MISCELLANEOUS NEWS STORIES

Fayette County Illinois

ILLINOIS CONVENTION, January 9, 1832

PROTECTING THE FRONTIER, May 1, 1833

CORN AND COBS, March 3, 1838

GOV. CARLIN ISSUES STATE BONDS, June 26, 1841

PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENTS, March 31, 1853

GREENBACK CAUSE, Sept. 7, 1878

FAYETTE COUNTY, ILL., W.C.T.U., August 31, 1895

FAYETTE COUNTY (Ill.) TEACHERS, August 18, 1896

PUBLIC NOTICE, RAMSEY, ILLINOIS, Mar. 26, 1920


ILLINOIS CONVENTION
At the Jackson Convention held at Vandalia, Illinois, on the 15th ult--T. W. Smith, the Hon Elias K. Kane, Hon. John M. Robinson, and Gen. Joseph Duncan were appointed delegates to the Jackson Convention for the Vice Presidency to be held in May next.
A State Convention is also to be held at Vandalia for the nomination of an electoral ticket.
[Evening Post (New York, NY), January 9, 1832; transcribed by A. Newell.]


PROTECTING THE FRONTIER
Vandalia, (Illinois)--April 6--Col. Dodge, of the Dragnons, passed through this place on Wednesday last, on his way from Washington to the northwestern frontier.  We learn from Col. Dodge, that the two companies of Rangers, stationed at Vincennes and Danville, under Captains Becks and Brown, have been ordered to repair to Hennepin, on the Illinois River, by the 29th inst. for the protection of our frontiers from the incursions of the Indians, should they meditate hostilities against the whites.  Provisions will be forwarded from St. Louis, by the way of Illinois, for the use of the troops.  Captain Duncan's company will also be ordered to that frontier, should it be necessary for its protection.  We cannot, however, believe that the Indians will make any difficulty in removing from the country which they have sold.
[Charleston Courier (Charleston, SC), May 1, 1833; transcribed by A. Newell]


CORN AND COBS
The Vandalia, Illinois, Free Press of the 27th ult. states that "two wagon loads of specie, under an escort, recently left that place for St. Louis."  So it works.  The Land Office at Vandalia gathers in the specie from the people of Illinois, but not a dollar of it gets back to their pockets.  Do the Laborers on the National Road get the specie for making Uncle Sam's highway?  No they.  Rags are good enough fro their "huge paws," in the opinion of our hard money Government.  The soft hands of the office-holders are fit only to handle "long silken purses."  Do the Banks of Illinois, equally solvent with the Bank of the State of Missouri, get any part of this "solid capital?"  Oh no!  Benton's pet must have the "spoils," although from Mr. Woodbury's statement, the Bank of the State of Missouri has now $187,382.79 in cash on deposits, ready for the fingering of the new Sub-Treasurers, should Van's scheme to plunder the people be adopted.  "Corn for the office-holders, cobs from the people, " say the logo fogos.
[Connecticut Courant (Hartford, CT), March 3, 1837; transcribed by A. Newell]



GOV. CARLIN ISSUES STATE BONDS
The Vandalia (Illinois) Free Press of the 12th states on what it calls unquestionable authority, that Gov. Carlin has caused to be issued upwards of a million of State Bonds, which he has sent eastward to be disposed of for whatever they will bring.
[Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, Va), June 26, 1841; transcribed by A. Newell.]


PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENTS
Appointments by the President,
By and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
Andrew J. Gallaher, of Illinois, to be register of the land office at Vandalia, Illinois, vice James M. Davis, removed.
Daniel Gregory, of Illinois, to be receiver of public moneys at Vandalia, Illinois, vice Jas. T. B. Stapp, removed.
[Alexandria Gazette, Alexandria, Va, March 31, 1853; transcribed by A. Newell.]



GREENBACK CAUSE
    Dr. D. B. Goldsmith, Ramsey, Illinois, one of the earnest, honest, unselfish patriotic and intelligent Greenback men of the State, on receiving from James Springer, Chairman of the National Committee for Illinois, a request to have some one correspond from there to the Chicago Times giving reports of meetings, asks Mr. Springer why he is so much interested in the Times, and if that paper is a friend to the Greenback cause, that efforts should be made to furnish it with items of information to the increasing of its circulation and influence, both of which are directed against Greenback men.  It seems to be popular with some of the so-called Greenback men in this State to do everything they possibly can to aid newspapers that are warring against them, at the same time ignoring every Greenback paper, no matter how faithfully and laboriously its editor may work to call the attention of people to the evils upon them as taxpayers, and the necessity of ignoring both of the old parties thaat continually sneer at Greenback advocates.  If those who profess to be Greenback men would discontinue the playing to the hands of the Democrats, the Greenback cause would get along better and faster than it does.
    The question asked by Dr. Goldsmith is pertinent, not only to this time and section, but others; although for calling attention to this matter we shall again be accused of disorganizing the Greenback party!  
[Pomeroy's Democrat (Chicago, IL), Sept. 7, 1878; transcribed by A. Newell.]

(Note:  The Greenback Party (known successively as the Independent Party, the National Independent Party, and the Greenback Labor Party) was an American political party with an anti-monopoly ideology which was active between 1874 and 1889. The party fielded Presidential tickets three times — in the elections of 1876, 1880, and 1884, before fading away.
The party's name referred to the non-gold backed paper money, commonly known as "greenbacks", issued by the North during the American Civil War and shortly afterward. The party opposed the deflationary lowering of prices paid to producers entailed by a return to a bullion-based monetary system, the policy favored by the dominant Republican Party. Continued use of unbacked currency, it was believed, would better foster business and assist farmers by raising prices and making debts easier to pay.
Initially an agrarian organization associated with the policies of the Grange, from 1878 the organization took the name Greenback Labor Party and attempted to forge a farmer-labor alliance, adding industrial reforms to its agenda, such as support of the 8-hour day and opposition to the use of state or private force to suppress union strikes.  The organization faded into oblivion in the second half of the 1880s, with its basic program reborn shortly under the aegis of the People's Party, commonly known as the "Populists.")  [Source:  Wikipedia]



FAYETTE COUNTY, ILL., W.C.T.U.
Ramsey, Ill., Aug. 30--The annual convention of the Fayette County W. C. T. U. adjourned today after being in session two days.  The township reports made a good showing and the membership in the county is rapidly growing.
[St. Louis (MO) Republic, August 31, 1895; transcribed by A. Newell]


FAYETTE COUNTY ILLINOIS TEACHERS
Vandalia, Ill., Aug. 17--The annual Fayette County Teachers' Institute met here today with 125 teachers enrolled.  The meeting will continue through this week.  The sessions are being conducted by County Superintendent Fogler, assisted by the following able instructors:  Professor J. W. Henninger, Assistant State Superintendent of Schools, Professor W. T. Gooden of Charleston, and Professor S. C. Hanson of Williamsport.  Much interest is manifested by the teachers.  
[St. Louis, (MO) Republic, August 18, 1896; transcribed by A. Newell.]



PUBLIC NOTICE
RAMSEY, ILLINOIS
Bids for the erection of a new addition to a school will be received by the Board of Education of School District No. 37, at Ramsey, Illinois, according to drawings and specifications by S. J. Hanen and Son, Architects, not later than one o'clock noon (1:00 p.m.) April 15, 1920, at the People's State Bank of Ramsey.  Sets of same may be obtained at same bank.
By order of the Board,
Jas. H. Hunt, President

[Source:  Daily Illinois State Journal, (Springfield, IL), March 26, 1920; transcribed by A. Newell]


Return to Index

©2015 Illinois Genealogy Trails