NEOGA TOWNSHIP BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
The following Biographies was transcribed by Barbara Moksnes from
  The Book "Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois"
Originally Published 1884 F.A. Battey & Co.

JAMES M. ALBIN, a leading agriculturist, and brother to Dr. G. W. Albin, of Neoga, was born in Putnam county, Ind., July 26, 1841, the son of Joseph and Rosana [Sheeks] Albin, and is the twelfth is a family of fifteen children.  He was married September 4, 1862, to Miss Mary J. Goddard.  Mrs. Albin is a native of Virginia.  They have four children, viz; Joseph L., Charles M., Florence R. and Eugene C.  Mr. Albin came to Cubmerland County in March 1871, and settled four miles east of Neoga.  Here he has since lived, and has a well improved farm of 198 acres.  He is one of the best farmers in Neoga Township.  He is a thorough Republican.  Mr. and Mrs. Albin are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is a prominent and an honorable man, and one of the most successful farmers in Neoga Township. 

G. W. ALBIN, M.D., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., December 17, 1822, the son of Joseph and Eliza [March] Albin, daughter of William Marsh, an office in the war of the Revolution, and is of English-Irish extraction.  His father was a native of Kentucky and his mother was born near Philadelphia, Penn.  His father emigrated to Indiana in 1816, and settled in Harrison County.  He died in Putnam County, Ind.iIn 1863, and his mother in Lawrence County in 1823.  His father was a soldier in the war of 1812.  In 1843, our subject of this mention began reading medicine at Cloverdale, Ind.  In the winter of 1846-7 he attended lectures at the Indianapolis State Medical College, which was then located at LaPorte.  He practiced his profession for a time at Delphi, Ind., then went to North Arm, Edgar County, Ill.; here practiced for one year; then went to Coles County, Ill.; there remained four years.  In the winter of 1851-52, he attended Rush Medical College, at Chicago; graduated February 19, 1852.  In March 1853, he came to Cumberland County, and settled four miles east of Neoga.  In 1856, he removed to Neoga, and here has since lived and been in active practice.  Dr. Albin erected the first dwelling house in Neoga.  He was married January 10, 1854, to Miss Cynthia C. Dryden.  Mrs. Albin was born in Bedford County, Tenn.  They have had five children, viz; an infant that died unnamed; Mary C., Oscar W. C., May, and William C. W.  He is a Republican.  He enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty Third Regiment Illinois Infantry, in 1864, and was discharged September 26, 1864; was commissioned First Assistant Surgeon.  He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, I.O.O.F.; A.L. & H., and G.A.R.  Dr. and Mrs. Albin are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He is the second graduate of medicine that ever practiced in Cumberland County.  He is now the oldest practicing physician in the county.  As a physician he has been very successful.  He is one of the pioneers of Cumberland County, and a most influential citizen.  A man is known by the work in his life.

DAVID A.. CALDWELL, farmer, was born in eastern Tennessee, May 16, 1831, is the son of Robert and Sibby [Russell] Caldwell, the second in a family of eight children, and is of Irish lineage.  His parents were also natives of Tennessee.  In 1837 they emigrated to Boone County, Ind.  They died in that county.  The subject of our mention was married April 25, 1860, to Miss Ann E. Mount, daughter of Atwell and Lucinda Mount.  Mrs. Caldwell was born in Montgomery County, Ind.  They have nine children, viz; William A., Frederick A., Robert W., Mary C., James C., Carrie R., Sibba E., Frank R. and Horace M.  In the fall of 1861, Mr. Caldwell went to Neoga Township, Cumberland County, Ill, and made settlement four and one half miles northeast of Neoga, and there has since resided, and has 200 acres of well- improved land.  He is a Republican and advocates the continued success of the Republican Party.  Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are members of the Presbyterian Church.  They are taking great interest in the education of their children.  He is a prominent citizen and a most pleasant gentleman.  The family is praised by all who know it.  Frederick A. Caldwell, a son of the subject of this sketch, is one of the leading school- teachers of the county, and an affable young man.  He has commenced a course in Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Ind.  Mr. Caldwell comprehends the necessity of a finished education.

JAMES CLARK, farmer and stock dealer, is a native of West Virginia, born September 20, 1840, the son of Cornelius and Abigail [Wright] Clark, and is of English descent.  The parents of Mr. Clark were natives of Massachusetts; and born near Boston.  In 1856, the emigrated to Illinois and settled in Coles County, and here his father died the following year.  In 1880 his mother was deceased in Decatur, Ill.  On the 28th of November 1866, occurred the marriage of Mr. Clark to Miss Lucinda Buchanan.  Mrs. Clark is a native of Indiana.  To this union have been born seven children, viz: Mary, Rose, Carrie A., John J., George, Charles and Robert.  Mr. Clark came to Cumberland County in 1859, and three years later he removed to where he now resides, and where he owns 430 acres of well- improved land.  The farm has many fine advantages as a stock farm, and is well improved.  As a farmer and trader, Mr. Clark has been successful.  For a number of years he has been interested in Shorthorn cattle, and he has the finest herd of that stock in the county.  Mr. Clark has a partner in the stock business.  He is a Republican, Mason and an upright citizen.  Mr. and Mrs. Clark are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He has been an elder in that church for many years.

L. M. CASSTEVENS, farmer, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., January 21, 1831, and is the son of Thomas and Hester [Massey] Casstevens.  He is of Welsh extraction and the second in a family of nine children.  Mr. Casstevens is one of the early settlers of Cumberland County, coming here and making settlement in 1844, in Neoga Township, and here he has since resided.  The plat on which he settled is situated four and one half miles northeast of Neoga.  He was one of the first in all that region of country to begin improvements.  The marriage of Mr. Casstevens took place in October 1854, to Miss Amanda McCartney, a native of Indiana.  To this marriage have been born seven children, of which two are living, viz: Andrew T. and Joseph W.  In 1866 he moved to the site of his present residence.  His farm consists of 280 acres of good land, and which Mr. Casstevens has splendidly improved.  The success that attends him has come up through the avenues of industry and economy.  Mr. and Mrs. Casstevens are members of the Baptist Church.  He is a well-to-do farmer and Democrat. 

MRS. MARY E. COLE, wife of William J. Cole, deceased, was born in Ohio County, Ind., May 20, 1847, and is the daughter of John B. and Rebecca Baker, is the fourth in a family of six children, and is of German descent.  Mrs. Cole was married February 20, 1866, to William J. Cole, a native of Indiana.  In October 1866, they came to Coles County, Ill., and there remained two years, and then came to Cumberland County.  To this union was born two children, viz: Fannie R. and Wilburn A.  Mr. Cole died July 9, 1872.  He was a soldier in the late war; a member of Company C, Thirty-Seventh Indiana Volunteers; served three and one half years.  He was a Republican and honorable citizen.  Since the death of Mr. Cole she has spent seven years at her native home in the Hoosier State.  She now resides in Mattoon, Ill.  She owns 110 acres of well improved land in Neoga Township, Cumberland County, Ill.  Mrs. Coles is a most amiable woman, and one of the leading ladies in Mattoon. 

