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Genealogy Trails - Greene County, Illinois

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BAKER J. S. - farmer. Sec. 15, P.O. White Hall, was born Feb. 11, 1846, in Scott Co., Ill.; was married to Sarah F. Lakin, daughter of Thomas Lakin, who was born, June 9, 1845, in Greene Co., Ill.; have three children: Carlos E., born July 2, 1868, died June 20, 1870; Sarah E., born Jan. 20, 1871; George E., born April 24, 1876
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 642(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BAKER, JOSEPH R. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 20, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Baker was born in 1842, in Pennsylvania, second child of Elijah and Elizabeth Baker. His early years were passed among the rugged hills of Pennsylvania. When the war broke out he enlisted in Co. B, 10th Pennsylvania volunteers, for three years service, a non-commissioned officer. He became engaged in the famous battles of Gettysburg, Antietam, second battle of Bull's Run; wounded at the battle of White Oak Swamps; honorably discharged when the war closed. He returned to Pennsylvania, where he followed the occupation of a miner for a period of ten years, and during this time married, in 1867, Miss Martha Chandler, a native of New York, by whom he has one child, Jennie E. Nine years ago he first settled in Greene County, where Mrs. Baker died in 1873. He was united in marriage to Miss Flora Milliken, a daughter of Emanuel Milliken, by whom he has two children, Dwight and Ann Ida
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 583(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BAKER W. C. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. White Hall. The subject of this sketch was born Aug. 18, 1848, in Scott Co., Ill.; was married, Oct. 6, 1870, to Alice Griswold, daughter of Damon Griswold; she was born Aug. 12, 1849; have four children: Mabel, born June 30, 1871; Fred, born July 1, 1873; Edgar, born May 27, 1875; Charles, born Aug. 8, 1877, died Dec. 29, 1877. The father of Mr. Baker was born, Feb. 2, 1802, in Kentucky, died, June 6, 1863, in Greene Co., Ill.; was married twice: first, April 13, 1820, to Sallie McCarty, who died Aug. 12, 1852; was married second, Sept. 8, 1835, to Elizabeth Ecton, who died Aug. 31, 1855; by the two marriages, fourteen children. The subject of this sketch was last child of the second marriage; participated in the late rebellion; enlisted in 1864, and was honorably discharged in 1865; he was in the battles that were fought around Mobile, which lasted for three weeks; has followed the occupation of farming all his life, and now owns about 200 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 642(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDES JOHN - farmer. Sec. 1, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in Prussia, Nov. 1, 1825; came to this country in 1857, where he remained until he accumulated means to purchase the land he now owns. Was married in 1865. to Miss Regina Taffrey. They have had five children; Joseph, born Nov. 1, 1867; John B., born March 19, 1869; Kathrina, born Feb. 14, 1871; Peter, born Sept. 11, 1873; Anna M., born Aug. 20, 1878. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and says he has always voted the Democratic ticket. He owns 40 acres of Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 629(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN E. V. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 20, P.O. White Hall; born in Ohio, 1827; came to Greene Co., Ill., in 1848, when he was twenty-one years of age; was married in 1850 to Mary Pankey, a native of Greene Co., born in 1835; have no children. Mr. Baldwin came to Greene Co. with a willing hand and a stout heart, and has accumulated 400 acres of farming land, which is under good cultivation, and has one of the finest barns in Greene Co.; can feed fifty head of stock under shelter, has running water through his barn yard all the year
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN F. M. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 17, P.O. White Hall. Born in Warren County, Ohio, 1831; came to Greene County, Ill., with his father, Benjamin Baldwin, who was born in Virginia, 1792; was married in Warren County, Ohio, about 1814, to Martha Varner, who was born 1796, in Hamilton County, O., near Newtown; lives at the age of 82 years. Her husband, B. Baldwin, died Feb., 1865, in White Hall. He was an industrious and enterprising man, had the respect of all who knew him. Was elected to the legislature of Ohio in 1829, serving two terms, and elected in Illinois to the same office in 1860; served one term. Was in the War of 1812. Started in life without any means only a set of shoemaker's tools. Had accumulated some wealth in Ohio before he came to Greene County, in 1847; came prospecting in that year and bought 320 acres of land; returned to Ohio and disposed of what property he could; returned to Greene County in 1849; bought 760 acres, returned again to Ohio and brought his family to Greene County in 1850. Bought 320 acres more land, disposed of his homestead in Ohio, bought more land in Greene County, and kept buying, till he owned in all during his life 3,020 acres, which he gave to his children as they became of age. The subject of this sketch was married April 5th, 1855, to Mary A. Bowman, who was born in Logan County, Ill., Dec. 11, 1832; have nine children; five living: Etna, born March 29, 1856; married to Damon Griswold. Mattie, born March 31, 1858; married to Marcus North. Twins "Minnie and Fannie" born May 7, 1860. Fannie died Sept. 9, 1862. Eddie, born April 6, 1862; died Nov. 18, 1875. Harry, born Dec. 5, 1863. Elias, born May 15, 1865; died Sept. 2, 1876. Aggie, born June 18, 1867. Emery, born March 28, 1867; died Aug. 18, 1869. Mr. Baldwin has followed milling part of his life, but is now farming; has a fine orchard of choice fruits; owns 120 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 642-3(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN GEORGE E. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 21, P.O. White Hall, was born Dec. 25, 1849, in Ohio. Came to Greene County, Ill., in 1850. Was married to Theresa Kendall, daughter of Nathaniel Kendall, Dec. 27, 1870. She was born Oct. 24, 1851, in Greene County. Have four children: Marilla, born Nov 14, 1871; deceased. Artemus W., born Nov. 7, 1872. Benjamin F., born Jan. 3, 1875. Peter, born Jan. 6, 1877. Mr. Baldwin lives on the estate of his father, B. F. Baldwin, and has one of the best stock farms in Greene County. On one part of the estate there is a spring of living water, which is one of the finest in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 643(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN HANNAH MRS. - Sec. 21, P.O. White Hall. Born in 1834. B. F. Baldwin, deceased, the husband of the subject of this sketch, was born in Warren County, Ohio, in 1821. Came to Greene County March, 1850; was married to Hannah Sever Oct. 15, 1840, and died Feb. 5, 1875; have seven children: Louis S., Martha M., deceased; Mary A., George E., Alice C, John A., Alva C. Mrs. Baldwin lives on the estate of her late husband, with her three sons, which consists of 2,000 acres of land, shipping about one thousand head of cattle from the farm every year. Has one of the finest stock farms in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 643(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN JANE M. MRS. - Sec. 16, P.O. White Hall. J. W. Baldwin, deceased, was born Nov. 10, 1836, died Oct. 3, 1873. Was married to Miss Jane M. Headrick, daughter of John Headrick, of Carrollton, Oct. 31, 1866. Have four children: Franklin C, born Feb. 18, 1867; Hattie O., born Sept. 28, 1869; Albert R., born Dec. 16, 1870; Mary, born Dec. 3, 1872. Mrs. Baldwin owns 240 acres of Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 643(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALDWIN THOMAS J. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. White Hall, was born Oct. 6, 1833, in Warren County, O. Came to Greene County Nov. 10, 1850, at the age of 17. Followed the occupation of a farmer all his life, and owns 24O acres of fine farming land, which he inherited from his father. Was married to Margaret F, Headrick June 28, 1864, who was the daughter of John Headrick, Carrollton. Have six children: Edward V., born May 10, 1865; Amy A., born July 8, 1866; Ina E., born Dec. 20, 1868; David M., born April 8, 1873; Alice A., born July 8, 1875
