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a Ruling Elder of the same. He died January 29, 1867; his wife 1844. But two children were born them - Newton A. and Susan E. The latter married Henry IMPAGE; she is now deceased. In April, 1861, Newton A. HUGHEY married Julia A. STEVENSON, born November 2, 1840, in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo., daughter of A. K. STEVENSON, of North Carolina. He was a son of James STEVENSON and Jane FLEMING. They raised a family of three children. Mr. A. K. STEVENSON died November 9, 1881; his wife in 1844. Mr. HUGHEY came to [Page 74] Bond County in 1864, locating where he now resides. He has 210 acres, and has put nearly all the improvements on the same. Has four children - Emery G., Linley J., Pearl E. and Roxana. Two died when infants. Mr. HUGHEY is a member and elder of the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. HUGHEY's brother Linley was a soldier in the late war; member of Company B, Twenty-ninth Missouri Infantry. He died October 1862, in the hospital at St. Louis.

James M. JETT, P. O. Elm Point, was born June 1, 1812, in Fauquier County, Va. He is the eldest son of John JETT, a Virginian, who was born in 1787, son of William JETT, to whom was born the following children: James, John William, Thomas, Washington and Jefferson. James M. the grandson of William, above mentioned, removed with his parents, when a lad, to Greene County, Tenn., afterward to Know County. His father was a farmer, yet a mason by trade, which he followed when convenience was consulted. In the fall of 1829, he, with trowel in hand, walked from Tennessee to this county, to look out a home for his family. Having no money, he defrayed his expenses going to and from by the aid of his trowel, occasionally putting up a chimney for the pioneers as he passed through. He selected a place on Section 4, Township 6, Range 3, and moved his family out in the fall of 1831. Here he settled, and remained until his death, which took place October 31, 1867. The farm is now owned by his son, B. F. JETT. But two of his brothers ever came to Bond County. They were John William and Thomas. The brothers and sisters of J. M. were William, John, Washington, Jacob, Jefferson, Benjamin F., Marion and Henry. Of this number, J. M., William, Jacob and Jefferson are in this county and precinct. Washington moved to Wisconsin. Marion and Henry to Kansas. The sisters were Susan, Polly, Linda and Ester, all now deceased. The year following his arrival here, James M. married Sallie JETT, daughter of Humphrey JETT, the pioneer. She died, leaving three children - William C, Mary and Humphrey. In 1846, he married Mrs. Eliza PENTERCOST, whose maiden name was EDWARDS, daughter of John EDWARDS, who came to Bond County in 1819. In the fall of 1837, Mr. JETT located where he now resides. He first entered sixty-seven acres, to which he has added at different times, until he now has about three hundred acres. He has been hard working and industrious, and what he has is mainly the fruits of his own accumulation. He for sever years, has been a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. By his last wife he has the following children: Samuel A., Martha, John, Margaret, Henry, Linda and Finesse. John resides in Kansas; Margaret in Missouri, wife of Lafayette BENTLY.

James W. JETT, farmer, P. O. Greenville, son of William B. and Carisa PARKER JETT. James W. was born December 27, 1824, in Oldham County, Ky., and came here, with his parents, in 1834. The grandfather of J. W. was William. The father of J. W. was a farmer. He purchased land about the year 1838 and settled on the same, and remained in the county as long as he lived. He died, aged fifty-five, in 1844. He raised a family of seven children, the eldest of whom was Elizabeth; next in order came James W., then in rotation, Thomas J., George W., Ann E., Frances, Louisa J., Henry C. and Owen, who married Nancy LAWS by her had one daughter - Cora. Thomas J. served in the Mexican war, and there died. Henry served three years in the late war. After the death of his father, J. W. lived with his mother. At the age of twenty-three, he married a Miss SMITH, who was born in Caldwell County, Ky., daughter of Thomas SMITH. Since his marriage, he has been a constant resident of the township. He began with nothing, and from this small commencement he now has nearly two hundred and fifty acres of land as the fruits of his industry. [Page 75] He is a member of the Christian Church; has seven children - Mary J., wife of James M. JONES, of Montgomery county; Louisa married Abe HUBBELL; Agnes is the wife of William SMITH. The remaining are George, Henry B., Ida and Isaac N.

B. F. JETT, farmer, P. O. Elm Point, is the seventh son and tenth child. His parents were John JETT and Elizabeth HITTLE. B. F., or "Doc", as he is called, was born in December, 1831, on the farm he now owns, his birth occurring the same year of his father's location in Bond County. Benjamin F. was raised to farming pursuits, and remained under the home roof until he attained his manhood. May 11, 1857, he married Mrs. Nancy THATCHER, a native of Bond County. She was a daughter of James SHELTON and Edith BENTLY. Mrs. JETT is a granddaughter of Col. Richard BENTLY, an early settler in Bond County; came here about the year 1828, and settled in Cottonwood Precinct, near Bethel. He was a prominent man in his day. He was identified with the Baptist Church in its early organization, and a Democrat. He was twice elected to the Legislature, and in all his associations with his friends and neighbors be bore the high regard and esteem of all. He lived to a ripe old age, lived to see his great-great-grandchildren. After the marriage, he removed to Jefferson County in 1862, and remained here about two years, and returned to the homestead farm and has since been a resident of the same. He has eight acres of land; has eight children -Edwin, Shelton, Logan, Frank, James E., Edith O., Richard and Lizzie; is a member of the Christian Church at Hopewell.

S. B. KENAGA, farmer, P. O. Elm Point, is among the substantial farmers of La Grange Precinct. He was born October 18, 1841, in Mifflin County, Penn., the youngest son of his father, John KENAGA, whose father was Jacob, a native of Holland. The mother of our subject was Sarah BYLER. Prior to her marriage to John KENAGA, who died when S. B. was a lad, he removed with his mother to Lawrence County when eight years of age. Here he lived until eighteen years of age, when he came to Logan County, Ohio, where he lived until 1868, at which time he came to Bond, and located where he now resides, on Section 8, in La Grange Precinct. February, 1864, he married Mary YODER, a native of Huntingdon County, Penn., born 1841, and came to Logan County with her parents in 1845. Her parents were Daniel YODER and Mattie HOOLEY, to whom were born five children, three sons and two daughters. Mr. KENAGA is a successful farmer, and principally a self-made man. He has 200 acres of land, is a substantial citizen of the community, and a member of the Christian Church since 1873. His children are Sarah J., Anthony J., Walter O., Lewis J. and Emma M.