P. L. DeVORE, farmer, was born in Brown County, Ohio, September 8, 1843, is the son of Peter M. and Sarah [Day] DeVore], the fifth in a family of eight children, and is of Scotch-German descent.  His parents were also natives of Brown County, Ohio.  His father died in that county in 1876, and his mother in 1878.  The subject of our notice enlisted in the United States Army, September 20, 1861, in Company B, First Ohio Zouaves, Thirty-Fourth Regiment, as a Private, but was discharged as a Sergeant, March 30, 1865.  He was wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill, Virginia, and was taken prisoner October 1864.  He saw the scenes and withstood the hardships of Libby Prison for five months.  Mr. DeVore was married December 1867, to Miss Sallie E. Parks.  Mrs. DeVore is a native of Cumberland County, Ill.  To this union has been born six children, viz; Alfred L., Flora, John W., Emma, Thomas W. and Frank.  In September 1880, Mr. DeVore removed from Brown County, Ohio, to Cumberland County, Ill, and has since resided one mile west of Neoga, on a farm that he purchased of his brother in 1878.  The farm contains 137 acres, and is one of the best stocked farms in Cumberland County; also one of the best improved farms in the county.  He is a thorough Republican; cast his first vote for “Old Abe.”  Mr. DeVore was a splendid soldier, is one of the most prominent men in Neoga Township, and an honorable citizen.  Mrs. DeVore is a member of the Christian Church.  He is a member of the G.A.R.

MORTON DOW, tile manufacturer, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., March 20, 1839, is the son of Joseph and Augustine [Ichibaud] Dow, the second in the family of five children, and is of Scotch-French extraction.  His father was born in Scotland, and his mother in France.  They came to America about 1836, and settled in Switzerland County, Ind., and there they were both deceased, father in 1862, and mother in 1881.  The early life of Mr. Dow was spent on the farm.  He was married December 25, 1862, to Miss A.M. Gale, daughter of A.E. Gale, formerly of Jefferson County, Ind., but who now resides in Cumberland County, Ill.  They have three children, viz; Cora C., Charles M., and Edmond E.  The subject of our notice came to Cumberland County, Ill, in April 1865.  He has lived in Neoga since 1867, save one year.  Mr. Dow first engaged in the lumber businessm then changed to general merchandising, in partnership with C.D. Green.  For a number of years he was in the employ of Tracy Kingman.  In January 1882, he bought one-fourth interest in the Neoga Mill, and sold the same in January 1883.  In February 1883, he formed a partnership, in the manufacturer of drainage tile, with W. B. Phillips.  He is the junior member of the firm known as Phillips & Dow.  He is a Republican.  He has long been identified with the business interests of Neoga, and is loyal to all causes that are for the bettering of general humanity, and the country.

G. F. DOUGHERTY, M.D., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., September 24, 1855; son of Isaiah and Sarah [Harsey] Dougherty.  His parents were born in Indiana.  He is the second in a family of three children, and is of Irish-English descent.  His paternal grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812.  His parents came to Cumberland County, Ill., in 1877, and settled in Neoga; came in March, and his father died here in the September following.  His mother now resides in Neoga.  The literary education of Mr. Dougherty was confined to the common schools of Indiana and the Shoals Academy, at Shoals, Ind.  In 1876, he began reading medicine, at Shoals, Ind., in the office of Dr. D. Gaddis; remained there only a short time, and then came to Neoga, and continued the work under the instruction of Dr. L. H. Mason.  In the winter of 1878-79, he attended lectures at the American Medical College, at St. Louis; also, the winter of 1879-80, and graduated, June 1, 1880, from that institution.  Since that time, he has been practicing his profession in Neoga.  In 1882, he formed a partnership with Dr. F. M. Richardson, which still continues.  He was married October 15, 1878, to gilla Sawyer.  They have had three children, viz; Edina, Kittie, and Clyde.  Kittie is deceased.  He is a Democrat; is a member of the I.O.O.F.  As a physician, he has been successful.  He is one of the prominent young physicians of eastern Illinois, and his future as a practitioner indicates much.

JAMES EWING, pioneer, was born in Tennessee, November 3, 1804, the son of James and Mary [Thompson] Ewing, is the fourth in a family of six children, and is of Scotch-Irish extraction.  The father of Mr. Ewing was a native of Virginia, and his mother of North Carolina.  His parents were deceased in Tennessee.  His father attained the advanced age of more than ninety years.  The year 1827 dates the coming of our subject of this sketch to Edgar County, Ill.  There he resided until 1854, when he came to Cumberland County.  He is one of the few men yet living that served as a soldier in the Black Hawk War.  In 1833, he was united in marriage to Miss Rachel Ewing, an own cousin of his.  Mrs. Ewing died in November of the year following, and he was next married, three year later, to Miss Mary Alexander, and to them was born four sons and four daughters, viz; Milton A., Sirus K., George F., Josiah A., Martha V., Flora E., Linda J., and Emma C.  Mrs. Ewing died in May 1864, since which time Mr. Ewing has remained a widower.  In 1874, he quit the farm and became a resident of Neoga, but still owns a farm, which is moderately well improved, and is located two miles east of Neoga.  Mr. Ewing has long been a thorough advocate of the principles of Republicanism.  He is one of the men who cast their ballots in what was known as the Wabash Precinct.  The Ewing family has a long line of ancestors, and was known in America many years before the war between the United States and Great Britain.  Mr. Ewing is one of the first settlers of Illinois, and is one of its’ representative men. 

JAMES EWING, farmer, was born in Vigo County, Ind., July 31, 1825; son of Alexander and Margaret [McColloch] Ewing, and is of Scotch-Irish extraction.  The parents of Mr. Ewing were natives of East Tennessee.  In 1824, they emigrated to Vigo County, Ind., and there remained two years; then moved to Edgar County, Ill., and here the father died in 1851.  His mother died in Cumberland County in 1866.  In 1854, the subject of our notice came to Cumberland County, Ill., and settled three miles east of Neoga, in Neoga Township, and here he has since resided.  His marriage took place February 12, 1861, to Miss Prudentia T. Stone.  Mrs. Ewing was born in Livingston County, N.Y.  They have had three children, viz; Whitney L. Norton E. and James T.  He is a thorough Republican.  In 1877, Mr. Ewing was elected Supervisor of Neoga Township, and served three terms.  He is a Royal Arch Mason; made a Mason in 1860.  He is one of the best and most successful farmers in Neoga Twonship; owns 239 acres of good land.  He is a prominent citizen and a most honorable man.  Mr. and Mrs. Ewing are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He is one of the early settlers of the county.

C. D. GREENE, general merchant, is a native of Gallia County, Ohio; born March 13, 1838, is the son of C.D. and Sarah E. [Porter] Greene, the third in a family of ten children, and is of the Scotch-English extraction.  His father was born in Vermont, and his mother in Ohio.  In 1857, his parents emigrated to Cumberland County, Ill.  Here his father died in 1868.  His mother now resides in Indianapolis.  Mr. Greene’s paternal grandfather was a soldier in the war of the Revolution.  The schooling of the subject of this mention was confined to the common schools of the Buckeye State.  He enlisted first in the three months service at the beginning of the war; was in the first regiment that went to service from Ilinois.  He re-enlisted in Company B, Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, January 2, 1862, for three years and was honorably discharged January 6, 1865, at Savannah, Ga.  He was at the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Atlanta, Fort Donelson, etc.  He was married October 22, 1865, to Sarah E. Bell.  Mrs. Greene is a native of Indiana.  To this union has been borne four children, viz; Conie B., James B., C. W., and Charles A.  The first two are dead.  After his marriage he began farming.  In May 1866, he engaged in the mercantile business in Neoga, and this has since continued.  In 1882, he built the brick block he now occupies.  The same is 40x80 feet, and is the best constructed and most conveniently arranged business house in Cumberland County.  He is a thorough Republican.  Mr. and Mrs. Greene are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is one of the principle merchants in eastern Illinois; his stock excels anything in Cumberland County.  He is a man of many fine qualities, and a most amiable citizen.

THOMAS HANCOCK, editor and proprietor of the Neoga Weekly News, was born near Greenup, Cumberland County, Ill., December 30, 1843, and when about one year of age he removed with his parents to Licking County, Ohio, where he and they remained until Thomas was about sixteen years old, when all returned to Cumberland County, and where he has since resided.  The early life of Mr. Hancock was divided between attending school and working on the farm.  Three years of his life were given to the service for the protection of the American flag, enlisting July 26, 1862, as a private in Company B, Ninety-Seventh Illinois Infantry.  He was soon promoted to the office of Corporal, and then to Sergeant.  He was in thirteen hard fought battles.  After returning from the service, he taught school for a time.  His time for a number of years was divided by various occupations, viz; farming, clerking in a store, and school teaching, until he purchased the Neoga printing office of J. L. & W. H. Allison.  For five years, he has had complete control of the paper, and has been instrumental in elevating the standard of the News and greatly increasing its’ circulation and influence, until it now stands second to none as a local paper in southern Illinois.  The marriage of Mr. Hancock took place November 1, 1869, to Miss Vinia E. Graham, of Vigo County, Indiana.  Mrs. Hancock is an intelligent and most amiable woman.  He is a thorough Republican, and an influential newspaper- man.

WILLIAM H. HANCOCK, salesman for C.D. Greene and brother Thomas R. Hancock, editor of the Neoga News, was born at Hebron, Ohio, December 3, 1847, is the son of Thomas and Leah [Wiseley] Hancock, and comes of English-Irish blood.  When the subject of our notice was eleven years of age he emigrated from Ohio to Cumberland County, Ill., and made settlement near the town of Neoga, in Neoga Township.,  The early life of Mr. Hancock was spent on the farm.  When eighteen years of age he began the painting business, which he carried on during the summer and clerked in a store in the winter.  In this way his time was divided for about four years.  Since 1872 he has been a dry goods salesman, and has been clerking in the store of C. D. Greene for seven years.  December 22, 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Huldah J. Shore, daughter of John N. Shore, of Clay County, Ind.  To this union have been born six children, viz; Cora E., Gertrude L., Ora B., Mary A., Charles B. and William R.  Ora B. and William R. are deceased.  The principles of the Republican party are closely adhered to and supported by Mr. Hancock.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Hancock is one of the self-made and self-informed men of Cumberland County, and one of its’ most thorough and enterprising representatives.  On the general topics of the day he is always well informed.  Mr. Hancock is taking much interest in the education of his children.  As a salesman he is unexcelled by any man in Cumberland County.  He is a true and highly respected gentleman.

WESLEY HICKERNELL, boot and shoe dealer, was born in Lisburn, Cumberland County, Penn., June 10, 1832, is the son of Jacob and Sarah [Myers] Hickernell, the second in a family of three children, and is of German descent.  While the subject of this notice was still in his infancy his father was deceased, and at nine years of age he began supporting himself and making his own way in life.  He worked on a farm until sixteen years of age, and then began a three year apprenticeship at the shoemaker’s trade, after which time he and an older brother opened a shoe shop at Andersontown, Penn.  In 1852 our subject came to Ohio and settled in Madson County, and here he was married March 17, 1853, to Miss J.E. Woods.  Mrs. Hickernell was born in Madison County, Ohio.  They have had six children, viz; Hettia, Ora L. W., Frank M., Dollie and Delia.  In 1854 he removed to Wisconsin and there remained two years, and then came to Cumberland County, Ill., and settled on a farm east of Neoga and there lived until 1873, when he came to Neoga and engaged in his present occupation.  He now has a good stock of boots and shoes.  He is a Democrat; cast his first vote for James Buchanan.  He has taken an active part in politics.  He is a Mason.  Mr. H. now owns 130 acres of well- improved land, and one of the best shoe and boot stores in Cumberland County.  He has made his own way through life, and has much pioneer experience that he loves to relate.  He struggled against poverty for several years but is now in comfortable circumstances.  They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is one of the prominent men of Neoga.

ROBERT M. HUNTER, old settler and farmer, was born in what was Morgan but now Noble County, Ohio, January 21, 1830, son of James and Martha [Marshall] Hunter, is the third in a family of seven children, and is of Irish descent.  His parents were born in Pennsylvania, and came to Ohio at a very early day.  They died in that State.  The marriage of the subject of our notice occurred May 13, 1857, to Miss Sarah C. Bailey.  Mrs. Hunter was born in Washington County, Ohio.  They have six children, viz; Carrie K., Lucy L., Nellie, Howard B., Sarah E., and Anna S.  Mr. Hunter came to Illinois in 1858 and settled in Neoga Township, where he still lives, and owns 200 acres of well- improved land, located three and one half miles northeast of Neoga.  He is a Democrat; cast his first Presidential vote for Buchanan.  Mr. Hunter has been road commissioner in Neoga Township for six years.  They are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He is a leading farmer and influential citizen.  When he came to Cumberland County he made settlement on the wild prairie, and has improved the same.  

 JOHN K. KELLY, farmer, was born in Clark County, Ind., October 17, 1817, the son of Robert and Margaret [Kelly] Kelly, the youngest in a family of thirteen children, and is of Irish Lineage.  His father was born in “Old Kaintuck”, and his mother in Tennessee.  About the year 1805, his parents emigrated from Kentucky and settled in Clark County, Ind.  His father was a 1812 soldier, and one of the first settlers of Indiana.  The marriage of the subject of this notice took place May 1850, to Miss Mary A. Manaugh.  To this union were born four children, viz; Margaret J., Otis M., John H., and Mary C.  Mrs. Kelly died September 12, 1856.  Mr. Kelly next married January 1860, to Mrs. Mary Neal [formerly McLain].  They have three children, viz; Martha E., William J., and Lena.  Mr. Kelly came to Cumberland County, Ill., in the fall of 1864, and settled in Neoga Township, three miles northeast of Neoga.  Here he has since lived.  He owns 219 acres of well-improved land, and is one of the successful and leading farmers of Neoga Township.  He is a Republican, and one of the prominent men of Cumberland County.

THOMAS LACY, farmer, was born in Oldham County, Ky., October 10, 1825, the son of Jesse and Lucy [Willhite] Lacy, the second in a family of six children, and is of English-German extraction.  His parents were natives of Virginia, but in youth were removed to Kentucky, from which state they emigrated to Owen County, Ind., when the subject of this mention was about nine years old.  The paternal grandfather of Mr. Lacy came to America prior to the Revolutionary War, and was a soldier in that conflict.  Until Mr. Lacy had gained his majority, he remained at home and worked for his father on the farm; after this time, the realities of life dawned upon him for himself.  His marriage took place August 20, 1837, to Miss Evaline E. Long.  They had eleven children.  Mrs. Lacy died February 17, 1877.  He was next married, August 20, 1879, to Mrs. Mary A. Elder.  To this union have been born three children.  Mr. Lacy came to Cumberland County in 1856, and settled in Neoga Township, and here he now resides.  He owns 300 acres of good land.  He is one of the many who came up through the old Whig line, and is now a Republican.  Mr. Lacy has been Trustee of Neoga Township for six years, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for thirty-eight years.  Mr. Lacy’s first wife was a member of the same church, but his present wife is a member of the Christian Church.  He is one of the prominent farmers and citizens of Neoga Township, and an honorable Christian gentleman.

B. H. LAWSON, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Coles County, Ill., April 26, 1851, is the son of Thomas F. and America A. [Wortham] Lawson, and is of the English-French lineage.  His parents were born in Kentucky.  In 1840, the emigrated to Illinois, and settled in Coles County, and were among the first settlers in that part of Coles County.  In 1852, they removed to Cumberland County, and here his father died in 1854.  The subject of our notice worked on the farm until he was seventeen years of age, and then he began trading stock for Col. T. A. Apperson, his stepfather. In 1872, he took a business course in the Terre Haute Commercial College, and graduated from that school in December, the same year.  He was married October 28, 1875, to Miss Mary Kelly.  Mrs. Lawson is a native of Clark County, Ind.  They have had three children, viz; Lucy A., Fonrose, and Tracy [deceased].  After his marriage, he began farming on tat part of the old Lawson homestead that he came into possession of by the death of his father.  He now owns 283 acres of well-improved land, which is one of the best stock farms in Cumberland County.  He is a Republican; has been Township Collector for three years, 1878,1879 and 1880.  In 1880 he was nominated for County Clerk in the Republican convention, but was defeated by L. W. Brewster.  He has always taken an active part in politics.  He is one of the most prominent young men and farmers in the county.  Energy and industry form largely his composition. 

J. W. MILLER, ex-County Judge and farmer, is a native of Clark County, Ind., the son of Martin and Susan C.[ Mitchell] Miller, born December 8, 1828, is next to the youngest in a family of ten children, and comes of German blood.  His parents were natives of Penn., and were born near the City of Brotherly Love.  They emigrated from Indiana to Cumberland County, Ill., in a very early day.  In this county they were deceased, father in 1870, and mother six years later.  When the subject of this mention gained his majority, he began life’s battles for himself.  He was awarded the advantages and privileges of much more than an ordinary education, and Mr. Miller made good use of these blessings.  For a number of years he taught school, and was considered a most successful teacher.  In 1852, Mr. Miller came to Cumberland County, and settled in Neoga Township, where he began improving a farm.  On the 1st of January 1852, He was united in marriage to Miss Louisa E. Ketcham, who was also a native of the Hoosier State.  To this union have been born twelve children, viz; Amanda J. J., Meltidas, Margaret B., America A. M. , Ella, James M., Mary E., Sarah L., Cora A.., Lora, Charles L., and Ira O.  Politically, Mr. Miller is known as an Independent, but of late years he has been casting his vote with the Republicans.  In 1873, he was elected County Judge of Cumberland County, on the Independent ticket, and was re-elected to the same office in 1877.  Mr. Miller is one of the leading husbandmen in the county, and a most prominent citizen.  The family is extensively known and greatly respected. 

DAVID NEAL, farmer and stock dealer, is a native of North Carolina, born June 27, 1826, son of Daniel and Letitia [Perdue] Neal, is the second oldest in a family of twelve children, and is of French-Irish blood.  The parents of Mr. Neal were also natives of North Carolina and early settlers of Indiana, having in 1831 emigrated to Wayne County, that State.  His father was one of the most enterprising and prominent of Indiana’s early men.  The Democratic Party always had in him a true representative and earnest advocate.  His death occurred in Wayne County, Ind., in 1845.  The mother of Mr. Neal now resides in Randolph County, of that State.  When the twenty-second anniversary of the birth of the subject of this mention came around, it found him out in the sea of life for himself.  February 12, 1850, he was by the holy bonds of matrimony united in marriage to Miss Martha Rainier, a native of New Jersey.  To this union has been born five children, viz; Sarah E., William R., John C., Benjamin F. and Mary A..  Of these, three are living.  In 1865 Mr. Neal came to Cumberland County, and settled in Neoga Township, where he has since resided.  Mr. Neal now owns 200 acres of good land.  His farm is one of the best improved in Cumberland County, and one of the most productive.  He is one of those men that believes in the advancement of science in agriculture as much as anything else, and the condition of his farm warrants such fact.  Politically, Mr. Neal has Democratic convictions, and is one of the leaders of his party in the county.  In 1880, he was elected Supervisor of Neoga Township, and served one term.  Mr. Neal is a man of more than ordinary qualifications, and is well informed on all leading issues of the day.  He is worthy of the extensive respect he commands.  

JOHN PETERS, farmer and liveryman, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., July 4, 1822, is the son of Henry and Margaret [Dunn] Peters, the second eldest in a family of eight children and is of German descent.  The father of Mr. Peters was a native of Virginia, and his of Kentucky.  His parents were among the early comers of Cumberland County, Ill.  His father died in this county in 1875, and his mother deceased in Coles County, in 1880.  the early part of the life of this subject of this mention was spent on a farm in his native State, and then he was united in marriage April 10, 1845, to Miss Louvisia Hugle.  Mrs. Peters is a native of Hamilton County, Ohio.  To this marriage has been born eight children, viz; William H., Margaret, Napoleon B., Julia Ann, John W., James B., Ellen and Charles N.  In 1865 Mr. Peters came to Neoga Township, Cumberland County, and purchase 160 acres of raw prairie, and this farm he began improving the next year.  Mr. Peters now owns 224 acres of well- improved land just south of Neoga.  He cast his first Presidential vote for James K. Polk, and has been a life long Democrat.  In July 1883, he engaged in the livery business in Neoga, and the same has been successful beyond his expectation.  His father was a soldier in the 1812 and Black Hawk Wars.  Mr. Peters enjoys an extensive acquaintance and commands much respect.

W. B. PHILLIPS, farmer and tile manufacturer, was born in Madison County, N.Y., February 17, 1824, the son of Brazilla and Betsey [ Heminway] Phillips, and is of Scotch extraction.  The parents of Mr. Phillips were born in Massachusetts.  His father was a soldier in the War of 1812, and his paternal grandfather a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  His father died in New York in 1851.  In 1837, the subject of our notice came to Allen County, Ind., and settled northeast of Fort Wayne.  In 1854, he came to Cumberland County, Ill., and settled in Neoga Township, and here he has since lived.  He was married October 19, 1843, to Miss Nancy McCourtney, of Allen County, Indiana.  They have four children.  In August 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fifth Illinois Cavalry; was discharged on account of ill health, March 1863.  For a number of years Mr. Phillips was interested in the Neoga Mill.  In the fall of 1882 he began the manufacture of drainage tile.  The factory has a capacity of 60,000 tile [different sizes] per month; has a splendid shed 40x70 feet.  There is in connection two extensive kilns.  Mr. Phillips is a senior member of the firm known as Phillips & Dow.  He is a Republican and a Mason.  He has been Treasurer of Neoga Lodge, No. 279, for sixteen years.  He is one of the extensive farmers of Neoga Township.  The tile factory is one of the best in Cumberland County.  He is one of the leading men in Neoga, and one of its’ principle citizens.

HENRY H. REX, dry goods clerk, was born in Mifflin County, Penn. December 26, 1835, is the son of Henry and – [Barnhart] Rex, the youngest in a family of three children, and is of German lineage.  The Rex family came originally from Reading, Penn.  In 1836, it removed from Lancaster to Mifflin County, Penn., and there his father was murdered, in 1836, for money that he was supposed to have had on his person. The body was never found.  His mother died when he was six weeks old, and his father was murdered when he was about 7 weeks old.  In his infancy, he was in the care of a widow lady by the name of Margaret Haller, and was supported by Derry Township, in Mifflin County, Penn.  The deformity of Mr. Rex is due to cruel treatment in infancy, previous to his being placed in the hands of Mrs. Haller.  The Township supported him until he was nine years of age.  In 1854, he began clerking in a drug and hardware store in Lewistown, Penn.  In 1860, he left that position and came to Logan County, Ohio, and there remained until 1861, when he emigrated to Edgar County, Ill.  In 1866, he came to Neoga Township, Cumberland County, Ill., and one year later, came to Neoga, and here he still resides.  He was married September 20, 1865, to Miss Harriet M. Ewing.  Mrs. Rex is a native of Edgar County, Ill.  They have had two children, viz; Oliver S., and Minnie B.  He is a Republican.  Mr. Rex has served as Township Clerk and Town Clerk for six years; he is at present a member of the Town Council.  He has been a salesman for twenty-one years, and is the second oldest salesman in Neoga.  Mr. Rex has more than an ordinary education, which he obtained under the most trying circumstances, paying his own way through college.  He is a most affable and pleasant gentleman.

T. J. SHORT, general merchant, was born in Randolph County, Ill., March 11, 1856; son of Thomas E. and Sarah [Harmon] Short, and is of Irish-English extraction.  His parents are natives of Randolph County, Ill.  the Short family was first known in Kentucky, and emigrated to Illinois in 1819.  the subject of our notice remained at home and worked on the farm for his father until he attained his majority.  In the fall of 1879, he came to Neoga and engaged in general merchandising, and in that he has since continued.  He has been successful beyond his own expectations.  Mr. short has $5,000 invested in his business, which is steadily increasing.  He is a thorough Republican; cast his first Presidential vote for Hayes.  He is one of the promising young businessmen of Neoga, and a thorough gentleman.  By energy and industry he has succeeded, and his prospects for a prosperous life each year become more extensive.  Mr. Short already has a trade that has become extensive, and his customers are known miles around.  In his store you can always find choice goods at prices, within the means of all. 

W. H. SINGER, miller, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, July 24, 1841, is the son of Christian and Mary A. [Lowe] Singer, and is of the German-English extraction.  His parents were born in Pennsylvania.  In 1820 they emigrated to Wayne County, Ohio, and there remained until the fall of 1882, when they came to Neoga, where they now reside.  The grandfather’s were soldiers in the war of 1812.  During the boyhood days of the subject of this mention he worked in his father’s farm.  In 1858 he began learning the miller’s trade at Wooster, in the mill of A. Jolliff, serving an apprenticeship of three years.  He enlisted in the cause of his country in April 1861, in Company e, Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  In June following he re-enlisted in the same company and regiment for three years; was in many hard fought battles.  He was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, on the 6th of May 1863, and discharged June 5, 1863.  After returning from the service he attended school six months.  In 1864, he came to Charelston, Ill., and for two years was foreman in Tinkey’s mill.  In 1868 he went to Tipton, Mo., and for four years was a foreman in the Tipton Mills.  Mr. Singer came to Neoga in 1874, and leased one half interest in the Neoga Mill for one year.  He purchased one third interest in the mill in 1875, and one year later he owned one half interest.  In 1882 he became the sole proprietor and owner of the Neoga Mill.  The mill [one of the best in Cumberland County] was built in 1863, re-built in 1881.  the “roller” system was put in, in July 1883.  The mill has a capacity of fifty barrels of flour per day, and meal one hundred barrels per day.  The machinery thorough is of modern improvement.  The flour is equal in quality to any manufactured in eastern Illinois.  Mr. Singer was married October 24, 1867, to Miss Mary A. Lewis, of Charleston, Ill.  Mrs. Singer was born in Delaware County, Ohio.  They have two children, viz; Minnie A. and Dollie E.  He is a Republican, cast his first Presidential vote for Lincoln, and has always been loyal to the Republican cause.  He is one of the most enterprising and one of the substantial businessmen in Cumberland County.  He was a good soldier and is a most amiable citizen and gentleman.

B. R. SPENCER, miller, was born in Carroll County, Ky., September 5, 1834, is the son of George and Rachael [Long] Spencer and is of the Scotch-German lineage.  When the subject of this notice was eighteen years of age he began learning the trade of an engineer.  In 1853 he began serving an apprenticeship at the miller’s trade.  His life, for the most part, has been that of a miller and engineer.  In 1865 he emigrated to Cumberland County, Ill., and settled in Neoga, and here has since resided.  For six years after coming to Neoga he was engineer in the Neoga Mills.  In 1871 he began discharging similar duties in the Neoga City Mill.  Since 1879 he has been the miller in the Neoga City Mill and also general manager of the mill.  His marriage took place February 9, 1860, to Miss Emaline Davis.  Mrs. Spencer was also born in Kentucky.  They have five children, viz; John W., James B., Ora V., William M., and Leslie W.  He is a Democrat, and cast his first Presidential vote for Fillmore.  He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and is one of the charter members of the I.O.O.F. Neoga Lodge No. 347.  They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  As a miller his reputation stands second to none in Cumberland County.  He is an honorable citizen and a pleasant gentleman.

MRS. A. E. STONE, dealer in millinery, fancy goods and notions, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, January 12, 1844, daughter of John and Maria Bradman, who were natives of the Old English Empire.  Mrs. Stone comes of pure English blood.  Her father came to America in 1810, and her mother some years later.  Her parents were among the pioneers of the Queen City, where they lived for a number of years, and moved to Kentucky where they resided until the breaking out of the late war, when they emigrated to Cumberland County, Illinois, and settled in Neoga, but subsequently removed to Beardstwon, Ill.  The subject of our sketch remained in Neoga, and for a series of years taught school, at which she was most successful.  The marriage of Mrs. Stone occurred November 28, 1865, to Mr. J. M. Stone, a native of the Empire State.  Since 1870, Mrs. Stone has been engaged in the millinery and notions business.  With a cash capital of $150 the business was commenced, but the same has increased to at least $3,000.  Her stock of goods is unequaled in Cumberland County, and thirteen years of active, energetic business and practical experience places her in the front ranks of the millinery trade.  Mr. Bradman is a man of much prominence and has always been a strong anti-slavery advocate, and removed north in 1861 lest his sons should be made to do service in the rebel army.  After coming to Illinois two of his sons became soldiers in the Union Army.  Mrs. Stone is one of the most enterprising citizens of Cumberland County, and is one of the principle business representatives of Neoga.  She is one of the leading workers in the Presbyterian Church and Sabbath school, a thorough temperance advocate, and one of the most eminent women in southern Illinois.  Mr. Stone has been in ill health for twelve years, and has spent much money and traveled extensively to regain his health but all to no avail.  He is a Republican in politics.

LUKE VAUGHN, farmer, was born in Owen County, Indiana, January 9, 1841, is the son of Thomas and Isabella [Hooley] Vaughn, the youngest in a family of five children, and is of German-English extraction.  His father was born in Kentucky and his mother in Indiana.  His parents came to Cumberland County, Illinois in 1856, and settled in Neoga Township, and here his father died in 1876.  His mother still resides in Neoga Township.  The subject of this notice was married December 23, 1863, to Miss Mary Groscup.  Mrs. Vaughn was born in New Orleans, Louisiana.  They have had these children, viz; Thomas, Isabelle, Louisa, Nancy, Lucetta, John W., Mary E., and Florence.  Mr. Vaughn now owns 140 acres of good land, the same being a part of the old Vaughn homestead.  He is a Democrat in politics, and a leading citizen.  Mrs. Vaughn died October 24, 1882.  She was a most amiable woman and beloved by all who knew her.

FRANKLIN D. VORIS, dealer in grain, hay, general farm machinery and livestock, was born in Bath, Summit County, Ohio, April 7, 1846, is the son of Peter and Julia [Coe] Voris, and is of Dutch-English lineage.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, in 1799, and his mother Connecticut, in 1808.  They emigrated to Summit County, Ohio, at a very early day, and were among the pioneers of that county.  His father represented Summit County in the Lower House of the General Assembly, of Ohio, from 1844 to 1846.  In 1857, the Voris family came to Coles County, Ill., and here the mother of Mr. Voris was deceased the year following, and his father died in 1880.  The paternal grandparent of the subject of this brief, was a soldier in the war of 1812.  At seventeen years of age Mr. Voris began learning the jewelers’ trade in Mattoon.  At this he continued to work for five years.  In 1868, he came to Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois, and immediately engaged in the grain and livestock business, in partnership with a man by the name of McAndrew.  The firm was then styled McAndrew & Voris, and of which Mr. Voris was the junior member of the firm and general manager.  In 1876, Mr. Voris assumed sole control and ownership of the business, and has been doing a very extensive business since; has for the past five years done an average business of $100,000 annually; business increasing every year, he employing from twenty-five to thirty men.  He came to Neoga in limited circumstances, but now has good credit.  He was married at Mattoon, Ill., January 19, 1870, to Miss Lockie McMum.  Mrs. Voris is also a native of the Buckeye State; born in 1846.  They have had born to them five children, viz; an infant that died unnamed, Ray, Alvin M., Henry C., Lovis M.  He is a thorough Republican; is also a member of the Masonic Fraternity and the I.O.O.F.  He is a man of much force of character, and is greatly respected.  Mr. and Mrs. Voris are members of the Presbyterian Church.  Mr. voris had five brothers in the late war, viz; Col. A. C. Henry, Capt. Samuel, Willis and Roswell R., who died in Andersonville Prison.  The other two died of injuries received in the service, and the two that are yet living were severely wounded.  The Voris family has always been noted for its’ patriotic principles and devotion to the country and flag. 

CAPTAIN MAHLON VOTAW, furniture dealer and undertaker, was born in Columbian County, Ohio, November 8, 1826, the son of Isaac and Susanna [Woolman] Votaw, and is of French-Scotch descent.  His father was born in Loudoun County, Va., and his mother in the state of New Jersey.  In 1803 his father came to the territory that now composes Columbian County, Ohio.  In that county he died in 1851, and his mother in the same county in 1881.  The subject of this mention at the age of twenty years began millwrighting; worked at the trade four years in Ohio.  In 1853, he came to Cumberland County, Ill., and assisted in erecting the Greenup Mills.  He was married January 25, 1855, to Miss Josephine Baker.  They have had two children, viz; Otis and Francis M.  the first is deceased.  Mrs. Votaw died in December 1858.  He was next married October 25, 1859, to Miss Delilah Reece.  To this union were born seven children, viz; Lyman T., Mary E., Oran M., Susan, alice, Alvin E., and Willie.  Mrs. Votaw died April 6, 1873, and for his third wife he married September 2, 1883, Mrs. Marcella Comstock, who is a native of Ripley County, Ind.  In August 1862, Mr. Votaw enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, in Company B, One Hundred and Twenty Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a Private, and as such served one month, and then promoted to the position of Orderly Sergeant.  He was made First Lieutenant, August 12, 1863, Captain, April 25, 1864, and was discharged July 1865, at Springfield, Illinois.  He was at the battles of Perryville, Hoover’s Gap, Chickamauga, the siege of Atlanta,etc.  The war over, and Mr. Votaw is found at Neoga, engaged in the furniture business.  For many years he has taken an active part in politics, and has been one of the party leaders in Cumberland County.  He has always been one of the most public spirited wide awake men in the county, and has always advocated and aided all public improvements that have been for the good of the county.  He was one of the leaders in the movement of Neoga’s second railroad.  In 1872- a company known as the Paris, Neoga, & St. Louis Railway Company of which company Mr. Votaw was President.  In 1881, a new company, styled the Charleston, Neoga and St. Louis Railroad Co. was formed, and of this he was also President.  Mr. Votaw was a brave and true soldier, and is a citizen of honorable worth and distinction.

J. T. WALLACE, meat dealer and fruit merchant, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., March 6, 1845, son of Thomas and Sarah [Lancaster] Wallace, is the youngest in a family of four children, and is of Scotch-German lineage.  In 1863, Mr. Wallace came to Cumberland County, Ill., and for five years lived and farmed in Neoga Township, and then removed to Centralia, Marion County, and engaged in growing all kinds of fruit.  In 1878 he returned to Cumberland County, and has here since resided.  The marriage of Mr. Wallace to Miss Laura Stevens took place September 9, 1869.  They have three children, viz; Minnie E., Edgar and Clarence.  In September 1883, Mr. Wallace engaged in the meat market business in Neoga.  The business of fruit growing he is still interested in, and of which he is having much success.  His orchards and vineyards at Neoga are very extensive, and each year he continues to make additions.  Mr. Wallace is one of the most extensive small fruit dealers and shippers in Cumberland County.  In 1883, he became the patentee of “The Common Sense Tree Protector”, which has proved to be a most valuable invention.  Mr. Wallace is a staunch Republican in politics.

CAPTAIN A. T. WELMAN, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Oldham County, Ky., December 7, 1828, the son of Andrew and Elizabeth [Williams] Welman, and is of English-German extraction.  His father was born in Va., and his mother in Kentucky, and in 1845, they emigrated to Morgan County, Ind.  Captain Welman remained at home until he was nineteen years of age, when he enlisted in Company B, Fourth Indiana Regiment of the Mexican Service; served about two years, then returned to Indiana.  He was married December 18, 1849, to Miss Sarah J. Pruett.  They had three children.  Mrs. Welman died in 1855.  He was next married in 1859, to Miss Mary Greenlee, of Morgan County, Ind.  This union has had four children borne to it.  Captain Welman enlisted in the late Rebellion June 23, 1861, in Company A, Twenty-Third Indiana Volunteer Infantry as a Private.  August 6, 1861, he was commissioned Captain of his Company.  He resigned his command January 12, 1863, on the account of ill health.  On the 15th of June 1863, he re-enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer; was a Captain of that Company.  He received his final discharge in October 1864.  In 1878, he removed with his family to Shelby County, Ill., and there remained until 1882, when he removed to Cumberland County, Ill, now residing two and a half miles east of Neoga.  He has 224 acres of good land.  He is a Mason; made such in 1861.  He is one of the prominent farmers and citizens of Cumberland County.  they are members of the Christian Church.

CAPTAIN PHILLIP WELSHIMER, is a native of Fairfield County, Ohio, born November 4, 1826, the son of Frederick and Catherine [Peters] Welshimer, and is of German lineage.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, and his mother in Maryland.  The Gazette and Express publishes as follows, in it’s issue of April 12, 1844, at Lancaster, Ohio, concerning the death of the grandparents of the Captain on his mothers’ side:” Died, on March 4 last, at his residence in Clear Creek Township, Abraham Peters, at the advanced age of eighty-four years, seven months, and eight days.  On the 4 inst., his aged widow followed him to the world of spirits.  She had attained the age of eighty-four years, one month, and seven days.  This departed pair were among the first settlers of Clear Creek Township, and had long endured together the privations and hardships of a pioneer life.  They had been united in wedlock sixty-four years, and left twelve children, ninety-six grandchildren, and one hundred and sixty-four great grandchildren, and one fourth of the generation.  Among all their descendants, only one has died in the last forty years.”  The early life of Captain Welshimer was spent in working on the farm and clerking in a store.  The spring of 1848, dates the coming of this man to Cumberland County, Ill., and his settlement in Cottonwood Township, where he remained two years and then removed to Greenup and engaged in general merchandising, and remained until the spring of 1857, when he came to Neoga.  In 1860 he engaged in the merchandise business, and in this he continued until his enlistment in the United States Army.  He assisted in raising the first ten regiments sent out by the State of Illinois.  He enlisted in Company B, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, and soon after his enlistment he was elected First Lieutenant of the Company.  Immediately after the battle of Stone River, he was commissioned Captain of his Company on the account of meritorious conduct at battle.  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Chickamauga, and was held as a prisoner of war for seventeen months.  For seven months he withstood the miseries and ills of the famed Libby Prison.  He was discharged at St. Louis, May 1865.  In 1868, Captain Welshimer was commissioned Postmaster of Neoga.  This position he still retains.  The Neoga post office is one of the most completely arranged and systematically managed offices in the State.  He is assisted in the office by Miss Eva Henderson.  In 1856, Captain Welshimer was commissioned Justice of the Peace, and has held the office for more than a quarter of a century.  He was married in 1847, to Miss Julia Pickering.  They had six children, viz; Ellen R., Alice W., Theodore M., who was accidentally killed April 1865, by the bursting of an anvil that was used in celebrating Lee’s surrender; Lucy A., Charles, and Frederick G.  Mrs. Welshimer died March 12, 1871.  He was next married in 1872, to Miss Malinda McNutt.  Two children have been born to them, viz; Frank M., and Phillip.  Captain Welshimer is a true Republican and a man of sterling merit.

WILLIAM RICHARD WHITE, natural mechanic and patentee of many inventions, was born in 1844, and is the son of B. W. and Elizabeth White.  The early life of Mr. White was one of depression, sorrow poverty, and sore affliction, and was mainly spent in Cumberland County, Ill.  For two years, however, he lived with his parents in Coles County.  At one year of age, he was deprived of the use of his eyes, and in this condition he remained eight years.  At eleven years of age, he had recovered his sight to such an extent that he began attending school.  At eighteen years of age, he began teaching school, at which occupation he continued for fourteen years, and was one of the most noted pedagogues of his day.  In addition to his school teaching, he taught singing school and delivered lectures on astronomy.  In 1867, he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss H. E. Keller, daughter of Riley Keller.  To this union have been born five children, four daughters and one son.  In 1876, he lost his property and his home.  After this, he traded for a time, but in 1878, he received the right to a patent fence, and sold about $40,000 of the patent.  The greatest work of the life of Mr. White was the invention of the “Drive Gate”, a few years later.  This is, without question, one of the best and most useful patents of the kind ever placed before the public.  He has in one year alone sold $50,000 worth.  By energy and economy, Mr. White has amassed quite a large amount of property.  Besides his property in Neoga, which is among the best and most conveniently arranged that the town affords, he has 2,000 acres of valuable land.  Mr. White of today is quite different from the White of fifteen years ago, as far as financial responsibility is concerned, for he is now worth at least $40,000, and at that time he was almost penniless.  In addition to making himself and family comfortable and surrounded by luxuries, he has done much for his kinsmen.  He is one of the leading and most public- spirited men in southern Illinois, and on of the most charitable and generous.  He is with his fortune the same common personage that he was in poverty.  He has many friends and is familiarly called “Happy Bill White, the generous man”.  He has a sound education, and is well read generally.  But for the lack of space, we would gladly publish some choice stanzas of poetry on his patent gate, which are wholly original and of his own composition.

S. F. WILSON, druggist, was born in Washington County, Ind., February 10, 1840, is the son of James and Ann [Hutchinson] Wilson, and of English-Irish lineage.  His father was born in N.C., and his mother in Kentucky, and emigrated to Indiana at an early day and were among the pioneers of the Hoosier State.  In 1852, the removed to Cumberland County, Ill., and settled two and one half miles southeast of Neoga.  There his father died in 1867, and his mother died in Neoga in 1882.  His paternal grandfather was a noted surgeon in the Revolutionary War.  The subject of our notice worked at home for his father until he attained his majority.  He enlisted in the cause of his country, May 1861, in Company B, Twenty-First Illinois Infantry, and participated in the battles of Fredericktown, Miss., Perrysville, Ky., and Stone River, Tenn.  At the latter battle he was wounded.  He was discharged April 1, 1862, and re-enlisted December 16, 1863, in Company G, Sixty-Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry; finally discharged March 21, 1866.  During his second service he was commissioned First Lieutenant.  He was married November 14, 1867, to Miss M.J. Reed.  Mrs. Wilson was born in Ohio County, W. Va.  They have three children, viz; Ambler F., Frank R., and Lena P.  He is a Republican; is a member of the Masonic Fraternity.  Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are leading members of the Presbyterian Church.  Since 1871 he has been engaged in the drug business in Neoga, and has the most extensive line found in Cumberland County.  Mr. Wilson is one of the men of true merit of Cumberland County, and one of the most patriotic men in the State.

IRA M. WRIGHT, dealer in grain and produce, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., June 9, 1836, is the son of Alfred and Lucinda [Buchanan] Wright, and comes of English-Irish origin.  His father was born in Maryland and his mother in Indiana, and they were among the first settlers of the old Hoosier State, having come there in 1821.  It was not until the subject of this sketch had reached the twenty-fifth mil stone in life that he began working for himself, having worked for his father until that time.  In August 1861, he enlisted in the United State Army, in the Third Indiana Calvary.  He served three years and was honorably discharged in October 1864.  He was at the battles of Gettysburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Second Bull Run, Wilderness and Petersburg.  In January 1864, Mr. Wright went to Arkansas and engaged in cotton growing for two years, at which he was successful.  In 1867 he came to Neoga, AND HAS BEEN A RESIDENT OF THE TOWN EVER SINCE.  He first engaged in the grain business, then added produce dealing, and in this connection he has been since engaged.  The business, which was meager at first, has become quite extensive, and he now does at least $30,000 worth of business annually.  He was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Shaw, of Vevay, Ind., May 15, 1868.  to this union has been born three children, viz; Ada M., Edward C., and Walter H.  He is an earnest Republican; a member of the Knights of Honor and the G.A.R. and one of the principle business men of Neoga.  There is not a more enterprising man in Cumberland County than he, nor a more useful citizen.

JOSEPH M. YOUNG, livery man, was born in Vigo County, Ind., September 22, 1821, is the son of Samuel M. and Margaret [McKashey] Young, the fifth in a family of fourteen children, and is of Irish origin.  His father was born in N.C. and his mother in Kentucky.  They emigrated to Vigo County, Ind., in a very early day, and were among the pioneers of that county.  His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his paternal grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution.  His parents both died in Vigo County, Ind., on the old Young homestead, where they had lived for half a century.  Mr. Young was married December 4, 1843, to Miss Matilda Van Cleve.  To this union has been born four children, viz; Mary E., Samuel T., William H., and Margaret J.  Samuel died of injuries received in the late war.  He enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, May 16, 1864, and was discharged September 28, 1864, at Mattoon, Ill.  Mrs. Young died February 7, 1861, and Mr. Young was next married, December 24, 1861, to Miss Mary E. Keller.  Mrs. Young was born in Jackson County, Ind.  Mr. Young came to Cumberland County, Ill, September 1854, and settled ten miles southeast of Neoga.  He rented a farm for two years, then bought eighty acres of prairie, and afterward bought forty acres more.  In 1881 he sold it and bought 100 acres one mile east of Neoga.  In 1878 Mr. Young came to Neoga, and here has since resided.  In 1878 he engaged in the livery business, and in this, he still continues.  In addition to his farm he has quite a number of town lots.  He has been successful in life.  He is a Republican in politics, and also a Mason.  He is one of the pioneers of Cumberland County.

W. H. YOUNG, farmer and general agent for the Howe Sewing Machine, was born in Edgar County, Ill., January 7, 1829, is the son of Claybourn and Mary [Russell] Young, and is of the Irish-English extraction.  His parents were born in Tennessee and emigrated from that State to Edgar County, Ill., in 1827, where they resided for two years, then removed to Boone County, Ind., and lived there until their deaths, the father dying in 1868 and the mother in 1872.  Mr. Young was married October 13, 1849, to Miss Margaret A. McColloch.  Mrs. Young is a native of Tennessee.  To them have been born four children, viz; John A.. M., Alice, Lillie M., and Claybourn H.  In 1850 Mr. young came to Illinois and settled in Edgar County, there remained for three years, then removed to Cumberland County and settled in Neoga Township, three miles northeast of Neoga, where he has since resided and has a farm of 120 acres, and well improved.  Since 1869 Mr. Young has been engaged in the sewing machine business.  He has sold 2,000 machines.  He is a Republican, and they are members of the Presbyterian Church.  They have a daughter in the Indian Territory, teaching the Choctaw Indians. Mr. Young is a leading citizen, and one of the old settlers of Cumberland County.  His office is in Mrs. A.E. Stone’s millinery store, Neoga.

Return To The Main Index