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BRACE, CURTIS W. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 28, P.O. New Kane. Curtis W. Brace, one of the most successful agriculturists of Greene County, is a native of New York State; born in 1825; three years later the family settled in Greene County. Like nearly all early residents, the present success of Mr. Brace is due his perseverance, integrity, strict sense of justice and energy of character. In 1855, he married Miss Catherine Black, a daughter of William Black, who emigrated from England in an early day, to Greene County, where he met with flattering success as an agriculturist. Mr. Brace is the owner of 700 acres of land, said to be for its size, the best in Greene County. It is needless to add he ranks among our most substantial farmers. The marriage of Mr. Brace, to Miss Black, was blessed with one child, Deceased
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 727(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BRACE, THADDEUS W. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 22, P.O. Carrollton; among the wealthier agriculturists of Greene County, who have borne an active part in the stirring scenes of Western life, when to be a farmer or pioneer meant to do without the luxuries of life, and to be fitted to endure the many privations incidental to a Western settlement. Mr. Brace is a native of the State of New York, born. in 1820. In 1828, Leonard Brace, the head of the family, a native of New York State, who married Miss Julia Eldred, determined to cast his fortunes in the far west; hearing many glowing accounts of Illinois, of its fertility and resources, he set out for his future home, where the family were to play an important part in the growth and development of Greene County. Floating down the Monongahela River, the little party of emigrants landed at Pittsburgh; from this smoky city, taking passage down the Ohio to a point not learned, they eventually, by taking passage on the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, arrived at their future home in Greene County. During the Summer, before the family were fairly settled on the broad prairies of Illinois, the husband and father passed to that bourne from whence no traveler ever returns. Mrs. Brace found herself at this period the possessor of 200 acres, costing $1,000, paid for, in quarters. The family, then consisting of four children, were enabled to some extent to carry on the farm. Mrs. Brace is still living, a true type of the Western women whose noble traits of character have found a worthy notice by the more famous poetical and prose writers. Thaddeus, whose fortunes we now follow, well remembers the early pioneers and their simple mode of living, when all were on an equal footing, and linsey wolsey the order of the day. January 12, 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Robley, a daughter of Richard Robley, who settled in Greene County as early as 1821. By this marriage three children were born: Alva O., Ella, and Clara. Owing to limited space in this large volume, we are necessarily obliged to be somewhat brief in these our records for futurity. Mr. Brace may truly said to be a representative farmer, who has watched the growth of this county from its earliest date to its present greatness
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 509-10(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BRADLEY, ABSALOM - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. Carrollton. Although not among the early settlers of Greene County is worthy of more than a passing notice in this volume; he was born in Sumner Co., Tennessee, on the 10th of November, 1816; the oldest son of, John and Elizabeth Bradley, whose maiden name was Goostree. Remaining a resident of Tennessee until attaining his majority, he then embarked on a prairie schooner for the fertile prairies of Illinois. He was then married, having united his fortunes to Miss Mary Maybery, a daughter of James Maybery, a native of North Carolina. Without entering into particulars as to the trip made over a boundless waste of prairie, we note the arrival of the family in Greene County in 1837, locating two miles west of Carrollton, on the farm now owned by Mrs. David Black. In order to show the daring, nature of the pioneer, on his arrival in Greene County he had but seventy-five cents in money wherewith to commence the battle of life; he first worked for ten dollars a month and subsequently split rails, thereby emulating the example of Honest Old Abe. In 1849 he made his first purchase of land in Greene County, consisting of 40 acres which he subsequently sold and purchased 100; since this time Mr. Bradley has added largely to his property now owning 340 acres of land unequaled in this township. For a period of forty-one years Mr. Bradley has been a resident of this county, and during this time has witnessed many stirring events incident to a western life. In 1845 Mrs. Bradley, who had shared the dangers of a western trip, passed to that world of spirits to which we all are tending, leaving to the care of her husband three children, Reuben, Jonathan, and Mary. October 19, 1846, Mr. Bradley united his fortunes to Miss Miralda Maybery, a daughter of Sander Maybery, of Tennessee, by whom he had ten children, seven of whom are living, Zachariah Taylor, Laura Ann, Alice C, Dora E., Eliza F., Maggie E. and Robert E. Further notice will be found in the old settlers record of this volume.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 510(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BRADLEY R. C. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 35, P.O. Carrollton, was born in Tennessee in 1818. He was bound out in his native State to E. Barnard, and lived with him till he was eighteen, years of age, which was in 1836 ; he then left his native place for the far West, drove an ox team through for a son of the man he was bound to, landing in Greene County in the Fall of 1836, with the small sum of twenty-five cents. Commenced working by the month for Thomas Black, on a farm, for eight dollars per month, working five months; then worked for Samuel Thomas in a distillery six weeks, then worked for Thos. Hobson off and on for several years, going to New Orleans in the winter on rafts of cypress logs. Then went to renting land which he kept up till 1850 ; he then bought 120 acres; as he accumulated bought more land, till he now owns in Greene County 444 acres, in Macoupin and Sangamon 250, and Bates County, Missouri, 230 acres ; in all, 934 acres. He has run a threshing machine since 1845, and a saw mill since 1852 He was married December 21st, 1843, to Elizabeth Hall, whose parents' names were Thomas and Mary, who came into Greene County in 1818, among the oldest settlers of the county. Mr. Bradley's family consisted of ten children, eight living : Mary E. James B., Clarissa H., deceased, Thomas A., Jeannette Z., Reuben H., Charles D., Joseph L., George J. and one infant not named.