Illinois Genealogy Trails History Group

Clark County Illinois
Genealogy and History


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Chapter 18
Orange Township

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The History of Crawford and Clark County
W. H. Perrin, O. L. Baskin & Co., 1883

Transcribed by Kevin Ortman

[Orange Township, starts on pg 432]

Excerpts:

pg: 432: The township of Orange to which the following pages are devoted, comprises thirty-six sections of land in the southern part of the county and was known in the congressional survey as town 9 north, range 13 west. [omitted text]. . .

pg 433: The settlement of Orange by white men dates from the year 1836, when the first entries of land were made, though it cannot be stated with correctness who was the earliest settler. [omitted text] ...

pg 433: In the above year Nathan Howerton and Moses Engle made entries in section 12, Elijah Peacock in section 25, and John F. Dodd in section 3, all of whom moved into their respective lands and began improving. Howerton located on the farm where William Hodge now [in 1883] lives, on which he made a number of extensive improvements, and which continued to be his home for twenty years. Peacock was a native of Ohio, and made his way into this part of the country on a tour of inspection for the purpose of selecting a home. Being pleased with the appearance of the country, he entered eighty acres in the section named., and moved his family here a short time afterward. He was a prominent citizen of the township and during the period of his residence here was highly respected by the entire community. The farm on which he settled is presently [in 1883] occupied by Mrs. Baker. In the year 1837 a man by the name of Stout came to Orange and entered land in section 27, lot 7, now [in 1883] owned by the widow Hunter. [omitted text] ...

Other entries were made in the year 1837, by Enoch Thompson, in section 20, C. Hillebert, in section 1, and Moses Aughin in the same section. Thompson and Hillebert never resided in the township, and Aughin lived here but a few years when he sold his place and moved to a distant State. In the year 1838 the following persons secured lands in Orange: Francis Howerton, C. Harrison, Henry Harrison, Herman Canaday, William Mapels, Isaac Foster and Ezekiel Rubottom. Howerton, of whom little is known, settled in section 21, where he made a number of improvements. He sold his land and moved to Walnut Prairie about the year 1837. C. Harrison entered land in section 2, and Henry Harrison in section 10, neither of whom has ever been a resident of this township. Herman Canaday came to this State from Tennessee in company with a number of other families, and improved a farm near the central part of the township in section 15. He was a man of considerable education and pure morals, and bore a commendable part in developing the resources of the country. His death occurred in the year 1850. In striking contrast to Canaday was William Mapels, who came to this township about the same time and settled in the same locality. This man bore an unenviable reputation in the community, and was known throughout the country as a desperate character, whose greatest delight was a brawl or drunken knock-down. He associated with a set of black-legs, and desperados as villainous as himself, and many acts of lawlessness and crime committed in various parts of the country were traced to his door. He became the possessor of eighty acres of land near the central part of the township, which he sold to John S. Hix two years later, and left the country accompanied by the wife of another man, since time which nothing has been heard of him. Israel Foster settled in the southwestern part of the township on section 30. He joined the tide of emigration which came to Southern Illinois in 1837, and found his way into this part of the country one year later, and being a man of more than usual energy he soon had a goodly number of acres under cultivation. At the fist election held in the precinct he was chosen justice of the peace, a position he filled creditably for a number of years. Among the early pioneers deserving special mention were Aaron Mills, Richard Imes and John Smith, all of whom came in the year 1839. The first named was a brother-in-law of Herman Canaday, at whose earnest solicitation he was induced to come West. He came from Tennessee and entered a tract of land in section 15, which is at present [in 1883] in possession of his descendants. Imes located in section 30, and was for a number of years prominently identified with the early history of the township. he subsequently moved to Iowa, where he died a number of years ago [from 1883] from the effects of poison accidentally taken. Smith selected his home in the northeast corner of the township, where he located for the two-fold purpose of farming and engaging in the tannery business. the tan yard which he operated was one of the first in the county, and retuned him a handsome revenue during the time he worked it. he acquired a considerable amount of real estate during his life in this county, which is at present [in 1883] owned by his descendants, several of whom reside in the township. his death occurred thirty years ago [about 1853]. About the same time the foregoing settlers came to the country, Nathaniel Blakeman made his appearance and entered a farm in section 29, where he still [in 1883] lives, the oldest living settler in Orange. He came here from Ohio, and for forty three years has been a prominent resident of the township, which he has seen changed from a wilderness to its present [in 1883] high state of improvement and civilization. The other settlers who came prior to 1840 were Mahlon Malone, John Beauchamp and George Bennett. [omitted text] ...

. . .

pg 434: Prominent in the list of pioneers who selected homes in Orange, was Andrew Hardway, father of William Hardway, who moved his family to this township in the spring of 1840. He came from Ohio, but was originally from Virginia, which State he left in his early manhood. The farm on which he improved and on which he lived until the time of his death, twelve years ago [in 1871], is situated near the northern boundary in section 4. Willam Hardway, son of the preceding, can be called an early settler, as he was but eighteen years of age when his father settled in Orange, and has lived since that time within the township limits. [omitted text] ...

. . .

pg. 435: John S. Hix and Alfred Prindle made settlements in the year 1840; also the former where Mapel had lived, and the latter in the northern part of the township in section 7. Prindle was supposed to be connected to the notorious Birch gang, as a number of them had made his house a stopping place while in the neighborhood. . . . [omitted text] ...

The other settlers who came in 1840, as far as known, were Elias Wilson, Georg Holt, Peter Shwalter, Jacob Allen, Basil Wells, John Bostwick, Elijah King, and John Elliot, all of whom made entries in different parts of the township, but the limits of our space forbids a more extended notice. [omitted text] ...

. . .

pg 436: The first person born within the present limits of Orange was Francis Hardway, son of Andrew and Margaret Hardway, whose birth occurred in the year 1840. In the winter of 1842 two brothers, Charles and Maxwell Auld, while crossing Big Prairie one night got lost and were frozen to death. These were the first deaths as far as known that occurred in the township.

The first marriage ceremony was solemnized in the year 1840 by Squire Nathan Wells, the contracting parties being John S. Hix and Olive Blakeman. . . . [omitted text] ...

** To be continued.**



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