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 643(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALLARD A. J. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 21, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Ballard was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, March 2d, 1828; third child of Avery and Anna R Ballard, whose maiden name was Wallace. Avery Ballard moved from North Carolina to Tennessee in his twentieth year, and there married the lady above mentioned. In 1831, accompanied by his wife and four children, he set out for Illinois in a two-wheeled ox cart. The trip occupied some four weeks, and when he landed in Illinois he had but twenty-five cents in money. He settled on the farm now owned by Chester Crabtree, entering 160 acres of land from the government; also purchased forty acres from Andrew Bingham, and after many years he became a prosperous farmer. He was treacherously assassinated on the 16th of April, 1870. This unprovoked murder made a deep impression on the community, who thoroughly respected Mr. Ballard, as he was an extremely law-abiding citizen and it was not supposed that he had an enemy in the world. Mrs. Ballard is still living. Andrew, from whom this sketch is obtained, married in his twenty-first year Miss Martha Smith, a daughter of David Smith, by whom he had eight children, seven of whom are living: Mary, who resides in Missouri, Sherry, Frances, Emily, Melissa, William, Henry, and Maitie. Mr. Ballard is the owner of 100 acres, 80 acres prairie and 20 timber
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 547(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BALLARD LOUIS J. - farmer. Sec. 7, P.O. White Hall, was born in Lincoln County, N. C. Oct. 4, 1800, the sixth child of ten children of Wiley and Nancy Ballard, who were of English descent. At the age of ten years the subject of this sketch moved to Tennessee, and in July 22, 1824, he married Miss Rutha Pace. In 1829 they removed to this county, where they have since remained. They have had born unto them twelve children, five of whom are living: William P., born Dec. 17, 1831; Wiley, born Dec. 27, 1833; Sarah, born March 28, 1842; Louis N., born March 30, 1844; Joseph C, born April 15, 1848. Mr. Ballard and wife are members of the M. E. Church since 1838, and have endeavored to live a life that may be emulated by the younger. He has not been eager after this world's goods, being content to live a quiet and retired life, satisfied with a living, and to lay up treasure where "moth and rust doth not corrupt," rather than this world's goods, which perish with using. Has not paid much attention to politics; is identified with the Democratic party
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 629(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BALLARD W. P. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 4, P.O. Roodhouse. During the Autumn of 1829, when glowing accounts were sent out of the fertility of the now great western State of Illinois, the Ballard family, consisting of husband, wife, and three children, set out in a covered wagon for Greene County; and on reaching the garden spot of the west, located near the present village of Berdan. The first winter was spent in a log cabin, open at one end, and usually closed during severe weather with a blanket. A large open fire-place in one end made room for large back logs that when fairly ablaze threw a ruddy glow over the inmates, and despite the keen, cutting weather that at times fairly shook the little cabin, spread a genial warmth through the one roomed dwelling. When warm weather came a more comfortable cabin was built. As Mr. Ballard, Senior, is still living, and a resident of Greene County, we now narrate a few facts in reference to the industrious gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch. At a proper age he attended school during the winter, his first teacher being Abel Spencer, once circuit clerk of Carrollton. In his twentieth year he was married to Miss Pamelia Smith, a daughter of David Smith. When the war came on he enlisted in Co. I, 91st Ills. Infty., for three years, or during the war; honorably discharged in 1865. He returned to Greene County, where he has since followed farming, owning 160 acres in township 12, range 11. Like the early pioneers, the generosity of Mr. Ballard is unbounded. Of nine children born of this marriage, all are living: Martha Ann, James L., David L., Emily J., 'Mary F., Sarah E., Naomi E., Wm. H., and Chas. E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 583-4(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BALLOW G. A. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 30, P.O. White Hall, was born Dec. 10, 1826, in Virginia. Came to Greene County, Ill., July, 1845. Was married Dec. 24, 1848, to Margaret North, the daughter of W. H. North, who was born in Sept. 1828; had eight children, two of which are dead: Burley E., born Sept. 2, 1850; Laura, born July 6, 1853, died July 7, 1863; Charles J., born Jan. 14, 1855; Lizzie M., born Jan. 20, 1857; Sarah E., born Dec. 10, 1859; Emily J., born August 10, 1862; Catharine B., born Jan. 31, 1865, James H., born July 4, 1869, died Dec. 12, 1874. The father and mother of Mr. Ballow died in Virginia when he was very small. He came to Greene County, Ill., when he was 19 years of age, and started in life as a farmer, and owns 50 acres of well improved land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 643-4(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BANDY HORATIO - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 25, P. O. Carrollton, was born in Greene County, Jan. 9, 1831; is the son of Elihu and Elizabeth Bandy, who came to Greene County in an early day, and entered the land where Roodhouse now stands, living there for several years till 1833, sold the land and entered southwest of Carrollton, where he still resides; was in the war of 1812. The subject of this sketch was educated at the old style log school house ; was married March 25, 1858, to Miss Malinda Ray, who was born March 7, 1836, in Missouri, she is the daughter of Asa and Rhoda Ray. Mr. Bandy's family consists of ten children, all of whom are living: Martha E., born Dec. 30, 1858 ; Carolina M., May 23, 1861; Asa E., Dec. 30, 1862; Mahulda C, Feb. 6, 1865 ; Horatio T., Nov. 16, 1866 ; John W., Sept. 28, 1868 ; James M., Sept. 22, 1870; Edgar S., Feb. 17. 1873; Frances M., Feb. 17, 1875 ; Wade T., Nov. 11, 1877. Mr. Bandy started in life with no means, is a hard working man, and has accumulated 165 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 716(T10N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BANDY, THOS. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 25, P. O. Carrollton, was born in Greene County, Ill., 1828, on the land that is now Roodhouse, and which was owned by his father E. Bandy at that time, who is one of the oldest settlers of Greene County. The subject of this sketch was educated in subscription schools, the first school he attended was a log structure with a dirt floor, and the old time fireplace, and the seats were rude benches made of slabs with no support for the back ; being reared in an early day, he has seen some of the privations of the earlier settlers of Greene County ; was married in 1856 to Julia A. Looper, who was born in 1832 in Greene County, she is the danghter of David and Nancy Looper. Their union was blessed with ten children, seven living : Arthur L., Alice E., Robert C, Emma A., and (twins) Thomas M. and Julia A., and James E. Mr. Bandy owns 195 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 716(T10N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BARNETT, GEORGE - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Barnett is the third child of William and Catherine Barnett, natives of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Illinois in 1835, locating in Greene County, near the present farm residence of the subject of this sketch, where land was purchased, and here were spent the last days of William Barnett, who was in his later days a prosperous farmer. His wife, who still survives, resides on the old homestead, where so many of her pioneer days were spent. George is a native of Greene County, born in 1835. Growing to mature years he received a good common school education. From his earliest years he has followed farming successfully. In 1864, he was married to Miss Eliza Jane Hutton, a daughter of John Hutton. Three years later Mrs. Barnett was laid at rest in the Jones cemetery. Mr. Barnett owns 160 acres of valuable Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 584(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BARNETT, HENRY A. - farmer. Sec. 14, P.O. Wrightsville, was born June 1, 1843, on the identical section he now lives upon. Nov. 2, 1865, he married Miss Mary E. Wood; they have had nine children, of whom six are now living: Charles S., Henry L. Susan H, Mary E., Luella A., and George A. Mr. Barnett was a member of the 133d Reg. Ill. State Vol., in which he enlisted in 1864, in the 100 day service. He is Republican in sentiment and cast his first vote for "Honest Old Abe." Has a good farm
