Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois,Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States.
(Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 195.
Transcribed by Judy Rosella Edwards.

JOSEPH PARTRIDGE, Jr., is Cashier of the First National Bank of Effingham, and a young financier of unusual ability, whose experience as cashier and sole manager of a bank began at the early age of sixteen. He is the eldest son of Joseph and Alice (Smith) Partridge, and from his infancy has been a resident of Effingham. He was born in Jewett, Ill., December 29, 1870, and was brought to Effingham by his parents when six months old. At the age of four years he began attending the public schools of Effingham, and when a lad of ten summers he became a student in St. Joseph's College, of Teutopolis, this county. Two years later he was prepared for advancement and was sent to the College of the Christian Brothers, of St. Louis, where he took a scientific and business course of study. From that institution he was graduated in June, 1885, when in his fifteenth year.

On returning from college, Mr. Partridge was given a position in his father's bank in Effingham, the private banking house of Mr. Partridge. Beginning there in June, 1885, he was soon advanced to the position of cashier, and after October, 1886, had sole charge of the bank for nearly four years, or until it was converted into the First National Bank. When the latter institution was organized he was made cashier and has since continuously served in that capacity. While his father, the President of the bank, visits it twice a day, the entire business management devolves upon the son, whose rare success and prudent management not only while holding his present position, but while cashier of the former bank, entitle him to the utmost confidence and respect. Since the lapse of seven months after the private bank was opened for business, the cashier has had sole charge. The success of the institution has been such as to reflect credit upon its management and to prove very satisfactory to its stockholders. Further mention of the bank is made on another page of this history.

The above account is rather a remarkable history for a young man of twenty-two years of age, and the prospect is certainly favorable, considering his good natural ability, industry and good habits, that he will in mature years win a foremost place among the prominent financiers of his native State. Mr. Partridge is also a stockholder and director in the Effingham Manufacturing Company and also in the Effingham Apple Orchard Company, of which he is Treasurer. He is likewise Treasurer of the Effingham Building and Loan Association and throughout the surrounding community is recognized as a young man of sterling worth and most excellent business ability. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Democratic party.

An incident in the life of Mr. Partridge which is deserving of perpetuation and which he will undoubtedly never forget, was his experience with robbers. It happened one day in 1891 while the Soldiers' Reunion was being held in Effingham and the town full of people, that, as our subject was alone behind the counter of the bank, two strange men entered and immediately covered the cashier with large revolvers. Threatening his life if he made an alarm, they demanded his money. Taking in the situation at a glance, and not being in possession of a weapon, he sprang behind the large safe door that stood as high as his head and drew it partly to, so as to screen him from the ruffians' bullets, and then yelled for help with all his might. The robbers, seeing a crowd collecting, seized a few hundred dollars that lay handy and beat a retreat. The show of their revolvers at first opened a way for them as they ran, but the crowd soon rallied and ran them down. They were captured without anyone being hurt and the whole amount of money taken was recovered. Had the cashier been intimidated by their threats and remained passive, they would, no doubt, have secured nearly all the money in the bank and possibly have escaped. His presence of mind in utilizing the heavy safe door as a shield and his loud outcries, which drew a crowd from the street, disconcerted the robbers.

 

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 381. Transcribed by Judy Rosella Edwards

 

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