Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois,Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States.
(Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 195.
Transcribed by Judy Rosella Edwards.

HON. WILLIAM GILLMORE is engaged in farming and is a grain and hay dealer of Edgewood. He is also one of the most extensive land-owners of the county and is a prominent and influential citizen, widely and favorably known. With the business interests of this community he has long been connected, and in all the relations of life his career has been one of such integrity and honor that he has gained universal confidence.

Mr. Gillmore was born in Morgan County, Ky., November 7, 1826. His grandfather, William Gillmore, Sr., was a farmer of Alabama and afterward of Kentucky, in which State he spent his last days. Jeremiah Gillmore, the father of our subject, was born in Alabama, but accompanied his parents to Kentucky when a child. He was reared to the occupation of farming, and followed that pursuit throughout his entire life. He married Mary Landsaw, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of William Landsaw. They became the parents of thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters, ten of whom are now living: William, James L., Andrew H., Alfred G.; Julia, widow of John Broom, of Edgewood; Elizabeth, widow of John McKeloy, of Edgewood; George W., Francis Marion, Jasper, and Martha, who is the wife of William Reese. The father of this family came to Illinois in 1832, locating in Marion County, where he resided for fifteen years. He then removed to Fayette County, where his death occurred in 1868, at the age of sixty-six years. He was a prominent and thrifty farmer, a valued citizen, and for a number of years held the office of Justice of the Peace. His wife died in 1874, at the age of seventy.

William Gillmore, of this sketch, spent the first six years of his life in his native State, and then came with his parents to Illinois, where he has since lived. The educational privileges which he received were those afforded by the district schools. He remained under the parental roof until he had attained his majority, when he started out in life for himself. He settled upon a farm of eighty acres, a mile and a-half west of Edgewood. He obtained the land from the Government and it was therefore in its primitive condition. He there built the first cabin which was erected on the prairie in what is now known as West Township.

As a companion and helpmate on life's journey, Mr. Gillmore chose Miss Elizabeth Coals, their wedding being celebrated in June, 1848. They had two children, but one died in infancy. The other, James L., married Nouvenia Laudenberger. They reside upon a farm, a mile and a-half from Edgewood, and have four children: William, Annie, Laura and Charles. Mrs. Gillmore, wife of our subject, died in 1852. She was a member of the Baptist Church. In 1854 Mr. Gillmore married Miss Rhoda Ann Coals, who died in 1878, and in 1883 he was joined in wedlock with Miss Nancy A. Tunnan. They have a little daughter, Maud D.

Mr. Gillmore devoted his time and attention assiduously to the cultivation of his farm and placed the wild prairie under a high state of cultivation. As his financial resources increased, he also added to his land, until he now owns thirteen hundred acres in this county, together with five hundred acres in Jackson County. He carries on farming and also deals extensively in stock, but the greater part of his money has been made in railroad contracting. He also engaged in general merchandising for upwards of twenty years, but has now retired from that line of trade. Mr. Gillmore is a man of excellent business ability, sagacious and far-sighted, and by his own efforts he has risen from a humble position to one of wealth and affluence. He entered official life as Township Supervisor, which office he held two terms. In 1862 he was elected Sheriff of the county and was elected at each succeeding alternate election until 1874. In that year he was elected on the Democratic ticket as Representative to the General Assembly. He was also a member of the State Board of Equalization for eight years. His public and private life has been alike above reproach, and the community finds in Mr. Gillmore one of its best, as well as most prominent, citizens.

 

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 490. Transcribed by Judy Rosella Edwards.

 

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