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 629(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BARNETT, W. L. - CARROLLTON TILE WORKS, near the C. & A. passenger depot, was constructed last Spring by that enterprising gentleman, W. L. Barnett, whose genial face, for the past ten years, has been frequently seen at the window of the C. & A. passenger depot, at Carrollton, where he officiates as agent and telegraph operator. To his practical mind it became evident that what the farmers of Illinois were in need of was more tile and less wet land. With his usual zeal he set to work, and the result is, that we to-day have tile works that will bear comparison with any other similar establishment. The clay used is of a very superior quality, and thoroughly ground before entering into the manufacture of tiling. This tile is manufactured from three to eight inches, is of very superior quality, and finds a ready sale. Mr. Barnett, senior member of this firm, was born in Indiana, November 11, 1846. When but eleven years old his parents moved to Mattoon, Ill., where young Barnett received a liberal education; attaining the age of fifteen he entered the employ of the Terre Haute R.R. Co., becoming a telegraph operator in the city of Mattoon, Ill. When the Jacksonville division of the St. L.,J.& C.Ry. was constructed, he went to Murrayville, Morgan county. Ill., where he officiated in his former capacity, and was probably the first operator on that line; proceeding from here to Jacksonville, thence to Mason City, remaining here thirteen months; he came to Carrollton. At Mattoon Mr. Barnett was married to Miss Amelia Allen, daughter of H. A. Allen, of Mattoon, now of Geneva Lake, Wis.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt

BARRETT, WILLIAM - The above named gentleman, who came to Roodhouse one year ago and opened a first class tailoring establishment, was born in Dublin City, Ireland, in 1823. In 1847 he emigrated to America, landing in New York City, he remained there many years of his life, and there learned the trade of tailoring, becoming a very superior workman. To the city of Richmond, Virginia, he directed his footsteps, before the war, where he began business, and was very successful. Remaining during the stormy scenes of the Rebellion, in 1869 he made his way to Philadelphia, thence to New York City, thence to Illinois. Mr. Barrett married in Ohio. From past experience in the leading houses in Ohio and Illinois he is prepared to do first class work at as low prices as first class work can be done. Give him a call
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 568(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt

BARROW, A. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 27, P.O. White Hall. A. Barrow was in his eighth year when his parents, James and Lucy Barrow, settled in Greene County, on the farm property now owned by him. James Barrow was a native of North Carolina, who moved to Kentucky in an early day, where he married. When the family landed in Greene County, Carrollton was but a village, where but a few rough dwellings were seen. While yet a boy A. H. Barrow witnessed the hanging of Cavanaugh near the present farm-residence of C. F. Bruce; the prisoner confined in an old jail that looked even worse than the present stone structure, was led forth to execution while the rain poured in torrents. This affair creating a great sensation at the time, owing to the circumstances surrounding it. Mr. Barrow well remembers the marching through White Hall of the volunteers for the Black Hawk War. In his thirtieth year he was married to Miss Polly Ann Childers, by whom he had three children: Pleasant M., James H.and Susan J. Mrs. Barrow died in 1870. October 19, 1875, Mr. Barrow was married to Miss Delilah Heaton, whose father was county surveyor. Mr. Barrow is a very successful farmer, owning 200 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 548(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BARROW, ALFRED H. - farmer and founder of the live little shipping town of Barrow, was born in the old homestead of his father, Joseph Barrow, in 1834. He received a common school education; in 1862 he was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Shaw, a daughter of David Shaw, of Greene County. Mr. Barrow has one adopted child, Gracie. He has met with more than ordinary success as a farmer. A few words in reference to the history of Barrow Station; in 1871 the property adjoining the town was owned by Mr. Barrow. The consideration of his sale of land to the railroad company was in this wise: the company were to have the right of way through his farm; he to donate three acres of land for depot, stock yards, etc.; this offer from the railroad was responded to by Mr. Barrow who is ever alive to all things pertaining to the public good; owing to his enterprise the railroad was soon in running operation, and the result is another thriving town has sprung up in Greene Co., in which dwells an industrious people. Mr. Barrow at one time owned the greater portion of the town, and assisted in building the greater portion of the town. Close to this enterprising town he owns 300 acres of valuable land; for ten years he was a merchant at White Hall; also in the mercantile business at Manchester, Scott Co. During the war he bought government horses and mules, having as a partner George H, Amos
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 548(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BARROW, JOSEPH - deceased, who is well remembered for his many generous qualities by the early settlers of Greene County, was born in Tennessee, and emigrated to Illinois in 1818, becoming cotemporary with such early settlers as the Huitts, Thomases and others. The Barrow family, who afterwards became among the wealthier farmers of Greene County, settled on the prairie near what is now White Hall, and were, in all probability, the original settlers of the town. Joseph Barrow was married in 1825 to Miss Elizabeth Taylor. But little is known of the early history of Joseph Barrow. He was a very industrious man, and became a prominent farmer. Wm. H. Barrow, from whom this sketch is obtained, resides on the original homestead, settled on over half a century ago; he necessarily lived the frugal life of the pioneer for many years, and step by step arose to a prominent position; a farmer, he now owns over 1000 acres of land, on which he erected some years ago a handsome farm residence, in Township 12, Range 12; in his twenty-fifth year he was married to Miss Mary J. Bingham, a daughter of Elisha Bingham; in 1857 he was a partner in a grocery store at White Hall, as this was the year of the panic it proved a very hard blow to him in his business transactions, but his unswerving integrity and strict honesty carried him safely through. This strict sense of honor laid the foundation for his present success in life; at one time Mr. Barrow held the position of county commissioner. There were five children born of this marriage: Addie, Joseph, William, Nettie and Alfred; the three children first mentioned are not living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 548-9(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BARROW TILE FACTORY - Barrow, Greene County. Messrs Ashley & Bruce, proprietors. The above named enterprising gentlemen entered upon the transaction of the above important business one year ago; they are doing a thriving business, manufacturing a very superior article, from 3 inch tiling to 8 inch; these tile are manufactured from a very superior quality of clay, and give tlie best of satisfaction wherever introduced; the factory is the only one at Barrow; employs from six to eight men, and from four to eight thousand tile of the different sizes, are shipped daily; a good showing indeed for the enterprising firm. Mr. C. F. Bruce, from whom this sketch is obtained, was born in New Hampshire, March, 1830; in his twenty-fourth year he went to Vermont, also to Massachusetts, and shortly afterwards wended his way to Illinois; locating at Scott Co. in 1856, where in connection with others he entered into the saw milling business, he also farmed for a considerable time on the Big Sandy; four years ago he became a resident of Barrow, where he built the elevator now owned by J. Israel of White Hall; he next built a grist mill, now owned by Whittaker & Rigg; In 1857 he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Hood, by whom he has two children: Eva E. and Minnie M.