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 716-7(T10N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BRADSHAW, MARY A. - farming, Sec. 4, P.O. White Hall, was born Jan., 1804, in South Carolina, and at an early age her parents moved to Tennessee, where she became acquainted with and married her husband, Charles Bradshaw. In the year 1828 they came to Morgan Co., where they remained two years, and then moved to the place she now lives upon. They have had sixteen children, nine boys and seven girls, of whom seven are now living, viz.: William M., John, Perry, Francis M., Nancy, Mary, and Lucinda, all of whom are now married and settled, except Francis M., who lives with his mother on the farm. Mrs. Bradshaw is a member of the Christian Church. She owns 320 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 630(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BRADSHAW, PERRY - farmer, Sec. 3, P.O. White Hall, was born in White Co., Tenn., May 17, 1828. His family were natives of North Carolina, and were among the early settlers of this county. The subject of this sketch was first married to Phebe Wise, by which union they had four children, all of whom are now numbered among the dead. His second marriage was with Elizabeth J. Wells. March, 1860, a native of this county. They have had nine children; eight of them are now living, viz.: Laura J., Oliver P., Albert J., Charles F., Louis A., John A., Shannon O., and Miner Douglass. Mr. Bradshaw has 373 acres of land, upon which he now resides. Mr. B. is a man of retiring habits, has had no aspirations after office, but in sentiment is Republic.in, and is a member of the Christian Church, and is endeavoring to live a life that is in harmony with the principles he professes
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 630(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BRADSHAW, WILLIAM M. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 27, P.O. White Hall, the subject of this sketch, is worthy of more than a passing notice. He was the fifth child of Charles and Mary Ann Bradshaw, who settled, on first arrival in Illinois, in Morgan, near the present city of Jacksonville, where they remained until the settlement in Greene County in 1831, locating on what is now familiarly known as Lorton's Prairie. An improved claim was purchased on which stood a log cabin, and here the family lived for years, during the winter season often suffering severely from the cold. In these pioneer days the house-wife made the best of her hard lot, while the husband, to provide shoes for his growing family, tanned the leather in a rough trough. Charles Bradshaw was a man of no ordinary energy, who penetrated the forests of Illinois, or traversed its prairies as an assistant surveyor, in the laying out of many of its towns and villages, a man of noble impulses. His death, which occurred in 1869, was universally regretted. Mrs. Bradshaw is still living. William, from whom this sketch is obtained, married, in 1847, Miss Susan P. Lorton, who died the following year; one child born of this marriage. In 1850, Mr. Bradshaw was married to Miss Elizabeth Chipman, by whom he had three children. Mrs. Bradshaw departed this life in 1855. In 1S56, he was married to Miss Mary Baker, by whom he had one child. The third wife of Mr. B. died April 5th, 1857, and in 1861 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Stewart by whom he had eight children, seven of whom are living. Mr. Bradshaw is a prominent farmer, owning 260 acres of valuable land.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 584(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BRENT, Albert A. - In the person of the subject of this article is presented one of the successful farmers of Neosho county and a patriotic and progressive citizen. He has resided in the county a third of a century, has contributed his modest portion toward its internal development and now, in the season of his decline, he is in the enjoyment of the fruits of his labors. Mr. Brent was born in Green county, Illinois, November 14, 1845. His father, John J. Brent, was a native of Massachusetts and born in 1810. His mother was Mary Avise, a New Jersey lady, born in 1823, and died in Montgomery county, Kansas, in 1892. The parents had five children, viz., A. K. Brent and Mrs. Julia Allen, both deceased; Mrs. Mary Wagner, of Montgomery county, Kansas; Mrs. Maria T. Allen, of Webb City, Missouri, and Albert A., of this review. At seven years of age our subject was orphaned by the death of his father, but he remained with his mother on the farm till his enlistment in the army. When just past sixteen - December 25, 1862 - he became a member of Company B, 17th Iowa infantry, with which he went to the front as a part of the command operating under General Grant down the Mississippi river. He participated in the battles of Corinth, First and Second Iuka, Jackson, Champion Hills, siege and capture of Vicksburg and at Fort Hill where he was severely wounded with a piece of a shell, one and one-half inches by one and one-fourth inches, striking him just above the ankle and breaking square off the bones of the leg. He had had a touch from a rebel ball in the battle of Jackson, which shot just grazed his eye and left its mark, but the shell did its best work. It sent our subject to the hospital for a year and he was not again in the service. He is even now a sufferer from inconvenience on account of the injury and the piece of shell, as a pocket piece, has been his daily reminder of events on that fatal day at Fort Hill. He was discharged from the army in April, 1865, and went at once to Colorado and New Mexico where he spent one year in recuperation and observation. Returning home he passed the years 1867 and 1868 there and the following year transferred all his interests to the new state of Kansas. He settled eight miles west of Osage Mission where he purchased a quarter of land, improved it partially and resided on it eight years when he sold it and repurchased southwest of Galesburg four miles. He is now a citizen of Shiloh township and is the owner of a valuable and desirable one hundred and sixty acres of land. On the 2nd of April, 1874, Mr. Brent married Mary Maxwell, a Pennsylvania lady who came to Kansas in 1869. She died July 7, 1890, at forty-seven years of age. After his wife's death Mr. Brent moved his family to Parsons where he resided seven years, interested in the education of his children. He then returned to his farm in Neosho county, where he has since resided. The five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Brent are Harry, who graduated in the Parsons high school and in the business college there and, in 1898, enlisted in Captain Elliott's company, 20th Kansas regiment, Spanish American war. He went to the Philippine Islands, saw service with the regiment there and returned as sergeant major of his company. He spent a year and a half in the State University, on taking up civil pursuits, and was appointed in 1900 clerk of the Republican state central committee and, on the organization of the legislature that year, was chosen clerk to the speaker of the house. The same year Governor Stanley appointed him his chief clerk where he is now serving. Grace, our subject's second child, is a stenographer, and his next, Orville, is at home. Louisa is a teacher. Bertram is still at school. Mr. Brent is a Workman, a member of the G. A. R. and a Republican.