William R. McCASLIN, farmer, P. O. Donnellson. the McCASLIN family came to Bond County in 1831, where they have since been identified. The pioneer was Thomas G. McCASLIN, who was born February 16, 1795, in Tennessee, son of James McCASLIN, of Scotch-Irish parentage. November 10, 1818, he married Sallie ROBINSON, born in the same State May 18, 1794, daughter of Samuel ROBINSON. Subsequent to their marriage, they removed to Caldwell County, Ky.; here William R. was born January 6, 1825, being the eldest son and fourth child of his parents. He removed with them at the time of their coming; the family spent one year south of Greenville six miles, where they made one crop. coming north in the spring of 1832, his father located 400 acres in Town 7, Range 3, in the extreme north part of the county; said lands were embraced in Sections 27, 28 and 29. Here the family settled, and have since been associated with the county and its interests. His father, Thomas G., died about the year 1844; his companion survived him until 1869. Seven children were born them, who were Elizabeth J., Cin-[Page 76] dilla A., Isabella C., William R., Mary M., James W. and Sarah R; of the above who married and settled in this county, were Elizabeth (married Isaac G. BARR); Cindilla, William SMITH, of Bethel; Isabella, Robert FRAME; Mary M., William LAWS, of Montgomery County; and Sarah Allen THACKER, of the same county; all the rest settled in this county and are living, except James, who died young. William R. remained with his parents until he attained his majority. He was first married in 1846 to Lucinda McINTYRE, who died, leaving two children - Sarah E. (now wife of B. F. McLAIN), and Thomas G.; his second wife was Mary H. DENNY, daughter of George DENNY, the pioneer; she died, leaving three children - Elizabeth M. (wife of George LEWY), Emery and Henry B.. His present wife was Nancy A. ROPER, a Kentuckian, who bore him one daughter - Hattie M. All of his children except the last are married and settled in this county, and are doing well. Since he was first married, he has been a resident of the farm he now owns, having some 300 acres of land, all of which he has improved. For twenty-five years he has been a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church.

Joseph McCULLEY, farmer, P. O. Greenville. Of the self-made men and substantial farmers, Mr. McCULLEY ranks among this list. He was born November 11, 1821, in Rockbridge County, near Lexington, Va. He was the eldest son and second child born to his parents. His father was Frederick McCULLEY, a native of County Derry, Ireland. He married Margaret Irving, and, in 1819, emigrated to Virginia, where he located, and remained until the year 1838, when he removed with his family to Lauderdale County, Ala. Here he abode until the spring of 1841, when the family started in wagon for Illinois, and $50 in money, having $25 when they reached Montgomery County. There was a family of eight children. A cow was purchased for $10, and a plow for $8, leaving $7 to buy such things as their necessities required. The family was poor, and had no means to purchase land; but they began work in earnest. Joseph, being the eldest son, he took the lead of the work. In 1843, he came to Bond County and selected a place for the family. He purchased eighty acres of land at $3 per acre. There were twenty acres partially cleared, and a small cabin on the same. Here his parents died. They raised a family of six children - Elizabeth, now of Kansas, wife of Calvin BALCH; Joseph; Margaret, married Jerry McCLUNG; Martha, married S. W. R. HULL, and James I., all of Kansas. Joseph maintained the family, and worked for them, bringing into them the fruits of his labor. He remained a bachelor until April, 1876, when he married Martha L. MITCHELL, a native of Cape Girardeau County, Mo. He has only one daughter - Margaret Lunette. Mr. McCULLEY is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He has 400 acres. The McCULLEYs were of Scotch descent.

R. C. PAISLEY, farmer, P. O. Greenville, is a native of Bond County, and was born June 21, 1830, on Section 6, in this township. His father, William Paisley, was a native of Guilford County, N. C., born June 8, 1795; his wife was a native of the same State; her maiden name was Nancy NELSON, born May 30, 1795, and they were married August 13, 1816, and emigrated to this State two years later, locating on Section 6 in this township, and remained a constant resident. He died August 29, 1870; his wife preceded him August 3, 1847. He served in the Black Hawk war, and was a man of Quiet and reserved manner, yet withal a worthy and respected citizen. He married Catharine DENNY, who yet survives him; she bore him no children. The children born to him by his first wife were Malinda, who married J. POTTER, and resides in Lincoln, this State; John W., the second child, resides in Lee County, Iowa; Joel B. resides in Lincoln, in the dry goods; William F. resides in this township, [Page 77] Mary E. married Clemons BOYD, and also resides in Lincoln. Robert C. after coming to his manhood's years, gave his attention to farming. In 1852, he went the overland route to California, and spent three years mining in El Dorado County, and returned to his count in 1855. April 20, 1858, he married Lydia LIBBY, born Oct. 21, 1835, in Pawlet, Vermont, daughter of Isaac T. LIBBY, born 1812, in Vermont, who married Nancy FRISBEE. In 1850, he located on the farm he now owns, which he has improved, having now 476 acres. Mr. PAISLEY served one year in the late war; was a member of Company B, Fifty-ninth Illinois. He has three children -Anna M., Frank N. and Horace. His grandfather, PAISLEY, was named John, and of Scotch descent, and had a family of twelve children born to him. Mr. P. and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Charles WOOD, deceased, was one of the pioneers of Bond County. He was born January 9, 1798, in Darlington District, South Carolina, son of Thomas and Jane (JENKINS) WOOD. The subject of these lines emigrated to this county in the fall of 1826; he made one crop on the farm of William PAISLEY, and the following year he located on Section 29, in Town 7, Range 3 La Grange Precinct; here he settled and cleared up his land and remained a constant resident of the township until his death, January, 1867. His wife's maiden name was Sarah McCORMICK, a native of Scotland, who bore him eight children. Mr. WOOD was truly a representative man. While in Carolina, he obtained a good education for that time, and for several years taught school prior to his coming West. He was an industrious and thoroughgoing business man; he was often consulted by his neighbors to make mathematical calculations, and settled affairs too complicated for his rural associates, who always found in him a valuable and safe advisor. As a neighbor, he was kind and obliging, and ever stood ready to lend them a hand or do them a kindness. He was a hospitable man; no stranger or wayworn traveler was ever denied food or shelter under his roof, neither was he ever known to make a charge or a bill for his hospitality. He was not a member of any church or society, but never opposed those who were, but aimed to abide by the golden rule as near as he knew how. He left land and property for each of his children, although he had nothing himself when he settled in this county. His children were as follows: Caroline, Eli, Ezra, Nancy J., David, John, Sarah A. and Ira, all of whom lived to be grown, except David, who died young, all of whom married and settled in this county, except John, who never married, yet has remained in the county, and since the death of his parents has resided with his brother Ezra. John served three years in the late war, and was a true and faithful soldier. He was a member of Company B, One Hundred and Seventeenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and participated in many hard-fought battles, and came home unscathed. Ira, also, was a soldier; he served in the cavalry department, and died since the close of the war. Six of the family, three brothers and three sister, reside near each other, all doing well and have good homes.

[Zion Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 78] J.M. BINGHAM, farmer, P. O. Woburn, is a Carolinian by birth, born March 19, 1828, in Lincoln, County, N. C. His parents were Samuel BINGHAM and Barbara CARPENTER, both natives of the same State. His maternal grandfather was Jacob CARPENTER. Samuel BINGHAM was a farmer by occupation, and raised a family of ten children, viz., Susan, William, Elizabeth, Jacob, Christopher, Anna, Samuel, Martin, Peter and Joseph M., who is the youngest in the family; his father died when he was fifteen; he then remained with his mother until he attained his majority, at which time, in 1849, he came to Macoupin County, where he engaged to work by the month. Having no means left him by father he had to "paddle his own canoe," and depend solely upon his own exertions. In August, 1860, he came to Bond County, and the same year he married Narcissus V. GRIGG, a native of this county, daughter of Frederick GRIGG. By this marriage five children were born, viz., John F., William E., Lizzie R., Carroll S. and Emma J. After his marriage he located in Town 6, Range 2, where he remained until the spring of 1863, when he moved to Town 7, Range 2, and located where he now resides, purchasing at first eighty acres on Section 32; he has since added to the same, until he now has 190 acres; he has put all the substantial improvements on the same, has a good location and a pleasant home, all of which he has acquired by his industry and frugal economy. Of his brothers and sisters the following settled in North Carolina - William, Susan, Elizabeth, Jacob and Christopher. Jacob finally removed to Iowa, and settled in Marion County. Samuel settled in Lucas County, Iowa. Annie settled in Marion County, having married John LACKEY. Since 1867, Mr. BINGHAM has been identified with the United Baptist Church, and an efficient member of the same.