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 549(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BARTHOLOMEW, B. B. - hotel and livery, P. O. Greenfield. "Bart" as he is familiarly known, was born in Copporel Green, Essex County, England, Dec. 1826; was the son of Charles and Hannah B. whose maiden name was Bradbrook. At the age of eleven years he came to this country, arriving at Buffalo, N. Y., where he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and after his trade was completed he worked at journey work up to the time he was married, which occurred Feb. 10, 1853. His wife's maiden name was Mary Hassett, who lived at Lancaster, ten miles east of Buffalo. By this marriage they have had two children: Charles, born April 11, 1855, died Jan. 9, 1857; Mary E. born in Davenport, Iowa, May 23, 1858, now the wife of H. P. Dix, of St. Louis, Mo. After Bart's, marriage he had charge of the repairs on the New York Central Railroad for two years and nine months; then came west to Davenport, Iowa, where he remained until May, 1859, when he came to this county and located at Carrollton, where he engaged at his trade as builder and contractor, in which he was engaged for about ten years; was engaged on some of the public works in the county, and as contractor and builder he was a success; he being a good workman and a man of great energy he always pushed a job through with dispatch when he undertook it; hence he was always in demand and always had all the work he could command. He engaged in this business up to the time of the war, when he was engaged for about one-and-a-half years in selling goods, and was considered a fine salesman, and at this business proved himself a success. He then engaged in real estate and insurance business in which he was connected for six years, then sold out, and in Dec. 1875, moved to Greenfield and bought out the Secor heirs and fitted up and run the first hotel that has ever been conducted on the hue system. He has a livery in connection with his business, and his house is the popular resort for all the commercial men who stop in the town, as his fame as a hotel man is well known and the traveling men are well aware when they turn in with "Bart," that the best of fare and the cleanest of beds are awaiting them. During Bart's, sojourn in Carrollton he was owner of the famous trotter, of Greene County, "Honest John"; he has had a good deal of experience with horseflesh, and there are few men who think more of a good horse than Bart. On Feb. the 11, 1878, Bart, and wife celebrated their silver wedding, which was the grandest affair that has taken place in the town for many years; the guests were numerous and the presents various and elegant. During the last twenty years Bart. has been the leading auctioneer of the county. In conclusion, there are but few men who have more ambition and energy than he, and whenever his attention is directed towards any enterprise, success is inevitable. Such is but in brief the sketch of B. B. Bartholomew "Mine host of 'Bart's' hotel."
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 662-3(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BARTON, ISAAC - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 21, was born in Lancaster Township, Lancaster County, Pa., on the 28th of April, 1817. He was the fifth child of Thomas and Phoebe Ann Barton, both natives of England, who voyaged to America in an early day, settling in Pennsylvania, where he followed farming, and where he was married on the 2d of May, 1839, to Miss Mary Chamberlain, of Little York, who died on the 25th of April, 1848. When war was declared between Mexico and the United States Government, Isaac Barton enlisted in Co. I, 1st Regular Inf., and participated in the Battles of Palo Alto, Resaca, Monterey, Vera Cruz, Cerro Cordo, Penale Pass, Cherubusco, Molino Del Rey, and was also at the siege of Mexico. On leaving Pennsylvania, in 1858, he proceeded to Iowa, where he remained two years, when he came to Greene County. In 1859, during the Pike's Peak excitement, he made an overland trip, and remained through one Summer in Colorado. Returning to Greene County, he was married to Mrs. Ann J. Carter, on the ist day of Jan., i860. Mrs. Barton is a daughter of Stephen and Mary Spencer. They have two children, Elisha T, and Eva Ann
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 652(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BASSHAM, B. U. - hotel and livery, Greenfield, was born in Jackson County, Tennessee, Nov. 4, 1842, son of Merideth A. Basshani; his mother's name was Elizabeth A. Fox prior to her marriage, and a native of Tennessee. His father was born in the "Old Dominion," and emigrated to Tennessee at an early day and became a well-to-do farmer; but in consequence of his inability to say "No," went security to such an extent that he became embarrassed and lost nearly every thing he had, and to better his fortune emigrated to this State, first locating in Madison County; remained two years, then moved to Jersey, where he farmed about ten years; then went to Macoupin County, where he bought him a farm and lived eight years; then sold out and moved to Greenfield, bought the farm now owned by Smith Lemasters, where he lived until he died, which occurred April 2, 1875. Benjamin remained under the parental roof until April, 1865, when he married Louisa V. McBride, a native of this county, had four children: John H., born Jan. 12, 1866; Eva May, born May 1, 1868; Altha Ann, born Sept. 14, 1870; Laura E., born Feb. 1, 1873. After his marriage, farmed six years on the McBride property, of which he had a lease. Nov. 12, 1864, moved to Greenfield, where his wife died March 11, 1874. After coming to town was engaged in teaming, which business not being satisfactory, abandoned it and bought out the livery stable owned by Joseph Carter, Nov. 12, 1874. Two years later built the hotel building he now occupies, and has since been running it in connection with his livery. June 26, 1876, was married to Elizabeth J. Crauch, born in Washington Tennessee, May 11, 1841. No issue.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 663(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BATES, PETER J. - retired farmer. Peter J. Bates is a native of New York State, where he was born in 1813, and is the youngest son of Peter and Elizabeth Bates. On the old farm homestead our subject worked almost from the lime his head reached the plow handles until attaining his twenty-fifth year, when he crossed the plains for southern Illinois, settling in Greene County some eight miles southwest of White Hall, where he secured employment in the White Hall Steam Mill, used principally as a saw mill, although in connection crude machinery was in use for the grinding of grist. During this time Mr. Bates was the owner of farm property and afterwards turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, during the war becoming the proprietor of a hotel. May 7, 1839, he was married to Miss Rebecca Rumrill, a daughter of John Rumrill, a native of Germany, Of this marriage five children were born, Mary E. deceased, Wesley B., Cornelia C, Geo. B. deceased, and Lewis O. Two years ago Mr. Bates erected his present residence and established what is now the well-known Bates' Nursery. Mrs. Bates died on the 24th of March, 1875; for many years Mrs. Bates was prominently identified with the M. E. church, and her untimely death was deeply deplored by a large circle of acquaintances
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 524-5 (White Hall; - transcribed by bmt

Bates, Theodore P. - industrial commissioner; born, White Hall, Greene Co., ILL., Aug. 25, 1873; son of Wesley P. and Mary M. (Baker) Bates; educated in public and high schools, White Hall. In employ of Swift & Co., 1892 and 1893; handling manufacturing properties, East St. Louis, 1894-1906, and in same business in St. Louis and East St. Louis, 1906-09; sales manager for Kettle River Company's creosoting plant, wood paving blocks, etc., 1909 and 1910; industrial commissioner for Business Men's League since 1910. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Mercantile, Normandie Golf. Recreations: golf and motoring. Office: 510 Locust St. Residence: 11 Beverly PL.