[Source: History of Neosho and Wilson Counties, Kansas, Pub. by L. Wallace Duncan, Fort Scott, Kansas, Monitor Printing Co., 1902; tr. by VB]

BRICKEY, JAMES H. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 17, P.O. Roodhouse. James Brickey is a native of Illinois, born in Monroe County, Jan. 9, 1819. He was the second son of Preston B. and Emilia, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. Many years ago Preston Brickey was a scout or ranger on the plains. Few save himself and others of a like daring nature, had then set foot on our Western prairies. Several years after his settlement he was united in marriage (in 1817) to Miss Millie Rawls, by whom he had nine children. For a number of years he ran a distillery, quite a novelty in early days, afterward turning his attention to farming. He died in Monroe County, in the prime of life; the family then consisted of four children; James was then married, having united his fortunes to Miss Mary Ann Crislar, a daughter of Silas Crislar. He was then the owner of 100 acres in Monroe County. In after years he became a property owner on a large scale. In 1868. disposing of his property for $12,000, he came to Greene County, where he purchased 220 acres in tp. 12, range 11. Through great industry, indomitable will and enterprise he became the owner of some 500 acres, brought to a high state of cultivation. No more live, energetic man than James Brickey, exists in Greene County, whose impulses are liberal, where occasion requires it, On the well cultivated farm he has erected a handsome farm residence. Of this marriage nine children were born, seven of whom are living: Denton, Margaret, Alonzo, Manfred, Fernando, Addie and Nora
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 584-5(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BRIDGES, F. M. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 10, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch may be truly said to be one of the old settlers of Greene County. Born on the old homestead of his parents, A. W. and Dorlesca Bridges, who were natives of North Carolina and Connecticut respectively. Mrs. Bridges, in all probability, settled in Greene County as early as 1821, and the following year her future husband, for she was then unmarried. As they have long since been gathered to a home not made with hands, their busy eventful life ended forever, we deem it proper to state that like nearly all pioneers on becoming housekeepers, they found themselves in poor circumstances, compared to our present mode of living; still, compared with pioneer days, they were well to do. The youthful couple working early and late soon became, not only good livers, but very comfortably situated in life, who merited the respect of their pioneer friends, who, like themselves, dared the privations of Western life and founded homes in the timber belts or prairie long before Lo was driven to the Pacific; at an advanced age the old folks passed away amid the scenes of their labors. Of Frank, whose name heads this sketch, it may be said that, in early youth, he followed farming, above the average in point of intelligence; after taking a course of study at Shurtleff College, he proceeded to Memphis, Mo., where he entered into the mercantile business. Becoming very successful, his sales footing up to $100,000 a year, in one day sales footing up to the magnificent sum of $1,000; while here he married Miss Malena Hudnall, a daughter of Dr. M. L. Hudnall; by this lady he has three children, Archibald, Helen, and Jessie; three children deceased whose names were Edgar, Nellie, and Ruth. During the Rebellion he traversed the plains for California, thence to Mexico, and thence to South America, and thence to New York; from the latter city proceeding to St. Louis. On becoming once more a resident of Greene County he purchased the property that he now owns, consisting of 225 acres in one of the best townships of Greene County. From 1874 to 1876 Mr. Bridges was our popular sheriff, being elected by a moderate majority; a candidate on the Democratic ticket with the Hon. Judge Hodges, they were the only ones obtaining their respective offices. During the present year he became the regular nominee of the Democratic party for the lower House of Representatives, becoming elected by a large majority.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 510-11(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BRIDGEWATER, ELISHA - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 16, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in the town of St. Marys in Hancock County, Ill., on the 26th day of August, 1839. Fifth child of William Bridgewater, a native Kentuckian, born in 1802, a blacksmith by occupation, who married in Kentucky Miss Nancy Pasley; in 1827 or 1828 he moved to Morgan County, where he entered land from the government; subsequently removed to Hancock County, where he followed blacksmithing for several years, when he moved to Scott County and thence to Greene County, where he settled upon sec. 16, in township 11, range 13, where he died. Mrs. Bridgewater is still living, a resident of this township. Elisha, from whom this narrative is obtained, passed his boyhood in Scott County, and removed to Greene County in 1863, where he was married to Miss Sylvia J. Boyrun in 1S65, a daughter of Benjamin J. Boyrun, whose ancestry settled in Greene County a full half century ago. In March, 1868, Mr. Bridgewater came into possession of 120 acres of land, part of which was settled by Davis Carter in 1821, and entered from the government by Joseph Harris in 1832. Mr. Bridgewater has always taken a deep interest in county affairs, and at one time officiated as township constable and school trustee, holding this position at the present writing. There were born of the marriage two children: Addie M. and Benjamin F.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 652(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BROOKS, JAMES E. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 23, P.O. Kane. The above named gentleman is a native of England; born in Lancashire, March 18, 1828; he had attained his eleventh year, when his parents William and Mary Ann Brooks, determined to emigrate to America. Landing in New York City, the family took up their residence in the State of New Jersey, where they remained a short time, when they removed to Rhode Island, and three years later, in 1844, the head of the family set his face toward the far west, in search of a home. He landed at Alton, Madison County, in this State; from there making his way to Greene County, where he purchased his first farm in Illinois. In 1845, came the remainder of the family, consisting of Mrs. Brooks, and seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth child. On the old homestead property he passed his boyhood, and here united his fortunes, in 1853, to Miss Anna Davis, a daughter of James Davis, a native of North Carolina. Like many who followed agriculture in an early day, Mr. Brooks met with many discouragements. Purchasing 40 acres, now owned by Robert Brooks, in 1852, subsequently purchasing apart of his present farm in 1854; since this date Mr. Brooks has added to his possessions, and now owns, through indomitable will and industry, 180 acres of valuable land in this township, and a beautiful farm residence. It is needless to add that Mr. Brooks ranks among our most substantial farmers. Of the marriage above referred to, eight children were born, living: Mary Ann E., Harriet E., Clara J., Geo. H., Sarah B., Chas. W., Anna L.; deceased, Kate
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 727-8(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BROOKS, WILLIS - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Carrollton. Willis Brooks is a native of Greene County, and was born near the city of Carrollton, on the 18th of July, 1830; the third child of Henry and Elizabeth Brooks; the former was born in the old Dominion State, and the latter in Kentucky. Henry Brooks was a farmer from his earliest years, and married in Kentucky; the date of his coming to Greene County cannot now be ascertained, but in all probability he became a cotemporary with many of the early settlers; during the latter years of his life he became moderately successful as an agriculturist, and died in Kansas, where he afterwards removed, and where his wife also passed the remainder of her days. Willis whose name heads this sketch, grew to manhood in Greene County. During his boyhood, he worked as a farm hand, and from the wages thus obtained, he received a liberal education in the district schools in his native place. In 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Cassa A. Thomasson, a daughter of Spencer Thomasson, by whom he has seven children: Virginia A., born Jan. 24, 1861; Nancy E., born Dec. 14, 1862; William Preston, March 31, 1864; Fanny E., June 10, 1867; Josephine, Oct. 24, 1869
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 748(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, ANDREW - retired farmer, for the past four years a resident of Roodhouse, was born in Frederick County, Virginia, near Winchester, October 24, 1820, His father, Leroy Brown, was a native of Virginia, who there married Margaret Hutton; there were three children born of this marriage, of whom Andrew was the oldest. When seventeen he left Virginia for Ohio in company with his parents. They settled in Ross County, where the head of the family followed shoemaking. Leaving Ohio in 1849, the family came to Illinois, settling in Morgan County on a farm. In 1853 Andrew was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jane Burcher, a daughter of Clark Burcher. He now set himself resolutely to work, and soon became enabled to buy 160 acres of good land near White Hall, in Greene County, and followed agricultural pursuits successfully many years, and only abandoned it on account of ill health, produced by overwork. Selling his property, he moved to Roodhouse, where he now lives and where his wife has opened, to meet the wants of the enterprising people of Roodhouse, a first class millinery establishment. Five children born of this marriage: Jackson, Phoebe and Margaret living; John and Henry deceased
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 568(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, FELIX - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 30. P.O. White Hall, was born in Nelson County, Ky. He was in his 8th year when his parents, Frederick and Polly Brown, came to Greene County, where Felix passed many years of happy life. From his own lips we gleam the following: In his youth he wore buckskin pants, and was in his fifteenth year when he fastened the first pair of shoes upon his feet. When the rebellion came on he enlisted in Co. H, 91st Ill. Inft. for three years service, or during the war; honorably discharged in 1865, he returned to Greene County. In 1852, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Elizabeth Jackson, who died on the 25th of October, 1866; of this marriage two children were born: Mary H. and Martha C. In 1866, Mr. Brown was married to Miss Lauretta Jackson; of this marriage three children were born. Like nearly all old pioneers, the generosity of Mr, Brown is well known
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 585(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, GEORGE - agriculturist. The growth and development of the prosperous county of Greene, is largely due to that restless energetic people known as Kentuckians; among this people George Brown was born in 1801. While a youth he wended his way to Franklin County, Mo., where at the early age of nineteen, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Antrobus, and the following year hearing many glowing accounts of the fertility of Illinois, he made his way thither, where he found but few inhabitants, as but few then had the hardihood to venture to the wilds of Illinois, save a few daring spirits in search of new scenes and incidents. Building a cabin near the present Munday estate, he prepared to battle for an existence in Illinois, at a time when such kindred spirits as Samuel Thomas, Peter Cartwright and others were among the principal settlers. We cannot owing to limited space, follow in detail the progress of Mr. Brown in his career in Southern Illinois. Many years after his marriage, about the year 1847, Mrs. Brown died, leaving to the care of her husband, ten children. Mr. Brown survived his wife many years, passing to a home not made with hands in 1872. One thing in the life history of Mr. B. is somewhat remarkable, living in an age when horse racing, drinking and carousing was the order of the day, he held himself aloof from the prevalent vices of the times, and was much respected for his Christian character; and when the gray light of morning beamed upon his pathway, beckoning him onward to a brighter and better land, he obeyed the summons of the Great Unknown with true Christian fortitude. Richard W. Brown, from whom this sketch is obtained, grew to manhood in Greene Co., following farming from his earliest years. In 1862 he enlisted in the 122d Ill. Infantry under the command of Captain King. Proceeding to the front he became engaged in many important battles as Parker's Cross Roads, Paducah, Nashville, Mobile, etc. Honorably discharged at the close of the Rebellion, he returned to Greene County, where he was at one time the owner of 290 acres of valuable land. January 25th 1865, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Witt, a daughter of Franklin and Melinda Witt, of whom notice will be found in another department of this work. Of this marriage five children were born, of whom four are living; Mary E., John F., Henry and Ida M.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 728(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, I. T. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 4, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch, who is well and favorably known for his success as an agriculturist and honorable business man, was born in Greene County in 1846, the fifth child of John and Mary Brown, who dwelt in the confines of Greene County when scarcely a cabin broke the monotony of a broad expanse of prairie. Isaac, from whom this sketch is obtained, became early inured to the hard work that ever attends an early settlement in a new country, receiving a liberal education; in his twenty-third year he was united in marriage to Miss Alice Jackson, a daughter of William and Nancy; the marriage of Mr. Brown to Miss Jackson was blessed with three children, Arthur, deceased, and Allie and Eddie living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 511(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN ,JOHN - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 4, P.O. Carrollton. Mr. Brown not only takes a leading position as an agriculturist but ranks among our wealthy pioneers; he was born in Indiana on the 1st of May, 1814. In early infancy his father departed to that bourne from whence no traveler ever returns; disheartened, the mother and her children removed to Kentucky where many years of her life were spent. During the year 1828, when Illinois was a far western point, Mrs. Brown, in order to give her children a start in the world, migrated to Greene County settling on the farm now owned by the subject of this sketch; here this energetic lady settled down to the hard task of making a comfortable home. Mrs. Brown was a native of North Carolina. A most kindly woman of large loving sympathies and kindly disposition, she merited the respect of her pioneer neighbors. John grew to maturity a hardy youth, possessed of more than ordinary energy; a hard worker he pushed forward, hopefully looking forward to a bright future. In his twenty-second year he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Landis, a daughter of Isaac Landis; he was then the owner of 240 acres of improved lands, these comprised part of the property he now owns. In those primitive days his grist, brought to horse or water mill for grinding necessitated a considerable waste of time. The habits of the pioneer and his family were extremely simple. The neighbors, oftentimes many miles away, when they met at a raising or meeting a friendly greeting was always in order. We now turn to the subject under consideration; step by step John accrued property and wealth as the county grew older and became more densely populated. A representative of the early pioneer and of the farmer of to-day; he is the owner of 920 acres of valuable land in one of the best townships in the County of Morgan. Of this marriage eight children were born, Frances, Esther A., John L., Jane, Taylor. Mary, and Alice
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 511(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, LOUISA - Sec. 18, P.O. Carrollton. The above named lady, by whom this narrative is kindly furnished, is the oldest daughter of James Ware, one of the original pioneers of Greene County, and relict of William Brown, deceased, who became a prominent agriculturist of Greene County, and who was in all probabilities horn in the county, as his parents Jackson and Elizabeth Brown, settled in Illinois when it bore little evidence of civilization. From his boyhood young Brown became identified with the farming interest and upon the old farm homestead; he developed an energy of character that led to successful results in subsequent years, although it must have been that educational advantages were limited, still he received a good common school education. Aug. 7, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Ware, whose name heads this biography. Of this marriage four children were born: Martha A., Mary S, Cora A., and William. After a long and honorable career William Brown was laid at rest in the Mount Gilead Cemetery, a handsome monument marking the spot. Mr. Brown died in affluent circumstances; his estate comprising 240 acres, will compare favorably with any of like number in the county. The handsome farm residence was erected during the Autumn of 1867
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 748-9(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, PETER A. - farmer. Sec. 19, P.O. Carrollton. Is a son of Peter M., and Aseneth B., whose family name was Crane. Peter M., was born in Cumberland County, Virginia, in the year 1806, and his wife is a native of Ohio, and dates her birth Dec. 23, 1811. They are of Scotch and Welsh extraction; the former came to this State in April 1830, and was first engaged in a mechanical pursuit, being a worker in wood; afterward was engaged in mercantile business in Carrollton, and subsequently entered land, began farming, and has since remained on same land and confined himself to that business the greater part of the time; has traded a good deal in stock with success; is still living, having just past his seventy-second birthday. The subject of this sketch was born Aug. 15, 1839; remained with his father until he attained his twenty-eighth year, then he abandoned his bachelor life, and obtained the hand of Leonora Robinson in marriage; she was born Feb. 4, 1847, is a daughter of T. C. Robinson of this township; after their marriage, which took place Feb. 4, 1868, they moved six miles northeast of Greenfield, where he engaged in farming and stock trading, at which he continued until 1878, when they moved to the place he now occupies; having recently bought him a farm in this neighborhood, Sec. 18, which he intends occupying in the Spring. Has four lovely children- Walter, born Nov. II, 1868; Mamie born Oct. 3, 1871; Harry, born July 5, 1874; Hallie, born Feb. 3, 1873. Is liberal minded politically, votes for men rather than party
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 707(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWN, SAMUEL E. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 10, P.O. Carrollton. Samuel E. Brown is a native of Greene Co. Born in 1841, he is the oldest son now living, of Elijah and Mary E. Brown. Elijah Brown died during the early infancy of the subject of this sketch; it is supposed he was a native of Georgia. He married his first wife. Miss Polly White, November, 1st, 1827, in Missouri, and not many years after occurred the death of this lady. His second wife, Miss Belinda Stevens, was a native of Missouri; of this marriage three children were born, none of whom survived. He married his third wife. Miss Mary E. Scoggins, in Greene County, where he removed in an early day; the marriage occurred on the 1st of March, 1837. His wife was a native of Kentucky, and was born on the 18th of January, 1818; seven children were productive of this union, of whom four survive. Samuel, from whom this narrative is obtained, passed his boyhood and grew to manhood in Greene Co., and from his earliest years has followed agricultural pursuits. In 1864 he was united in marriage to Miss Nancy M. Kirby, a daughter of Daniel and Polly Kirby; of this marriage five children were born: Edward B., George. G., Abraham J., Anna E. and Nina M. Mr. Brown is the owner of 240 acres of valuable land, and takes a leading position as a grain thresher and farmer in this section.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 728-9(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BROWNING, JOHN P. - farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 6, P. O. Carrollton. John P. Browning was born in Greene, on the 29th of March, 1833. His father was Meshac Browning, a native of Kentucky, and there married Miss Maxie Wood; in 1831, during the Autumn of the year, he wended his way to Greene County, and first settled in Carrollton, where he found employment at his trade that of a brickmason; subsequently he became a farmer, and gained some distinction as a minister of the Baptist Denomination, and as the gray light of morning beamed upon his pathway beckoning him onward to that brighter and better land, he quietly awaited the summons to a home not made with hands; to the care of his wife he left a family of nine children, of whom our subject was the third child. In 1864, he was married to Miss Ellen Trimble, a daughter of Harvey Trimble, by whom he has six children: Henry O., Meitie A., Pleasant H., Thomas O., Dean and Norman. Mr. Browning is the owner of 77 acres, and a consistent member of the Baptist Church.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 749(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BRUNER, A. J., DR. - physician and surgeon. The above named gentleman is a native of Tennessee, where he was born in the year 1835, the fourth child of Daniel and Marena Bruner. Daniel Bruner was a farmer in limited circumstances. Having married in Tennessee Miss Marena McCoblum, he worked early and late, but never became more than ordinarily successful. He passed away in Tennessee, and not many years after his wife was laid at rest in the village cemetery. Our subject received a preliminary education in the district schools of his native place. Removing to Kentucky, he entered upon a literary course of study at the Hiawatha College. Proceeding to Keokuk, Iowa, he entered the College of Physicians, graduating from this institution with honor on the 17th of February, 1875, and since this date has secured a large practice in Greene County; a resident near Woodville, where he has become the owner of a valuable property. In 1869 he was married to Mrs. Mary A, Slater, a daughter of Richard and Sarah J. Spalding
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 749(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BUCK, FRED L. - farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 36, P.O. Fielden, Jersey County, was born in Hanover, Germany, 1822, living in his mother country till he was 15 years of age, which was in 1837; at so young an age he was determined to go West, where there was a better chance for a young man. Getting permission of his parents, he came across the ocean, landing at Baltimore, and made his way to St Louis, and hired as waiter boy in the Missouri hotel, remaining for six months; the man he hired to ran off and did not pay him. He was left with nothing; some one stealing his shoes and coat. He then worked for twenty-five cents per hour on the water docks till he had money enough to buy a pair of shoes. He then received the position of cabin boy on a steamboat; followed the river for nine years as cabin boy and second cook. Leaving the river he engaged in keeping a saloon in partnership with another man; sold out in a short time, and clerked in the saloon, and working in a distillery, which he followed for four years. He then, in 1850, went with a party to California, going by overland route, which took them one hundred and forty days. When he arrived at his destination he had the small sum of fifty cents; having no rations, and meals were one dollar, three of them together bought one pound of cheese for one dollar and ten cents, and one loaf of bread for fifty cents; that was the way he got his first meal in California. He sold one of his shirts to get some money to buy provisions. His partner had an old pick and spade to go to work with, and a friend that came over with him bought him a rocker to clean the gold. They made one thousand dollars in the next five months. Staying in California for two years, he returned to St. Louis with $1,400, and clerked with the same man that he did before, staying two years. Then bought land in Jersey County and farmed. Sold out and bought in Greene County, where he now lives, farm contains 345 acres, he purchased in 1865. He was married in 1856 to Caroline Horseman, who was born in 1835. Their union was blessed] with sixteen children, eight of which are living: Matilda, Richard, Nettie, Seagle, Henry, Frederic, Lula, and Mary.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 768(T9N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

BULLARD, J. B. - During the Summer of 1873 Mr. Bullard made his first entree into Roodhouse, and entered into partnership with Mr. A. E. Freeto, of Dupage County, Illinois, for the transaction of a general hardware business. They entered at once upon a successful career, as the town built up rapidly, with a good class of citizens. November 5, 1877, on the retirement of Mr. Freeto as a partner, Mr. Bullard took entire charge and now transacts a large and constantly increasing business, both in hardware and tinware. Mr. B. was born in Sangamon County, January 20, 1854. His father, John Bullard, one of the first settlers of Sangamon County, came west in very moderate circumstances, making his trip over the western prairies on horseback. But little improvements were then manifest in Illinois, and money was generally an unknown quantity. In Illinois the wants of Mr. Bullard were few and simple. An energetic man, he worked during the pioneer days of Sangamon Co. as a rail splitter at forty cents per hundred. He became a prominent farmer of this county, and died in 1860. His wife was Miss Sarah Follis. The marriage took place in Kentucky. Of eleven children born of this marriage, the subject of this sketch was the tenth. He received a liberal education, and at an early day became apprenticed to the trade of a tinner; becoming a skillful workman. In 1878 he was united in marriage to Miss Josie Dugger, of Macoupin County, Illinois
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 568-9 (Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt

BURGHARDT, H. O. - barber. Greenfield, was born in Great Barrington, Mass., August 9, 1833; is the son of H. O. and Altha Burghardt; her maiden name was Berry. There were ten children in the family, of whom H. O. was the fifth. The subject of these lines had the usual school advantages afforded in that locality; remained at home until he was nineteen years of age, when he left home and went to learn the trade he has since followed; after he had completed his trade he changed his base to western New York, a place called Angelica, where he remained about sixteen years; from here he went to Cuba- Alleghany County, continuing there two years; then came to this State, at Jacksonville, where he staid two years, then went to White Hall, and from there located in Greenfield, where he has since remained and followed his trade up to the present time; has by close attention to his business acquired sufficient means to secure him a good home and property; has a good business. Oct. 3, 1863, was married to Mary Levy, born in Lowell, Mass., Feb. 17, 1838; they have had one child, William, born in Nunda, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1855, now in Texas; has obtained sufficient education to enable him to command $85 per month as a teacher. Mr. Burghardt cast his first vote for Fremont, and since been Republican in sentiment; is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church; his wife is an Episcopalian.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 666(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BURKHARDT, CHRISTOPHER J. - meat market, south Main street. White Hall. The above named gentleman is a native of the State of Ohio, born in 1828, where he passed his early years and learned the occupation of a butcher, in due time branching out in business by the opening of a market in Tontogana, Wood County, Ohio, where he conducted a successful trade until his location in Greene County in 1870, where he purchased the farm formerly owned by S. E. Carter of Sand Ridge. Prior to this, in 1868, Mr. B. was married to Miss Sarah Cunning, who died in 1864. By this lady he has two children: J. L. and Ernest C. In 1868 Mr. Burkhardt was married to Miss Mary Shannon, in Greene County. Mr. B. followed agricultural pursuits until embarking in his present calling during the present year
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 526(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt

BURNETT, DR. W. L. - physician and surgeon. The above named gentleman is a native of Indiana, born in 1842. In an early day his parents, James E. Burnett and Martha, who were natives of Kentucky, moved to the State of Wisconsin. The head of the family was a gentleman of fine educational abilities and great force of character. In Wisconsin he became largely interested in mining, and subsequently in Iowa. In 1852, moving to Alton, Ill., he became a professor of book-keeping; many of the more noted western scholars acquiring their learning through his instructions; in 1856, the death of his wife occurred, who was the mother of our subject, she was laid at rest in the city of Alton. Subsequently James Burnett moved to Missouri, where he was stricken with paralysis, and there were passed the remainder of his days. W. L. Burnett received his education principally at Shurtleff College. When the war broke out, he enlisted in Company F. 27th Ill. Infantry; during the war, he became a participant in numerous noted battles, receiving a severe wound, he lay in the army hospital three months; subsequently he was promoted to an orderly sergeant. When the war closed he became a resident of Arkansas, where he engaged in the mercantile business until 1866, when he became a resident of Jerseyville, Jersey Co., where he took up the study of medicine, under Dr. T. O. Hamilton; in 1869 graduating from the St. Louis Medical College, and for several years practiced his profession in the town of Fidelity, Jersey Co., thence to the town of New Kane, where he has gained a good practice through his genial manners and knowledge of materia medica. In 1869, he was married to Miss Emeline Smith, by whom he had four children, three of whom are now living; Irene, Cora L. and Charles
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 729(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

BURNS, Dr. GEORGE W. - for ten years a resident of Wilmington, was born in Mercer County, Pennsylvania; his father was Thomas II. Burns, a native of Pennsylvania; there married Miss Sarah Duff; of eight children born of this marriage Dr. Burns was the second child; his preliminary education was received in the district schools of his native place; for some time he became a school teacher, and then entered the Lebanon Academy, wliere he became versed in the higher classical studies; prior to the war he studied medicine under Doctor T. H. Fulton; when the call came for 600,000 more troops, the young student enlisted in Company A, 139th Penn. Vols., in the service of Uncle Sam; during the war he was wounded at the second battle of Fredericksburg; transferred to the Army Medical Corps as an assistant to some of the most eminent army surgeons, he gained an experience that has helped materially to make of him a skillful physician and surgeon; he was among those detailed to bury the dead after the famous battle of Bull Run; among the more famous battles participated in by Dr. Burns were Antietam and Fredericksburg, where the regiment was seven days under fire; while on duty at Armory Square Hospital he was the student of Professor G. K. Smith, of the Long Island College Hospital; when the war closed he returned to Pennsylvania, where he studied medicine under Dr. White of Harlemsburg; proceeding to Philadelphia, he attended the medical college there for two terms pursuing the higher medical studies; in 1868 he moved to Wilmington, Greene County, where his skill as a physician is well known; in 1872 he returned to Pennsylvania, where he was united in marriage to Miss Helen M. Black, a daughter of A. H. P. Black; returning to Wilmington, he resumed his practice and now ranks among the leading men of the town
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 549(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt

BURROUGHS, W. P. - retired farmer, Greenfield, was born in Addison County, Vt., Nov. 10, 1810, in the city of Vergennes; was the son of Richard and Sarah, whose maiden name was Brown; his parents were of English descent. The father of the subject of this sketch was a graduate of Dartmouth College, and was a distinguished scholar; taught navigation, surveying, and the languages as a specialty; quite a number of men in this country were students of his, and it is said that at one time there were eight men in Congress whom he had taught their ABC; he had, at the time of his death, a work occupying twenty quires of paper, which contained subject matter which, had he lived to complete, would have been of great service to the scientific world; he died Sept. 22, 1865. The subject of this sketch, during his early life, was employed on the farm while his father was engaged in teaching. At the age of 21 he came to this State, making the entire trip in a wagon, from Vermont; he returned the same way he came, and on Oct. 14, 1832, was married to Abigal M. Griswold, born Augusts, 1812; was the daughter of David E. Griswold. Mr. Burroughs and wife made the trip from Vermont to this State in a wagon, during which trip she was not inside of a house. When Mr. Burroughs and wife first settled they stopped on Apple Creek Prairie, and rented land; in the Spring of 1834 they moved to town 10, range 11, where they entered some land and bought what they could, and remained upon this land until 1869, when they moved to Greenfield, and are now enjoying the fruits of their labor, and are very comfortably situated; they have had eight children, but two are now living, David, born Aug. 14, 1837, in Vermont, and Lydia, born Aug. 11, 1856, now the wife of Smith Joyne. Mrs. Burroughs is a member of the Presbyterian Chureh. Mr. Burroughs has long been identified with the interests of the county, is a member of Hugh de Payne Commandery. In conclusion, it is but justice to say of him that he is well deserving of the high esteem with which he is held by the community in which he resides.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 666-7(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt

BURRUSS, J. C. - the enterprising proprietor of the Carrollton Machine Shops and Foundry, was born in 1847, near the present city of Carrollton, in Greene County, upon the old farm homestead of his parents, George L. and Maria Burruss. Geo. L. Burruss is the well-known stock dealer. The subject of our sketch passed his early years upon the farm. In 1869 Mr. J. C. Burruss traveled for the well-known house of J. Sedgbeer, dealer in feed grinders, continuing in his employ for a period of one year; he now became employed upon the farm of his father, sinking an artesian well, getting no supply of water at a depth of a thousand feet. In 1872 Mr. B. married Miss Kate Beaty, daughter of D. E. Beaty, of Jersey County. In 1875 he was employed by the Illinois State Farmers Association as State contract agent, and, during the Winter of 1877, purchased the frame building owned by Winn Bros., and used as a machine shop, which was destroyed by fire six weeks after its purchase. By no means discouraged however by his misfortune, in 1877 Mr. Burruss erected the substantial building now owned and occupied by him for the transaction of a machine shop, foundry, blacksmithing.and machinery business. All varieties of farm machinery, from the most noted establishments are handled; and here is also manufactured to order a very superior wagon, made in a more workman-like manner than those generally in use. See business card elsewhere.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 471(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt