MORE MEMORIES OF
CUMBERLAND COUNTY


Legend says Abraham Lincoln Slept In The Old Greenup Hotel
By Alfrieda Kingery Jewett Correspondent


GREENUP — The old Greenup Hotel which has served the community continuously since 1815 and where Abraham Lincoln may have slept has closed its doors and is up for sale.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Winnett, owners, closed the hotel permanently on Dec. 1, 1969, and hope they can find someone who will buy it and retain it in its present historical form, redolent of a bygone era.
The building, full of legend and lore, played an important part in Cumberland county history. There is some evidence that the Lincoln and Hall families stopped several times at the hotel.
According to one legend, Abraham Lincoln helped wall up the well in native stone. The well remains in front of the hotel and is filled with water, but is covered over and not in use.
Furnishings of the hotel are almost wholly antique, but are not the highly redone pieces that are often seen in restoried buildings and houses. Most retain their original finish.
The hotel lobby today looks much the same as it probably did in the early days of its existence.
During the years, the hotel has gone under three different names. The first owners with the Barbours and the hotel was known as the Barbour Inn. The Conzit family then acquired the property and named it Conzit House.
When the building was bought by the Sheplor family, then changed the name to Greenup hotel.
Mr. and Mrs, Winnett purchased the hotel in 1944 from the Sheplor family heirs, and at the time it was closed there were a number of permanent guests, some of whom had resided there for several years. They had to find new places to stay.
As they closed the hotel and announced that it is for sale, the Winnetts said they hoped that someone who lived history would buy it and preserve a place that has played a big role from the days of the Old Cumberland Trail into the days of super-modern Interstate 70.

 

THE LINCOLN WAY
(Excerpts)


Thomas Lincoln, when immigrating to Illinois, came by way of Westport, opposite Vincennes, crossed there, and that they came from Westport to Greenup and crossed the Embarras River at the old ford near where the Old Water Mill was located in 1832.

This is the way I have traced it, and are my conclusions.

Affiant states that her father was married in Natches under the Hill, now Greenup, Illinois. Affiant's father was A. K. Bosworth, who immigrated from Washington, D. C, to Illinois when a hoy yet under age. Affiant further states that U. F. Linder, who was the first Attorney General of Illinois, accompanied many times with Abraham Lincoln, made this circuit, Greenup being the first county seat of Cumberland County, and that they held Court in an old log cabin consisting of one large room, and that U. F. Linder would stay all night at Mr. A. K. Bosworth's, who was County Clerk at that time, and Abraham Lincoln would stay at Dr. James Ewart's.

Most of this information was heard from old Dr. Ewart's wife, Charlotte Ewart, and also others who accompanied Abraham Lincoln on the Greenup circuit at different times, viz.. Judge Schofield, Judge Constable, Judge Harlan. This all happened several years before the Lincoln and Douglas debates. Affiant further states that her daughter, who is now living, has a coverlet or bed spread, which was used on the bed in which Abraham Lincoln slept when stopping at Greenup, and that this coverlet was given her by her mother-in-law, Charlotte Ewart, for a wedding present, and later that affiant gave this coverlet to her daughter, Mrs. S. L. Levering, who now resides at Terre Haute, Indiana, and who, at this time, has same in her possession, and up to the present time refuses to loan it.

Affiant further states that as she traces the immigration of Abraham Lincoln, there was no other road leading through Greenup, at the time the Lincolns immigrated but the Old Palestine Road, and that the Old Mill Road ford crossing was the main wagon way leading north out of Greenup for several years thereafter, and that this ford was located a little east of the present Toledo-Greenup bridge. Laura O. Ewart. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 29th day of April, A. D. 1929

Fred Wylde, Notary Public.

                                                                                                                                       Affidavit of William Chester Jones

State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss.

William Chester Jones, being duly sworn, upon oath says that he was born on the 22nd day of August, A. D. 1847, on a farm about six miles north of Greenup, Cumberland County, Illinois, and was a Civil War veteran from November, 1862, and served two years and three months. Affiant further says that his father, William Jones, was a pioneer settler in said County, and immigrated from Kentucky while yet a single man and was also one of the first surveyors of Cumberland

Affiant further says that he has often heard his father say, when in conversation with old people during his lifetime, that when Lincolns immigrated to Illinois they came by the Palestine trail and camped a day or two by a log cabin that stood near where the Town Hall of Greenup now stands. Affiant further says that he has heard his father say that he worked on a bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup with Thomas Lincoln and Dennis Hanks. William Chester Jones.

Witnesses: E. J. Bancroft, Arthur Jobe. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of April, A. D. 1929.
John L. Carr, Notary Public.

T.B. SHOAFF


The Shelby County Leader, a newspaper published at Shelbyville Illinois, that he is a grandson of Dennis Hanks the cousin of Abraham Lincoln's mother, that affiant is of sound and clear mind and light step and is now 82 years of age.

Affiant states that he has for years past been in possession of many of the acts, doings, travels, customs and incidents of historical value, of the Abraham Lincoln family and the members of the original immigration party which were with the family of Abraham Lincoln when they emigrated from Indiana to Illinois; that many of the original emigration party were relative of affiant and that he is well versed and informed as to the statements in this affidavit.

Affiant says that John Bank, helped Abraham Lincoln build a log cabin in Macon County Illinois, in 1830, for Abraham Lincoln's father, and that a tiny old-fashioned photograph described as a picture of the cabin Lincoln helped his father buald is new in his possession. The picture of John Hanks and Dennis Hanks is shown in this pamphlet.

Affiant further states Harriet Chapman, daughter of Dennis Hanks, Is his aunt, and that affiant was present in the year 1913, when Aunt Harriet Chapman made an affidavit as to the Lincoln Way through Illinois in the year 1830, and that one copy was presented to C. M. Thompson, and one was retained by affiant and is still in his possession.

Affiant further says that he has information from Dennis Hanks that he, along with Thomas Lincoln, and Abraham Lincoln, worked on the National Road bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup, Illinois, in the year 1832, which is also stated in Aunt Harriet Chapman's affidavit made in the year 1913.

Affiant also has information from his relatives who were in the Lincoln immigrating party that they crossed the Wabash river opposite Vincennes to the point called Westport, thence came north and west over the old Palestine, Springfield wagon way, which led in a northwest direction from out of Hutsonville, Illinois, to Greenup, Illinois, at which place fliiy forded the Embarrass River, and then traveled in a northwest direction up to Paradise and on to Macon county, in which county Thomas Lincoln put out a crop with the aid of his son. Abraham, in the year 1830.