(Source: "The Book of St. Louisans", Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

BEADNELL, GEORGE - foreman over the extensive clay works of the White Hall Co., was born at Dunham, England, March 3, 1827; in his early years a coalminer in England, where he gained extensive knowledge. At the early age of nineteen he was united in marriage; leaving England December, 1849, he landed in New Orleans, and thence to Kentucky, and thence to St. Clair Co., Ill., entering the employ of Mr. Gathside, a prominent citizen of the place. In 1865, he came to White Hall, first working for Isaac Tunison. His large experience as a miner had given him an enviable reputation, and now for many years he officiated in the capacity of foreman, to the general satisfaction of one of the most substantial companies in their line, in America
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 584(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BEASON, W. S. - farmer. Sec. 13, P. O, Wrightsville, was born in this county, Nov. 4, 1847; was the ninth child of ten children of David and Mary Beason, who were early settlers, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter Tennessee. In 1873 Mr. Beason was married to Miss Julia Cannedy, born in this county; from this alliance they have had three children: Guynn, born Jan. 17, 1873; Bruce, May 4, 1875; Samuel L., March 29, 1876. Mr. Beason lost his wife Feb. 27, 1878. Since then his mother has been keeping house for him. He is Democratic and a staunch advocate of Jacksonian principles. Mr. Beason owns 160 acres of land, and hopes to become one of the opulent men in his township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 629-30(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BEEBE, SAMUEL L. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 21, P.O. Carrollton. SamuelBeebe is a native of Greene Co. born May 11, 1831, the third child of Seldon and Fidelia Beebe. As Seldon Beebe was a cotemporary settler, with such early pioneers as Samuel Thomas, John Huitt, and others, a short description of him will be of interest to those who knew him in the days of log cabins and unbroken prairie. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and first sought a home in Greene County, as early as 1818, becoming permanently located two years later. Of his early life here, but little can be learned. He necessarily endured many privations, as did all who sought a home in Illinois, when many weary miles were traveled to a horse mill, or the long journey made to St. Louis or Edwardsville, then the largest cities. In 1853, Mr. Beebe was laid at rest amid the scenes of his labors, a representative pioneer, who helped very materially toward the prosperous condition of this county, His wife was Miss Fidelia Bushnell, a worthy wife and mother, who died in l863. The survivors of the family are four : Caroline, Sarah, Marcus and Samuel L., from whom this narrative is obtained. Nov. 31, 1857, he was united in marriage to Eunice Sprague, a daughter of Ephraim and Harriet Sprague, by whom he has three children: HattieF., Martha A. and Henry Y. Passing beyond the earlier years of Mr. Beebe, we arrive at the present year; the owner of a valuable farm in Christian County, also in Greene, on which he has lately erected a beautiful farm residence. He is among our most substantial agriculturists
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 508(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BELL, JOHN - farmer, Sec. 22, P.O. Athensville, born in Yorkshire, Eng.,Sept. 10, 1837; came to this country in 1854, and lived with his uncle, Mr. Thomas Bell, of Morgan County, who emigrated to this country many years ago, and still resides in Morgan Co. Mr. Bell married Dec. 22, 1861,-to Elizabeth Gordon, born in Canada, July 17, 1834. Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bell removed to Greene Co., where a family of five children have been born, viz.: Lizzie, born Oct. 16, 1862; Richard T., Nov. 11, 1864; Frederick H., Dec. 13, 1867; John F., July 7, 1869, and George T., Sept. 4, 1871. Mr. Bell has been a farmer all his life. Owns seventy acres, well improved
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 603(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BELL, MARTIN L. - farmer. Sec. 5, P.O. White Hall, was born in this county Dec. 8, 1844; was the third child of four children of Zachariah and Susanna Bell, who were early settlers. In the early part of Luther's life he was engaged as engineer and general worker about a mill; went to California, remained two years, then returned to this State, and on Oct. 22, 1865, abandoned the life of a bachelor and married Harriet C. Lorton, who was born on the section that they now are living on. They have had four children, viz.: Carrie E., born Nov. 13, 1869; Robert E., born July 10, 1871; Mattie H. born Nov. 5, 1874; Clinton L., born Aug. 14, 1877. Mr. Bell now owns fifty acres of land in this township, which he intends building upon in the Spring; he has also an interest in some Nebraska land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 630(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BERMIS, PHILLIP - farmer, Sec. 13, P. O.Greenfield. Was born in Flomborn Chris Alzei, Hesse Darmstadt, July 28, 1830; is the son of Peter and Margaret Bermis, whose maiden name was Helf. In the year 1851, he emigrated to this country in company with his parents, locating in New York, June 20, same year and located in this county, and on the same land now occupied by the party whose name heads this sketch, who remained at home until he attained his thirty-third year, when he was united in marriage to Susan Laher, sister of John Laher, which took place April 6, 1863; she was born in same locality as her husband, and dates her birth Feb. 17, 1834; they have had eight children, five of whom are now living: Peter, born March 15, 1866; Phillip, born Aug. 2, 1867; Fred, born Oct. 14, 1872; Ann M., born Jan. 25, 1874; Louis, born Sept. 28, 1877. The year after his marriage, his father died. His mother still resides on the homestead now owned by Phillip, which he has farmed since his marriage. Mr. Bermis has 240 acres of land in this county, and no in Christian Co.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 707(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BERNTHISTLE, I. W. - retired farmer, residence East Bridgeport street. White Hall. The subject of our notice was born in Pennsylvania, Perry County, Nov. 9, 1827. He was but four years of age when his parents, Jacob and Jane Bernthistle, moved to Wood County, Ohio, where farm property was purchased, and here were spent upon the farm homestead the earlier years of L W. Bernthistle. In 1849 he crossed the plains for the golden shores of the Pacific coast, where, on his arrival, he turned his attention to mining, and unlike many he succeeded in securing a goodly share of the shining metal. After two years of hardships among the mines of California, Mr. B. concluded to again return to his old home in Ohio, where he was shortly after united in marriage to Ann E. Burkhardt, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Burkhardt. Four years later he crossed the Ohio for southern Illinois, settling near the Illinois River, on the property now owned by him, and consisting of 532 acres. Here, however, he first worked as a farm hand, and subsequently achieved the success met with in after life through no ordinary energy. In 1868 he moved to White Hall, where he purchased the buildings and ground owned by David Potter, and for some years conducted a successful business as a contractor in meats, supplying the south branch of the C. & A. R. R. Although now retired from life, energy is still a distinguishing trait in the character of our subject
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 525(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt

BERTHLETT, WILLIAM - cabinet maker. White Hall, Ill. Mr. B. has been a resident of Greene County nearly half a century. He was born in Ohio in 1813, where he became apprenticed to his trade, eventually becoming a skillful journeyman workman. In 1833 he moved to Greenfield Greene Couniy, Ill. It then contained six houses. He now set resolutely to work in this primitive wilderness, where in after years he erected some of the finest dwellings. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Rugle, of Tennessee. During the war he bought eighty acres of valuable land at Berdan. He transacted a very successful hotel business. During the present year he came to White Hall, where he opened the popular hotel known as the Denver House, where price are in keeping with the times. Mr. Berthlelt was a participant in the Black Hawk war.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 525(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt

BIGHAM ELY T. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 31, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Bigham was born in Greene County, May 1843. Youngest child of Eli and Mary Bigham, who were among the early settlers of this county. The head of the family passed away some twenty- six years ago. Mrs. Bigham is still living, residing in Greene County. Ely, who heads this sketch, received but a common school education, as his time was almost wholly occupied on the farm from the time he could reach the plow handles. In 1865 he was married to Miss Jemima A. Seeley, a daughter of the Hon. Stewart Seeley, by whom he has five children: Ida M., Eva S., Herman C. and Roy Porter (548)
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 548(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BIRD, BARNEY - farmer. Sec. 7, P.O. Greenfield, is among the prominent representatives that have crossed the briny deep from Erin's Green Isle, and cast his lot among the Greene Countians. He is a son of Owen and Rose Bird, and dates his birth in the year 1833, in Monahan County, Ireland. His father died in the old country. His mother came to this country subsequently, and died in 1868. Barney came to this country at the age of sixteen, landing in New Orleans, remained a short time, then went to St. Louis, where he engaged to learn the trade of ship carpenter, at which he continued about one year and-a half; then went to learn the trade of boiler making, at which he continued about the same length of time, when the business not suiting him went to steamboating, at which he continued for three years; then went to Iowa, where he remained three years; was engaged in farming while there; then returned to St. Louis, where he engaged in steamboating again, at which he continued until the breaking out of the war, and left just in time on the last boats before the blockade was raised; went North, and stopped at St. Louis; and in April, 1861, was united in marriage to Rosanna Gillick, born in Caven County, Ireland, Dec. 23, 1832; they were married by Father Wheeler. By the marriage they have had seven children, but six now living: Jennie, born Oct. 22, 1862; Katie, born Aug. 11, 1865; Mary, born May 1, 1867; Florence, born Oct. 19, 1868; Ellen, born July 8, 1870; Barney, born July 17, 1873. After his marriage went to Carrollton, where he engaged for Isham Linder, at $10 per month, boarding himself. Among the last men he worked for was Judge Woodson. He then engaged in farming for himself, renting land of Robt. Harden, at which he continued about ten years; then bought forty acres of land, which he sold afterwards and bought another forty of the same man. In the year 1875, he moved to the place he now resides upon, and has since been renting land on the Edmondson estate, and in the Spring intends moving to his own land in Sec. 7. Mr. Bird is a man of industrious habits and of great energy, and is self-made, and has earned a reputation for candor and uprightness, and is highly esteemed in the community in which he resides. Is Democratic in sentiment
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 663-4(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BLACK, JOHN W. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 30, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman comes of a numerous and respected family, who sought a home in Greene County nearly sixty years ago, when few were inhabitants of the county, save the daring adventurer or trapper. John was the oldest of a family of eight children, four of whom died in early infancy; three now living: John, Catherine and Alice, of whom due notice will be given in this volume. The father of the subject of our sketch, William Black, was a native of England, who there followed farming until attaining his 16th year, when he accompanied his parents to America, eventually finding a home in Greene County, not far distant from the flourishing city of Carrollton. Mr. Black became a very prosperous farmer, is still living, as is also his wife. John W., from whom this narrative is obtained, grew to manhood in Greene Co., where he was born Feb., 1831. He received a liberal education for the time in which he lived; in his twenty-fourth year, in 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Delilah Early, daughter of Benjamin Early, by whom be had five children: Mary, who married John T. Hobson; William A., Alice C, Laura, and Henry. Mrs. Black died in 1876, and was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery of Carrollton, a handsome and worthy monument marking the spot. In conclusion, it may be said that Mr. Black is among the older residents born in Greene County, and ranks among our most successful farmers
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 508-9(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BLACKSHAW, J. - merchant and deputy postmaster of Berdan, was born Jan. 10, 1831, in England. Came to St. Louis, Mo., in 1849, with his father, Edward Blackshaw, who was born in 1797, and died in St. Louis with the cholera six weeks after arriving there, at the age of 52. Was married about 1819, to Rebecca Dayball, who was born in 1799, in England, having twelve children. The subject of this sketch is the sixth child; was 18 years of age when he came to this country; he followed the occupation of teaching school for twelve years; for six years he held the position of city weigher of St. Louis. Came to Berdan, Greene County, in 1867, went to clerking in the store he now occupies. Was married twice, the first in 1852, to Rebecca Dayball, who was born Oct. 1828; have seven children, three of whom are living, Sarah, Henry and William. Married second time March, 1873, to Mary M. Strain, of Missouri, who was born in 1843, having three children, two now living, James E. and Mary F.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 644(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BLODGETT, M. R. - drygoods and groceries, Rockbridge, is a native of New England, born Feb, 11, 1832, in Grafton County, New Hampshire; he is the seventh child of a family of seventeen children; his father being twice married, the second time to the mother of M. R., whose maiden name was Mary Utley; his father's name was Darius; both of them were born in Connecticut, and M. R. was raised up under the influence of that Puritanical region, and it may be said of him that he was very dutiful, and though remaining at home until he was several years past his majority he never left home (before 21) without obtaining permission, and never afterwards without first indicating his intention. Worked for his father by the month, one year and lost but half a day in that time. Subsequent to this, taught school at $17 per month and boarded 'round. Was engaged in the mercantile business in Vermont before coming West. In 1856, emigrated to this State, first located at Brighton, where he clerked for Shipman one year, then returned to his native State, returning after the war to Brighton, then clerked for Greer. Sept. 20, 1S67, he moved to Rockbridge and engaged in the mercantile business, in which he has since continued; keeps a general stock. Is now postmaster, which office he has filled for five years; was also postmaster at Brighton. In Feb. 1858, was united in marriage to Parmelia Woods; two children have blessed their union, but one now living: Edna Belle, born Sept. 16, i860. Mr. Blodgett is a member of the Knights of Honor, Golden Rule Lodge No. 10 17
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 664(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BOERLIN, HENRY - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 20, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman is a native of Switzerland, born in 1843. At an early age he became a ribbon weaver, following this vocation until his emigration to America in 1857, in company with our honored fellow- citizen, John Kaser; he made his way to Greene County, where he has since resided, following agricultural pursuits, and where he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Walter, a daughter of Henry and Mary, whose maiden name was Campbell; two children were born of this marriage: Jacob and John. Six years ago Mr. B. rented the extensive farm owned by Leonard Eldred, where he resides at the present writing. In his native land he served three years as a soldier
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 509(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BORING, JOHN M. - carpenter. Sec. 4, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Washington County, Tennessee, March 5, 1824, the sixth child of Hezekiah and Mary A. Boring, the latter's family name was Meldin. The former was born in Baltimore County, Maryland. The Boring family trace their ancestry to the Isle of Breton, to the Mc- Donald family of Tory fame. Hezekiah, the father of John M., was born Feb. 22, 1789, and is still living and has celebrated his ninetieth birthday. Emigrated to Tennessee, 1798, and to this State in Nov. 1829, and located one-and-a-half miles south of White Hall, on Apple Creek Prairie, remaining two years there, located permanently in township 10, range 11, three miles northeast of Greenfield, where he entered land and has since remained. John M. remained at home until he attained his twenty-second year, then learned the carpenter's trade, under Speaks & Wooley; learned in the meantime the cabinet and furniture business. These trades completed, he began for himself, and worked at his trade for about six years. Nov. 24, 1853, formed a matrimonial alliance with Mary A. Bailey, born in Shelby County, Kentucky, Jan. 12, 1830; nine children have been born to them, eight of whom are now living, viz.: Ara, Mary M., William A., Ellen, Louis, Blanche, Frank and Florence. After his marriage he moved to Macoupin County, where he remained about twenty years, during which time was engaged at his trade as contractor and builder. In 1865-6 built the public school building at Carlinville, where he then resided, which enterprise proved a very serious one to him. After he had contracted for the same and begun operations, material took a rapid rise, and the result was he lost by the operation $10,000 and one year's work. This was a severe loss to him, having to sell his fine residence in order to fill his contract. In 1872, moved to Greenfield, where he has since remained and engaged at his trade. Is a member of the M. E. Church, and Republican in principle
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 664-5(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, DR. A. - a leading physician of White Hall, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1817, youngest son of John and Sarah, who crossed the ocean from Europe in an early day, locating in Pennsylvania, where young Bowman received a liberal education. Shortly after the death of his father, which occurred in 1839, Mr. Bowman moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he began the study of medicine and graduated from the State Eclectic Institute. From Cincinnati, Dr. B. came to Bond County, Ill., where he practiced as a physician four years. He then made his way to Greene County, practiced as a physician eleven years in Carrollton, and for a number of years has had a large practice at White Hall. A professional gentleman of twenty-five years standing, he has gained an enviable reputation as a skillful physician and honorable man. In 1850 he was married to Miss Elizabeth D. Johnson, in Bond County, Ill. There were six children born of this marriage : Mary C, Sarah A., John C, George, Hettie and Alexander. March 3, 1865, Mrs. Bowman died and was laid to rest in the beautiful resting place of the dead near White Hall. In 1871 Dr. Bowman united his fortunes to Mrs. Dallas, a daughter of Jacob Rickart, and sister of the Hon. Joseph Rickart, who owns one of the best farms in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 525(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, ABRAHAM - farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Greenfield, is a brother of Dr. Bowman, whose sketch appears elsewhere; he was born in Bourbon County, Ky., Sept. 20, 1820; he is a son of George and Margaret Bowman. During Abraham's youth he attended school but about four months in all, his schooling being principally in the school of experience, having more of a practical knowledge than a theoretical one. He remained with his parents until he was 36 years of age, during which time he was engaged in agricultural pursuits with the exception of two years, when he was engaged with his brother Joseph in the milling business, which mill was the property of their father. In March, 1857, he came to this State, and located the land he now occupies, and in the Spring of 1858 got possession of the same, and has since farmed; being a bachelor, he boarded in the meantime with a neighbor for several years; this getting rather too monotonous, he concluded that it was not good for man to be alone, so on Feb. 2, 1865, he was united in wedlock to Mary J. Barrett, daughter of Abner Barrett. They have had three children, but one now living, Harriet Ellis, born Oct. 19, 1865; one pair twins were born them, but they died soon afterward. Mr. Bowman was a member of the Whig party, but since has been an adherent of the Republican faith; he has never sought office; he is highly respected in the community
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 665(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, ALBERT - farmer and stock raiser, town 10, range 10, P. O. Rockbridge, was born in Greene County, July 18, 1841; his father, Dr. Daniel Bowman, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., emigrated to Butler County, Ohio, where he married Catharine Meneely, and in an early day they removed to this county. Albert Bowman, the subject of this sketch, was raised on a farm, and received his education at the common schools of the country. In the Fall of 1861, at the age of 20, he enlisted in Co. F, 1st Mo. V. C, for three years' service; he participated in the various actions in which the company were engaged; he received an honorable discharge in the Fall of 1864, and returned to Greene County; he commenced farming and dealing in live stock, which he followed for the next two years, when he went into mercantile business at Rockbridge. This he followed for two years, when he again commenced farming and dealing in stock, which he has followed to the present time. March 28, 1867, he was married to Miss Ellen J. Vallentine, whose parents were James and Martha A. Vallentine, natives of Massachusetts and Kentucky. From this union they have five children living; one has died in infancy: Lucie M., born March 11, 1868; Lillian M., born Aug. 27, 1870; Clyde A., born Jan. 25, 1874; Hairy V., born Sept. 5, 1876; Lynn D., born Oct. 19. 1878. Ellen J. his wife, was born in Greene County, Nov. 25, 1844; finished her education at Monticello Seminary in 1863. She became a member of the Presbyterian church in early life
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 665(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, ALVIN C. - farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Carrollton. Is a son of Martin and Hannah Bowman, of this county. Alvin was born Jan. 2, 1840; there were eight children of the family entire, he being the fifth in order. During his boyhood he attended school the greater portion of the time. In his twentieth year he was in the employ of his uncle Jacob Bowman, then sheriff of this county, remaining in service two years as his deputy. Aug. 14, 1862, became matrimonially allied to Helen Davis, born Feb. 25, 1842; five children have crowned this union, viz: Jennie L., born July 1, 1863; Mary V., born Oct. 4, 1866; Andrew C, born March 17, 1869; John C, born April 23, 1872; Martin Lee born Aug. 4, 1874. Immediately following his marriage, engaged in farming pursuits, and has since continued at the same. His mother died Nov. 5, 1876; his father is still living, and resides in Carrollton. Mr. and Mrs. Bowman, are both members of the Presbyterian church. Cast his first vote for Douglas, and is still an adherent to the principles maintained by that illustrious personage
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 707(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, CHARLES ALBERT - lumber; born, Carrollton, ILL., Feb. 5, 1874; son of John A. and Angie (Black) Bowman; educated in public schools, graduating from high school in 1890; married, Carlinville, ILL., June 5, 1901, Myra May Parker. Began business career in the general merchandise store of L. F. Wheeler, Carrollton, ILL., continuing, 1890-1900; came to St. Louis, 1900, and was with the South Arkansas Lumber Co., 1900-01; joined in organization, 1901, of Huie-Hodge Lumber Co., Limited, of which became vice president; now secretary South Arkansas Lumber Co. Member Order of Hoo Hoo. Office: Fullerton Bldg. Residence: 5228 Von Versen Avenue.
