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Clay County
Illinois

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Louisville
CLAY COUNTY ALMSHOUSEŚ SEPTEMBER 26, 1911.
HIRAM HAYES, Superintendent, Louisville.
The Clay county almshouse is a two-story frame building, situated one and one-half, miles from Louisville. The present keeper receives $1.50 a week for each inmate, and the rent of the farm. He furnishes board, medical aid, clothing and care of sick. At the time of inspection, there were eight inmates, one feeble-minded woman, three blind men, a feeble-minded man, a normal girl of twelve, a deaf and dumb boy, and a consumptive boy. All were comfortably clad. The house is substantially built and in a fair condition of repair. There is no plumbing, no fire protection, no bath tub. The house is heated by stoves and lighted with coal oil lamps. The county furnishes the house; more rockers and a few tables would render the place more homelike. Paint and paper are badly smoked from the stoves. The rooms are kept thoroughly clean and free from vermin. The inmates say that they have plenty to eat and are well treated by the keeper and his wife, who apparently consider the welfare of all their charges.
[Source: SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE State Charities Commission, By Illinois State Charities Commission, December 31, 1911]




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