John T. BUCHANAN, farming and insurance, P. O. Mulberry Grove, is a descendent of one of the early settlers. He was born March 31, 1842, in this township, on the southeast quarter of Section 35; his father was John BUCHANAN, born February 17, 1797, and in 1828, July 31, he married Eleanor LONG, who was born November 18, 1809. Ten children were born of this marriage, of whom eight lived to be grown - James L. Mary A., Nathaniel W., Sarah J., Martha E., Priscilla J., John S., Nancy E., George P. Deceased are Martha, Priscilla, Nathanal W. John BUCHANAN died March 13, 1880; he was for many years a member of the Baptist Church. In his early life he followed the shoemaker's trade, but later he took up farming. His widow yet survives him. Our subject was raised to farm labor. April 9, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Sixty-fifth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served in this command until the close of the war; was in Miles surrender at Harper's Ferry, and taken prisoner here. He came through the war without wounds or receiving serious injury. In 1866, he married Lizzie R. MATTINLY, daughter of Dr. MATTINLY, of this county. After marriage he lived at the Grove some time; came here in February, 1879, locating on Section 15, where he purchased eighty acres and is engaged in farming. In addition to his farming he is interested in protecting his neighbors and friends against loss by fire, and gives them a reliable indemnity is such companies as the Rockford, Continental and American Companies. In pol-[Page 79] itics Mr. BUCHANN is Republican; has three children - Jesse E., born October 15, 1867; Sallie J., born August 22, 1869; and Annie R., March 15, 1876.

M. W. CRUTCHLEY, farmer, P. O. Mulberry Grove; born February 13, 1829, in Jefferson County, Va., fifth son of John CRUTCHLEY and Ann CHAMBERS. The family emigrated west to Saline County, Mo., in 1839, and the following May came to this county; father died 1844, mother two years later. But three children now living -Samuel and M. W. of this township and county, and George a physician in Carroll County. Our subject started in life upon his own merits, and for seven years and nine months he worked continuously for John S. HALL on his farm of Town 5, Range 2; during this time he saved some money which he invested in land. November, 1856, he married Elizabeth MILLER, born in this county, daughter of John MILLER. The same year of his marriage he located on the farm he now owns, which land he entered. In politics he has been Democratic, and stanch in the principles of his party. His brother, Frank, was accidentally killed on an adjoining farm in 1869. He has 140 acres on southwest quarter Section 33, where he resides, and since his location here has given his attention mainly to farming. March 3, 1881, the partner of his bosom and mother of his children was borne away to the spirit land, leaving eight children to mourn her loss, whose names in order of their birth are George N., Anna E., Mary F., Thomas S., Frances A., Albert W., Elizabeth G. and Silas W. James S. CORNISH, farmer, P. O. Smithboro. Among the young farmers of this township, who have been here less than a score of years, is the above, who was born October 10, 1847, in Clarion County, Penn., son of Henry CORNISH, who was born September 26, 1806, in Massachusetts, son of Andrew CORNISH. His mother's maiden name was Susan, daughter of Andrew, who was a son of Mark NOBLE, of Massachusetts. The family first settled in Venango County; afterward, in 1847, located in Clarion County, where James S. took his first observations. Father died in his sixty-eighth year; he was for many years a member of the German Baptist Church, and minister of the same. The children born to Henry CORNISH and wife are Rosanna, Henry, Mark, Susan, Sarah, John, James and Aurilla. James received but a common school education. His early manhood was spent in the lumber woods, yet at the age of twenty he began doing business on his own account. In 1874, January 1, he married Susan McDOWELL, born in Clarion County May 1, 1848, daughter of James McDOWELL. In the spring of 1876, he emigrated to this State, locating in Bond County. His first purchase was forty acres on Section 21; soon after he added twenty more. In the spring of 1879, he sold out, and purchased eighty acres on Section 28, where he has since lived, having added to the same until he now has 120 acres. He began upon his own resources, and had nothing donated to him, but by industry and frugality he has secured his present possessions solely upon his own individual merits.

Thomas K. CLINE, farmer, P. O. Woburn, was born on the farm where he now lives, Sept. 28, 1842. Is the youngest son of Thomas CLINE, the pioneer, who was born July 15, 1800, in Lancaster County, son of Henry CLINE, from Germany, with whom he emigrated from Pennsylvania to North Carolina when young. He had several brothers and sisters, who were Amos, Martin (Thomas) and Mary. October 18, 1825, Thomas CLINE was married to Sarah MITCHEM. She was born June 12, 1807, in Lincoln County, N. C., daughter of Nathaniel and Mollie (TUCKER) MITCHEM. After marriage, they raised one crop, and made a sale that fall which amounted in all to $109.25, which they could not then collect. The same [Page 80] fall, they came to this county with one old blind mare. During that winter, Mr. CLINE went to Vandalia, where he was allowed to enter eighty acres, and pay for the same when he could command the money; he after entered eighty more. This land is now owned by his son Thomas, on Section 29. It was a wilderness then; but two houses between his home and Greenville at that time. He died June 24, 1868, and for many years was identified with the Presbyterian Church, but before his death a few years joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, there being no church here at that time. Eight children were born to him who grew up: Mary, William, Nancy, Lizzie, Jennie, John, Sarah and Thomas; the two latter are residents of this township. Thomas was raised a farmer. February, 1864, he enlisted in the Third Illinois Cavalry, Company G, and served until the fall of 1865, when he was mustered out, having participated in all the battles in which his command was engaged. In 1867, he married Sallie, born in Fayette County, daughter of Frank DOYLE. Has six children - Lucy, Willie, Jennie, Frank, Josie and Peter. In 1879, he moved to the farm he now owns, where he has recently erected a new house. He has a very fine spring on his farm, which feeds a large fish pond, which is being stocked with many varieties of fish. His mother is yet living, and is like a shock of corn, fully ripe for her Master's use. She is a member of the Free Methodist Episcopal Church.

Philibert DECHENNE, farmer, P. O. Woburn. The old countries have furnished no better husbandmen and citizens than Mr. DECHENNE, who hails from Valdajal, Lorraine, France, where he was born February 2, 1813, son of Nicholas DECHENNE, a farmer, whose wife was Marianna BOLMONT, who bore him Isadore, Florinne, Philibert, Virginia, Julian, Francis, Mary, Gilbert, all of whom, except Isadore, emigrated to American, in 1837, coming direct to St. Louis, locating near there at a place called French Village. The father of our subject was a farmer, and owned considerable property in France, but being largely in debt he resolved to sell out and pay his creditors, and emigrated to the United States, and cast his lot with those of his family. When he arrived at St. Louis, he had but about $200. He located at French Village, where he died October, 1844, aged sixty-two; his wife died 1839. Philibert, at the age of eighteen learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed at French Village for several years, working on the farm a portion of the time. In 1850, he went to California, where he spent two years at his trade. Upon his return to this State, he located in Rich Prairie, St. Clair County, where he lived until 1858, when he came to this county the fall of the same year and purchased ninety acres in this township, where he has since remained, having now 170 acres. In 1847, April 14, he married Agatha ROYER, born 1829 in Lagarde, Lorraine, France, daughter of Francis ROYER, who emigrated to St. Clair County with his family in 1846; he died two years after. His children were Frances, Jacob, Celestine, Agatha, Mary and Matilda. Francis and Jacob are deceased. Matilda resides in Jasper County, Celeste and Mary in California. Mr. DECHENNE has nine children - Jules, Delphine, Eugene, Leonora, Theodore, Victor, Henry, Edward and Millie. Delphine is the wife of Jacob METCALF, and resides near the homestead. Mr. DECHENNE has one brother in Pocahontas, this county. Has one brother, Frank, in California, and one sister in New Orleans. Member of the Catholic Church.

Frederick DURR, farmer, P. O. Woburn, a thrifty farmer in Town 7, Range 2, son of John DURR, a native of Germany, who came to America, and when a young man cast his fortunes with Bond County, when it was but partially improved. For several years he worked out by the month and earned sufficient means to enable him to purchase a home in this town-[Page 81] ship. He married Malinda KIMBRO, a native of North Carolina, daughter of Frederick KIMBRO, which family were likewise very early settlers in this part of the county. Mr. DURR and wife had born them the following - John H., Mary E, Frederick, George, Isley, Jonathan, Martha A. and William. Of the above John H, Martha A and Jonathan are deceased. Mr. DURR died November 15, 1860; Frederick, his successor, was born February 12, 1844, on Section 28, Town 7, Range 2, on the homestead upon which he lived as his home until his marriage. In March, 1865, he enlisted in Company K, Third Illinois Cavalry, in which he served until the fall of the same year; his range of observation during this time extended from Eastport, Miss., to St. Paul, Minn.; received his discharge October 19. December 3, 1868, he married Julia S. ROBERTS, born in this township, daughter of R. S. D. ROBERTS, an old and highly respected resident of the county. By this union he has four children - Keturah E., John R., Samuel T. and Illinois Maude. Mr. DURR has 360 acres; located on the farm he now owns in 1868; after his marriage sold his farm on the south half of Section 32, Town 7, Range 2. He and wife are members of the United Baptist Church.

F. M. ELAM, farmer, P. O. Woburn. One of the largest land-holders and most successful farmers in Town 6, Range 2, is Francis Marion ELAM, known among his friends as "General", not that he earned the title from his association with gory battle fields or valorous deeds in martial array, but his father dubbed him with this handle to his name when a youth, which name he has since borne. This gentleman was born in Rutherford County, N. C., April 18, 1826, the eldest son and fifth child born to his parents, who were Thomas and Elizabeth ELAM, the latter a daughter of Edward ELAM. The paternal grandsire of Francis M. was Alexander, a native of Virginia, who emigrated to North Carolina. In 1827, the family moved to Sumner County, Tenn., where they remained until 1833, when they came to Fayette County, this State; here Thomas ELAM died in 1854, his wife dying in 1877; he and wife were members of the United Baptist Church. Twelve children were born to them, nine of the number lived to be grown, viz., Susan, Nancy, Cicely F. M., Thomas A., Sabra C., Lovincia, Sarah and Edward. Francis M. remained at home until he reached his majority. In 1846, he married Nancy, born in Sangamon County, this State, daughter of Richard WALKER, a Kentuckian by birth. When Mr. ELAM was married he moved to this township; he had a small commencement in the way of this world's goods; had one yoke of young steers, three cows and a three-year-old filly. His outfit for keeping house was bought for $5; he worked hard during the day, and at night he made such furniture as they most needed; with a cheerful heart and willing hand he pushed ahead, and as fast as he made money he invested it in land. In 1849, he located where he now resides. Before he divided up his land among his sons he owned 1,200 acres; he has now about 700. He has been a zealous member of the United Baptist Church for many years. Liberty Church, of which he is an officer, stands upon the land he deeded for that purpose. Of the following eight children born to him but five are living - Mary E., James F., John S., A. J., Daniel E., Sarah, Samuel D. and Joel A..

Eugene ENLOE, merchant and P. M., is the eldest son of Thomas B. ENLOE, born in this county in Town 6, Range 3, August, 1830, son of Ezekiel ENLOE, of North Carolina. The wife of Ezekiel was Charlotte WHITE, daughter of Richard WHITE, of North Carolina. In 1858, May 1, Thomas B. was married; his wife was Sarah CLINE, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (MITCHEM) CLINE. After the marriage of Mr. ENLOE, he moved to the old homestead, where he died November 20, 1864. Four children were born [Page 82] to him - Eugene, Henry, Ellen and Thomas B. To Ezekiel ENLOE were born ten children: eight grew up, viz., Marshall, Clayburn, Thomas B., William, Edward, Mary, Benjamin and George; five are now living; Thomas Marshall and Clayburn are deceased. Eugene, whose name heads this sketch, was born April 24, 1859; he was raised on the farm. April 30, 1879, he married Clara M. MOSS, daughter of L. S. MOSS; has two children - E. M. and baby unnamed; is now running a store at Woburn. November 15, 1881, he was commissioned Postmaster.

Lewis S. HUBBARD, farmer, P. O. Smithboro. This gentleman is a grandson of one of the earliest settlers of this part of the county, and son of T. S. HUBBARD, and Ann E. SAUNDERS. Lewis S. was born on the homestead farm, situated in the northwest corner of Town 5, Range 2. He first saw the light of day January 11, 1845. His father, T. S. HUBBARD, being a farmer, his sons were brought up with the same education. While in his nineteenth year, he volunteered his services to put down the rebellion, enlisting in January, 1864, in the third Illinois Cavalry. The first six months of his service he, with his company, E, acted as an escort to Gen. STEELE, after which, he, with his company, joined the regiment, and started in pursuit of HOOD, on his march in the rear of SHERMAN. He participated in all the principal battles in which his company was engaged, and escaped without wounds, but during his exposure he contracted rheumatism, which is now a source of considerable annoyance to him. After the close of the war, he and his command were sent North into Minnesota, to look after the Indians, and he did not receive his release from the army until the fall of 1865, after which he returned home and resumed labor on the home farm. September 17, 1873, he married Frances SEAMAN, daughter of Jonathan and May Ann (MILLER) SEAMAN. Since his marriage, he has been a resident of the farm he now owns, situated on the southwest quarter of Section 33, which farm he began improving in 1866. He has 120 acres, and his wife sixty. He has one son, Earl S. William A. JETT, farmer, P. O. Greenville, born January 15, 1819, in Fauquier County, Virginia, second child and son of Thomas and Elizabeth (ROGERS) JETT. When ten years of age, he went with his parents to Tennessee, and from there they removed to this county, about the year 1831, his father making his location in Zion Precinct. William A. remained with his father until several years past his majority; in fact, he made his father's house his home until he was married, which was August 28, 1856. His wife was Emma S. DAVIS, a native of La Grange Precinct. Her parents were William and Lucy A. (NANCE) DAVIS. William DAVIS was a native of Trigg County, Kentucky, son of Rev. John T. DAVIS, a Baptist minister. Lucy A. NANCE was born in Versailles, Woodford County, Ky. Mr. DAVIS removed with his family to Bond County, locating in La Grange Precinct, on Section 9, about 1836 - 37, where the FOSTER brothers reside. Mr. DAVIS died April, 1857; Mrs. DAVIS, August, 1865. To them nine children were born; of this number the following are living: Robert Dale, traveling salesman; Amanda, wife of Samuel PLANT, of Greenville Precinct; Margaret resides in Fayette County, wife of Henry CASEY; Lucy A., wife of James SAUNDERSON, same precinct; also Laura, who married Addison THOMPSON. Mr. JETT located on the farm he now owns, shortly after his marriage; he has 160 acres. His family consists of six children: Sarah M., the eldest, is the wife of James W. REED, of Greenville; Flora Married John H. BOOHER, and resides in La Grange Precinct; those at home are Stephen A. D., William L., L. Virginia, and James Arthur Dale. Mr. JETT is not a member of any church society; Mrs. JETT, of the Christian Church.

Stephen Jackson JETT, farmer, P. O. [Page 83] Greenville, is a representative of Jett Prairie born June 12, 1827, in Fauquier County, Va., and emigrated to this State, with his parents, when only eighteen months old. They located on Section 6, Town 6, Range 2; her he was reared, and has since been a constant resident. His father's name was Thomas JETT, a native of the Old Dominion, son of William JETT, a Revolutionary soldier. When Thomas JETT came here, he entered about two hundred and sixty acres of land which he cleared, and remained on the same until his death, which occurred June 29, 1854, at Pocahontas, of cholera, while on his way from St. Louis. He was a Whig and a member of the Christian Church. His wife died 1859. To them ten children were born, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood - James H., William A., Alexander W., Thomas J., Stephen J., Wesley, Susana, Mary J., Eliza and Sarah. Stephen J. and William reside on farms adjoining. Our subject was married, in February, 1849, to Nancy, born in this State, daughter of John BOOHER. She died 1866, leaving four children - John W., William E., Thomas M. and Stephen. Mrs. JETT died May 9, 1866. His second marriage was to Eliza BULL, of Morgan County, daughter of Moses BULL, and four children were born to them - Solomon, Oscar, Nancy and Charles. Mr. JETT has 210 acres of land.

L. S. MOSS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Woburn, is the eldest son of W. W. MOSS and Drusilla SCOGGIN, daughter of Lemuel SCOGGIN. The former was born in North Carolina, 1878, son of Henry MOSS, a Revolutionary soldier. The MOSS family are of English stock. Three brothers emigrated from England, one of whom settled in Virginia, another in North Carolina, and the third in the Eastern States. The subject of these lines came West with his parents and grandfather in 1830. They located first in Madison County, and about five years later his father came to Bond County and bought a claim; he died 1861; his wife, one year previous. The number of children born were L. S., James H., Henry J., Martin V., Edward A., W. Preach and Mary; but two of the above are in this county - L. S. and James H. L. S. not liking the way matters were being "run" about the parental roof, he ran off at the age of sixteen and began to scratch for himself, and, hiring out at $6 per month, he thus continued on, and well knows what is to "paddle" his own craft, and in this time saw much of the workings of human nature and the cold side of humanity. At the age of eighteen, he went to Wisconsin; remained here some time. While in this State, cast his first vote for Gen. PIERCE, and has since been a Democrat, and voted his sentiments as well as talked them. From Wisconsin he settled here permanently in this county, where he has since been identified, not only in farming, but in trading and commercial pursuits. Was for several years engaged in running a store in Woburn, also a mill in company with his brother J. H. In 1850, he married Sarah, daughter of Lewis KERR and Selma WATSON, both families from North Carolina. Seven children have been born him, viz.: America, Josephine, Clara, Dolera, George L., James H. and Edith H. He has 370 acres of land adjoining Woburn; has forty-eight acres set in orchard; raises stock and grain. Is a member of the A., F. & A. M.

James H. MOSS, farmer, P. O. Greenville, born February 11, 1833, in Madison County, this State, is the second son born to his parents, who were William MOSS and Drusilla SCOGGIN. J. H. remained with his parents until he attained his majority, or nearly; left home at the age of twenty. In 1856, he married Elizabeth JAY, born near Shelbyville, this State, daughter of Edward JAY. The mother of James was Jane, daughter of Burril GRIGG. After his marriage, he first located on the KLINE place, and from 1854 to 1858 he was interested in running a saw-mill. Afterward he moved to the Cross Roads (Woburn), where he and his [Page 84] brother, L. S., were for some time engaged in the mercantile business, also in running the steam saw and grist mill. In 1868, he located on the farm now owned by Lemuel S., which he improved, where he lived until 1874, when he located on the farm he now owns, containing 680 acres on Section 30. Of a family of ten children born to him, six are living -William W., Rose E., Amy L., Della A., Lena E. and babe unnamed. Since 1859, he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; more recently has been associated with the Free Methodist Church, as well as an official member of the same.

Henry H. MULL, farmer, P. O. Woburn, is a thriving farmer of Pennsylvania origin, born September 20, 1840, in Venango County; son of Abraham MULL, who was born in Berks County, 1812, and married Hannah GILGER, who was a native of Lancaster County, same State, daughter of James GILGER. This marriage was crowned by the birth of nine children, of whom Sarah was the eldest. In order of birth came the following: Margaret E., Henry H., Samuel E., Jonas L., Catharine J., Charles W., David E. and Oliver G., all of whom are living in Pennsylvania, in Venango and Clarion Counties. Father died in 1862; mother yet survives him. Henry H. received a good common school education, and early in manhood learned the carpenter's trade of his father. In June, 1862, he volunteered to serve three years in the defense of his country's flag, joining Company A, of the One Hundred and Twenty-first Regiment, which command he continued with until the close of the war, serving in all the hotly contested battles from that of Antietam on. At the battle of Gettysburg, he was taken prisoner, but joined his command two months after. He returned home at the end of the war unscathed. In 1866, he cast his lot and his fortunes with the good people of Bond County, arriving in this township April 18, and immediately engaged at his trade, which he followed regularly until 1873, having, three years previous, located where he now resides, and has improved the place very materially since his occupation. The forty acres occupied by the house was given his wife by her father, when she married, in January, 1870; her name is Priscilla, born in Clarion County, Penn., daughter of Jacob LILLIGH. Mr. MULL has added to the forty acres given his wife 180 more, all of which he has earned by his industry and management, having received but about $200 from his father's estate. Has three children - Charles O., John W. and babe not named.

A. W. MAHLE, farmer, P. O. Woburn. This gentleman was born June 19, 1812, in Hesse-Cassel, and emigrated to Lancaster County, Penn., with his parents in 1819; three years later they moved west, to what is now Clarion County. Here his parents died, having had to them born twelve children, ten of whom grew up, three of whom are now living. The mother of our subject was Maria STRICHENBERGER. Mr. MAHLE was first married to Catharine SICKWORTH, who bore him several children of whom Edward, Sarah and Maria are in Pennsylvania, Louisa and Emanuel in Arkansas. John resides in this county, a druggist in Mulberry Grove. Mr. MAHLE married for his second wife Sarah SHANER, a native of Pennsylvania; by her has three children - Elizabeth, Marietta and Clemons. She was born March 16, 1827, daughter of Henry SHANER and Elizabeth RAPP, the former a native of Lehigh, she of Berks County. To them were born six children, Mrs. MAHLE being the eldest of the number. Mr. MAHLE purchased land in this township in the spring of 1865, on Section 21, where he lived until 1882; in March located near Woburn, where he has improved a home. Since 1847, he has been identified with the German Baptist Church, and was mainly instrumental in getting the church built in this township. His farm he now rents, he being in a manner retired from active business associations. [Page 85] E. P. POINDEXTER, physician, Woburn, takes rank among the first physicians in the county. He is a representative of an Old Virginian family. He was born August 10, 1838, in Patrick County, in the Old Dominion, a son of Joseph S. POINDEXTER, a native of Campbell County and of French descent, born Oct. 5, 1802, son of John POINDEXTER. His mother's maiden name was Martha FRAISER, who was born and raised in Rockingham County, in North Carolina, near the Yadkin River, daughter of Thomas, an Englishman, a man noted for his large size and physical development, being six feet and seven inches in height, and weighed 240 pounds, and a giant in strength; he moved to Jackson County, Ohio, in 1837, and died in 1845. John POINDEXTER, the paternal grandsire of our subject, was a large slave-owner, owned nearly 300 slaves in Virginia. He married Elizabeth CHILTON, and by her had seven children. Joseph S., the father of our subject was the eldest, who emigrated with his family West to Saline County, Mo., where he died July 3, 1863, leaving four children, three sons and one daughter. The subject of these lines, by the force of circumstances, was thrown upon his own resources when a young man; he received the advantages afforded by the common schools, and in 1858 he entered McKee College, but the war broke out, preventing a further prosecution of his studies at that time. Dr. H. B. REDMON was his first preceptor. In the spring of 1861, he joined Capt. BROWN's company (Capt. BROWN was a son of Sam BROWN, who fought Cassius M. CLAY), after, in Col. BROWN's regiment, in PARSON's division, in PRICE's army. The Doctor served through the entire war. He at one time raised a company and served as Lieutenant under Capt. GULLET; he was wounded but once. In the battle of Pea Ridge he was gunner in one of the batteries, and did effective work. He followed the fortunes of PRICE's army all through the war, serving in various localities and in different positions, enduring much hardship and exposure. Returning to his former residence after the war, the feeling being so strong against him on account of his advocacy of the Southern cause that he came away, and cast his fortunes in the Sucker State, where he has since lived. In 1867, he began the study of medicine at Charlestown, in Coles County, under Drs. SILVERTHORN & TROWER, continuing his studies, graduating in the spring of 1874 in St. Louis Medical College. His course was a slow, yet a thorough one; he burrowed the money to enable him to prosecute his studies to completion. April 16, 1870, he came to Woburn, Bond County, and has since been in the practice of his profession, and he has been very successful, having the entire confidence of the people. In his practice has given the poor the benefit of his skill without fee or reward, and did it cheerfully. September 17, 1873, he married Tabitha J. GOODRICH, born in Salem, Marion County, daughter of Chauncy and Ruth (COLBURN) GOODRICH, of Massachusetts. The Doctor has three children - Don Victor, Annie and Della Maude. In religious matters, he is a free-thinker.

John W. PRATER, farmer, P. O. Greenville. The PRATER family were about the first settlers in this part of the county. the pioneer was Halliday, born January 23, 1777; he married Anni ADAIR, who was born May 1, 1776. The family emigrated from the Carolinas to Kentucky in the early part of the century, but remained here but a few years; finally came to this locality before it was a State, making his settlement on Section 31, Town 7, Range 2; here he remained until his death in 1846, November 28; his wife the same year, August, 30. The father of John W. was Samuel PRATER, born March 31, 1800, in South Carolina; he married Nancy WALKER, daughter of James WALKER, of Virginia. Five children were the issue of this marriage, who were in order of birth as follows: Tabitha, John W., Mich-[Page 86] ael H., Martha Ann and Mary. Tabitha married William BEARD and settled in Madison County. Michael never married, but remained with his mother; Martha A., married James M. BROWN; Mary, Willis SANDS, all of whom reside in this locality; father died February 26, 1852. John W. was married March 12, 1846, to Sarah HUNT, born in 1827, in Warren County, Ky., daughter of John HUNT and Elizabeth WRIGHT, who raised a large family of children, a dozen or more. Mrs. PRATER's parents never came here; she came with her uncle, Joseph WRIGHT, who settled here in Illinois. In the spring of 1848, our subject located on the farm he now owns; first lived in a cabin, but a few rods from his present residence, which he built in 1871. His farm consists of 266 acres; has had seven children - James, William, John Thomas, Caroline, Samuel, Sissie and Jessie K. Mr. PRATER was born on his farm December 5, 1824; since been a constant resident of the township. He drinks neither tea, coffee, whisky nor uses tobacco.

R. S. D. ROBERTS, farmer, P. O. Woburn, was born in Kentucky, Henry County, September 15, 1822, and came to Bond County with his parents when three months old, remaining here about two years, when he went with the family to Montgomery County, where he came to manhood's years. He was married in July, 1843, to Mary R. WHITE, a native of Loudoun County, Val, daughter of James and Mary (VERNANDO) WHITE, who came to this State about the year 1839. Shortly after his marriage, he came to this county, locating in Town 6, Range 2, purchased land, and has since been identified with this township and been engaged in farming pursuits. He has been successful in his business, having 272 acres of land. Had eight children - four sons and four daughters - six living. Mary is the wife of Hardin ELMORE; James H. resides in Fayette County; Julia is the wife of Frederick DEEN; Elizabeth ;married Fred KIMBRO, now deceased; George, deceased; Harriet, wife of J. F. ELAM; and Richard at home; Stephen. Mr. ROBERTS has been a member of the United Baptist Church many years, having joined the church at Liberty soon after its organization. Mr. ROBERTS served in the Mexican war under Col. FOREMEN; was a member of Company E., Third Regiment, and has been a Jackson Democrat of the first order, and has always since he cast his first vote been a warm supporter of Jeffersonian principles. The father of our subject was a son of Capt. Benjamin ROBERTS; he died in Kentucky. ROBERTS died 1847; he was one among the first school teachers in Montgomery County. He married the mother of R. S. D.; her maiden name was Sarah SIMMONS, daughter of Samuel SIMMONS, a Revolutionary soldier of seven years' service; he lived to be one hundred and fifteen years old. His wife died at the age of one hundred and seven of cancer. Our subject had one brother, Henry, who served in the Black Hawk war, and was out with the Rangers, and also in the Florida war, and one bother, Marcus S., who was in the Mexican war; he is now in Colorado.


[Cottonwood Grove Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 87] John D. ALEXANDER, retired farmer, Cottonwood Precinct, is one of the old pioneers of Bond County, having been here since May, 1820, a constant resident. He was born October 24, 1793, in Mecklenburg County, N. C., son of Jedediah and Betsey Alexander - Jedediah was born 1757, son of Francis, who was born 1730. The ALEXANDER family are of Scotch-Irish descent. John D. lived in North Carolina until twenty-three years of age. September, 1816, moved to Maury County, Tenn., where he lived until May 1, 1820, when he came to Bond County, and located three miles southwest of Bethel Church, on the William CRUTHIS farm; where he lived until 1832, when he located on Section 12, in this precinct, where he has since lived. He joined the Sugar Creek society of the Presbyterian order, at the age of seventeen, when in North Carolina, and has since been a member of that organization, and was one of the first members at the time of the organization of the Bethel Church, September 15, 1825, and of sixty-two members he is one of three now living. His wife was Mary SCOTT McCORD, whom he married on December 10, 1819. She died January 8, 1837, having borne the following children: William F., James H., Robert W., Demas W., John L., Amelia and Melanthon Hill. None lived to be married except Amelia J., wife of J. V. McFARLAND, Melanthon and Demas M. Robert went to California in 1850, and was killed by the Indians. Demas M. served through the late war, and one year after in the regular army. He was fist commissioned as Captain and came out as Brevet Major; he went out from Kansas, where he had gone in 1856. He was prominent and well known in that locality. He served as Justice of the Peace and was twice elected Representative from Douglas County. He died in 1871, highly esteemed by all who knew him. Melanthon H. was born June 12, 1828, on the CRUTHIS farm, and moved with his father to the place he now owns, where he has since lived. January 1, 1860, he married Caroline V. FOSTER, born 1841, near the Hudson River, in Dutchess County, daughter of Rev. Aaron FOSTER, whose wife was a SEAMAN. He is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, now located in Vermillion County, where he came from New York in 1843. Mrs. ALEXANDER has one brother, John L., now of Vermillion County. Mr. ALEXANDER has four children living -Leroy E., Mary, Percy and Clarence. Walter died, aged ten years, in 1875. Mr. A. is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and has 310 acres.

J. V. McFARLAND, farmer, P. O. Cottonwood Grove, born May 15, 1833, in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo., son of Robert S. and Agnes (FLEMING) McFARLAND. Robert S. was born in North Carolina, in 1799, son of Jacob McFARLAND a native of Scotland. In the spring of 1818, the father of our subject came to what is now Bond County, and made a crop on the site of ground where Greenville now stands. He remained here however, but a short time after, when he moved South to Tennessee, afterward removed to Missouri, when he returned to this county with his family in 1837, and located in Cottonwood Precinct and remained here until his death, March 15, 1863; his wife survived him until May 12, 1865. They were both members of the Presbyterian Church. Of seven children born to them but two are living - H. Columbus and John V. who remained under the parental roof until his marriage. He was married April 26, 1866, [Page 88] Amelia J. ALEXANDER, born in this county, daughter of John D. ALEXANDER, and Mary S. McCORD, both old and highly respected families in the county. Since his marriage he has been a resident of the farm he now owns, having 174 acres and good improvements, which were of his own establishment. He has no children. He has served as County Commissioner one term, and as Overseer of the Poor. Is not a member of any church yet not an opposer of religion but a friend to the same and maintenance of good morals.

William F. PAISLEY, farmer, P. O. Elm Point, born November 24, 1836, on the homestead of the old Pioneer, William PAISLEY, situated in Town 6, Range 2, in Cottonwood Grove Precinct. He is the youngest son of his father, and remained with him until his death. November 24, 1880, he married Alice HENDRICK, a native of Alabama, daughter of Robert and Julia (PHILIPS) HENDRICK. She moved to Bond County with her parents in 1875. Mr. PAISLEY has been a resident of the homestead since his marriage, having 235 acres of land. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, having his membership at Donnellson. Has one child - Lucretia, born September 21, 1881.

James REDFEARN, farmer, P. O. Greenville. The REDFEARN and CARROLL family are contemporaneous with the early settlement of Bond County. James REDFEARN was born in North Carolina, September 8, 1813, son of Isaac who moved with his family to Bond County about the year 1825, and settled at Round Prairie, this county. Isaac had the following-named children, of whom James was the eldest, the others in order of birth were John, Jane, Isaac, Milberry, Jemina, Martha, Ruth, Lydia and Ira. James REDFEARN, whose name heads this sketch, was brought up to hard labor, raised on a farm and had little or no school advantages. In March 4, 1842, he married Nancy CARROLL, who was born May 15, 1822, in Virginia, daughter of Mac CARROLL and Elizabeth BAROM, who were Virginians. The family first removed from Virginia to Tennessee, and from there they came to Bond County, about the year 1827, and settled with the REDFEARN family on Round Prairie. Eleven children were born to them, viz.: Ambrose, Jackson, Nancy, Caroline, Rhoda, Tillman, Robert, Mary, Elizabeth, Berdine and Susan, all of whom lived to be grown and raise families except Elizabeth. After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. REDFEARN they settled near Bethel, where they remained until they came to this farm in 1851. Of ten children born to them, nine are living - John T., James P., Lydia M., Mary F., Nancy E., Jemima E., McClellan, Millie J. and G. M.; Isaac, deceased. Lydia married E. B. DAGGET, Mary F. married John SIBERT; Nancy, Wilson FILE; Jemina, Charles B. FILE; all residents of this county. Of Mrs. REDFEARN's brothers and sisters, living, are: Tillman, Robert and Berdine, they reside in Linneus, Linn Co., Mo.; Rhoda, of Sioux City, Iowa, wife of Henry JANDT, a prominent business man; Susan resides in Round Prairie, wife of James SANER; Mary married John HOCHDERFFER, and lives in the county. Mr. REDFEARN has 960 acres of land. Mrs. R. is a member of the United Baptist Church, and a thoroughgoing business woman.

James W. ROBINSON, farmer, P. O. Cottonwood Grove, was born in North Carolina, March 14, 1800, son of Alexander and Betsey (WHITE) ROBINSON, both natives of North Carolina, who came to Montgomery about 1812, he, a harness-maker by trade, and dying October 10, 1853, the wife having died many years previous. Seven children were born to them, our subject being the eldest, who was raised to a life of farming, afterward carrying on milling, both grain and saw milling. In 1831, he married Catharine HESS, who died July 11, 1833, leaving one son, Alexander S. February 12, 1835, he married Mary Ann ARMSTRONG, daughter of John and Polly (DUDLEY) ARMSTRONG, he of Georgia, and she of North Carolina. Alex-[Page 89] ander S., the eldest son of our subject, entered the Union service, enlisting in Company B, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Twenty-second Regiment, and was captured at Chickamauga, dying in Libby Prison, Richmond, January 20, 1864. Mr. ROBINSON has had born to him four daughters and two sons. Two of the daughters are living - Mary E., Mrs. J. N. ROSEBOROUGH, and Alvira R., Mrs. H. M. FERGUSON. Sarah was Mrs. Rev. F. G. STRANGE, who died leaving two sons. Lemuel F. ROBINSON died July 20, 1854.

John M. ROSS, farmer, P. O. Cottonwood Grove, was born in Maury County, Tenn., June 7, 1823, son of Thomas ROSS, a farmer born in Georgia, in 1786, and died in Montgomery County, in 1835, whither he had moved tin the spring of 1829, locating in Town 7, Range 4. Our subject's mother was Sally (ARMSTRONG) ROSS, a native of Tennessee. John ROSS came to Bond County when a mere child of five years, and received his first schooling in the pioneer schoolhouse, just over the north line of this county. At Cottonwood Grove he learned the blacksmith's trade with Reuben MORRELL, and followed this trade about fifteen years. July 13, 1847, at Pleasant Prairie, this county, he was married to Ruth N. JONES, a native of the same county as her husband, daughter of Pleasant and Sallie (OSBORN) JONES, the former from Virginia, the latter from North Carolina. The father of Thomas ROSS was one Andrew ROSS, a native of Scotland, and, like his grandson, learned the trade of blacksmith, and was known to have made swords and bayonets for use in the Revolutionary war. He was buried in North Carolina. Thomas was his only son. Our subject has five children living - Albert D., S. Jeanette, J. Warren, Sprague D., L. Shoeman; one, Louis J. is dead. Thomas ROSS' family consisted of six children, four sons and two daughters, three of whom are now living; two residents of Bon and one of Montgomery County; all farmers. Our subject bought his first twenty acres about 1845, and has since added until he has now 276, 84 of which he entered June 22, 1853.

James M. VOLLENTINE, farmer, P. O. New Douglas. Prominent among the early settlers and representative men of Bond County was William Bigford VOLLENTINE, a native of North Carolina, son of Hardy VOLLENTINE, William B. emigrated from North Carolina to Tennessee, where he married Fannie PLANT. While here he served in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans. He emigrated to what is now Bond County when it was a Territory. When he first came here, he remained for a time where Pocahontas Township now is, and finally located in Town 6, Range 4, on Section 18, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1869. He was thrice married. His first wife bore him the following children - George W., now of Christian County, Hardy of Wisconsin, Mrs. Elizabeth CONDIFF of Montgomery County, Mrs. Nancy BROWN, now of Minnesota. His second wife was Sophia SUGGS, a native of Tennessee, daughter of Josiah SUGGS. This union was crowned with eleven children, those living are: James M., John J., Rebecca, Letta and Christopher C. J. M. and C. C. reside in this township, Letta, wife of James RIDGEWAY, of Pocahontas Precinct. His third marriage was to Elsie PRECKETT, a native of Kentucky; she bore him five children - Jennette, Lois, Charles J., Margaret Jennette and Douglass. William B. VOLLENTINE was one of the prominent men of the county, he became a large landholder, and owned at one time 2,000 acres. He was a stanch Democrat, and took a lively interest in the affairs of his county, he served some time as Justice of the Peace, was County Commissioner and Associate Judge, and for many years was a leader in the Methodist Episcopal Church, during the early part of his life. He was generally known all over the country, being a thorough business man - trading largely in stock, and farmed quite extensively - was a man of great energy and persever-[Page 90] ance, and a successful financier, and the father of twenty-three children; of this number J. M. was of the second set. He was born February 4, 1828, on the homestead, where he remained until his majority, after which he attended school two years. In the spring of 1852 he went to California, where he spent seven years in Nevada County, where he was engaged in trading and freighting, and had a varied experience. He returned here to this township in 1859, and since remained. He, for a time ran a store in New Douglas, and in 1866 he located on the farm he now owns, which place was settled by William CARSON. In August 7, 1860, he married Louisa J. JERNIGAN, born in Christian County, daughter of Lewis H. and Sallie (CURRY) JERNIGAN. Lewis H. was born in Tennessee, son of Jesse. Lewis H. was a very early settler in Christian County, Gabriel JERNIGAN, son of Jesse, was Sheriff of his county two terms, and represented his county in the Legislature. Mr. VOLLENTINE has one brother, Napoleon B., he is a liveryman in New Douglas. Lizzie, a sister who resides in Marion County, Kan., wife of Ben NESBITT, and Emma, Mrs. William CONNOR, of same county. Mr. VOLLENTINE has a good farm of several hundred acres, and is a thorough and progressive farmer, and one of the best in the township. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and has been a class leader and Steward for several years, and a great Sunday school worker, at Corrington Chapel. Had three children born to him, two are living -James F. and William Lewis. His only daughter, Sallie Sophia, was removed by death, August 16, 1876, aged nine years.

E. J. VOLLENTINE, farmer, P. O. New Douglas, is a descendant of one of the early settlers. He was born February 3, 1837, on the homestead farm, which is now owned by W. B. VOLLENTINE. He is the second son and third child of Jackson O. VOLLENTINE, whose wife was an ARMSTRONG. Jackson died about the year 1852, March 30. He served in the Black Hawk war, and for years was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He had four children born to him, viz.: William D., E. J., Alonzo and Thomas. E. J. was married in 1860 to Mary SMITH. She died 1870, leaving two children - Ulis T. and Jackson O. He has 260 acres and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


[Okaw Precinct, Bond County, IL]

[Page 91] Jacob BARTH, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Heilsburg. Among the prominent farmers and self-made men of this portion of the county is Jacob BARTH, who was born October 9, 1826, in Hesse-Darmstadt, son of George and Barvell (MANN) BARTH. Jacob, when a lad, learned the glazierís trade in the old country, and at the age of nineteen bid good-bye to the land of his nativity, and cast his fortunes with Americaís free soil. He left home with nothing, his fatherís only endowment was a whipping, which he gave Jacob before leaving. Jacob came first to St. Louis, and sought employment at his trade, which was at the time unprofitable here; he then learned the wagon-makerís trade and worked journey work of several years, and traveled over several States. In the fall of 1850, he came to Bond County and made a purchase, in the locality where he now resides, and engaged in farming, and has since lived here, and became one of the leading farmers in his township. He has nearly 600 acres of land, which he farms very successfully. In 1850, he married Elizabeth GERTNER, a native Wurtemberg, who has borne him six children Ė Edward, Theresa E., Matilda E., Henry G., Jacob and George. The daughters are married to two brothers, James and John GUNN, and reside in this township.

Alexander MYATT, deceased, Prominent among the early settlers of this precinct is the MYATT family, of whom the above was the head and father. He was born February 9, 1802, in Tennessee, son of Wiley MYATT, and came to Bond County in the year 1831, locating first in Beaver Creek Township, and removed to this township, locating on the west half of Section 33, in the year 1836, and remained here until his death, September 4, 1865. For many years he was a member of the Methodist Church, his house being used in early time as a place for holding meetings, and the pioneer minister ever found under his roof a hospitable welcome. He was a man of quiet and unpretentious habits; yet, withal he was a man of substantial worth and merit. He was twice married; first to Mary CHISENHALL, of Tennessee, who bore him six children, viz., Emily, Martha, Pernecia, Wiley, Wesley and Mary. His second and last wife was Mrs. Murphy WILMERTH, whose maiden name was SUGG, by whom he had six children as follows: William C., Josiah, Alexander B., Nancy E., Sarah S. and Murphy L., all of whom were born in this county. Of this numer William C. and Alexander B. reside on farms adjoining. Alexander Barnesí sons reside upon and own the homestead farm here; he was born April 17, 1837, and was married June 30, 1858, to Caroline POWELL, who was born February 18, 1836, in Montgomery County, Tenn., daughter of Benjamin and Nellie (COSSIE) POWELL; he was a son of Eaton POWELL; she was born in Kentucky, daughter of Robert COSSIE. Mrs. MYATT was the second of a family of six children, but two of the number living, herself and Catharine, who reside in California, wife of Alfred LOUIS. The POWELL family came to Illinois in 1844, and wer Methodists. To Mr. and Mrs. MYATT have been born four children, but two living, Fannie E. and Roxcillana. The entire family being members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. MYATT has 265 acres, and with the exception of about four years spent in Greenville educating his daughters, he has remained a constant resident of the farm.


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