Affiant further states that the following year they started hack to their old home in Indiana, and upon reaching Paradise settlement in Cole’s county, that he, Thomas Lincoln, was persuaded to locate there, which he did, and in which neighborhood he remained the balance of this life and was buried in the Gordon cemetery, which is now called Shiloh cemetery, located about 12 miles north of Greenup, Illinois, west of the Embarrass river.

Affiant further states that the old water mill which was erected at Greenup in 1832,. was patronized regularly by Thomas Lincoln, this mill being located at the Palestine road ford at Greenup. Illinois, and—

Affiant further states that it is evident from the conversations he has had with his relatives which made up the immigration party, that there is no doubt in his mind, hut that they crossed the Embarrass river at the Greenup ford, and not at McCannes ford, as presumed by some.

lt affiant, herehy state that I have presented to the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Association, Inc. picture cuts of my relatives, namely, to-wit: Dennis Hunks. Janus Shoaff,  Sarah Bush Lincoln. First Home of Thomas "Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, Tomb at Springfield. John Hall Log Cabin, John Hanks, which affiant states are genuine, and are loaned for the purpose of permitting them to be printed in the Lincoln Way for information for all to whom it may concern, that present and future generations may have the benefit of this information, with a view of establishing the true route traveled by the Lincoln party when emigrating: from Indiana to Illinois an the year 1830. Thos. B. Shoaff.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 29th day of August, A. D. 1929                               
 E. A. Johnston, County Clerk

Shoaff Swears his Story Is True


Thomas B. Shoaff of Shelbyville told, The Herald Tuesday that it was willing to make an affidavit that the Lincoln cabin from the Harristown bottoms was exhibited on Boston Common in 1865.

"I'll swear to it,*' Mr, Shoaff's answer to the statement of the Massachusetts Historical society .published in the Continental edition of The Herald.

Requesting the truth about the story. The Herald wrote to the Society and had this reply from the librarian. Julius T. Tuttle;

"I am sorry to say that I am unable to find any reference to the exhibit on Boston common of Lincoln's cabin in the "60's or any other time. An important event of that kind, if it happened, would have found its way into the record of this region."

In reply, Mr. Shoaff has invited The Herald to search the records of the Boston City council for the permit that his father, James Shoaff of Decatur secured for the exhibition of Lincoln's first home in Illinois.

"I was 18 years old in 1865," said Mr. Shoaff, "and was publishing my first newspaper,  "The Boy About Town" the year before. I remember the incident clearly. Father had the logs numbered and shipped to Boston. Later I expressed walnut rails, taken from the cabin sight to Boston, and the express charge was $14. These rails were fashioned into souvenirs and sold. Dennis Hanks, my mother's father and John Hanks went along with father."

"Grandfather Dennis Hanks has told me many times how people wept on seeing the cabin. It was soon after Lincoln's assassination, either June,  July or August, For several months father was with the cabin.

"The cabin was later shipped to Chicago and there exhibited. It passed out of father's hands and was supposed to have been shipped to England and lost in the passage of course, the story that the cabin was exhibited in the centennial exhibition in Philadelphia is a fake."

Mr. Shoaff has a picture of the cabin with Dennis and John Hanks standing in front of the cabin, and on the back the certification that it is a true picture.

Mr. Shoaff says while attending Memorial service at the Shiloh cemetery in Coles County, on Decoration day. where Thomas Lincoln, father of Abraham Lincoln, and his stepmother, Sarah Bush Johnston are buried, he met Mrs. Eleanor Gridley, 5844 Harper Avenue, Chicago, who delivered an address, "Lincoln from the Cradle to the Grave," who says she paid $25 for the same picture which bore the date, 1861. Mr. Shoaff told her that she had been imposed upon since the picture was not taken until four years later, and that fraud is being practiced by changing the date, 1865 to 1861. and claiming that it was shown on the Boston Common in that year.

"I Thomas Benton Shoaff, being; duly sworn depose and say that the foregoing interview in part, published in the Decatur Herald July 10, 1929, is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Thomas Benton Shoaff, Shelbyville. III., July 15, 1929.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of July, A, D, 1929 E. A, Johnston, County Clerk, Shelby County, Ill., -Decatur Herald.

Find Permit to Exhibit Lincoln Cabin on Boston Common


Direct proof, says the Decatur Herald, that Thomas B. Shoaff, Shelbyville editor was correct in asserting that the original; Macon County cabin of Abraham Lincoln was exhibited on "Boston Common, Boston, Mass. in 1865 was received Monday by The Herald.

The proof came from William Alcot librarian of Boston Globe, who searched the official record of the meetings of the Boston Board of Aldermen for the year 1865 and found that license to exhibit the cabin was granted to John. Hanks on the 10th day of July. 1865, Enclosed is a copy of the record, proof of the revelations that Mr. Shoaff is. right in asserting that the cabin was exhibited on the Commons in 1865, and reads, as follows:

"At a meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, held at Mechanics' Hall on. Monday, the tenth day of July, Anno Domini, 1865"—

"Agreeable to the reports of the Committee on Licenses and Common, leave was granted to John Hanks to exhibit President Lincoln's original log cabin on Boston Common"

Lincoln Family Moves to Illinois


In the spring of 1830, when Abraham Lincoln was 21 years of age, the Lincoln and Hanks families removed from Spencer county, Ind. to Macon county, Illinois. After a short time, the families of Thomas Lincoln and Dennis Hanks moved to Coles county, Illinois. Their route from Indiana to Illinois is set forth by Harriett Chapman, she having made an affidavit in the year 1913, and T. B. Shoaff of Shelbyville, her nephew, was present at the time. One copy of the affidavit was retained by Mr. T. B. Shoaff and one was given to. C. M. Thompson of the University of Illinois. It waa in this affidavit that Mrs. Chapman declares that they crossed at Vincennes to a town called Westport and on through Palestine, III. She stated she remembered Palestine on account of its having a Bible name. Then she said they crossed the Embarrass river at Greenup, III., and the reason she remembered it was Greenup was that later Thomas Lincoln and Dennis Hanks worked on a bridge at Greenup in the year 1832. Mrs. Chapman was the aunt of T. B. Shoaff, who has in his possession the sworn interview.

"In 1856" Judge Henry C. Whitney writes, "Lincoln and I walked to the open space in from of the old court house in Decatur, and Lincoln said; 'Here on this spot. 26 years ago, I made my first halt in Illinois; here I stood, and there our wagon stood, with all that we owned in the world. ' "

The first home of the Lincolns in Illinois was a rude log cabin, which Lincoln and John Hanks, a farmer at that time living four miles northwest of Decatur, built on the Sangamon river eight miles west of Decatur. During the civil war, John Hanks served as wagon-master in Col. Richard J. Oglesby's 8th Ill. Regiment.

Little did the horny-handed young Lincoln dream in 1830 that 30 years later a state convention, assembled at Decatur, was to set on foot a movement that would carry him to the White House. And little did the town folk of Decatur dream that this ungainly young rustic, in coonskin cap and bespattered jeans goading his "four yoke of gaunt oxen," would one day become an illustrious President of the United States. It was the Republican State Convention, field in Decatur in the spring of 1860, that pledged its delegates to the National Convention two weeks later at Chicago to vote for "Lincoln for President" and defeating Salman P. Chase and William H. Seward, who were candidates for the nomination. Later, President Lincoln appointed Chase Secretary of the Treasury, and Seward Secretary of State.

The nomination of Lincoln added a colorful paragraph to the school histories of our land by injecting the famous "rail splitter" episode into the campaign.

Memento of Abraham Lincoln


Among the relics and mementos of Abraham Lincoln is a Measuring Rule, made of wood taken from the Bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup, III., built in 1832, and upon which Abraham Lincoin And Thomas Lincoln, his father, labored. This rule is among the mementos assembled and on exhibition at the Lincoln Tomb, in Springfield,Ill. Upon the rule are the following words: "Memento of Abraham Lincoln, This wood is from the bridge over the Embarrass River at Greenup Ill., built in 1832, and upon which Abraham Lincoln labored. Presented by Mark Sperry, Greenup, Illinois, March 12, 1881,"

Affidavit of Lucinda Chaney


State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss. Lucinda Chaney, being duly sworn, deposes and says that she is now and has been for a period of about twenty years past, a resident of the village of Greenup, in said county and state.

That she was born near the present site of Yale, in Jasper County, Illinois,, that she has forgotten the year of her birth, and that all private and public records of her birth have been lost or destroyed. That she has resided in Coles and Cumberland Counties, Illinois, most of her life, having lived in the State of Wisconsin and in northern Illinois a few years only; that her father's name was Joseph Coboon, and her mother's maiden name was Rebecca Graham; that her father was a Dutchman and her mother was half Indian. Affiant further states that her youngest daughter, Mrs. Sarah Strickland,  now living in Shamrock, Oklahoma, is 61 years old. And that affiant is informed and believes that she (affiant) was 43 years old when her said youngest daughter was bom.

Affiant further states that her father's family, including affiant, lived in Goosenest or Gordon's neighborhood, in Coles County, Illinois, when the Thomas Lincoln family first came to this state, and that her father, Joseph Cohoon, (affiant being present) first saw them when they (the Lincolns) were on their way from Indiana to Illinois, when they (the Lincolns} were camping for the night at a point now known as the Tippett farm located about 2 1/2 miles east of where the town of Bradbury now stands; that she remembers she had accompanied her father, (Joseph Cohoon) on a trip from where they then lived in the Goose nest or Gordon neighborhood in Coles (then Clark) County, Illinois, down into the southern part of Cumberland (also then Clark) County, to get a load of corn, and on the way back traveled along the trail or wagon way leading north out of Greenup (then Natches under the Hill), which was the only trail or wagon way leading north out of Greenup at that limei that on their way home they came upon a company of campers at or near the Tippett farm, as above indicated, who were in the act of preparing their evening meal (it being after sundown), and that she remembers they were baking: potatoes, and frying venison; that the father of affiant, Joseph Cahoon, wishing to know who the campers were, left his wagon loaded with corn and went over to interview them; that he found it was Thomas Lincoln, his wife and family that Thomas Lincoln said to her father that they had come from the south, with the intention of settling in Illinois  that they had two yoke of oxen, and that affiant's father said them a bushel of corn, receiving twenty cents for the same; and that affiant and her father drove on home that night that the next day, as affiant remembers, the Lincolns drove into the Goosenest or Gordon neighborhood, near where affiant's family lived, and stopped at the home of one of the Gordons.

Affiant further states that she is informed arid believes that the Lincoln family went on in a northwesterly direction from the neighborhood in which she first met them as above indicated, and finally located in Macon County, Illinois; that about three or four years thereafter affiantr her father^ Joseph Cohoun, and one of the Gordons again met in the neighborhood of where Lerna it now located and engaged in conversation while sitting on a pile of rails in Mr. Gordon's woods near where affiant's: family lived, Thomas. Lincoln and family having in the meantime located in that neighborhood; that the conversation turned to the question of a suitable site upon which a log or pole cabin might be built, that affiant's father and Mr. Gordon, helped Thomas Lincoln to select this site, which was a forty acre tract located near where Lerna now is; that the next day after the selection was made, affiant's father, Thomas Lincoln and Mr. Gordon went to the land office at Palestine, III, to obtain the necessary entry papers for this forty acres of land, and that in going to Palestine they went south over the same trail they (the Lincolns) had traveled when first coming to Illinois, some three or four years previous, so affiant's father told her many times, again crossing the Embarrass River at Greenup, and over the old Palestine road or trail, in a southeasterly direction from Greenup; that as affiant is informed and believes there were no other Wagon ways or trails leading out of Greenup to the south except this one; that there was then no National Road, it at that time being only a blazed trail; that in returning from the Palestine land office, where the entry of the above mentioned forty acres of land was effected, they came back the same way that shortly thereafter Thomas Lincoln engaged neighbors to help cut poles and build the cabin on the said forty acres of land so entered from the Government', that at the time Thomas Lincoln located on this homestead he had two yokes of oxen, and that affiant's father bought from him one yoke of oxen, paying him $45.00 for them. That shortly after their arrival, affiant, her father Joseph Cohoon and a Mr. Gordon engaged in conversation with the Lincolns; that during the conversation, Thomas Lincoln asked Joseph Cohoon father of affiant, if he would like a six weeks' job of splitting rails at 50 cents per 100, that affiant remembers, of her father relating this incident many times,

Affiant further states that shortly after Thomas Lincoln and family occupied their new homestead that on one occasion Abraham Lincoln visited with them and brought with him a team of mules as a gift to his parents; that when the mules were delivered his father said, "lord, Lord, son, they are all ears" and that Abe said to his father, "Yes, but they will pull" Affiant remembers that it was afterwards told her by her father that the mules were bought in the neighborhood of where Neoga now stands.

Affiant further states that she worked for the wife of Thomas Lincoln at various times after they had settled in Coles County, doing: such work as was common to that day, such as feeding chickens. tending garden, and other chores, receiving fifty cents a week for her services; that she became acquainted with Abe Lincoln when he was on one of his visits to his father's home, that she remembers that on one occasion she cried to go home, and that Abe led her out to where his father was cutting wood, and that her father took her home. Affiant further states that she knew of no bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup at that time, but that there was a ford, afterwards a ferry, and later a wooden bridge, and that this point was near where the Toledo-Greenup bridge is now located, and that at this point the Palestine Road made contact with the river. Affiant further states that she has heard both her father and Thomas Lincoln s&y that in coming to Illinois to locate, water came into the wagon bed while fording the river at Greenup: Witness: James Patter. Lucinda  Chaney.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 20th day of May, A, D. 1920. Fred Wylde, Notary Public

Affidavit of Wm., Glenn


State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss.

Wm. Glenn, being duly sworn upon his oath deposes and says that He is seventy-seven (77) years old, and that he has spent alt his life near Greenup, Cumberland County, Illinois, and that the "Glenn Settlement"' mentioned on page 150 in the History of Cumberland County, Illinois, was named after his family, and that the Palestine Road running southeast from Greenup to Palestine, Illinois, passed near their old homestead and was used by the early settlers in going to the Government Land office, located at Palestine, Ill.

That he is personally acquainted with the old trail (Palestine Road), and that he can follow the old trail from. Greenup to as far as Bellair, Crawford County Illinois, and that near Greenup there are two strips of the old road stilt in use, the balance of the road being changed so as to run on the section lines. Wm. Glenn.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 8th day of April, A. D, 1929. Fred Wylde, Notary Public.

Affidavit of Laura O. Ewart

 

Greenup, Illinois, April 29, 1929


Laura O Ewart, being duly sworn upon her oath deposes and says that she was bom in May, 1842, in a log cabin on the Havens farm, adjacent to Greenup, Illinois, and has heard a Mr. Fisher say that Thomas Lincoln, when immigrating to Illinois, came by way of Westport, opposite Vincennes, crossed there, and that they came from Westport to Greenup and crossed the Embarras River at the old ford near where the Old Water Mill was located in 1832.

This is the way I have traced it, and are my conclusions.

Affiant states that her father was married in Natches under the Hill, now Greenup,. Illinois. Affiant's father was A. K, Bosworth, who immigrated from Washington, D. C, to Illinois when a boy yet under age. Affiant further states that U. F. Linder, who was the first Attorney General of Illinois, accompanied many times with Abraham Lincoln, made this circuit, Greenup being the first county seat of Cumberland County, and that they held Court in an old log cabin consisting of one large room, and that U. F. Linger would stay all night at Mr. A, K. Bosworth^s, who was County Clerk at that time, and Abraham Lincoln would stay at Dr. James Ewart's.

Most of this information was heard from old Dr. Ewart's wife, Charlotte Ewart, and also others who accompanied Abraham Lincoln on the Greenup circuit at different times, viz,; Judge Schofield, Judge Constable, Judge Harlan. This all happened several years before the Lincoln and Douglas debate-.Affiant further states that her daughter, who is now living, has a coverlet or bed spread, which was used on the bed in which Abraham Lincoln slept when stopping at Greenup, and that this coverlet was given her by her mother-in-law, Charlotte Ewart, for a wedding present, and later that affiant gave this, coverlet to her daughter, Mrs. S. L. Levering, who now resides at Terre Haute, Indiana, and who, at this time, has same in her possession, and up to the present time refuse to loan it.

Affiant further skates that as she traces the immigration of Abraham Lincoln, there was no other road leading through Greenup, at the time the Lincolns immigrated but the Old Palestine Road, and that the Old Mill Road ford crossing was the main wagon way leading north out of Greenup for several years thereafter, and that this ford was located a little east of the present Toledo-Greenup bridge. Laura O. Ewart.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2ftth dav of April, A, D Fred Wylde, Notary Public.

Affidavit of William Chester Jones

State of Illinois., Cumberland County—ss.


William Chester Jones, being duly sworn, upon oath says that he was born on the 22nd day of August, A. D. 1847, on a farm about six miles north of Greenup, Cumberland County, Illinois, and was a Civil War veteran from November, 1862, and served two years and three months. Affiant further says that his father, William Jones, was a pioneer settler in said County, and immigrated from Kentucky while yet a single man and was also one of the first surveyors of Cumberland County.

Affiant further says that he has often heard his father say, when in conversation with old people during his lifetime, that when Lincolns immigrated to Illinois they came by the Palestine trail and camped a day or two by a log cabin that stood near where the Town Hall of Greenup now stands. Affiant further says that he has heard his father say that he worked on a bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup with Thomas Lincoln and Dennis Hanks. William Chester Jones.

Witnesses: E. J. Bancroft, Arthur Jobe. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of April, A. D. 1929. John L. Carr, Notary Public.

Affidavit of Charles E. Hicks


Greenup, Illinois, April 25, 1929.
State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss.

Charles E. Hicks, being duly sworn upon his oath, deposes and says that his age is fifty-seven years past, and that he is now living at Greenup, Illinois, and further states, that he heard his father say about twenty years ago, that while affiant's father, Ellis Hicks, was on his way to Charleston from Jasper County, he entered Greenup on the old Palestine Trail, and that he was on horse back, and that when he reached the Embarras River ford, located near the Old Water Mill, he found the river had risen; when he started to cross, some one called to him to wait until they were across, and the said Ellis Hicks found the party to be the following persons: John R. Eden, Abraham Lincoln, Judge Schofield and O. B. Ficklin, all on horseback and that they all proceeded together to Charleston, Illinois. This was in the early fifties. Affiant further states that the above four persons had been to Vincennes and that they returned over the Palestine Trail to Greenup ford, thence north to Charleston on the west side of the river; and affiant further states that he heard, many a time, his father call the Palestine Road the Lincoln Trail-   Ellis Hicks died October 17, 1912, born March 2, 1832. Charles E. Hicks.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of April, 1929. Nett Hibben, Notary Public.

Affidavit of Fred Wylde

State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss.


Fred Wylde, being duly sworn upon his oath deposes and says that he is 43 years of age, and that he is the son of Wm. Wylde, now deceased. That his father began to make his permanent residence in Greenup in the year A. D. 1866, prior to that time he was in the business of farming, and buying and selling cattle at Toledo, Illinois, and was well acquainted in Greenup and vicinity several years prior to 1866. Affiant states that his father has related to him at various times his experiences of the early days in this vicinity, some of them pertaining to buying cattle in Crawford county, Illinois, and drivinjr them over the Palestine road to Greenup, crossing the river at that point and taking them on to Toledo. Illinois. The Palestine Road was a wagon trail, that according to legal descriptions of real estate in Cumberland County, originated at the Embarras River and ran in a southeasterly direction to the Village ol Palestine, Illinois, where a Government Land office was operated. This road was just a trail across the country, laid out without regard to section lines, and was used first by the early settlers doing to Palestine. Illinois, to see about entering real estate from the Government The affiant is now the part owner of two tracts of land, across which the Palestine road once ran. bwt which was later Abandoned so that the roads could he plated on section lines, one of the tracts of land being located about two miles southeast of Greenup, and the other is where the said road traveled the Embarras river at Greenup, Illinois, at a point about 400 feet north of the present Toledo-Greenup bridge, and on each of these tracts of land as the old scars that the road left when abandoned. The affiant further states that his father, after his arrival in Greenup, took up the profession of real estate surveyor and spent year* at this kind of work during the early development of Cumberland County, and was in a position to well know all the above facts. Fred Wylde,

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 8th day of April, A. D. 1929 M. S, Coleman, Notary Public.

Statement of James L. Ryan

(Historian of the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Assn.. Inc.) I was born Nov. 2, 1848. in the northern part of Cumberland county, one and one-half miles above the Sconce Bend. My father, Milton G. Ryan, owned the farm lying on the Embarrass river, on which I was born and grew to manhood. On reaching maturity I taught school in the neighborhood and thus earned money to attend law school at the University of Michigan in 1870-1871. I returned to my native county and continued my law studies at Toledo, then Prairie City, the county seat, I taught school at Diona in the winter of 1872-1873, and located in Greenup as s lawyer May 1, 1873, where I resided during: my public life. I utilized the opportunities 1 had on locating in Greenup by conversing with many of the old citizens who possessed many of the traditions and facts about the Thomas Lincoln itinerary through the county, and the visits of his distinguished son. Abraham Lincoln, as a lawyer, to Greenup, after it had become the county seat of the then new county of Cumberland. At an early term of the circuit court held by Judge Wilson, the well-known case of Sig Luster was brought to the court at Greenup, on change of venue from Coles County. It was a case charging an assault to murder with a knife. Abraham Lincoln and O. B. Ficklin were Luster's attorneys, and Alvin Kitchel, district Attorney, prosecuted. My father, Milton Ryan, was one of the jurors who sat in this trial.

In 1858, when the Lincoln-Douglas debate were being held, one of these discussions was held in Charleston. I was in my tenth year. The notoriety given these men by these debates put our older citizens (who knew Lincoln) to talking. Since then, I often heard my farther speak of Lincoln. Describing his peculiar eloquence as he observed it in the Luster trial. He loved to talk about it. He was also well acquainted with Thomas Lincoln when he lived near old Farmington, in or near Goose Nest Prairie. I have often heard him state the traditions of how the Lincoln family came here in their bumble ox-cart and crossed the Embarras River near Greenup, arriving at Greenup over the old Palestine trail, and going thence north up through Cumberland {then Clark) county, to where Thomas Lincoln settled in Macon county, he afterwards locating in Coles county.

These traditions, as related by him, corresponded with those as related to me by the old settlers, several of whom were living when I located in Greenup. Soon after my location in Greenup,. A. K. Bosworth, who was one of the early county clerks of Cumberland county, came to my office and presented me with a large copper key, weighing about one-hall pound, to use as a paper weight. He said it was kit in his hands shortly after the removal of the county seat to Prairie City (now Toledo) in the year 1856, that it was the first jail key to the county B and turned on Sig Lustre, Lincoln's client. It is a key to a huge padlock, which was as big in outline as a horseshoe, and locked a log jail. He (Bosworth) then launched forth in minute accounts of Lincoln and the men who attended court there. He stated, among other things, that at the adjournment of court, after the Sig Luster trial, the Court and bar went to the Embarrass River, on the National Road (then a trail), and all took a swim in the river, like a gang of boys.

The old abutments to the first bridge across the Embarrass river were made of soft stone, and at the close of the swimming spree, above mentioned, several of these distinguished men, by means of a knife, nail, or some other hard substance, scratched their names on a column of one of these abutments, U. F. Linder was the first, William Wilson {the judge) was the second, A. Lincoln the third, A. Kitchell the fourth,. S. A. Douglas the fifth, R. J. Oglesby the sixth, O. B. Ficklin the seventh, and the 8th and 9th I have forgotten- I told Bosworth it must be a forgery, and he replied: "If a forgery it surely was ingenuous. Examine it when you are there." I did examine it. The style of signatures, which I had previously studied, were accurate. 1 was called to write a historic sketch of the county to road at the Centennial Fourth of July celebration at Greenup, and I related the facts about this stone in the paper which I read at the celebration. It caused several to go there and see. The hole was there but the stone was gone. Later, three boys, viz; Jont Bright, John Hazelwood and Frank Robinson, related that while there swimming on one occasion a stranger came with a buggy and crowbar, pried it cut and took it away, saying that he was going to send it to a memorial hall in Philadelphia. In the paper referred to, I wrote facts and names of jurors in the Luster case having obtained the day from an inspection of the records of the trial, which records were destroyed by fire when the court house at Toledo burned in the year 1885, This record confirmed the statements which I heard my father make.

I was a member of the 31st General Assembly of Illinois, and had a seat by the side of Hon. O. B, Ficklin. This session was held in the year 1879. At this session Ficklin was 72 years of age, and loved to speak of Douglas, Lincoln, Linder, John Logans father of John A. Logan,, and other men who rose to eminence, and who were members of the General Assembly from 1830 to 1840, Ficklin himself having been a member of the 11th General Assembly in 1838-1840, Lincoln having also been a member during that session. Many conversations did I have with Mr, Ficklin in about his memories of Lincoln, and those rehearsals corroborated many things stated in the affidavits of Mrs. Laura. Ewart, H. C. Freeland, W. K. Gilbert, J. S. Rue, and William Glenn to as the old Palestine Trail Leading to Greenup, and thence in a northwesterly direction and that it was commonly referred to as the Lincoln Trail.

It will be remembered that Ficklin was first elected to the General Assembly from Wabash County in 1834, and that he was in a position to gain much of his knowledge concerning Lincoln at first hand. He (Ficklin) was a man of great memory and greedy for knowledge about men of note, and never wearied in asking questions about them. He never forget, and when such folks were mentioned he could tell all about them. He knew the men he had sat in the Legislature and in Congress, with, and the lawyers he had met in courts. I never met a man who knew so much about the public men of his day off did O. B. Ficklin.

My father made at least two trips to Palestine to enter land and be traveled ever this old Palestine Trail, because he said there was no other road, and it was poor enough. He had the traditions, as did Ficklin and the above-named affiants, all of whom are credible men and woman,and highly worthy of belief.

In October, 1865, (as I now remember) my brother, Wm L. Ryan, John N. Gill, a cousin, and myself, rode horseback to visit some relatives who resided in and near Palestine—the Steels, Kitchells, J. C Allen and Thomas Gill. Judge J. C. Allen then resided in Palestine, as did all the others except Mr. Gill. Our trip down there from Cumberland county was along what was known as the Palestine Trail, from Greenup, through Bellair, and Hutsonville. The greater part of the road at that time was through woods, over and along uncultivated lands, across unbridged creeks, and from many indications showed considerable age, thus forcing the conclusion and making it easy to belivve that it was the old Palestine Trail over which the Lincoln traveled in coming to this state. I am now a resident of Charleston, Ill., having resided in Greenup until Oct. 1, 1927. I practiced law until 1891, when I became a minister. Now retired. This statement is made this 6th day of April, 1929. James L. Ryan.

Affidavit of John S, Beals

State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss.


John S. Beals, being duly sworn, upon oath states, that he is 63 years of age, and a resident of Toledo, in said County and State; that affiant's father* Levi F, Beals died about Nov. 1, aged 80 years, having been born in the yeas 1817; that affiant heard bis father say many times that in conversations he (his father) had had with Thomas Lincoln and A. Lincoln, father and son, they stated that in coining to Illinois in the year 1830 they (the Lincoln family) traveled what was then known as the Palestine Trail from a point opposite Vincennes, Ind., to Greenup, Ill, and that there they crossed the Embarrass River and came north or northwesterly up through Cumberland County to Coles County, in the neighborhood off where Trilla now is, they having considered settling in that neighborhood but that they finally went on north and settled in Macon county; that affiant's father and family were residents of the Trilla neighborhood about four years after the Lincolns first came to this state, and that when Thomas Lincoln and family came hack to Coles County from Macon County in the year 1832 they lived in the vicinity of affiant's father and family several years, John. S. Beals.

Subscribed and sworn to before we this 20th day of June, A. D. 1929. Chas. M Conner, Notary Public.

Affidavit of Flavins Tossey
State of Illinois, Cumberland County—ss

Flavius Tossey, being duly swore, deposes and says that he is 61 years of age, and has been a resident of said county since 1852; that about the year he was editor and publisher of the Cumberland Democrat, then published an Prairie City (now Toledo) in said county; that he remembers that in the year one Dennis Hanks, uncle of Abraham Lincoln, called at his (affiant's) office, accompanied by Miles Moore, by whom he said Dennis Hanks was introduced to affiant; that in the course of the conversation between affiant and the said Dennis Hanks on that occasion the said Dennis Hanks stated that he helped work on a wooden bridge across the Embarrass River at Greenup, along the National Road, about the year 1832, being the first bridge built across the river at that place. Affiant further states that he has been a practicing: attorney at law in the Village of Toledo ever since the year 1878.

Flavius Tossey
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2nd day of August, A. D., 1929. Chas. M, Connor, Notary Public

Resolution Passed and Approved by the Board of Supervisors of Cumberland County, lllinois

Whereas, according to the best information obtainable, in the year 1830 there were only three wagon ways in the territory now known as Cumberland County, namely: one wagon way leading north on the went side of the Embarrass River and then northwest to Johnstown, Ill., one from Greenup west to Woodbury, Ill., thence north to Johnstown, Ill, and the third from Greenup to the Palestine Government Land Office, which road ran in a south-eastly direction from Greenup, Ill., passing about one mile to the south of where Hazel Dell now stands and thence southeast to Quaker Lane, on through Hutsonville to Palestine, Ill., and

Whereas, according to the history of Cumberland County, all wagon ways at that time were nearly straight (as near at possible) wagon ways, or wagon trails from one point of interest to another, and as the first milt erected in what is now Cumberland county was installed at Johnstown, in the year 1828, owned by a John Tully, which mill was the only mill in this section at that time, until another mill was erected on the Embarrass River at Greenup, III., in 1832, which mill Thomas Lincoln regularly patronized, and

Whereas, when the Thomas Lincoln family and party were emigrating in the year 1830 from Indiana to Illinois, according to affidavits, camped one night along the old Palestine wagon way at a point near where Hazel Dell, Ill., now stands, and camped the following two nights along the old Palestine wagon way at a point which is now the Greenup, Ill. Public Square, and camped the following night along the wagon way which led north out of Greenup on the west side of the Embarrass River, at a point known as the Tippatt farm; and

Whereas, the affidavits of Harriett Chapman, Lucinda Chaney, Laura O. Ewart, Chester Jones, W. R. Gilbert, Rev. James L, Ryan, John D. Beals and others, all support the facts as set forth above;

Therefore, be it resolved by the Board of Supervisors of Cumberland County, that we approve, and adopt the route of the Thomas Lincoln family, which is sponsored by the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Association, Inc., as being the true route taken by the Thomas Lincoln family in the year 1830 when emigrating from Indiana to lllinois, namely, from Shiloh cemetery and the last home-stead of Thomas Lincoln, south, passing Toledo to the east two miles, to hard road route No, 131, thenee crossing the Embarrass River at or near the Toledo Greenup bridge, thence southeasterly, following the old Palestine wagon way, as near as practicable, passing through or near Hazel Dell, thence southeasterly toward Quaker Lane in Crawford County, this being the route approved through Cumberland County.

This 10th day of September, A. D. 1929.

W. F. Thompson, Chairman; Ed Connor, Allen Cutright, E. B. Cutts, R. R. Loveall. Wm. Fearday, John E. Sharp, Fred Wetherholt, Supervisors.

Extracts from History of Cumberland County, Published by F. A. Battey & Co.,  Chicago, 1884

In 1917 Congress appropriated money lor the construction of a National Highway from Cumberland,. Maryland, to Wheeling, Virginia,

Subsequent administrations, with less legal qualms. completed its construction through Columbus., Ohio, Indianapolis. Indiana, and Vandalia, Illinois, to St. Louis. This road was constructed through Cumberland county about and became a famous stage route. (See page 97.)

The road ( National Road) had been surveyed before this, but no work was performed on it here (Cumberland County.) until about this time. Wm. C Greenup had been connected with the engineer corps that laid out the road, and subsequently, in company with Joseph Barbour, took a eontract to construct the bridge, at or near the village which bears his name.

About the year 1833, George Henson and David Henson, with Jack Houtchins, cut out the National Road through this County {Cumberland) and settled in Woodbury. See page 113

Until about the year 1826 the natives were in full possession of the territory of Cumberland County. (-See page 111).

Indeed the squatter and hunter who constituted the advance line of the permanent settlement was here before, and from 1S20 to 183ft this region wai a common hunting ground for both the white and red man.

It is difficult at this, time to ascertain who first made the permanent settlement here. It is probable however, that John Tally was the original pioneer in the territory now embraced within the limits of Cumberland County. In the year he moved to the site of Johnstown, Ill in Cottonwood township, for the purpose of establishing a still and grist mill. He first  built a still house in the edge of the timbers, and in 1829 built a small log water mill See page 112.

Early in this year, ___ Hunt, with his two sons-in-law, Henry Lance and Purcel. settled in the vicinity of Tully, This family came from Indiana. A little later, in 1859, the families of Levi and David Beals were added to the settlement,

In the fall of 1829, a  settlement was formed en the Embarrass near Sconce Bend, James Gill, a native of Kentucky, and one of the occupants of old Fort La Mott, at Palestine, in Crawford County came here   See page 112.

Henson Bright was an early settler on the Embarrass River between the settlement at Sconce Bend and Greenup. He was a native of Kentucky and one of the families in the fort at Palestine: he came to Cumberland County about 1880. Henry Nees, a native of Tennessee, was another of the occupants of the fort, and came here about the same time.

In 1843 when Cumberland County was formed, there were about 2000 inhabitants. The early settlements were all made in some point of timber at Muddy Point. Sconce Bend, Nees Ford, Greenup, Woodbury and Bear Creek, thus encircling the central part of the county.   See page 114.

In 1832 a good mill was established at Greenup.   Page 117

The Cumberland or National Road was laid out about the time, or before, of the earliest settlement here. It was subsequently completed sufficient for general travel as early as 1832, This was of great influence upon the community, bringing, as it did. persons from all parts of the older settled portions of the East in contact with the community settled in the southern part of the county. From this road, at different points. Of the early roads led back on either side to the remoter settlements. Of the earliest wagon-ways in Cumberland County, scarcely more than trails, one led from Greenup to the Johnstown settlement; another led from Woodbury to Johnstown, and a third led from Greenup to the Glenn settlement, in Coles (now Cumberland) County by way of "Cutwood Gap."

Of the earliest wagon ways in Cumberland County, scarcely more than trails one led from Greenup to the Johnstown settlement; and other led from Woodbury to Johnstown and a third led from Greenup to the Glenn settlement in Coles County. (The Glenn settlement was on the Palestine Road at that time, and is the road referred to See  Glenn affidavit)   See page 150.

Greenup at this time, 1830, was called Natches under the Hill, and what is now Cumberland County was Coles County at this time.

The old Palestine road which led from Greenup, Ill., in 1830 through the Glenn settlement was the old Palestine Road which led from Greenup to the Government land office at Palestine. III.

The county seat was moved from Greenup to Prairie City (now Toledo) in 1855.   See page 147

The first circuit court was held in the village of Greenup and presided over by Honorable William Wilson.   Sec page 140,

The grand jurors that served in this court , it is reported, when convened, presented a very grotesque and novel appearance. During the time they were transiting business they were As sactimionious as a Presbyterian deacon, but as soon as an interval of leisure interposed, they would straddle their oaken benches in pairs, and engage in the harmless but scientific game of "mumble peg."   See page 140,

An old log school house was converted into a temple of Justice, and in justie and respect to the officials and attorneys of that day, it must be said that suits were as hotly contested, law and equity as impartially dealt out. and the cause of the client as ably and earnestly advocated in the old school house, as though it had been a costly stone structure.   See page 140.

Some of the attorneys who attended court in this building have since attained great celebrity. Among others was Abraham Lincoln. One case in particular in which Mr. Lincoln participated was the notorious "Lustre" case, which was brought here on a chance of venue from Coles county.

The charge against Lustre was an assault with a deadly weapon, with intent to murder, Lustre was ably and earnestly defended by Lincoln and O. B. Ficklin, and prosecuted by State's Attorney Kitchell.

Lustre was convicted, but through the efforts of his counsel, was afterward pardoned by the Governor, on petition. See page 141,

(See also affidavit of James L. Ryan.)

(In View of all the above facts, the affidvits of Harriet Chapman. Lucinda Chaney, Chester Jones. Laura O. Ewart and Mr. Gilbert of Hazel Dell. Ill., and others in possession of The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Assn., Inc.. are noteworthy and corroborative as regards the only wagon ways in the year 1830.

There were no other roads in the year 1830 that they could get to Greenup over at that time except the old Palestine Road which ran from Greenup. III., then called Hatches under the Hill, to the Government land office at Palestine. Ill., which was the route Lucinda Chancy, now living, states that her father, along with one of the Gordons, went with Thomas Lincoln from their claim near Lerna, Ill.,  and traversed over the old Palestine road from Greenup Ill., to the land office at Palestine. Ill. Lucinda Chancy also states that she lived in Goosenest at the time Thomas Lincoln immigrated !o Illinois in 1830 and met them while camping near the Tippett farm when they were on their way to Macon County, and when they returned in the Goosenest neighborhood that Thomas Lincoln, her father, and one of the Gordons accompanied him to Palestine to get the entry papers for 40 acres of land. See affidavit of Lucinda Chaney.)

Proof of Greenup -Palestine Road


Some time in the latter part of 1853 Captain Edward Talbott built what is now called the "Cumberland Mills" They are situated on the St. L., V. & T.H.R.R. the railroad in the south part of town. See Cumberland History, Page 208. Road also Page 206 regarding A. K. Bosworth, U. F. Linder and Abraham Lincoln.   Read also Page  204.

THE LINCOLN WAY


The Lincoln Way through Illinois is the route traveled by the Lincolns in their immigration from Indiana to Macon county, Illinois, in the year 1830, leaving their home in Spencer county, Indiana, about March 1st.

On entering the Lincoln party came to Vincennese Indiana at which place Abraham Lincoln saw for the first time a printing press, and it was. at this place that he first saw an American Indian; then crossing the Wabash River to the Illinois side at Westport, opposite Vincennes., they came up the river road to Palestine, Ind., where the goverment land office was located. The Lincolns stopped here a short time  and observed a juggler performing sleight-of-hand tricks, which amused Abraham very much.

From Palestine they traveled northerly over the old state road to Hutsonville, then continuing north ahout two miles to what  now known as Quaker Lane which lane runs east and west. This lane entered a wagon way which led in a northwesterly direction to the proposed national road at Greenup, Ill., this being the route the Lincolns traveled from Palestine to Greenup.

When leaving Hutsonville, traveling over what was known in Cumberland county to be the Old Palestine road, they stopped and stayed overnight with W. R. Gilbert, who then lived adjoining the Greenup-Palestine road at a point in the southeat corner of Cumberland county near where Hazel Dell is now located. The old Palestine road ran (year 1830)  about one mite nouth of Hazel Dell. The next day Thomas Lincoln party continued their journey to the north-west, and after crossing Range creek they had a break down, and upon reaching Greenup, it is said that they had their wagons repaired at the blacksmith shop which located there at that time, 1830. At this place Thomas Lincoln and party of 13 people camped by a log cabin at the side of the old Palestine road, which point is located near the town house in the public square. From here the Lincoln party crossed the proposed National road, continuing over the old Palestine toad to the Embarrass river, at which place there was a ford,, which was located about 300 feet east and up the river from where the Toledo-Greenup bridge is at present located on Route 131. When fording the river, water ran m the wagon beds. At this point a good water mill was erected in 1832. (See Cumberland . County history.) The Thomas Lincoln family regularly patronized this mill after they had moved from there Macon County home to their first home in Coles County.

After crossing the river at Greenup, they continued on their journey north-westerly and. then north, and camped the following night at an entrance to the Tippett farm,, this point being about 2 1/2 miles east of where Bradbury now stands. They arrived after sundown. For their evening meal they had fried venison and baked potatoes,

The following day they continued on their journey through Paradise settlement. Traveling through this settlement they conversed with the Gordans and Cohoons, then went in a northwesterly direction to Macon County.

After farming in Macon County in 1830 with the aid of his son, Abraham, Thomas Lincoln became very much dissatisfied and discouraged and decided to return to his Indiana home. On their way back to Indiana, they again entered the Paradise neighborhood and talked with some acquaintances they had met the previous year, and were induced to locate there, which they did.

It it well known by the citizens of Cumberland county as well as citizens of Lerna, Ill, that this route is the. Thomas Lincoln Trail as it has been pointed out, Mr. Sumerlin, editor of The Lerna Eagle, in a speech made some three years ago at the Toledo public hear-ing tor Rout* implored the Department of Public Works and Buildings to build Route 131 from Route 25  east through Lerna, Ill. then past the Shiloh cemetery and Lincoln home and on south, passing Toledo, and on to Greenup, and extending through the entire of Cumberland County, which route, he said, would be popularly known as the Thomas Lincoln Trail, which would be only one link in the proposed Lincoln National Memorial Highway which in a very shore time would be destined to become the most popular highway in the world. (See copy of Mr. Sumerlin's  speech.)

The Greenup Bridge


We herewith submit a report on the "Lincoln Way" investigation which was voluntarily undertaken, beginning in March, 1929, and ending August 20, 1929, by the Abraham Lincoln Memorial High-way Association, Inc., as up to this time there had been no investigation whatever made of certain portions of the original, route from Indiana to Illinois, especially in Cumberland County, south of the Shiloh cemetery. During our investigation, we have been unable to locate any person who has any knowledge of anyone heretofore making, or seeking, any information as to the route the Thomas Lincoln family traveled when immigrating to Illinois from Indiana in the year of 1830, in the section mentioned above.

A map of the Lincoln Way, as originally marked, appeared in the Decatur Review as late as February, 1929, conforming to the traditions and legends handed down to the people of this vicinity, and resulting in the inactivity of the people of this section. When it was learned that certain individuals to the north of us were endeavoring to switch the route to the east of the Shiloh cemetery, this action immediately aroused the feeling which has always existed as to the Lincoln Way, as it has always been, handed down that the crossing at the ford at Greenup was the place of crossing the Embarrass river and not at the McCann Ford, and to substantiate this fact, in reviewing the affidavit of Harriett Chapman, daughter of Dennis Hanks, and an aunt of T. B. Shoaff, she insists that they crossed the river at Greenup, and: the fact that Dennis Hanks and Thomas Lincoln worked on the bridge across the National road in the year 1832 caused her to remember their crossing place, and Mrs. Chapman, being one of the Lincoln party when immigrating, surely remembers correctly.

Therefore, we believe that Harriett Chapman never had in her mind any other bridge than at Greenup which was built in 1832.

Then again in the year 1881, before any memorial road was even thought of, our pioneer settler of Cumberland County, a Mr. Mark Sperry, presented a measuring rule to the Lincoln Tomb at Springfield, on which is inscribed the  following memento "This rule was made from the timber in the bridge that Abraham Lincoln labored on in tho year of 3832 at Greenup, Ill. Other affidavits in this book of information will bear on this point.

The foregoing facts we submit to your Excellency, Governor Louis L. Emmerson and the Highway Department, concerning the route taken by the Thomas Lincoln party in immigrating to Illinois in the year 1830, are offered in the hope that they will serve to clarify any doubts, as to the true route. The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Association, Inc.


Historic Proofs And Data In Support Of The Lincoln Way. Being The Route Traveled By The Thomas Lincoln Family In Coming From Indiana To Illinois In The Year 1830 For Submission ,To The Governor Of The State Of Illinois And The Department Of Public Works And Buildings Of The State Of Illinois By The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Association. Inc. Greenup, Ill. Published By The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway Association, Inc. 1929

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