(Source:"The Book of St. Louisans", Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

BOWMAN, DANIEL - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 30, P.O. Rockbridge, is a native of Bourbon County, Ky., born July 21, 1811; is the fifth child of a family of eleven children born of George and Margaret B.; her maiden name was Smock. At an early age removed with his family to Ohio, locating in Warren County; his father was a farmer, and raised his boys in the same line. Daniel's entire school term can be summed up in the space of six months, and what education he now has been acquired by burning the midnight oil, and in the active practice of business life; after he became of age made a trip to this county, the Spring of the "deep snow, "remaining until the Fall, when he took the chills, and returned to Ohio; was married in Ohio Sept. 15, 1839, to Catharine Meneely, by whom he had eight children, but three are now living: Joanna, born March 22, 1839; Albert, born July 18, 1841; Lucius, born Dec. 6, 1844. After his marriage, was engaged in a paper mill during the day, and at night employed his time in studying; having a desire to study medicine he began with Dr. Drake, who gave him all the assistance in his power; remained with him until he completed his course, and then attended lectures. In the year 1836, he removed to this county, first located west of Carrollton, where he raised two crops, then moved to the section he now lives on, first bought 80 acres of land, and has since added to the same until he now has 320 acres, which he has since farmed; has practiced medicine since his arrival, but of late years has declined riding except in special cases; has been engaged for several years past in stock raising in conjunction with his farming. The Doctor lost his first wife April 23, 1838; married the second time to Hester Ann Meisner, had four children, three now living: Mary V., born March 1, 1852, died Dec. 20, 1874; Julia E., born May 29, 1855; Lincoln, born March 11, 1860; Virgil R., born Jan. 13, 1864. The Doctor has been long and favorably known in this county, as one of the staunch men of his township; is a man of excellent information, has written a treatise on botany, and has given the matter a deal of study; is a man of strong will power, and has a high regard for his word, and is among that class whose honor stands first, policy afterward. Is a member of Sheffield Lodge A. F. and A. M., No. 178
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 665-6(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, JACOB - agriculturist, and for many years prominent as such in Greene County; is a native of Ohio, and became a cotemporary settler with Samuel Thomas and others identified with the growth and prosperity of Greene County; and long before a railroad ran through the State of Illinois he became largely engaged as a stock buyer and shipper; in his twenty-seventh year he was married to Miss Letitia Fry, a daughter of John Fry, and niece of General Jacob Fry, one of the most upright and honorable men in Uncle Sam's dominions. Passing briefly by the pioneer days of Jacob Bowman, spent upon the unbroken prairies of Illinois, where he roughed it in common with his neighbors, often proceeding to Alton where he awaited his time in the grinding of grist. In subsequent years he became more than ordinarily successful as a farmer, and held numerous offices of trust and responsibility, in 1860 becoming the popular sheriff of Greene County; for the past three years Mr. B. has been a resident of Kansas. Of the marriage above mentioned seven children were born : Samuel, who married Miss Rosalie Curtius; George, John, who married Miss Angeline Black, a daughter of David Black; Julia, who married Thomas E. Evans; Catherine, who married E. M. Prindle; Rosie, who married W. H. Fry; and Alice
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 509(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BOWMAN, M. - resides in Carrollton; one of the first settlers within the borders of Greene County; was born in Virginia; he was in his 15th year when his parents moved to Illinois, settling four miles southwest of Carrollton, Greene County, in 1820. The subject of this sketch received the usual pioneer education; for a number of years he worked on the old homestead. In 1830 he was married to Miss Harriet Cristy, a sister of the late Hon. Andrew Cristy, who ranked among the wealthier citizens of St. Louis. Digressing a little from the subject in hand, it may be here stated that for many years the hardy pioneer roughed it in the little log cabin. The table, constructed of puncheon, fairly groaned each day beneath the weight of venson and wild turkey, brought down by the unerring aim of the backwoodsman. M. Bowman, whose name heads this sketch is an unassuming Christian gentleman, well and favorably known in this county. The marriage of Mr. Bowman to Miss Cristy was blessed with eight children : Mary, Elizabeth, Emily, Anna, Kate, Alvin C, Francis and Lucy. Mrs. Bowman not living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 470-71; - transcribed by bmt

BOYD, THOMAS H. - retired merchant; was born at Alexandria, Virginia, in 1817; his father, John Boyd, was a saddler and harness maker by trade, who married Miss Mary Kirk, a native of Philadelphia, Penn. In an early day they moved to Washington City, where they passed the remainder of life. Thomas was but 10 when he accompanied an emigrant to Illinois; this was in 1834. At 25 he entered into the mercantile business at Columbiana, Greene County, where he started a small store, and became a dealer in cord-wood and also a successful grain shipper. He transacted a good business here until 1856. About this time he married Mary Ann Ellis, a native of North Carolina, by whom he had six children; three are living: Oily A., Carrie and Thomas. In 1859 Mr. Boyd was elected Probate Judge; faithfully discharging the manifold duties of this office he received a re-election. In 1872 he was elected by a large majority to the State Legislature, serving four sessions. When his term of office expired he settled down to quiet life, so consistent with his abunbant means.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 471(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt