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CADE JAMES R.
CADE JAMES R. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. White Hall. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, where he was born on the 16th of January, 1841, oldest son and third child of Thomas and Tabitha Cade. Thomas Cade became a resident of Greene County during his childhood, as did also the lady who was destined to become his future wife. There were born of this union twelve children, seven of whom are living, whose biography we are necessarily compelled to omit owing to limited space. Mrs. Cade died in 1862, on the 18th of November; the remains now repose in the Dodson Cemetery of Carrollton. Thomas Cade is now a resident of Kansas, where he is engaged in farming. James, from whom our narrative is obtained, passed his early years upon a farm, and indeed, has always, it might be proper to state, been identified with agricultural pursuits. On the 7th of April, 1864, Mr. Cade was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Hunnicutt, a daughter of Rowell Hunnicutt. Mr. C. is the owner of 60 acres of valuable land, brought to a high state of cultivation through great industry and energy. Receiving an unusually liberal education, he became more than ordinarily proficient as a marksman, gaining considerable notoriety as such
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 652-3; - transcribed by bmt


CAMBELL D. W.
CAMBELL D. W. farmer. Sec. 23, P.O. Carrollton. Is a native of Knox County, Tenn., born May 13, 1838; son of John S. and Nancy C, whose maiden name was Smith, a native of Tennessee; the former of Virginia. David had the advantages of a liberal education. Remained with his parents until he attained his twenty-second year, at this time was attending the Ewing and Jefferson College, when the war breaking out the institution closed. Had previously made a trip to this State, and intended to return upon his graduation, which in consequence of the college closing, was not permitted to do, and in 1861, bade adieu the scenes of his childhood, and came to Illinois, landing in this county, first stopped at Jesse Roberts remained there three years, working for him in the meantime, and teaching some. May, 1864, enlisted in the one-hundred day service in Co. G. Ill. State Vols. Upon his return engaged in farming; went to McDonough County, staid one year; returning married Miss Serepta Hardcastle, a native of this county, born Oct. II, 1836, daughter of Wm. Hardcastle, their marriage took place Oct. 17, 1866; after which returned to McDonough, remained one year, then returned to this county, locating on Sec. 13, and which he farmed eight years; sold his farm and bought 160 acres on Sec. 23, where he has since remained. Has four children: Edgar, born Sept. 12, 1867; Daisy, born Nov. 5, 1869; Maude, born April 5, 1871; infant born August 9, 1877. Mr. C, is a member of Presbyterian church, also a member of Carrollton Lodge No. 70, A. F. & A. M.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 708(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CAMERON GEORGE W.
CAMERON GEORGE W. retired farmer, living on Sec. 17, P.O. Greenfield. Was born in Tennessee, Smith County, November, 1819. Emigrated to Illinois in 1836, landing at the Macoupin Creek, Dec. 20, the day of the sudden change; crossing on the first bridge that was made across the Macoupin, before it was quite finished traveling some three miles on Dec. 20, and stopped before the sudden change came on them. Cattle froze to death during that terrible storm. The family came west of Greenfield before they settled. The father of the subject of chis sketch was in the Mexican War, and died there during that war. His son that heads this sketch, was married Feb. 27, 1851, to Mary Moore, who was born Nov. 12, 1825, and died Nov. 7, 1871. Mr. Cameron was married again in 1872, to Martha E. Overby, who was born in 1835; have one child by last marriage, Florence
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 620-1(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CAMERON J. T.
CAMERON J. T. saddler and harness maker, west side of Square, Carrollton, Illinois. The above named gentleman, who is well and favorably known to the business community here, is worthy of more than a passing notice; the pioneer in the harness trade of Greene County, he began his business career at the early age of 18, in the City of Carrollton, having become regularly apprenticed to the trade of a harness maker at an early age; born in Tennessee in 1832; at five, his parents became residents of Greene County. Since this period of time he has lived here continuously, and has been known here as a business man from his 18th year. Commencing his business career with no capital, save willing hands and an energy that carried him in after years through many discouragements, he went steadily forward to a successful business career, transacting for many years a successful business both at Carrollton and Greenfield. In 1873 the store building owned by him was destroyed by fire, and shortly afterward Mr. Cameron bought the edifice where he now transacts a large and constantly increasing trade. In conclusion, we would say, give Mr. Cameron your patronage and secure good work at living prices. With the exception of alderman, Mr. Cameron has managed to keep clear of office. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 471-72(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CAMERON S. P.
CAMERON S. P. harness maker, Greenfield. Born in Warren County Tenn., Dec. 27, 1830; son of Joseph Cameron, of Scotch descent. At the age of six years came to this State, and he well remembers the time, for it was at the time of the "sudden change; "they had arrived at a point near Greenfield on the eve of that event, and on account of the frozen condition of the country, they were detained about six weeks before they could complete their journey. Their first settlement was made in town 11, range 11, where they continued five years, during which time they were engaged in agricultural pursuits. His father selling out in 1843, he moved to upper Alton, and he and Joseph were apprenticed to learn the harness maker's trade with Charles McFadden, of Carrollton, and at the age of 17, when he had completed his trade, he set up for himself in Greenfield, in 1849, in which he has since continued. In May, 11, 1851, he was married to Mary Kincaid, born Feb. 14, 1835, daughter of William Kincaid; seven children have blessed this union, viz: Belle, born Feb. 24, 1852; Kate, born Feb. 23, 185S; Edward, born Aug 11, 1859; Charles, born Feb. 3, 1861; William, born Aug. 5, 1862; Judson, born Aug. 6. 1867; Essie, born Jan. 19, 1878. Mr. Cameron has grown up in the town and established a good business, and has the respect of all who know him; has attended strictly to his own business, and, which is always the case in such instances, success is generally the outgrowth of that course of procedure. Mr. Cameron is a man of retiring habits; never been engaged in public life; is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 667(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CAMPBELL AMBERG
CAMPBELL AMBERG, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 16, P.O. Roodhouse, was born in Ohio; married Sarah A. Crist; five children: Flora, Morton, Robert, Carrie and Lelia. Mr. Campbell owns 160 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 585(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CAMPBELL DAVID
CAMPBELL DAVID, deceased, who during his life was a farmer within the borders of Greene County; was born in Tennessee where he followed farming, and here married Miss Edna Taylor, a daughter of Elijah Taylor. When the war came on, sorely against his will, Mr. Campbell was conscripted in the service of the South; obtaining his release he made his way to Greene County, settling in Carrollton, remaining a short time when he became a farmer. He died in 1871, and was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery of Carrollton. Mrs. Campbell, who resides in Greene County, was born in Tennessee in 1826. Of this marriage ten children were born, five of whom are living, Sarah J., Steven O., Charles, Frank, and Wylie who are residents of Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 511-12(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CANNEDY, J. J.
CANNEDY, J. J. farmer. Sec. 13, P.O. Fayette, a native of Greene County, born Dec. 15 1847; is a son of Andrew J. Cannedy, born May 13, 1825; he was a native of Warren County, Tenn.; his wife's maiden name was Vylotte Dixon, born Sept. 3, 1830. Andy J. came to this State about the year 1838, and settled near Sheffield, Greene County. Jefferson, whose name heads this sketch, was married Dec. 31, 1865, to Rachel L. Russell, who was born March 6, 1844; she is a daughter of William Russell; by this marriage they have had five children, but three of whom are now living: Cloyde M., born March 28, 1867; William A., born Aug. 29, 1871; Joseph D., born Oct. 9, 1876, died Sept. 3, 1877; John C, born Sept. 15, 1877. Their marriage took place in Buchanan County, Mo.; in 1866 came to this county; remained until the Fall of 1870, then went to Delta County, Texas, staid until 1878; during his sojourn in that locality he was engaged in farming; freighted some, and saw much of the country, and thinks that it is a very desirable country to live in, and contemplates returning in 1879 to settle for life
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 667(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CANNEDY STEPHEN D.
CANNEDY STEPHEN D. farmer. Sec. 21, P.O. Greenfield. The subject of this sketch is a son of one of the oldest settlers in this township, and but few in the county can date their coming to an earlier time than he; first made the trip on foot from Tennessee, his only companion his trusty rifle; he came out to take a view of the country, and, liking it, returned as he came, and brought his family out in an ox-cart, bringing therein what few articles of furniture they had, the family walking, his wife carrying a child in her arms. He made one or two trips back to Tennessee in the same manner before he finally located; he made a selection of land on the spot where Greenfield now stands, and erected the first cabin thereon; land not being in market at that time he disposed of his claim, and after his return from Tennessee settled on the place now owned by Anson Miller, three miles south of Griswold, where he remained about forty years; he died Jan. 18, 1870. The subject of this sketch was born in DeKalb County, Tenn., and came to this .country with his parents, being three years of age at this time; remained with his parents until he had attained his twenty-second year, when he set out for himself, working among the farmers, and at whatever employment that came hand; May 10, 1851, was married to Nancy Spradley, daughter of Bryant Spradley. She was born August, 1828; they have had five children, but two are now living: Harriet, born Oct. 10, 1852: Helen, born Feb. 23, 1860. Mr. Cannedy, after his marriage, made very many changes; lived rather of a migratory life, first settling on the place he now lives, then went to Greenfield, staid one year; was there engaged in the manufacture of brick, then to the homestead, remained about ten years; then to Fayette, staid ten years, back again to the old homestead, then to Texas, staid ten months, back again to Greenfield, then back to the place first settled; has since remained. While at Fayette was engaged in wagonmaking, and served as justice of the peace; has been occupied in running circular sawmills considerable of the time; thinks he will go to Texas again; he and his family are members of the United Brethren Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 667-8(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CANNADY WM
CANNADY WM, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 14, P.O. Fayette; was born in Bedford Co., Virginia, March 20, 1801; was the first of a family of six children born of George and Christina Cannady, whose maiden name was Warner. She was of Dutch descent; while her husband is of the Anglo Saxon stock. In his youth he had little or no opportunities for securing an education. At the age of fifteen he moved with his father and family to Kentucky, where they remained about thirty years. They settled in Nelson County, and during this time William was engaged with his father on the farm. In 1845, the family emigrated to this State, and located in Carrollton, where they remained three years, during which time he was engaged in teaming; hauling from the river, Alton and St. Louis. Then engaged in farming at Kane; where they rented land for nine years. In the year 1B49, he was married to Narcissa Vaughn, by whom he had six children: Julia, born in 1848; Lucy, born in 1850; William born in 1852; Sarah L., born in 1854; Martha, born in 1856; Effie, born in 1857. William died Jan. 21, 1876. Mr. Cannady buried his wife Jan 10, 1866. In the winter of 1858, he moved to the section he now lives on, and bought four hundred acres of land, which he has since farmed. In the Spring of 1869, Feb. 16, he was married to Mrs. Narcissus Dennis, relict of Harvey Dennis; they have had no children. Mrs. Cannady has four children living, all of whom are now married and settled. She had one son, Charles Steadman, who died in the United States service at Murfreesboro Hospital, of typhoid fever. Mr. Cannady is now in his seventy-seventh year, and has a remarkable degree of health for one of his age. He has been long and favorably known in the community in which he resides
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 668(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CANNEDY WILLIAM H.
CANNEDY WILLIAM H. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 5, P.O. Rockbridge. When the long lines of emigrant trains dotted the prairies between the States of Tennessee and Illinois, and many sought the new Eldorado, extending from St. Louis to Chicago, among the number whose white-capped wagons were drawn slowly across the native prairie grass, we mention with more than a passing notice, James Cannedy, father of the honored gentleman whose name stands at the top of this sketch. He was born in South Carolina, March 20, 1790, removing to Tennessee when that State had witnessed few improvements. He was there married to Miss Eliza Grizzle. In the war of 1812 he took an active part, and after its close began the life of a saddler, and subsequently became an exceedingly prosperous farmer. In the commencement of this narrative, we have made mention of his emigration to the West, this was in 1829, when marvelous reports began to be spread abroad, of Illinois. The family then comprised husband, wife and eight children. A first stopping place was made in Jefferson County, but not long afterward he moved to that portion of Greene County now set apart and known as T. 11, R. 10. He built a cabin of the usual description and became in after years a moderately successful farmer; he was commissioned a captain of a military company during the Black Hawk war, but was not called upon to participate, owing to the rebellion coming suddenly to a close. He died on the 15th of January, 1872, finding a last resting place in Greene County; his wife had preceded him to that bourne from whence no traveler ever returns, Aug. 10, 1867. William, whose energetic career in Illinois is worthy of more than a passing notice, grew up amid the pioneer boys of Greene County, many of whom bear a prominent part in the prosperity of Southern Illinois. He received a liberal education by dint of hard study during his youth and early manhood. The 5th of March, 1855, he was married to Miss Mahala Allen, a daughter of Nathan Allan of Kentucky; he now taught school for a number of years. Regularly and prior to this he had taught young scholars, many who are now gray haired men, and residents of the county. During the Autumn of 185S, he was elected to the office of justice of the peace; in those days the press of business incumbent upon the office proved so great that it interfered materially with his school duties, and since this date, until very recently, he has attended to the duties of his farm and been the recipient of other township offices. In the capacity of justice, through his knowledge of the law, he acquired a proficiency that has never been equalled in this county. In religious matters he has taken a deep interest for many years, contributing financially and otherwise toward their support, and now, after a long and eventful life, he is the possessor of 151 ½ acres of valuable land, which will compare favorably with any other farm of its size in the State and county, on which he erected some years ago a handsome farm residence. Of the marriage above mentioned nine children were born, all of whom are living: Jas. F., Louisa, Mary Ann, Melinda C, Sarah M., Thos. J., John W., Cora J. I., Martha E. Before bringing this sketch to a close it will be well to make a note of the fact that few have the confidence of the people to such an extent as Mr. C, who has officiated as township school trustee and treasurer many years and is at present notary public
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 721(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CARLIN THOMAS J.
CARLIN THOMAS J. Circuit Clerk for many years; is a native of Greene County; born at Carrollton December 13, 1827, and is the eldest child of William and Mary Carlin. William Carlin was a brother of Governor Carlin, of Illinois, and a native of Fredericksburgh, Va.; born May 31, 1804. Mrs Carlin was born July 3, 1805, in Halifax County, Va., and at the age of 13 her parents moved to Kentucky. Mr. Carlin removed with his parents when quite young to the then Territory of Illinois, and settled on Wood River, in Madison County. At that place they resided several years. During the Autumn of 1820, William Carlin became a citizen of Greene County, and purchased a tract of land now in the corporation of Carrollton. On the 6th of December, 1826, he was married to Miss Mary Goode. Politically his views coincided with those of the Democratic party, of which, in Greene County, he was a prominent member, and such confidence did they repose in his ability and honor that they elected him to the office of County Clerk and retained him in that position 17 years, when he resigned and moved to his farm, eight miles west of Carrollton. Two years later, while on his way to New Orleans with stock, he was nominated by the Democrats and elected in December, 1849, entering upon his official duties at Carrollton. He passed away on the 20th of April, 1850, No man perhaps in the county was more universally liked than he, and his death was universally regretted by a large circle of acquaintances. His widow is still living, a resident of Carrollton. Thomas J. Carlin, while a boy, attended the common schools of Greene County. Shortly after the death of his father, he was appointed by Judge Woodson Circuit Clerk, to fill the unexpired term of his father. When the duties of this office came to a close he was appointed Deputy Sheriff under William Halbrit, and acted in that capacity two years. He married Miss Jane Kelly, a daughter of Andrew Kelly, of Carrollton, by whom he has three children. Their eldest daughter, Louisa, is the wife of William L. Robards. After the expiration of his term as Deputy Sheriff. Mr. Carlin settled on the old homestead, and soon after purchased a portion of the estate. In November, 1864, he was elected to the office of Circuit Clerk, and by re-election officiated in this capacity until December, 1876. Since this date he has followed agricultural pursuits. Viewing his past life, that has been characterized by ability in office and a spirit of generosity, few have contributed more toward the prosperity of the county than Thomas J. Carlin
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 472(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CARR JOSEPH S.
CARR JOSEPH S. attorney and counsellor at law, is a native of Missouri; born in 1832; he was the oldest of a family of four children; his father, John H. Carr, was a native of Kentucky, who developed a surprising energy, that carried him forward to a successful mercantile career in the mature years of manhood; although during his early years he practiced as an attorney, through natural ability and education he became a remarkably successful trader, and became exceedingly wealthy; he was assassinated at the city hall, in the city of St. Louis, which sad event was currently reported in the newspapers of that date; at one period of his life he was robbed of $40,000 by the Indians belonging to the Comanche tribe, suffering untold hardships on the confines of a desert. Col. Carr, who heads this sketch, received his collegiate education at the old college in St. Charles, Mo.; after completing his studies he made a trip to California, where trouble arising with the Indians he enlisted, and was made 1st lieutenant of Co. F, of the 1st Bat. of Cal. Vols.; after the war he engaged in mercantile pursuits, in which he continued two years; returning home on the loth of May, 1859, he was married to Miss Ann Georgia Logan, a daughter of James and Elizabeth P. Logan; they have had a family of eleven children, of whom eight are living. In 1860, Col. Carr was admitted to the bar, in Anderson County, Mo., and in 1869 was admitted to practice by the Supreme Court of Illinois; a member of the State Guards when the war broke out, he received orders to report to Gen. Price; reported at the general headquarters, near Lexington, about five days before the battle in which he took an active part, and was one of the officers appointed to receive the surrender of arms; he participated in many important battles fought in the West; at Vicksburg he tendered his resignation to Jefferson Davis; in 1864 he became a resident of Kane, Greene County, where he has gained a large practice as an attorney
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 730(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CARR R. W.
CARR R. W. drugs and groceries. Sec. 13, P.O. Fayette. The subject of this sketch is a grandson of James Carr, who was one of the early pioneers of Morgan County, who made the first purchase of land on which Jacksonville now stands; he was Gen. Jackson's cook during the war of 1812, and was at all the battles that took place during that time; remembers very distinctly of seeing Gen. Packenham fall from his horse. Upon his return from the war he settled in Macoupin County; this hardy pioneer and notable character died in the Fall of 1874, in his 79th year. R. W., who heads this page, is a son of Archibald and Mary Carr, who was born in Tennessee, and came to this State at an early age, and settled in the vicinity of Carrollton, and subsequently in Macoupin County, where R. W. was born, which was at a point two miles east of Fayette; his ancestors were among the most wealthy and influential citizens of their time, and trace their antecedents to the land of the immortal Bruce and Burns; R. W. had excellent advantages for obtaining an education, which he improved, and in addition to those afforded at the common district school, he attended the Blackburn University four years, taking the scientific and classical course; in the winter of 1871, Jan. 29, he was united in marriage to Mary Kennedy, daughter of Jackson Kennedy. Three children have blessed this union: Lindell L., born Feb., 1872; Ollie, born Oct. 12, 1874; Herman, born Feb. 5, 1876; Lindell died Feb. 4, 1874. After his marriage he moved to the farm where he remained three years, then moved to Carrollton, where he staid one year; was engaged in painting; then returned to the farm, where he remained until the Spring of 1878; then he began business in Fayette, and has since continued at the above named business. Is a member of the M. E. Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 668-9(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CARRICO JOHN C.
CARRICO JOHN C, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 4, P.O. Kane. Few commenced life under more discouragements than the whole-souled gentleman whose name heads this sketch. He was the eighth of a family of fourteen children, and was born in St. Louis Co., Missouri, February 28, 1819. His father, Dennis Carrico, was a native of Frederick County, Maryland. At an early age he became apprenticed to the trade of a wheelwright, and subsequently became a skillful journeyman workman; attaining his majority, he set out for Pennsylvania, where he worked as a journeyman, and here formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Jane Clark, in 1813; in order to better his condition in life, he determined to adopt the West as his future home, and accordingly made his way to Kentucky, where he engaged in his occupation as wheelwright. It was during the year 1813, that he became a resident of St. Louis Co., Mo.; at a period of time, when the entire commerce of the city of St. Louis scarcely footed up to the insignificant sum of $100,000. Hearing many glowing accounts of the fertility of Illinois, thither he directed his footsteps, and landed in that portion of Southern Illinois, then known as Greene County, since set apart and forming a portion of Jersey County; he necessarily lived a life of frugality for many a year, until such time as emigration flowed rapidly westward, although in after years he became moderately successful as an agriculturist, and became extensively known as a surveyor; his long and useful life ended in 1850, and his ashes repose in the Thompson cemetery, in Greene County. Mrs. Carrico passed to that world of spirits to which we are all traveling, in 1834, and the survivors of the family, few in number, now reside in different parts of the Union. John, from whom this sketch is obtained, grew to manhood in the West; received a common school education, and subsequently entered upon a course of study in the East. In 1839, he was married to Miss Minnie Ann VanMeter, a daughter of Amasa and Elizabeth VanMeter; he now set up housekeeping on $4.50; went to the enormous expense of purchasing a skillet and plain table, and began life in earnest, and mapped out his future success; by well directed energy, is the owner of 315 acres of land in one of the best counties in the Union, enjoying the respect and confidence of his neighbors; for eight years he has been honored with the position of justice of the peace; of the marriage eight children were born
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 729-30(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CARRICO LAFAYETTE T.
CARRICO LAFAYETTE T. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 33, P.O. Kane. Lafayette Carrico was born in Jersey County in 1843, and is the oldest child of John C. and Winnie Ann Carrico. In entering into a description of life and times in Greene County, and of the men who are actors therein, of those born in the State, it can only be said of those who followed agriculture for a livelihood, that little of the hardships of frontier life fell to their lot, and necessarily some of our- sketches occupy more space than others. Lafayette Carrico passed his boyhood upon a farm, and received the usual district school education. In 1864, he was married to Miss Rosann Shanks, by whom he had two children: Clara, born in 1868, and Anna, born Dec. 8, 1864, died Jan. 13, 1866. Mr. Carrico is the owner of 100 acres of land, and is a thorough-going, successful farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 749-50(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CARRIGER GEORGE W.
CARRIGER GEORGE W. farmer, Sec. 13, P.O. Breese, was born Jan. 12, 1850. in Lincoln Co., Tenn. His father died at the age of fifty years; his mother is still living in Tenn. He was married Feb. 13, 1873, to Nonie Coates, daughter of Lee and Emeline Coates. She was born Feb. 19, 1857. They have two children living and one deceased: Archie W. was born Sept. 3, 1875; Clyde T., born Jan. 24, 1877; Orie L ,born July 25, 1874, died Sept. 19, 1874. He is living just west of the town of Breese
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 613(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


CARRIGER NICHOLAS
CARRIGER NICHOLAS, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 12, P.O. Breese. Mr. Carriger was born in Lincoln County, Tenn. Nov. 16, 1828. He was two years old when his parents, Leonard and Sylvania Carriger, emigrated from Tennessee to Illinois; settling on the property now owned by Nicholas; the old folks, after many years of hard toil among the pioneers of long ago, were laid at rest beneath the prairies of Greene County that they loved so well. Nicholas was the third child born of this marriage; his schooling was obtained where the studies were limited to a spelling book or a testament. November 8, 1860, he was married to Miss Louisa Breden; of ten children born of this marriage the following are living: Sylvania E., George F., Orlena C, Henry McLean, Charles Perry, and Florence E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 549-50(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CARSON JOHN
CARSON JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 31, P.O.Greenfield. Was born in Ireland in 1815; was married in 1840 to Florence Stone, who was born in Ireland Feb. 14, 1819; have eight children living: Eliza, born Dec. 21, 1842; Ann, Dec. 23, 1844; Francis, Jan. 12, 1847; Mathew, April, 1849; Mary J., April, 1852; Sarah, June 10, 1855; Ida, Nov. 10, 1859; John, March 12, 1862. The first four children were born in Ireland. Mr. Carson emigrated from Ireland to Vermont in 1858, living there till 1860, then came to Greene County, Ill., and rented land from Robert A. Harden, remaining on his land as a renter for ten years, then bought the land he now lives on, which consists of 240 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 621(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CARTER JAMES W.
CARTER JAMES W. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 1, P.O. Carrollton. James W. Carter is a native of Kentucky, where he was born on the 25th of April, 1854. His father, John C. Carter, was born in Kentucky; there followed farming and married, shortly after attaining his majority, Miss Jane T. Stanton, of Kentucky, who bore him nine children, Charles F., James W., from whom our sketch is obtained, Joseph S., John C, David C, George A., Doctor F., Mary E., and Harry L. Some twenty years ago the family moved to Greene County, III., where the head of the family is now a prosperous farmer, and where our subject grew to manhood and received a liberal education. In 1876 he was united in marriage to Miss Mattie King, a daughter of John and Charlotte King; one child blessed this union, William, born in 1878. Mr. Carter is the owner of 160 acres of valuable land, and ranks among our more substantial farmers
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 512(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CHAMBERS JOSEPH
CHAMBERS JOSEPH, stone mason, res. Kane. Joseph Chambers is a native of the State of Ohio; born in 1817; he was the fourth child of Joseph and Elizabeth Chambers, natives of Ireland, who settled in Ohio in 1812. Here our subject passed his early years, and became apprenticed to the trade of a stone mason, in due process of time becoming a skillful journeyman workman; in his 20th year, 1839, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Welch, a daughter of Robert Welch, a native Irishman; of this marriage ten children were born, of whom nine are living. When war was declared between Mexico and the United States he enlisted in the 2d Ohio Regiment, and shortly after proceeded to the front, where he was destined to take an active part in the famous battles of Buena Vista, Cerro Gordo, Monterey, and others of note; during the last year of his service, for meritorious conduct, he was promoted a first lieutenant; when the war closed he returned to Ohio, where he followed the occupation of stone mason and farming. The second wife of Mr. Chambers was Miss Jane Haney, a daughter of Isaac Robbins, by whom he has one child; in 1862 he moved to Indiana, from this point wending his way to Greene Co. in 1869, where he has since resided, a well respected citizen of the place, few being better known for their generosity and energy
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 730(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CHAPMAN ADAM
CHAPMAN ADAM, retired farmer, Roodhouse, Illinois. The above named gentleman was the youngest son of Luke and Grace Chapman, natives of Yorkshire, England, who crossed the Atlantic about the year 1820. The family then consisted of Sarah, Benjamin and William. A settlement was made in Virginia, where Luke, Hannah and Adam were born. Adam, born in 1833, was but six years of age when his mother moved to Illinois; his father having died during his third year. On arrival in Illinois the little party of emigrants first settled in Scott County, remaining one year, and then moving to Greene County. Adam lived with his mother during her life. He became a resident of Pittsfield, Pike County, two year. A hard working farmer, owning a good property, he became truly successful. Moving to Roodhouse on account of impaired health. he invested in valuable town properly. Mr. Chapman was married to Laura B. Pea, a daughter of Ezekiel and E. M. Pea; one child, Edward, born in Greene County.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 569 (Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


CHAPMAN LUKE
CHAPMAN LUKE, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 16. P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Chapman was born in Western Virginia, Jan. 29. 1826, fourth child of Luke and Grace Chapman. During the early childhood of Luke, his father died. In 1835, Mrs. Chapman, accompanied by her family, traveled west to Illinois, settling in Greene County, where land was purchased, and here young Luke helped very materially toward the family maintenance. At twenty-three he married Miss Clarinda Lorton, a daughter of Thomas Lorton, who settled in Greene County in 1818. Prior to his marriage, Mr. Chapman had purchased 100 acres of land, and now set to work to prepare a home, and after many years of hard labor, now finds himself comfortably situated in life; one child, Cornelia, born in 1851
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 585(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CHINN WM. D.
CHINN WM. D. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 36, P. O. Berdan, was born Sept. 22, 1825, in Tennessee; married Jan. 30, 1855, to Mary Ann Dodson, who was born in 1837, having one child, Charles M., born June 12, 1858, who died Feb. 20, 1859. After death of his first wife was married to Abiah Dodson Sept. 19, 1865; she died Sept. 11, 1878. By this marriage two children, George W., born June 25, 1866, and Christopher D., born May 17, 1870. The father of the subject of this sketch, James Chinn, born July 22, 1794, died Jan. 17, 1853; married Nov. 4, 1821, to Miss Sallie Williams, who w-as born Feb. 9, 1805; had ten children; emigrated from North Carolina to Greene County, Ill., in 1829, and entered 120 acres of land from the government. The subject of this sketch, at the age of twenty-one, started in life with a horse, which he sold for $75, and loaned $25 of the money to the man who bought the horse, then took his note for $100. He then bought an interest in a threshing machine, which he run for a number of years. He now owns 487 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 644(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CHRISTY GEORGE
CHRISTY GEORGE, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29, P.O. Kane. George Christy is a native of Greene County, born in 1839; the youngest son of John C. and Elizabeth Christy. John C. Christy was a native of Ohio, born in 1801; in an early day he moved to Lawrence County, Ill., and subsequently to Greene, where he married Miss Elizabeth Dennison, and after his settlement in Greene he followed agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred about the year 1845. Mr. Christy was a brother of the widely known millionaire of St. Louis, Andrew Christy, whose generosity on the close of a wonderfully eventful life laid the prosperity of many who bear the name. George, from his earliest years, has followed agricultural pursuits, and to-day ranks among the wealthier farmers of this section
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 730-1(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CLAPP, Clement L.
CARROLLTON PATRIOT PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT, Clement L. Clapp, proprietor. Publishes the Carrollton Patriot, Clement L. Clapp, editor and proprietor; the White Hall Republican, , Pearce & Clapp, proprietors; the Scott County Arrow , Pearce & Clapp, proprietors. Mr. Clapp, the proprietor of this flourishing printing establishment, was born in Ohio in 1852, spent his boyhood in Connecticut; removed to Iowa, where he graduated from College in 1871. Taught three years, spent two years at Yale College as a post graduate student, was for two years a member of the editorial staff of the New Haven Conn., daily Journal and Courier , was for one year a tutor in Illinois College, Jacksonville, and in 1875 bought the Carrollton Patriot. This establishment employs eight men and its four presses are constantly in motion, turning out commercial printing, legal printing, pamphlets, etc., for a wide section of country. Its customer, are scattered from Jacksonville to Alton, on the C. & A. R.R., and from Winchester to Medora on the C. B. & Q. R.R. There is no country office in central Illinois that executes a greater variety or amount of printing
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 472-73(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CLARK ESTHER MRS.
CLARK ESTHER MRS. relict of Israel Clark, Sec. 9, P.O. Carrollton. In tracing the life history of families, we necessarily follow the varying fortunes of the head of the family. Israel Clark was a native of Ohio, where he was born in 18 14. Early in life he became apprenticed to the trade of a carpenter, continuing in this occupation after his marriage, which occurred on the 3d of October, 1839, to Miss Esther Demeen, in Ohio. In 1848, Israel Clark moved to Greene County, where he purchased a farm of 160 acres, east of Carrollton, and subsequently became the owner of 250 acres. In 1864, he purchased the property known as the Clark estate, consisting at one time of 240 acres; at present comprising 160 acres. In 1868, Mr. Clark was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery south of the city of Carrollton. The survivors of the family are Mrs. Clark, who •was born in Butler County, O., and seven children: John, Susan, Isaac, William, Alfred, Jennie L., and Charles
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 750(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CLARK JOHN M.
CLARK JOHN M. mechanic. Sec. 32, P.O. Rockbridge, was born in Rockbridge County, Va., Aug. 4, 1846, is the son of Samuel and Ann Clark, her maiden name was Reynolds. At the age of 14 he moved to Green County, Ohio, with his parents. August, 1862, enlisted in the 5th Ohio Cav., Co. C, Gov. Todd's Independent Scouts; remained about one year, and when they were disbanded re-enlisted in the 60th Ohio Vol., Co. C. This regiment was unfortunate, being severely cut to pieces. The Colonel in one instance led the regiment into the very face of a division of Lee's army, and thirty-three out of his company were buried in one grave at Spottsylvania, and out of 102 men in his company only nine of them returned unscathed, of which John was one of the number. He was at the battle of the Wilderness, Nye River, Bethesda Church, North Anna Riven, Spottsylvania, and Cold Harbor, where he was taken prisoner, and served about seven months m several prisons, Belle Isle, Libby, Milan, and Andersonville. During the time he was at Milan he escaped, but was pursued by blood hounds and captured, having to climb a tree to escape being torn to pieces. During the time he was with the regiment he had some very narrow escapes; had at one time twenty-three bullet holes through his overcoat, but came out without a scratch. When he came out of Andersonville prison he weighed but seventy-five pounds, and when he went home his mother did not recognize him. He received his discharge Aug. 6, 1865, and after the war came to this county; hired out to Charles Scandredt, jr.; worked for him three years on a farm; married Jennie Howard, born Jan. 19, 1851; had five children: Charles W., born Feb. 6, 1870; Magnolia, born Oct. 19, 1872; Elizabeth O., born Nov. 21, 1874; John S., born Dec. 12, 1876; Roy E., born Feb. 17, 1878. He has learned the wagon maker and carpenter's trade; is proprietor of a steam thresher, which he has been running for ten years; is a member of Sheffield Lodge No. 678, A. F. and A. M.; cast his first vote for U. S. Grant
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 669(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CLARK JOSEPH A.
CLARK JOSEPH A. farmer and stock raiser, res. Second st., Carrollton; farm property situated in township 9, range 13, and township 8. range 13, and consisting of 720 acres. Joseph A. Clark is a native of Iowa, was born in 1839, the second child of Joshua and Paulina Clark, whose maiden name was Hoffman. The family moved from Iowa when our subject was a child, and settled on land at a point familiarly known as the Bluff, where the head of the family followed agricultural pursuits, until his entree into the hotel business at Carrollton. He officiated in this capacity for six years, when he again took up the life of a farmer, and here young Clark passed his early years, and first embarked in business on Macoupin Creek; at a point now known as Clark's Landing; here he kept a grocery, and attended to the duties pertaining to his farm, and also rafted logs down the river to St. Louis and Alton, during the greater part of ten years. Mr. Clark energetically pursued the calling of rafting logs down the river, and on which transaction he realized a handsome profit, and in due time he accumulated a handsome property, and now owns as above stated, 720 acres. In Fuldom, Jersey Co., Mr. Clark transacted a general merchandise business, and held the position of postmaster when he moved to Carrollton, where he purchased a residence and town property. In 1861. Mr. C. was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Fulks, a daughter of John Fulks, by whom he has six children : Clara B., Mary, Jennie, Cyrilda, Rosa and Zana
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 473(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CLARK ROBERT H.
CLARK ROBERT H. farmer and thresher. Sec. 4, P.O. Rockbridge. The subject of our sketch was born in Virginia, Oct. 10, 1826, where he grew to manhood, receiving such education as time and opportunity offered. Attaining his majority he voyaged down the Ohio River to Cincinnati, and from this point proceeded to St. Louis, Mo., and thence to Greene County, where he entered the employ of Samuel Judy, as a farm hand. Several months had elapsed when he returned to Virginia, and there united his fortunes on the 20th of Sept., 1858, to Miss Isabel Vest. He now moved to Ohio where he remained a resident four years; at the end of this time he again became a resident of Greene County, where he entered the service of his old employer, continuing with him until his decease, which occurred one year later. From this time onward his energy and will carried him successfully forward. For many years he has ran a horsepower, and latterly a steam thresher, and in this vocation has met with flattering success. Of the marriage above referred to eight children were born: America, Lincoln, James, John, Phoebe, Nellie, Frank, and Clifton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 721-2(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CLEMMONS DR. C. P.
CLEMMONS DR. C. P. physician and surgeon, for the past twenty years in practice at Carrollton, was born in Davidson Co., North Carolina, January, 1817; at twenty-one he became a resident of Louisville, Ky., where he entered the medical university, remaining three years, graduating as an M.D. in 184S. It may be here stated, that Dr. C. is, in every sense of the word, a self-made man, whose studies in the medical profession were made under difficulties that many would have given way under, and never have risen to any worthy position in life. From this institution he graduated with high honors. In 1841 he took up the practice of medicine. For eighteen years, he was a resident of Pike Co., Ill., where he obtained a large and lucrative practice. In 1858 the Doctor moved to Carrollton, where his skill as a physician soon becoming known, he secured a very liberal patronage. In 1862 he erected the large brick building east of court-house, where, from '62 until '76, he transacted a large drug business. In addition to this Dr. Clemmons owns some four or five other substantial dwellings in the city, and a country property, consisting of 227 acres of land, within a short distance of the city. In Nebraska he also owns two sections of valuable land. For three terms has been alderman of Carrollton. In 1851 he was married to Miss Matilda Thomas, daughter of the Hon. Samuel Thomas, by whom he has four children: Emma, who married Dr. Lindsay, of Carrollton; Thomas, a farmer; Charles, a graduate of St. Louis Medical College, and Eliza, now attending Godfrey College, at Monticello Ill.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 473-74(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CLENDENEN H. P.
CLENDENEN H. P. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 21, P. O. Carrollton, is one among the oldest settlers now living in Greene County; was born in Bourbon Co., Kentucky, Oct. 12, 1812; he was the son of George W. and Mary Clendenen, deceased, who emigrated from Kentucky to St. Charles County, Missouri, in 1817, living there till 1820, then moved to Greene County, Ills., where they entered a small tract of land; they lived in the county for a number of years and passed from this world to a better, leaving many friends to mourn their death. Their son, who heads this sketch, was but eight years of age when he came to Greene County, in 1820, and received his preliminary education in the old-time log school house, with puncheon floor and slab benches, with the door swinging too and fro on wooden hinges; he commenced life by working on a farm for eight and nine dollars per month till he accumulated enough money to enter 320 acres of land from the government, which was in 1835, and owns the same land now that he entered; as he accumulated, bought land till he now owns 1,700 acres, which lays in the Illinois Bottom; he followed flat-boating in his younger days, making his own boats and filling them with produce that he raised on his farm, making from one to three trips a year, for fourteen years, and can tell some of those old flat-boat stories when steamboats and railroads were comparatively few. He worked hard in his younger days, starting with nothing but a determined will, to make something in the world for himself. Was married in 1843, to Mariah Clark, who was bom in Greene County, in 1832, was the daughter of Absalom and Lydia Clark, who emigrated from Ohio in 1815 to the American Bottom, and to Greene County in 1817. Mr. Clendenen's union was blessed with six children, three living: Mary, married to Robert King; Orson, married to Ella Flatt, and Jennie, married James Ellis. Mrs. C. died in 1863, at the age of 37
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 768-9(T9N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


CLOSE LUCINDA MRS.
CLOSE LUCINDA MRS. Sec. 17, P. O. Carrollton. Mrs. Close is a native of Kentucky, where she was born in 1811, and accompanied her parents Samuel and Elizabeth Martin in the year 1827 to Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 750(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CLOUGH JOHN
CLOUGH JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 23, P.O. Carrollton. The whole-souled gentleman, whose name appears at the head of this biography, is a native of Yorkshire, England, where he was born on the eighth day of October, 1821; the youngest child of Robert and Elizabeth Clough. The days of his childhood and early youth were spent upon European shores, where he followed agricultural pursuits and received a liberal education in the subscription schools of his native place. In 1850 he crossed the Atlantic for the new world; landing in New York City on the 5th of April of the year above given. Remaining in New York but a short time he came direct to the West, locating at Carrollton where he subsequently found employment as a butcher, and for twenty years was associated in business with W. O. Greaves, whose biography appears elsewhere, in a city meat market at Carrollton. Some eight years since Mr. Clough retired from the above business, turning his attention to farming, and now resides at his farm residence in Township 10, R. 12. In 1855 Mr. Clough was married to Miss Emma Greaves, a daughter of W. O. and Harriet Greaves. Seven children were born of this marriage, four of whom are living, and whose names are in order of birth, John, Robert, George, and Hattie. Mr. Clough has been twice mayor of Carrollton, and was first elected to this prominent position in 1873, and subsequently received a reelection to the same office in 1875
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 474(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


COATES CHESTER
COATES CHESTER, farmer and stock raiser. P.O. Roodhouse. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, born in 1842; fourth child of John and Martha A. His boyhood was passed upon the old farm homestead; on attaining his majority he was united in marriage to .Miss Zirelda Farmer, by whom he had one child, Florence W., not living. Mrs. Coates died in 1866; two years later Mr. Coates was married to Miss Elizabeth Craig, a daughter of Isaac; three children: Martha A., Frank O., and Willie A. Mr. Coates recently disposed of a valuable farm property of 100 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 585-6(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


COATES MARCUS
COATES MARCUS, farmer, Sec. 35, P.O. Schutz Mill, was born in this county Dec. 14, 1852. He was married July 8, 1871, to Christina Schutz, daughter of Matthew Schutz; she was born Nov. 4, 1852. He owns forty acres of land, valued at $500, and cultivates two hundred acres belonging to his father-in-law. His father was born in South Carolina, and was killed by a train on the Chicago & Alton R.R. three years since; he was about eighty years of age
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 613(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


COATES W. B.
COATES W. B. dealer in dry goods, boots, shoes, hardware, groceries, drugs, etc., etc. .Wilmington, Greene Co., Ill. Mr. Coates was born in South Carolina, October 1835; the following year his parents moved to Illinois, locating at Wilmington, in Greene County; here the head of the family erected the building now owned and occupied by George W. McCollister; shortly after this he moved down on the bluffs, and purchased the grist mill then owned by David Hodges; he transacted a successful business until 1844, when he leased it for twenty-five years to Lemuel Patterson George Sholts, and A. S. Seeley. Mr. Coates died many years ago; he was the father of ten children, of whom W. B. was the fourth; he first worked for neighboring farmers; for four years he worked in the mines of Montana; on his return to Wilmington he entered into the mercantile business, purchasing the building he now occupies, one of the most substantial in Wilmington; here he has held forth many a year, meeting with a large patronage due his honesty and square dealing. He was married in 1859 to Miss Elizabeth Watt, a daughter of Miner Watt, an old settler of Greene County. Mr. Coates has seven children: Peroria, Denver, Mary, Martha, Lillie, Tilden, and infant child
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 550(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


COBB L. E.
COBB L. E. retired farmer. L. E. Cobb was born in Burke Co., N. C, Feb. 24, 1810. At the youthful age of nineteen, he set out for the State of Indiana, on foot. The distance, 500 miles was made on foot not over a broad level prairie, like many who settled in the West in an early day, but on his way, which comprised considerable of the distance, he crossed the range of mountains known as the Blue Ridge, in North Carolina, and Clinch and Cumberland. This long distance was traversed in twelve days, giving the reader some idea of the strength of character and indomitable will of the hardy pioneers, who will soon be known only in history. Arriving in Indiana, Mr. Cobb secured employment in a tannery, also worked as farm hand; first entered Illinois in 1832; worked for a blacksmith two weeks, receiving five dollars therefor; his bed at night, a puncheon floor; his covering, deer skins; a life made up of variety surely. Becoming proprietor of a small tannery, he earned his first $100, and purchased eighty acres in Macoupin Co. In Morgan County, he married Miss Mary Crum, daughter of Mathais Crum, a native of Virginia. In 1852, he disposed of his property there and came to Greene Co., where he bought a valuable tract of land, part of which now lies in the corporation of Roodhouse. There are seven children: Joseph, William, John, James, Mary, Margaret and Fanny. On closing this sketch, it is due Mr. Cobb, to state that he has won his way to a leading position through merit
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 569(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


COLLINS J. F.
COLLINS J. F. merchant, Greenfield. Among the "young settlers"of this township who are self-made and have attained success under discouraging circumstances, is the party whose name heads this sketch. John is a native born Greene Countian; first saw the light of day in town 10, range 11, May 17, 1833; is the youngest of a family of four children, born of John W. and Miriam C, her maiden name was Piper, her people being natives of Kentucky, while the Collins family are of Maryland. John left home at the age of 17, and struck out for himself, having but a dilapidated suit of jeans, a home-made shirt, and not a copper in his pocket, yet he had willing hands and a determination to make something out of himself, these constituted his stock-in-trade; worked the first year on a farm; then went to learn the trade of a blacksmith with Cress & Barnett; worked the first two years at 12% cents per day, and the third year at 25 cents per day, then worked the next year for them as journeyman; then associated with John Broadmarkle in the blacksmithing business, which partnership lasted two years; then associated with Jonathan Adams in same business until 1862, when he enlisted in the 91st Regt., Co. K, and was commissioned as 1st Lieut., remaining with the regiment eighteen months, when he was discharged at New Orleans on account of disability. In 1864 went into the mercantile business with Edward Wooley, associating with him three years; subsequent to this went into business with Ben. Allen in the mule trade; then bought out the interest of James Wooley in the drug business. In 1867, went into business with G. W. T. Sheffield, carrying a full line of goods; this was carried on successfully until 1875, Then associated with "Jap "Johnson on west side Square, selling goods; in 1877 bough: out Johnson's interest, and has since continued at the same business; keeps dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes. Mr. Collins is known as an upright man, and conscientious in his dealings, and has been successful in business operations. Is a member of the Greenfield Lodge, A. F. and A. M., No. 129, also of the I. O.O. F. Was rocked in the cradle of "Whigism,"and died the hardest death of any man in the county (politically). Sept. 20, 1855, married Annie Mason, born May 4, 1837, she is a daughter of Dr. George Mason, town 10, range 11. Eight children have been born them, but four now living, viz.: Dr. Franklin, born April 1, 1866; Minnie H. born Dec. 26, 1869; John Mason, born Nov. 29, 1872; David Lynn, born March 26, 1875
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 669-70(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


COLLINS J. R.
COLLINS J. R. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 15, P.O. White Hall. The subject of this biography is a native of Hampshire County, Va., where he was born in the year 1810. He was the second of a family of nine children. At the age of eight years his parents, Jacob and Sarah Collins emigrated to Ohio, settling in Guernsey County, where the subject of this sketch learned the trade of a carpenter and joiner. In 1832, on the 12th of January, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda Jackson, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret Jackson, by whom he had ten children, eight of whom are living: Margaret Jane, O. J., E. S., J. M., A. A. and M. F. During the Autumn of 1856, Mr. Collins emigrated with his family to the West, and located in Greene County, where he bought a tract of land consisting of 240 acres. Since this date he has followed farming successfully, and now resides in township 11, range 13, where he lives in comfortable circumstances, and enjoys the respect and confidence of community in which he lives
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 653(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


COLLINS W. M.
COLLINS W. M. farmer. Sec. 1, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., March 2, 1831. He was the second child of six children of John and Miriam Collins, whose maiden name was Piper. John was born in Maryland, and his wife a native of Kentucky, they are of Danish and Irish descent. The subject of this sketch came to this county at an early age, and with his parents settled north of Greenfield. During the time he remained at home was occupied in duties pertaining to the farm, • and attended school but very little. At the age of 19 he took the "gold fever, "went to California, where he engaged in mining, in which he was successful, but his health failing him, was compelled to return home after one year's experience in the gold "diggings. "He was married to Nancy Ruark, which event occurred in March, 1852, she was born in Kentucky, Jan. 26, 1835. Thirteen children have been the result of this union, nine of whom are now living: Lorenzo C, born July 21, 1853; James S., born Oct. 28, 1856; Miriam L., born April 5, 1860; Charles E., born April 9, 1862; Richard Y., born Feb. 2, 1864; Walter E., born Feb. 21, 1868; Willie E., born April 27, 1870; Nancy J., born Oct. 6, 1874; Rosa B., born Oct. 15, 1878. Upon his return from California he bought 120 acres of land in town 11, range 10. In 1855 sold out and bought 216 acres of land on the section he now lives, and has since added to it until he now owns 406 acres. In 1864, enlisted in the U. S. service; had been previous to this captain of a company of militia, which company (nearly all) went with him, and were incorporated in the 103d Regt. Ill. State Vol. He was anxious to join the service in the outbreak of the war, but the illness of his wife prevented, but finally went out in the 100 day service, in which he served as captain. Mr. Collins is a member of the M. E. Church, and has been since his sixteenth year. Is also a member of Fayette Lodge of A. F. and A. M., No. 107. He is a man that stands high in the estimation of his neighbors, and whose honesty and integrity are unquestioned
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 670(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


COLLISTER GEORGE W.
COLLISTER GEORGE W. farmer. Sec. 18, P.O. Breese. Mr. Collister is an early settler of this county, and was born in Vermont, November 6, 1818; in company with the Hon. Judge Worcester, of White Hall, he set out by way of the Lake Erie Canal and Ohio River for Illinois; in due time the two emigrants arrived at White Hall when it contained a few scattered houses. Mr. Worcester became a school teacher. Mr. Collister worked at his trade, that of a blacksmith, for three years, proprietor of a shop; he now moved on Apple Creek, between Wilmington and White Hall, where he opened a blacksmith shop; during this time, date 1839, he was married to Miss Maria Johnson, a native of Vermont; for many years he worked as a blacksmith, and in 1852 set out for the golden shores of the Pacific, where he remained five years among the gold mines, becoming moderately successful; in 1857, returning to Illinois, he settled down to the sweet life of a farmer, having purchased 130 acres prior to his journey to the Pacific; for forty-two years, with the exception of his short residence on the Pacific coast, Mr. Collister has made his home here; for thirty-six years he has been a resident of Wilmington, and is the oldest settler now living within its limits; the marriage of Mr. Collister was blessed with six children, five of whom are living: Alfred, George, Lucy, Julia, and Mellisa; Mr. C. owns a valuable town property
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 550(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


COLMAN DAVID R.
COLMAN DAVID K. miller. Sec. 34, P.O. Rockbridge. David is a son of Jeremiah Colman, born in Vincennes, Ind.; married Alvira Robinson; in tracing back their ancestry we find that they are of English and Irish descent. David's education, that he obtained in the common schools, ended with his fourteenth year; he then went to learn the printer's art, but on account of ill health was compelled to abandon it. His father, Jeremiah, being a miller by occupation, he concluded to follow in the line of his father's footsteps, and began at Brighton, where remained two years. In Oct. 9, 1861, he formed a matrimonial alliance with Sarah Kellogg, she was born March 28, 1842. They have had seven children: Daniel K., born Nov. 19, 1862; May, born Sept. 1866; Leona, Oct. 9, 1869. David R. was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1837, he is the eighth child of a family of thirteen children. Aug. 15, 1862, he enlisted in the U. S. service, 38th Regt. of Ill. State Vol., Co. I, where he remained until the close of the war, during which time he was engaged in all the battles in which the regiment participated. Upon his return he went to Brighton, where he resumed his trade, and continued until i86g, when he went to the Rockbridge Mill, and there engaged with Mr. Sheffield, running the mill for a share of the profits. He remained there four years and a half, then returned to Brighton, remained one year, then went to Fayette June 15, 1875, where he run that mill for a time, then bought it, and moved the same to this place, and has since been running the same, and is making a success; came here without a dollar, and is now doing a good business; has a saw mill in connection with his flouring mill, and between the two he has all that he can do. His ability as an excellent miller, and his square dealing, has been recognized, and he is now on the road to wealth. He is a member of the Baptist Church, also a member of the Knights of Honor, Golden Rule Lodge, No. 1017
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 670-1(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CONNOLE ANTHONY
CONNOLE ANTHONY, Deputy County Clerk, r cor. W. 9th st. and Maple Av. Anthony Connole is a native of County Clare, Ireland. Born July 3d, 1842, crossing the Atlantic in his 17th year he landed in the city of New Orleans; from the " Crescent City" he made his way to Carrollton, where he first worked as a farm-hand for David Black and attended school during the winter, having previously received a liberal education in his native land. When the war broke out Mr. Connole enlisted in Co. F., 1st Mo. Cav., and subsequently re-enlisted as a veteran in Co. A., 53d Ill. Infantry; detailed as a sergeant, he became a participant in many noted battles; honorably discharged when the war closed, he proceeded to Kentucky where he became employed as clerk for a railroad contractor; afterwards proceeding to Springfield, he officiated as clerk for the U.S. Marshal; from here he went to Berdan, in Greene County,where he entered into the mercantile business, and was elected justice of the peace, and during the present year was appointed deputy clerk under the Hon. L. R. Lakin, County Clerk. In 1869 Mr. Connole was married to Miss Mary Markham, by whom he has five children
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 474(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CONVERSE URIAH
CONVERSE URIAH, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 14, P.O. Greenfield. Was born in Vermont, Dec. 24, 1824. His father, Alfred Converse, was married in Vermont, to Betsy Cary, who was a native of Vermont; seven children, five living. The subject of this sketch is the fifth child; was twenty-one years of age when became to Greene County, Ill.; entered 40 acres of land from the Government and commenced life on the unbroken soil of Greene County as a farmer. As he accumulated, bought land till he now owns 420 acres, which has been made by hard labor and economy. Married twice: first in 1848, to Miss Sarah E. Cary, who was born July 15, 1829, died May 30, 1852, leaving two children. Flora A., and Harriet E.; married second time Sept. 20, 1855, to Minerva Standefer, who was born Jan. 15, 1835, in Marion County, Tenn.; came to Illinois in 1851; five children by this marriage: Otis E., Fannie D., Henry, Jane, Truman U.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 621(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


COOPER MRS. MARGARET C.
COOPER MRS. MARGARET C. farming, Sec. 22, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in this county, Aug. 11, 1837, is the daughter of Joel and Nancy Johnson. Her mother's maiden name was Banning. Mrs. Cooper's father was a native of this State, and was identified with its interests up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1872. Mrs. Cooper remained with her parents until her nineteenth year, when she was united in marriage to W. T. Cooper, a son of E. L. Cooper, an old settler and resident of this county; their marriage took place April 27, 1856. After their marriage he located on the land now occupied by Mrs. Cooper, and farming was his occupation during the time he lived; on July 19, 1875, he fell a victim to that terrible malady, consumption ; was a man that was highly esteemed in the circle of his acquaintances; during his life was a consistent member of the U. Baptist Church, of which Mrs. Cooper is also a member. Seven children have been born to them: Owen, born June 26, 1857, died Aug. 26, 1878; Rosie Jane, born April 15, 1860; George E., born March 29, 1864; William E., born March 26, 1866; Martha A., born April 17, 1868; Minnie L., born June 5, 1872; Mary, born May 10, 1875. Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Cooper has continued the farm enterprise, and still keeps her family together, and gives the management of the farm her own supervision
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 631(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CORY O. P.
CORY O. P. contractor and builder; one of the older residents of Greene County, is a native of Addison County, Vermont; born in 1824. He was the fourth child of Zophar and Alice Cory. When our subject had attained his eighth year his parents determined to locate in the West, and accordingly made their way to that part then known as Greene County, but which now comprises the county of Jersey. Residing here three years, the family now moved to Greenfield, where our subject learned his present trade under the instructions of his father, and there gained a knowledge of his present calling that has made him a skillful workman. Here he married, in 1851, Miss Isabel Morfoot, the owner of farm property. He now followed agricultural pursuits until 1860, since this date devoting his time to the trade of a carpenter. In 1852, he became a resident of Macoupin County, and it was here that many years were spent in farming. When the present town of New Kane came into existence Mr. Cory was among the first ones to remove here, and during the Spring of 1865 erected the second residence in the place, his present home. We shall have occasion to refer to Mr. Cory in the general history of this volume; of the marriage above referred to, seven children were born, of whom six are living: William, Effie, Clara, Fanny, Sallie and Rose. In conclusion it may be said that Mr. Cory is one of our most public spirited citizens whose liberality crops out, so to speak, when public occasion requires it of him
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 731(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


COTTER. WILLIAM
COTTER. WILLIAM, marble agent, r cor. Bridgeport and South Main St., White Hall. Wm. Cotter, the oldest settler now living in White Hall, was born in the State of Tennessee, in 1812, where he passed his earlier years upon the old farm homestead of his parents, William and Anna Cotter, who concluded to emigrate to the West in 1827, locating east of White Hall, in Greene County, near Apple Creek, in 1827, where our subject received a good common school education in the primitive log cabin of the period. July, 1837, Mr. Cotter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Dennis, a daughter of Mathew Q. Dennis, by whom he has eight children, whose names are here appended: Mary F., Charles S., Laura, Warren A., Martha A., Lettie L., Dennis B., and Lulu. For a number of years Mr. Cotter followed the calling of a butcher, and in 1836 entered into the mercantile business, and on retirement from this was elected constable of the town, holding this position for a period of twelve years. In 1850 he crossed the plains for California, where he roughed it among the mines for two years, when he again sought his old home in White Hall, where he has since been identified with the business interests of the place, and for the past seven years in the employ of H. Watson, the only marble manufacturer in the city
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 526(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


COX J. N.
COX J. N. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 15, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Cox is a native of Ohio, where he was born on the 25th of January, 1832, and where he passed the days of his childhood and early youth upon the old farm homestead, acquiring a good common school education. Remaining in Ohio until 1852, he then emigrated to the West, settling in the vicinity of Walkersville, Galena County, during the Spring of that year; and the following year, in the month of July, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jane Collins, a daughter of Josiah Collins, deceased, by whom he has five children: Mary E., Ira E, Freddie W., Rosa Ann, and Major. Mr. Cox ranks among the more prosperous farmers of this township, owning 263 acres of valuable land, and few are better known for liberality and enterprise
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 653; - transcribed by bmt


COX WILLIAM
COX WILLIAM, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Rockbridge. The subject of our notice is the fourth child of David and Emma Cox. David was a native Pennsylvanian, born in 1810, a farmer by occupation, who there married Emma Dawson, in 1832, a daughter of Wm. Dawson, a farmer of the neighborhood. He moved from his native State of Pennsylvania in the year 1840, settling in Greene County, where he first rented farm property, but subsequently became the owner of real estate. Digressing a little from the subject in hand: Mrs. Cox died during the early infancy of our narrator. Mr. Cox is still living and resides in this township. William, whose career we now follow, was born in Greene County, March 14, 1840, following agricultural pursuits from his earliest years. On Jan. 23, 1862, he was married to Miss Mary Ann Stringer, a daughter of William Stringer, one of the pioneers of Greene County, by whom he has one child, Lucy R. Mrs. C. died on the nth day of May, 1872, and on the 3d day of May, 1874, Mr. Cox was married to Mrs. Mary C. Tucker, a daughter of James Whitlock, and relict of Francis Tucker, by whom he has one child, John A. Mr. C. has become exceedingly prosperous in his vocation by well directed energy and force of character. At the present writing he is the owner of 171 acres of valuable land in this township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 722(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CRANE GEORGE B.
CRANE GEORGE B. contractor and builder. Sec. 34, P.O. Rockbridge. The subject of this sketch was born in Grant County, Wis., Aug. 28, 1844, is the eldest of a family of two children, born of Harvey Crane and Sidney Bowman, his wife. He was 11 months old when he came to this county with his parents, who located on String Prairie. He had the usual common school advantages. His father being a carpenter, he learned the trade of him, assisting him during the Summer and attending school during the Winter, and at the age of seventeen had the trade completed. Sept. 23, 1861, enlisted in 32d Regt. Ill. State Vol., Co. D.; remained in that regiment until November, 1864, when he was transferred to the 4th Veteran Reserve Corps; had while in the 32d Regt., from exposure, impaired his health to such an extent as to render him unfit for active service, hence the transfer to Reserve Corps. Participated in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Siege of Vicksburg, and Jackson, Miss.; received an honorable discharge Sept. 6, 1864. Upon his return home resumed his trade with his father; made a trip to Montgomery County, remained about eight months, returning home worked at his trade about Greenfield. June 26, 1866, married Sarah J. Wetsel, of Rock Island, born in Beaver County, Pa., April 13, 1845; but one child living, Frank E., born March 3, 1867. August, 1870, moved to Rockbridge, and has since been engaged at his trade as contractor and builder. Republican in sentiment
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 671(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CRANE HARVEY
CRANE HARVEY, retired. Sec. 34, P.O. Rockbridge, was born in Claremont County, Ohio, July 14, 1810, was the second child of a family of ten children, born of Luther and Hannah Crane, her maiden name being Chalmers, his parents are of Welch descent. Harvey left the parental roof at the age of 17, and went to learn the carpenter's trade, which he completed at the time he attained his majority, when he embarked for the West, and landed at Carrollton, this State, where he engaged at his trade, at which he continued there, for six years; subsequent to this made several changes, first to Ottawa, Pike County, then to Plattesville, Wis., where he remained four years; and in the year 1845 came to String Prairie, where he remained until he came to the town of Rockbridge. In Oct. 5, 1843, he married Lucinda Bowman, sister of Daniel Bowman, of this township. They have had four children, but two are now living: George B. was born Aug. 28, 1844; Elias was born May 17, 1848; Joshua was born March 11, 1850, and died December, 1871. In March, 1877, he moved to the town of Rockbridge, and has since remained. Mr. Crane has been engaged in farming for several years past, his boys attending to the farm while he continued at his trade. Mrs. Crane was born Sept. 10, 1815, and died Dec. 28, 1878, since which time he has lived at his home and taking his meals with his son, who is living near. Mr. Crane was an old line Whig, and cast his first vote for Henry Clay; has since the dawn of the Republican party voted the straight ticket. Mr. Crane is now retired from business, and is now enjoying the fruits of his past labors in peace and tranquility
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 671-2(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CRANE MERCY J. MRS.
CRANE MERCY J. MRS. Sec. 18, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch first saw the light of day on the hills of New Hampshire, in Hillsboro County, March 19, 1831. Her parents names were Oliver and Sophronia Colby; her mother's maiden name was Howlet. Mrs. Crane emigrated to this county with her parents when she was very young, being about four years of age; they first stopped a while at Carrollton, then her father bought a place now owned by Mr. Ashlock, remaining there until the year 1848, when he sold out, went to Macoupin County, remaining there until his death, which occurred in 1850. Sept. 30, 1847, Mercy J., was united in marriage to Wm. Crane; born in Ohio. After their marriage, moved to the place now occupied by Mrs. Crane. There are nine children living: Alvin, Anna, Mary, Charles, Oscar, Judson, Meade, Lillian and Hattie. Mrs. Crane lost her husband March 2, 1872. She has since remained a widow, and still carries on her farm. She has 580 acres of land. Mrs. Crane is a member of the M. E. Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 708(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


Cranfill James Harvey
CRANFILL, James Harvey, manufacturer; born, Rockbridge, ILL., Aug. 21, 1862; son of Zachariah and Mary J. (Cato) Cranfill; educated in public schools; married, St. Louis, 1890, Mary S. Page; one son: Pha. Began active career in printing business, with which was connected until 1889; then became identified with firm of F. Applegren, manufacturers of burnt sugar color, and since 1902 has engaged in same line of business on own account, as president J. H. Cranfill Manufacturing Co. Republican. Presbyterian. Scottish Rite Mason; member Keystone Lodge, No. 243, A. P. & A. M.; St. Louis Chapter, No. 1, R. A. M.; Moolah Temple, Mystic Shrine. Recreation: fishing. Office: 1?23 N. 7th St. Residence: 3832 Russell Ave. (Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


CRESS HENRY
CRESS HENRY, farmer, Sec. 4 P.O. Greenfield, is a son of John and Nancy Cress, her maiden name was Broadmarkle. Both of John's parents were in the Hessian army, and fought against the Colonists; the British had induced them to believe that the Americans "were a set of cannibals," but after they saw for themselves and understood the situation, that Washington was fighting for liberty, after the battle of Preston, N. J., they abandoned the Hessians and joined his standard. Henry, the subject of these lines, was born in Alleghany County, Md., Feb. 18, 1820. His parents dying when he was young, he was placed under the fostering care of his grandmother. At the age of 13, went to learn the blacksmith's trade. In 1842 came West, first stopping at White Hall, remained there until 1846, when he came to Greenfield, which was then in its infancy; worked for Euen Johnson, staid with him until he built the shop now run by J. Broadmarkle, and set up business for himself, and continued at it for fifteen years; he then abandoned the anvil and forge and moved to the east side of town and began farming, and has since remained. Has 353 acres of land and 160 in Montgomery County. Dec, 30, 1851, was united in marriage to Nancy E. Benear, daughter of John S. Benear, she was born in Ohio, Dec. 16, 1827. Six children have crowned this union, but four now living: William, born Aug. 16, 1855; Joseph, born March 14, 1848; Everett, born Sept. 4, 1860; Norvel, born Oct. 25, 1867. Mr. Cress is a self-made man; been a hard worker and good manager; cast his first vote for James K. Polk; was always a Democrat until the war, since been Republican; is a member of the I. O. O. F., Greenfield Lodge, No. 195
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 672(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CRIST C. J.
CRIST C. J. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 21, P.O. Roodhouse; was born in Greene County in 1845; owns 160 acres in this township; during the present year elected justice of the peace, vice Perry McConathy; for ten years a school teacher
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 586(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CRIST DAVID
CRIST DAVID, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 16, P.O. Roodhouse. It was during the year 1833 that David Crist landed in Greene County; he was then in his twenty-fourth year; a native of Ohio, He had but a few hundred dollars wherewith to commence life on our western prairies; settling near White Hall, then a village containing two rude dwellings one answering for a store. Mr. Crist was far above the average in both intelligence and in a business point of view; entering into partnership with Joshua Simonds, they opened a general merchandise store where a fair trade was done for the space of one year, when Mr. Simonds died; disposing of his stock of goods by auction, he now entered into partnership with Knapp & Poe, who ran a flour mill at Beardstown; purchasing a flat-boat the adventurous speculators laid in a supply of pork and flour, and were soon bon voyage down the mighty Mississippi for New Orleans. Arriving in the Crescent City a fair profit was derived from the venture. This sort of life was suitable to the daring pioneer, and many ventures of a like nature were afterwards made down the Father of Waters. In 1836 he purchased a large drove of hogs, intending to ship to New Orleans; the winter proving unusually severe, the Mississippi being frozen over, he now found it necessary to dispose of his cargo to a man by the name of Talbot, realizing a $2,000 profit on the speculation. Turning his attention to farming, he brought his farm property to a high state of cultivation, through the same energy that marked his many voyages down the Mississippi; at one time he was the owner of 300 acres of good land. An honest, generous man, a true type of the western pioneer. The first wife of Mr. Crist died in 1851, leaving to his care three children, Louisa, Sarah, and Jacob. In 1853 he was married to Miss Lucinda Blivens, by whom he had four children, none of whom are living ; in i860 Mrs. Crist found a last resting place where so many years of her married life were spent. In 1862 Mr. Crist was united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah Campbell, a daughter of Thomas Lorton. A short biography will here be given of the children: Louisa married Benjamin Strang, Sarah married Amberg Campbell, Charles J. married Eliza Jane Wales. First wife of Mr. Crist was Maria Jackson, a daughter of Dr. Jackson
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 586(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CROUCH ELBERT
CROUCH ELBERT, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 25, P.O. Greenfield. Was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, in 1815; came to Greene County in 1843; married in 1843, to Mary Melon, who was born in Tennessee in 1825, and died in 1865; was married second time, June 7, 1868, to Mrs. Amanda J. Comes, who was born in 1844; has one child by her first husband, Edna A. Comes. Mr. Crouch has two children by his first marriage: John L., and Dicy E., deceased. Has been to Tennessee three times; came to Illinois the first time by wagon; owns 226 acres of land, which he has made by his own exertions
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 621(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


CROW DR. J. T.
CROW DR. J. T. physician and surgeon. The above gentleman was born in Pike County, Mo., on the 14th of April, 1S27, where he remained until he had attained his 17th year, date 1846, when he proceeded to Danville, Kentucky, where he entered upon a literary course of study, graduating with the honorary degree of Bachelor of Arts, with Dr. Geo. B. Wilcox, who was among the first families of Virginia, an eminent surgeon and a participant during his younger days, in the war of 1812. After remaining with Dr. Wilcox for a period of one year, the youthful student attended a course of lectures at the medical department of the St. Louis University, now the St. Louis Medical College. Graduating at this school in 1854, he first entered upon the practice of his profession in Scotland Co., Mo.; while here he married, in 1855, Miss Martha E. Gorin, a daughter of H. M. Gorin, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Decatur, Macon Co., for many years. In 1862 Dr. Crow became a resident of Greene County; the following year proceeding to Quincy, where he resided one year; then to Carrollton, and thence to the golden shores of the Pacific coast in 1865; here, for a short time, practicing as a physician, when he again turned his footsteps towards Illinois, locating in due time at Carrollton, where he has since became a permanent resident; where his skill as a physician is recognized and where he has a large and constantly growing practice. Of the marriage above referred to seven children were born, two only of whom are living, Charles C. and Albert S.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 474-75(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CRYDER DAVID
CRYDER DAVID, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 13, P.O. Roodhouse. The above named gentleman was born in Ross County, Ohio, August, 1813, where he resided many years. Learning the vocation of a miller, he became a workman in the flouring mill of his father; this not proving a healthful employment he turned his attention to farming. In 1836 he was married to Miss Mary Downs, by whom he had two children, one now living, Theodore. Mrs. Cryder died in 1840, and the following year Mr. Cryder was married to Miss Rachel R. Hunter, by whom he has three children: Mary, now the wife of E. A. Husted; James H. who married Miss Emily Martin; Emma, who married Francis M. Martin. Since 1855 Mr. Cryder has been a resident of Greene County, where, at one time, he held the position of deputy assessor; in his native State, Ohio, he held numerous offices of trust and responsibility. In 1846 he was a member of the House of Representatives, and, in 1843, while a resident of Delaware County, was elected probate judge
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 586(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CRYDER JAMES H.
CRYDER JAMES H. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 13. P.O. Roodhouse. The subject of this sketch was born in Ross County, Ohio, August, 1847; in his fifth year his parents moved to Delaware County; he was in his seventeenth year when they moved to Greene County, on the present property in Tp. 12, R. 11. In 1869 he was united in marriage to Miss Emily Martin, a daughter of Josiah; four children born of this marriage, Thomas, Charles, Bessie, and Maud. Mr. C. is the owner of 80 acres well improved Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 586-7(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CULLIMORE JAMES
CULLIMORE JAMES, retired hardware merchant. For a number of years transacted a successful business under the firm name of Cullimore Brothers. Was born in the city of Baltimore in 1842, where he resided until his parents removed to Greene County, in 1851; in the city of Carrollton passed his early years and became apprenticed to the trade of a carriage-maker and subsequently that of a tinsmith. A tinner when the war came on, he enlisted in Co. I, 91st Illinois Infantry for three years; served and became a participant in the battle of Elizabethtown and others of less note. When the war closed Mr. C. returned to Carrollton, where he, shortly after, formed a co-partnership business with his brother, John W. Cullimore, in the hardware, tin store and furniture trade. Both were men of enterprise and soon established a good trade; continuing in business for a period of ten years; at the expiration of this time the firm was dissolved by mutual consent. In 1874 Mr. Cullimore was united in marriage to Miss Alice E. Black, a daughter of William Black, by whom he has two children; Eddie and Gracie. Mr. Cullimore, Sen., first settled in Greene Co. in 1847
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 475(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


CULVER DR. S. H.
CULVER DR. S. H. for many years a resident of Greene County, was born in Rhode Island, September 26, 1803. His father was David Culver, who was born in the State of Rhode Island in 1758. He was the commander of a vessel during the Revolutionary War; a noted man in his day, who was as well known for his bravery as for his true nobility of character. He held many offices of importance. In his day an extensive business was done in clam fishery. His son, while engaged in this peculiar calling, had waded far beyond his depth; discovering his peril, his father immediately went to the rescue. He was a very powerful man and an excellent swimmer, but both father and son sank never to rise again, and two more victims were added to the long list of those who had perished beneath the broad waters of the Atlantic. The second wife of David Culver was Miss Mary Hill, of Rhode Island. Of nine children born of this marriage, S. H. Culver was the youngest. When but 18 years old, September, 1821, he was married to Miss Polly Madison. Shortly afier this important event he moved to Rochester, New York, where he began the study of medicine, under Dr. Smith. In 1823 he joined the M. E. Church, and was licensed to preach the Gospel. In 1831 Dr. Culver came to Greene County, locating west of White Hall, where, with but little exception, Dr. C. has been a resident ever since. For 55 years he has been a minister of the Gospel, and and an experienced physician. Dr. Culver is a prominent man in our county, who has gained prominence and wealth through industry, economy, and judgment. Of eleven chiklren born of this marriage, but two are living, Alonzo J. and Buell G.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 526-7(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


CUNNINGHAM A. M.
CUNNINGHAM A. M. farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman, although not ranked among the early residents of this county, is worthy of more than a passing notice. He was born in Marion County, Ky., April 16, 1820. Eight children of this family grew to maturity, of whom we here append the names : Isabella, Cassandra, William, Richard, Samuel, Andrew, and Ellen. The head of this family, Robert Cunningham, was a native of Pennsylvania. When six years old his parents moved to Kentucky, where he grew to manhood, and married Miss Nancy Beall, a daughter of Richard Beall, of Kentucky. Robert Cunningham was a tanner in Kentucky, where he passed the remainder of life, September, 1856. In 1831, Cassandra Cunningham, wife of Geo. Wright, came to Greene County; seven years later, A. M. Cunningham made a visit, and in 1841 became a permanent resident, entering land on what was called String Prairie, eleven miles northeast of Carrollton, where he broke prairie and cleared the timber for a home, and built a cabin; two years later, he married Miss Henrietta Greer, by whom he had eight children, three of whom are living: James M., Nancy J., and Mary E. He first purchased a tract of 200 acres, and from this estate now comes a tract of over 600 acres of well improved land. Mr. Cunningham has been twice mayor of Carrollton, for many years justice of the peace, and held the position of school treasurer sixteen years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 512(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CUNNINGHAM GEORGE M.
CUNNINGHAM GEORGE M. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 17, P.O. Breese. Mr. Cunningham is the youngest son of Joel and Theresa Cunningham, who came to Greene County in an earl day, settling near White Hall. Joel Cunningham was a farmer by occupation, following this calling successfully until his decease, which occurred during the Autumn of 1873; he was at one time a large property owner; a trip to California proved peculiarly disastrous. Among the pioneers of Greene County he was known as Uncle Joel, who respected him for his personal worth; to his wife he left the care of five children. George grew to manhood in Greene Co.; in 1874 he was united in marriage to Sarah Virginia Davison, by whom he has two children: Lenora and Arrinea
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 550-1(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


CUNNINGHAM R. L.
CUNNINGHAM R. L. farmer, Sec. 22, P.O. Wrightsville, is a son of Samuel Cunningham, of this Township, Sec. 36, who is well known in the county. Robert L. first drew breath in Kentucky, Oct. 1, 1851, and came to this State with his parents when a babe, and remained with his parents up to the time he matured. Jan. 11, 1877, was married to Mary Jane Jones, born Oct. 3, 1852, daughter of Enoch Jones, of this unity. After their marriage he located on the land he now occupies, and began farming, and has since continued. Has one child, Mary Ellen, born Dec, 1877. His wife is a member of the regular Baptist Church. He cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. Has 120 acres of land, 80 of which are in cultivation
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 631(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CUNNINGHAM SAMUEL Mc.
CUNNINGHAM SAMUEL Mc. farmer, Sec. 36, P.O. Greenfield. The subject of this sketch was born in Marion Co., Ky., Feb. 16, 1818; was son of Robert and Nancy Cunningham, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Cunningham came to this county in 1853, and has since been a resident of this county. Was married, Dec, 1850, to Emeline E. Cooper, daughter of E. L. Cooper, who came to this county in 1836. From this union they have had nine children: Richard, born Dec. 3, 1855, died Oct. 3, 1855; William B., born March 4, 1854, died Jan. 20, 1865; Belle, born March 19, 1864, died Jan. 18, 1868; Mary E., born Nov. 19, 1866, died Feb. 27, 1868; Robert L.. born Oct. 1, 1851; Henry, Sept. 7,1857; Geo. W., Oct. 10, 1859; Lewis, Jan. 13, 1862; Ann Jane, Feb. 28, 1869. Mr. Cunningham is engaged in farming pursuits; has 660 acres of excellent land, under the best of cultivation. Mr. Cunningham has been in poor health for several years past, and has not the enjoyment he desires; has accumulated wealth, and is reckoned among the solid men of the county; has long been a member of the C. P. Church, and has lived a life consistent with his profession, and has established a name and a reputation of which those who succeed him may justly be proud
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 631(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CUNNINGHAM W. D.
CUNNINGHAM W. D. farmer, Sec. 13, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in this county, Aug. 16, 1840, was the fourth child of ten children of Richard and Mary Cunningham, early settlers of this county. In September, 1866, was married to Emma Coates. They have had six children, of whom four are now living, viz.: Luman, Ora, Theodore, and Lee. Mr. C. moved to this place in 1873, and now owns 160 acres of land. He is a member of the U. Baptist Church, and is a good citizen and an upright man
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 631-2(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


CURTIUS L. S.
CURTIUS L. S. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 24, P.O. Carrollton. Luman Curtius, who ranks among the more prominent farmers of Greene County, was born in Duchess County, N. Y., on the 18th of May, 1808. Tracing back the genealogy of the family to the extent that our limited space will allow, we find that Nathaniel Curtius, father of him whose name heads this sketch, was a native of Connecticut, a farmer by occupation; moving to New York State, he there formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Mary Stoddard, by whom he had twelve children, of whom Luman S. Curtius was the tenth child. The old folks, after a life of activity and usefulness, passed to a home not made with hands, in the State of New York; Mrs. C. died in Greene County. Young Luman remained on a farm until he had arrived at the age of sixteen years, when he moved to New York City, where he became liberally educated, and for some time served as writer and collector for Andrew Williams, the well-known Member of Congress, who fitted out the first steamship for California commerce. In 1833, Mr. Curtius made his way to Chicago, then a resort of fur traders and trappers from the East; the dread disease cholera had advanced to the West; among hundreds of others, the subject of our notice was attacked. Shortly after his recovery he proceeded South to New Orleans, where he went for the purpose of embarking in business; finding trade at a stand still, his liberal education enabled him to reach a high position as a teacher in the Cuvilier College, his powers as a linguist enabling him to secure a comfortable salary. Misfortune, they say, never comes singly; no sooner had Mr. Curtius fairly recovered from the effects of the cholera when he was attacked with that Southern malady, yellow fever. His strong constitution enabled him to recover from this often fatal disease. Entering upon the eventful career of a speculator, he became more than ordinarily successful, handling principally grain and hay. Western produce generally. Having accumulated a fortune in 1840, he determined to make the West his future home, and accordingly made his way to Greene County, Ill., where he purchased 620 acres of valuable land, near the city of Carrollton. While here a resident he formed the acquaintance of and married an estimable lady, Miss Ellen Beebe, a daughter of Judge Beebe, of Elkhart, Indiana, who built the first house in Elkhart. Of this marriage nine children were born, two of whom died in early infancy; seven are living : Mary, Rosala, Ellen, Luman B., Augustus, Henry, and Caroline. During the year 1870, Mrs. Curtius was laid at rest in the cemetery of Carrollton, a worthy monument marking the spot. In 1872, Mr. Curtius united his fortunes to Miss Mary K. Snedeker, of Jerseyville, a daughter of Isaac Snedeker, of Trenton, N. J. In 1868, Mr. Curtius began the erection of his present magnificent farm residence, unequaled within the borders of Greene County; further notice will be given in the historical portion of this volume
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 512-13(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt