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HAHN, BENJAMIN
HAHN BENJAMIN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 8, P.O. Breese. For nearly half a century Mr. H. has lived in Greene County; born in the county in 1833, he grew to manhood on the old homestead of his parents, David and Mary Hahn; he received but little education, as the principal studies were then a speller and the New Testament. In his twenty- second year he was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Wells, a daughter of John Wells of North Carolina; about this time Mr. Hahn was worth but little; he first rented property, and after a time became able to buy 120 acres at $18 per acre, adding to this year by year; he now owns 398 acres, nearly all under cultivation. There are eight children, John, Anderson. Lewis, Ellis, David, William, Mary F., and Matilda E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 554(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HAHN DAVID
HAHN DAVID, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 31, P.O. White Hall. Mr. H. was born in Missouri, 1810. Came to Greene County 1829; owns 200 acres. First wife, Miss Mary Hubbard; second wife, Miss Keziah Seeley
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 554(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HAHN, WILLIAM
HAHN WILLIAM, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 31, P.O. Schutz Mill. Mr.Hahn is a son of David and Mary Hahn; he was born in 1835; his preliminary education was received in the log cabin of the period, the studies consisting of spelling, reading, writing, etc.; he, for the most part, attended school during the winter, for during the summer season he found employment on the farm. On attaining his majority he was married to Miss Mary Gurley, a daughter of Hester Gurley, by whom he had seven children, five living, George W., Charles E., Virginia B., Minnie V., and Hattie L. Mrs. Hahn passed to her reward September 29, 1876, Mr. Hahn is the owner of 113 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 554(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HALL, JOHN
HALL, JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 3, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Greene County, in 1843; the father, Nathaniel Hall, came to Greene County in 1831, as near as can be ascertained, and entered 300 acres of land from the Government, which land was left to his children. The subject of this sketch owns 142 acres of the land his father entered; was married 1867, to Amanda Vallard, who was born in Greene County in 1S50; have five children: Milton, born June 11, 1868; Lillian. March 17, 1871; Lulia, March 20, 1873; Ada, June 17, 1875; Fred, Nov. 12, 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 623(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HANDLER, CHARLES
HANDLER CHARLES, cooper, opposite fire clay works. White Hall, Illinois. Mr. Handler was born at Lubbenan, Germany, in 1840. At the age of 19 he migrated to America; landing in New Orleans he there became employed in a cooper shop as a journeyman workman, having acquired the trade at an early age. When the war came on he was stationed at Franklin, La. In those secession days able bodied men found in the State were subject to draft, or forced into the rebel army. Mr. H. succeeded in making his escape from Johnny Reb. making his way to New Orleans, thence to Brashear City, where he was captured in 1862 and sent, with others, to Eagle Pass where he was given six hours notice to leave the Confederate States; he in consequence made his way to Matamoras, Mexico, thence to Brownsville, Texas, and other points and once again to New Orleans, from here up the Mississippi to St. Louis, and thence to Alton, where he enlisted in Co. N, 7th Ill. Cavalry for three years service. A participant in the battle of Nashville. Honorably discharged when the war closed, he returned to Alton, in 1867 he came to White Hall. Four years ago he built and entered into active business for himself. In 1866 he was married to Miss Mary Smith, by whom he has four children: Charles, William, Fred, and Albert. Mrs. Handler died June 20, 1877; the following July Mr. H. was married to Ellinor Heck of Alton; one child, Katy
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 528(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HANKS, THOMAS
HANKS, THOMAS, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 32, P.O. White Hall. The above named gentleman, representative pioneer and founder of Hanks' Station, was born in North Carolina in 1793; on his westward trip he first settled at Cape Girardeau, Mo. Remaining one year he then proceeded to Alton, Madison County, Illinois, with Joshua Hanks, a brother. He remained at Alton one year and moved to Greene County in 1818. When it is remembered that steam or sail boats were the only means of transportation on water, and the stage or wagon by land, some idea of the daring nature of the youthful pioneer may be realized. On his arrival in the County of Greene, Carrollton was being staked out as a town. He left the old homestead, in North Carolina, with barely sufficient to pay the expenses of a horse-back journey to Illinois, and accordingly his first start in life was procured by the splitting of rails for three shillings per hundred. The first few hundred dollars of Mr. Hanks were obtained slowly but surely, and in time he became enabled to purchase 80 acres of land, part of the property he now owns. Early in his career he became largely interested in the raising of hogs, thereby realizing a handsome profit, and he now added 40 acres more to the estate. Some six years ago he was instrumental in the laying out of the village of Drake, heretofore known as Hanks Station, contributing liberally of his means. Mr. Hanks is now upward of eighty-five, still vigorous, whose memory is unimpaired. Now the owner of 500 acres and the village of Drake. He has indeed been prosperous
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 554(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HANLEY, JOHN C
HANLEY, JOHN C, farmer. Sec. 24. P.O. Athensville. Born in Tennessee, July 12, 1844, and came to this State with his parents when seven years of age, and settled in Macoupin Co.; married Nov. 14, 1866, to Minnie Hilyer, of Scott County, born April 13, 1848; this lady died shortly after marriage, June 22, 1867; Mr. Hanley married again, March 31, 1869, to Alice, daughter of Oliver and Martha Springer, of Greene County, born May 20, 1848; this union has been blessed by one child, John O., born July 19, 1873. Mr. Hanley took up his residence in this county in 1868; has made farming his occupation; homestead consists of 40 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 605(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HARDCASTLE JOHN C.
HARDCASTLE JOHN C. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 26, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, born in 1831, in the city of Carrollton, the oldest son of William C. and Lavina Hardcastle, maiden name Crane. Raised a farmer's boy he developed a hardy energy that counted in after years. Receiving a liberal education, in maturer years he became an extensive buyer and shipper of cattle, becoming more than ordinarily successful. March 4 he was united in marriage to Miss M. E. Kile, by whom he had one child, Nellie. Mr. Hardcastle is the owner of 200 acres of valuable land in this township and a successful farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 518(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HARDCASTLE, O. B.
ELDRED & HARDCASTLE, dealers in hardware, furniture, stoves and tinware, n.e. cor. Square, the only house carrying this line of goods, and one of the best and favorably known houses in Greene Co. The present members of the firm are Messrs. L. S. Eldred and O. B. Hardcastle. Of the former gentleman notice will be given elsewhere; of the latter it may be said, that he is a native of Carlinville, Macoupin Co., born in 1853, where he grew to manhood. Obtaining a liberal education at Chillicothe, Ohio, one year later, he embarked in the above business
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 478; - transcribed by bmt


HARDEN, R. H.
HARDEN, R. H. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 22, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Ohio, in 1846; his father, Robert A. Harden, was a native of Ireland, came to America when he was nineteen years of age, was married to Lucinda Lane; he owned several hundred acres of land at his death. The subject of this sketch was married in 1874, to Lucy Lane, who was born in Texas; have one child, Robert, born in 1877. Mr. Harden owns 140 acres of well improved land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 623(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HARP, W. N.
HARP W. N. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 4, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Harp is a native of Tennessee; born January 8, 1836; second child of Hubbard and Sarah Harp; the head of the family died in Kentucky; his wife passed the remainder of life in Tennessee, where the subject of this sketch followed agricultural pursuits until 1854, when he moved to Hancock County, Ill. ; afterward returned to Tennessee. On his next trip westward he settled in Bond County; thence to Greene. At this time the mining excitement ran high in California, and thither he directed his footsteps. On his return to Greene County he was united in marriage to Miss Lavina Rawlings, a daughter of James Rawlings, one of the most enterprising men in Greene County. Here Mr. Harp has since resided, owning 250 acres of valuable land, in township 12, range 11. Of eight children, born of this marriage, six are living: Luella, William M., Benjamin F., James H., Otis F. and John A.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 588-9(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HASSETT, W. H.
HASSETT W. H. lumber, Greenfield. William is a native of Erie County, N. Y., born July 17, 1838, son of J. G. and Elizabeth Hassett. His mother's name was Yost, and a native of Pennsylvania, her husband of New York, both sides of the family being of German descent. Received but the advantages afforded by the common district school. Left the parental roof at the age of eighteen and began for himself, having previously learned the carpenter trade. First worked in company with R. B. Bartholemew, his brother-in-law, on the New York Central R.R. Remained in the employ of the company about six years. In the Spring of 1866 he came west, and engaged in the lumber business; first .bought out the interest of Reed & Vedder, at Carrollton. remained there three years; sold out and moved to Jerseyville, and engaged in the same business until 1873, when he moved to Moberly, Missouri, where he stayed three years; engaged in the lumber trade; Feb., 1876, sold out and came to Greenfield, where he has since remained. Sold out his interest in the lumber business to Charles Edwards, July, 1877. Mr. Hassett, having been in poor health for several years, is contemplating a removal to a latitude more congenial. Feb. 27, he formed a matrimonial alliance with Eliza J. Beckham, born Aug. 27, 1844, in Lancaster, Erie County, Pa. Three children have been born to them: George N., born in Jerseyville, Dec. 26, 1869; Nye P. born in Lancaster, Pa.. Aug. 5, 1871, and Edith Male, born in Moberly, Mo., May 16, 1874. Mr. H. is a member of Greenfield Lodge, A. F. and A. M., No. 129, also a Royal Arch. Mr. Hassett's father died Jan. 12, 1873; mother, Jan. 11, 1864
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 677-8(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HASTINGS, PETER
HASTINGS, PETER, renter. Sec. 21, P.O. Athensville; born in Kentucky, Jan. 15, 1819; came to this State in 1834, and has lived in this county four years; married Feb. 4, 1846, to Mary Ruggles, of Tennessee, born Nov. 11, 1823; this union has been blessed by seven children, only two however of whom are living, viz: Clara, born June 9, 1850, and Louisa born Aug. 5, 1852. Mr. Hastings enlisted in August, 1861, in the 10th Mo. V.I., and served at Vicksburg, Champion Hills, Raymond, Corinth and Chattanooga, was mustered out at St. Louis, Sept. 1864, after three years very active and arduous service. Mr. Hastings followed the occupation of blacksmith for many years, but since his return from the war has devoted his industries to farming
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 605(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HATLER, F. M.
HATLER, F. M., renter. Sec. 32, P.O. Athensville. Born in Barren County, Ky., Feb. 28, 1833, and removed to Sangamon County, Illinois, with his parents in March, 1834. His parents were both stricken with fever shortly after arriving there, and died in June of that year, leaving the infant son, the subject of our sketch, an orphan in a new settlement. He was the youngest of three children thus left without a parent; he was raised by his uncle, John M. Hatler, who had lately settled in Greene County, where they have lived ever since. Mr. Hatler was married March 9, 1854, to Sarah C. Overby, a daughter of Andrew and Rachel Overby, of Greene County, born Sept. 10, 1837; this union has been blessed by five children, three of whom are living, viz.: James W., born May 11, 1856, Albert M., born May 21, 1861, and John Alonzo, born ,Dec. 13, 1867. Mr. Hatler has devoted his industries solely to agricultural pursuits; rents 300 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 605(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HAVEN, WM. H.
HAVEN WM. H., editor Greenfield Argus . William H. is of Yankee birth, being born in close proximity to the Green Mountains, Addison County, Vermont; first saw the light of day in the year 1831, and in the year 1843 he emigrated to this State in company with his father, mother, brother and sister. Upon his first arrival he was engaged on a farm, at which he worked until 1849, then entered the store of R. M. Booker of the town of Greenfield, where he was employed as clerk; continued at this about one year. Subsequent to this he began teaching school, which he continued up to the time he married, which event occurred Oct. 27, 1853, to Anna Kemper, born Dec. 25, 1833, in Kentucky. They have now three children living, V. H. Haven, born Nov., 1861, Leon Haven, born Nov. 1866 and W. Oilman Haven, born Feb., 1873. After his marriage he resumed teaching and continued until the breaking out ot the war, when he entered the army in Aug., 1861, and remained until its close, and received his discharge in 1865. Was with Sherman through all his campaigns. After his return from the war, engaged in agricultural pursuits up to 1870, when he engaged in the grain and milling business at Greenfield. This enterprise was an unfortunate one for him as it turned, as he lost all he had. Subsequent to this he was engaged as solicitor and local correspondent for the White Hall Register; until March, 1878, when he started the Greenfield Argus, and is now running the same with success. He is Republican in sentiment and has been since the war. Mr. Haven is also engaged much of his time as an auctioneer; has quite a reputation as such, having calls in adjoining counties, which he fills with credit to himself and satisfaction to his patrons. Mr. Haven, though having been unfortunate in his business when he first came here, yet he is a man possessed of much energy and "pluck," and, as his ability is unquestioned and he is possessed of much goodness of heart and lots of friends, we predict for him a successful finale
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 678(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HAYS, DR. T. B.
HAYS, DR. T. B. for the past two years a resident physician of Barrow, was born in Indiana in 1845; he there studied medicine under those skillful practitioners, Dr. W. H. Price and A. W. Porter, for three years, afterward attending the American Medical College situated at St. Louis, and under the management of Dr. George C. Pitzer; at Cincinnati he also attended the Eclectic Medical Institute. In Indiana, where he became a practicing physician, he became well and favorably known for his skill in materia medica. In 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Crane, a daughter of W. T. Crane, of Indiana; there was one child born of this marriage, Geo. W. In 1861 Dr. Hays enlisted in Co. A., 53d Indiana Volunteers, serving fourteen months; he was engaged during this time in the following battles: Aversborough, Bentonville, and others; honorably discharged when the war closed, he returned to Indiana. It should be stated Dr. Hays twice enlisted in the service of Uncle Sam, and, between enlistment, served as sutler's clerk, 2d Battalion, Pioneer Brigade
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 555(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HELM, JOHN W.
HELM JOHN W. farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Roodhouse. The subject of our notice is a native of Indiana, born in 1838, where he passed his earlier years. When he was sixteen his parents, Daniel and Deborah Helm, set out for Missouri, where they lived for many years, and where the head of the family passed to that bourne from whence no traveler ever returns. John grew to manhood in Missouri, receiving a liberal education, and largely developed that surprising energy that marks his entire subsequent career. During the Summer of 1863 Mr. Helm moved with his family to Greene County, where he first worked by the month for John Roodhouse, until such time as he became enabled to purchase his present farm, consisting of 140 acres of valuable land, located in township I2, range 11. It should have been stated that Mr. Helm, when in his twenty-second year, date 1860, united his fortunes to Miss Mary Strait, a daughter of William Strait, by whom he has three children: William II., Lorancy E. and Charles
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 589(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HENDERSON, JOSEPH
HENDERSON JOSEPH, farmer. Sec. 7, P.O. White Hall, was born May 26, 1813, in Ohio; at an early age he came to this county where he has since resided; was married at the age of 29 years to Mary Ann Stout, with whom he lived until her death, which occurred in 1876. They never had any children. Mr. Henderson has 100 acres of land, upon which he now resides. Politically he is Republican. He is a consistent member of the C. Presbyterian Church, and has always been esteemed as an honest and conscientious man, upright in his dealings, and generous to a fault
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 633(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HENDERSON ,S. M.
HENDERSON S. M. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 12, P.O. White Hall, his father, James Henderson, was born in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, March 9, 1783; at the age of 21, in 1804, emigrated to Virginia, residing there two years, then went to Ohio, when, near West Fall, was united in marriage to Mary White, who was born Oct. 25, 1787, near old Fort Pittsburg, Pa.; in May, 1818, in connection with his brother-in-law, Levi Beeder and family, embarked on a keel boat at the mouth of the Sciota, descending the Ohio to its mouth, then cordeling the boat up the Mississippi, via St. Louis, landing at the mouth of Wood River, in June, made their home on the hills of the Piasas, that season; in August of that year, in company with a few others, made a tour of inspection of the fertile lands northward, of which they heard such glowing descriptions. Crossing Apple Creek the first day, camped on the bank of a small stream which bore his name for a number of years, and upon which he laid the first claim north of Apple Creek, and in 1819 they reached their wilderness home, although privations and hardships ended not for many years. Not having cotton nor flax they resorted to the nettle for lint, from which they made clothing. The nearest postoffice for many years was Alton. In Aug. 1819, thinking that a little wheat flour would be well to intersperse with turkey, venison and hominy, Mr. Henderson went with cart and oxen to St. Charles, Mo., to obtain some. He was absent three weeks; during that absence the following episode occurred: a former acquaintance was visiting them as usual, accompanied by the backwoodsman's friend, the rifle; himself must take his own true gun, the friend promised to stay with the lone family—the oldest child not eleven years of age. One night as the family lay in the new camp, without a door or shutter, the screams of a huge panther woke them as he came leaping on the branches of the lately fallen trees near the hut. The cautious mother called, "Aaron, do you hear that?" "Yes." "Well, what is it?" "It's a painter, and don't make any noise or it will come into the camp and kill us all." "If I get you the gun can't you shoot?" "No; be still." "Well, if it comes in I will have you killed first." .She got up and made a trick of bark and clapboards and moved it up and down till the shocking blood-sucker retired. That same Autumn their infant daughter Mary died; this was the first death in the settlement. They lived to rear ten children, nine of whom are still living. James Henderson was noted for his strong love for morality and temperance; was an energetic man, and had the interest of schools at heart as much as any one in the neighborhood. Mrs. Henderson was a woman of strong mind, was sympathetic to the afflicted. Her mother's maiden name was McGhee, whose father and two brothers were in the Revolutionary war, one of them seven years, and composed one of Gen. Washington's body-guard, and rendered important service at the battle of Brandywine
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 646-7(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HENLEY, JAMES T.
HENLEY JAMES T. farmer, res. White Hall. James Henley is a native of Virginia, born in Albemarle Co., in 1833. Fourth child of Samuel and Frances Daves, who moved to St. Louis in an early day. Samuel Henley was a miller by occupation, and now secured employment of Cathcart & Walsh, proprietors of the first steam flouring mill in the city; for them he worked for a series of years, and then moved to St. Charles County, Missouri, and thence to St. Louis County, Missouri, where he purchased a farm of 160 acres and also purchased a farm in Montgomery County. At the present writing he is a resident of Missouri, where his liberal education fits him for many important public offices. James, from whom this sketch is obtained, grew to maturity in Missouri. A captain of State militia when the war came on; during its progress he moved to Greene Co., Ill., purchasing 80 acres of land, from this small acreage came his large estate now consisting of 560 acres. Mr. Henley also owns valuable town property. Three years ago he was president of the town board of White Hall. Mr. H. is a gentleman universally respected in this community. His wife was Miss Julia Hume, of St. Louis Co., Mo., a daughter of Stanton and Sarah Beckenridge, by whom he has had three children : Fanny D., Cora M., and Sallie P..
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 528-9(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HENSLER LEWIS
HENSLER LEWIS, manufacturer and dealer in Wagons, Buggies, Plows and Farming Machinery. All kinds of repair work promptly attended to. The subject of this sketch is a native of Indiana; born on the 1st of May. 1850; fifth child of John and Harriet Hensler, natives of Germany and the State of Indiana respectively. Young Hensler grew up in Indiana, where he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and wagon-maker. On completing his trade Mr. H. proceeded to St. Louis, where he worked nearly a year; finding times hard in St. Louis, he now directed his footsteps to Carrollton, Illinois, where he embarked in the same calling, and through his superiority as a workman, soon began to build up a large trade, and now transacts a large and constantly increasing business. He was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Howard, of Greene
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HENSON, ELIJAH
HENSON ELIJAH, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. White Hall. Elijah Henson was born in Greene County on the 12th of August, 1847. While still a youth he accompanied his father Solomon Henson to Pike's Peak, and in subsequent years traveled extensively. When the war broke out he enlisted in Co. G., 59th Ill. Inf. for three years or during the war, and became a participant in many hard-fought battles, as Nashville (both engagements), Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Buzzard Roost, Pilot Knob, Poplar Bluff, Perrysviile, siege of Atlanta, and other engagements of note; wounded at Poplar Bluff, Perryville, Lookout Mountain, and Nashville. When the war closed he returned to Greene County. On the 8th of August, iS65,he was married to Miss Angeline Smiley, a daughter of Aaron and Nancy Smiley. There were born of this marriage eight children, of whom three are living: Rhoda E., Elizabeth, and King Solomon. Mr. H. is the owner of 20 acres in this township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 653-4; - transcribed by bmt


HERON, A. C.
HERON A. C. farmer. Sec. 18, P.O. Carrollton. A. C. Heron is a native of New Orleans, where he was born Sept. 26, 1848; in 1864, his parents moved to Greene County, where our subject grew to manhood, and received a liberal education; in 1871, he was married to Miss Delilah Clark, by whom he had one child, deceased. Mrs. Heron died in 1874, and, in 1877, Mr. Heron united his fortunes to Miss Lucinda Lancaster, by whom he has two children, Edward P. and Robert L.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 755(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HERON, AUGUSTUS CONKLIN
HERON AUGUSTUS CONKLIN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec, 20, P. O. Carrollton. The subject of this biography was born in Erie County, Penn., May 14, 1819. Augustus was the oldest of a family of nine children; his father was Robert Evans Heron; he was a merchant in affluent circumstances; possessed of an ability that led to successful results, and amassed considerable property in mercantile pursuits; he died at Louisville, Ky., where he afterward removed. Augustus passed his early boyhood in Pennsylvania, where he received a liberal education; in 1832, possessed of that adventurous disposition characteristic of Young America, he departed from the parental roof and made his way to Missouri, where he sought employment on the broad waters of the Mississippi as a cabin boy, plying between the cities of Memphis, New Orleans, Natchez, and other points; he soon became valuable assistant, and, in process of time, a second steward; displaying marked ability, he became steward on board the George Collier, Natchez, Belle Creole, Eclipse and Imperial; in this capacity he gave such general satisfaction that few gained more reputation as an honorable man and one more skilled in his profession than he; one incident in his career is worthy of note, as a steward his ability was unquestioned, yet it would necessarily be strange if some unpleasantness in connection with his position did not occur. On one occasion, an employee of the boat, who could not stand prosperity or good living, made a jesting remark in reference to the corn bread, a staple article on all packets many years ago. Mr. Heron was notified of the conversation, and made his way to the cabin, "Jim," said he, to the surly boarder, "what is the matter with that corn bread?" A satisfactory answer not being forthcoming, he remarked, with that sarcasm peculiar to many who pass their lives on our Western waters: "Jim, that ain't the kind of corn bread you and I were used to when we came in from our fishing excursions, and your aged mother, with all due care and regard for our comfort, gathered together her baking material, and transferring it to the smoothing board, set it to bake from the large open fireplace." Jim made his exit amid the jeers of the passengers. While employed on the river Mr. Heron was married in the Crescent City, to Miss Martha A. Brant, by whom he had two children, Helen and an infant child. When that dread scourge of yellow fever became prevalent in New Orleans, Mrs. Heron became a victim to the yellow monster, whose bronzed breath carried death and desolation to many a saddened household. In 1861, he married his second wife, Mrs. Rachel Burkett, by whom he had two children, Alex. F. and Aug. C; in 1864, the yellow fever again prevailed to an alarming extent, and Mr. Heron was soon again called upon to perform the last sad rites for his second wife, who was laid at rest in the city of New Orleans during the year made memorable by the advent of the bronzed visitor. For a number of years Mr. Heron conducted a successful business in a bakery establishment of his own, on Choupetoulas street; for nearly twenty-five years he remained a resident of this Southern city; in 1849, he made a visit to Greene County, Ill., when he purchased 160 acres of land in this township, and five years ago he became a permanent resident, where he now owns 188 acres of valuable land, and ranks among the more honorable farmers in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 754-5(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HERON, J. G.
HERON J. G. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. Carrollton, was born in Erie County, Pennsylvania, in 1827, living in his native State till 1830, then moved with his parents to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was reared, living there till he was 14 years of age, which was in 1841; hearing of this fine country he was determined to try his fortune in Illinois. Came on horseback, with another young man, landing in Macoupin County, Illinois, and hired out on a farm for $10 per month, remaining there till the Mexican war, when he enlisted as private in what was called the First Illinois Regiment, in Company I, remaining in the service for eighteen months, was honorably discharged in July, 1849, and in August received his warrant for 160 acres of land, which he laid in Macoupin county. Was married in 1849, to Martha Clark, who was born in Owens County, Kentucky, in 1833; she came to Illinois in 1844, with her parents; their union was blessed with ten children; Mary E., deceased; James A., Sarah E., Martha G., Ada I., Henry I., Gorden F., Julia R., Agnes L., Carroll C. Mr. Heron remained in Macoupin County till 1850, then moved to Greene County, where he has remained and owns eighty acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 769-70(T9N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

HEWITT, George C.
One of the first men to settle in Lincoln township, Neosho county, was George C. Hewitt, of this review. He was several years ahead of the average settler of this locality and the red man, the coyote and nature unrestrained were the companions of that early time. It was early in 1865 that he "squatted on" a piece of Indian land, grassy and unbroken, within the limits of Lincoln township and began the labors which have produced the generous equipment of his present home. It is nearly thirty-eight years since that settlement was made and the physical, social and political change which has taken place in that period constitutes the county's internal development and the past stands in vivid contrast with the present.
George C. Hewitt was born near Syracuse, New York, August 13, 1833, and is the sixth child of the family of seven children of John and Mary (Potter) Hewitt. In childhood Mr. Hewitt's parents moved to Eric county, Pennsylvania, where he came to manhood's estate. On the farm he was reared and his education was confined to such schools as were provided for the youth of that day. He was married October 13, 1860, and he made the first and last move of his life when he brought his little family to Kansas and set them down among the Osage Indians in Neosho county. The trip from the cast was made "overland," and the journey lasted from early spring till the month of December, in which month our subject reached his objective point. He had little money, as was common for the pioneer, and he resorted to many makeshifts to husband what he had. The little shanty which gave first shelter to his family was a model for rudeness and simplicity and it afforded protection from the elements till the claim was entered, opened out and under profitable cultivation. To provide for his family necessities Mr. Hewitt broke prairie until his own farm responded with sufficient to keep the domestic larder full. Some supplies had to be hauled from the markets and over into Missouri Mr. Hewitt had to go, leaving his family alone for the time, the journey occupying sometimes several weeks for the round trip. Provisions were exorbitant, corn meal at the first mill - near where St. Paul now stands - was $3.60 per sack. This was a luxury the settler kept with him - if he could raise the price of it - and it might be said it helped settle Kansas, for wheat flour was certainly beyond the reach of the great body of common people. Mr. Hewitt's first effort to get into the cattle business proved the usual luck of the poor man. He made the trip to Iola, bought three cows and took them down to the rich grassy plain only to lose them in a short time with Texas fever. Two others were purchased with the same result and the attempt, for a time, subsided. Mrs. Hewitt tried engaging in the chicken business at the same time, buying her stock at $3.50 per dozen, and had a good degree of prosperity. By degrees the home developed and the farm was stocked and neighbors from everywhere settled all about them, and as the county filled up the first settlers saw the wisdom of their early determination.
Mr. Hewitt took for his wife Rachel Britt, a daughter of William and Louisa (Altam) Britt. She was born in Knox county, Tennessee, January 28, 1841. She was the oldest of ten children and, at the age of thirteen years, went with her parents to Green county, Illinois. She married Mr. Hewitt in Illinois and they are the parents of three children, namely, Lyman, Warren and Loren, who are all comfortably situated in Neosho county and near the family homestead. [Source: History of Neosho and Wilson Counties, Kansas, Pub. by L. Wallace Duncan, Fort Scott, Kansas, Monitor Printing Co., 1902; tr. by VB]


HICKS, CALVIN
HICKS CALVIN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 22, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Hicks was born in Greene County, September 10, 1827, on the old homestead of his father, Vinas Hicks. He was the fourth child, and while a youth attended school in a log cabin, presided over by Jessie Smith; the building, long since gone to decay, stood on the farm now owned by Thomas Hanks. In his twenty-first year he married Miss Catherine Martin, a daughter of Reuben Martin, of Tennessee. From his father Mr. Hicks came into possession of a 40 acre tract, and now set up housekeeping in the usual primitive fashion, the family dinner being prepared by means of skillets or pots suspended in the broad old fashioned fireplace. Years have gone by since then, but the stirring scenes of western life make a vivid impression on the minds of those who struggled for a scanty livelihood on our western prairies. The large tract of land now owned by Mr. Hicks, consisting of 300 acres, is one of the most valuable farms in this county. One child, Marcus L., who was born in Greene County, October 3, 1855
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 555(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt



HIGBEE, SUSANNAH MRS.
HIGBEE SUSANNAH MRS., a resident of Greene Co. for a period of time extending over forty years, is a native of Virginia, born Nov. 22d, 1789. In an early day her parents moved to Kentucky, where she spent many years of life, and where she married in 1808, Vincent Higbee. The family removal to the West was made in 1836, and a location made in Greene Co., near the town of White Hall. Vincent Higbee was a carriage and wagon manufacturer in White Hall for many years, where he passed the remainder of his life. He died January 11, 1871, aged 84 years. He was well and favorably known to early residents here: for a period of time extending over thirty years he was the successful proprietor of the White Hall House, the first inn or tavern in the present flourishing little town. Mrs. Higbee, widow of Vincent Higbee, who is now in her 89th year, a resident of White Hall, is the mother of many who bear an honored name in Greene County, who have tended in many ways toward the material prosperity of the county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 529(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HILL GEORGE
HILL GEORGE, manufacturer and dealer in pottery and stoneware. East Bridgeport Street, White Hall. George Hill is a native of England, born in Brighton, Sussex County, in 1836. At the early age of 18 he crossed the ocean; arriving in New York City he subsequently made his way to Albany, where he became apprenticed to an architect and builder; on completing his trade he went to Gloversville, where he married Miss Sarah Ricks, a daughter of Joseph Ricks, of McHenry County, Illinois. Taking up his residence once more at Albany, he became actively employed at his calling until 1852, when he moved to Fort Plain, where he erected many notable buildings, for by this time he had gained an extensive reputation as an architect and builder. During the war he was a soldier in Co. H, 10th N. Y. Zouaves. In 1866 he setteled in White Hall, Greene County, and it was not long before his talents and energy as a contractor and builder became manifest and he soon received orders from wealthy parties contemplating building. He it was who became the architect and builder of some of the more noted business blocks and private residences of White Hall, Roodhouse, Greenfield and other points. In 1873, owing to ill health, he abandoned this calling, in which he won the admiration of many, and the following year purchased the pottery of W. W. Hubbs; in this, owing to liberalty, honesty and industry he transacts a very large trade, having all modern facilities for the transaction of business
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 529(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HINTON, HON. JUDGE ALFRED
HINTON HON. JUDGE ALFRED, is a native of the State of Maryland; born the 15th of February, 1800; he was the second child of James and Catherine Hinton, the former a native Virginian, the latter a native of Maryland. In an early day this family, then consisting of husband, wife and two children, Alfred and Charlotte, located in Western Virginia, at a place called Wellsburg, and four years after moved to Delaware County, Ohio; subsequently the family removed to Ghent, Gallatin County, Ky., where the death of James Hinton occurred. Mrs. Hinton outlived all of her children with the exception of the subject of this notice, finding a last resting place in the city of Carrollton, at the advanced age of 80 years. Judge Hinton, quite early in life, commenced the trade of a carpenter, and in the Autumn of 1819, came to Edwardsville, Illinois, and three years later became a resident Of Greene County; in 1822, he entered a tract of land on Apple Creek Prairie, three miles west of the flourishing town of White Hall; in March, the same year, he married Miss Lucretia Pruitt, a daughter of William and Sarah Pruitt, and immediately after his marriage built a cabin and began the improvement of his land; eleven children were born of this marriage, of whom only five are living, who are married and settled in life; in 1835, Mr. Hinton was elected justice of the peace, and by re-election held the office twelve years; during the Autumn of 1842 or 1843, he was elected a member of the legislature from Greene County; wishing to advance his chil iren in educational matters he now took up his residence at Carrollton, where he was shortly after appointed postmaster, retaining the office nine years; in 1846, Judge Hinton was nominated again for the legislature; was again elected, serving through one session; one incident in the life career of Mr. Hinton is worthy of note; in 1831-32, he superintended the erection of the present court house, in connection with Moses Stephens; in 1865, he was elected judge of the County of Greene, filling the office to the general satisfaction of all; in 1832, Judge Hinton and wife became members of the Christian Church, at Carrollton, where, for many years, he has been an elder in the church, officiating in this capacity now. Democratic in his views, his first vote was cast for John Quincy Adams, in 1824; for sixteen years Mr. Hinton conducted a successful business as proprietor of the old Mansion House, at Carrollton, now designated by the name of the Hinton House. Mrs. Hinton passed away on the 18th of February, 1869, and in March, 1870, Judge Hinton was married to Mrs. Amy Holliday, of Kane, where he resides at the present Writing
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 736(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON, EDWARD B
HOBSON EDWARD B. asst. cashier, Carrollton bank. Mr. Hobson was born in 1843, on the old farm homestead of his father, Dr. John Hobson, situated near Carrollton. At the age of six his parents located near Alton, where farm property was purchased. Here a residence was made from 1849 until 1855, when the family settled near the village of Buckin, on the Grafton road, where farm property was purchased. Here were passed the last days of Dr. John Hobson, a most worthy gentleman of wealth, whose memory is cherished by many residents of Greene County. The family now consisted of Mrs. Hobson and Edward, an only child. Mrs. H. having relatives at Carrollton, now decided to make her home there, where she now resides. Edward received his preliminary education at Carrollton, which was afterward brought to completion at Shurtleff College, situated at Upper Alton. In 1864, he began the study of medicine under Dr. Armstrong, of Carrollton, in 1867 graduating from Rush Medical College, Chicago. Returning to Carrollton, he entered into the drug business with A. H. Donahue. Two years later the firm disposed of their interest to Fry & Armstrong. Dr. Hobson now turned his attention to farming, in Montgomery county, where he owns 1,000 acres, a magnificent property. In 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Elliott, daughter of Robert Elliot; there are two children : Mary E. and Adele W. During the present year Mr. Hobson became identified with the Carrollton bank, one of the safest institutions in this county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON, PETER
HOBSON PETER, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 29, P.O. Carrollton. Mr. Hobson is a descendant of the foremost families of England, and one of the oldest settlers within the borders of Greene County. He was born in Cumberland County, England, on the 29th day of December, 1804. He was in his eighteenth year when his parents, whose names are elsewhere recorded, settled in Greene County, on land previously purchased from the United States government. On the homestead property young Hobson worked from the time his head reached the plow handles. His pioneer days, spent in the usual fashion,were fraught with an interest of no ordinary nature; attending quietly to the duties of a farm, uncultivated with the exception of a small tract. A few short years before the red men had been as the leaves of the forest, but were compelled to go still farther westward, as the encroachments of the white man entered the domain where they had hunted from their earliest childhood. Mr. Hobson from a youth, was possessed of a wonderful energy, working with unflagging zeal. The old adage that in eternal vigilance is the secret of success, has proven a true one in this case. After many years of economy and self-denial he is to-day a wealthy farmer, owning 534 acres of land in Montgomery and Greene Counties. At the age of forty-five, in 1848, he was united in marriage to Mary Chron, by whom he had seven children, two of whom died in early infancy; five are living : Thomas, Robert, George, Charles and William. But a short time ago Mr. Hobson, whose wonderful vitality rendered him a hard worker, was unfortunately paralyzed, a source of regret to his many friends, who know him for his personal integrity and kindness of heart.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 518(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON, ROBERT
HOBSON ROBERT, who took a leading position among the merchants of Carrollton, was born in Cumberland Co,, England, May 1st, 1814. Passing by the early years of his life, spent in Great Britain, we follow his fortunes in the new world. It was during the year 1822, that his parents crossed the Atlantic for America, settling in Greene County, near the present city of Carrollton, where Mr. Hobson passed the days of his childhood—early youth, and grew to manhood, and where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1853, when he entered into a general merchandising business, continuing here two years. He then disposing of his stock, turned his attention to the vocation that had been his from boyhood, In 1874, became extensively engaged as a stock dealer and shipper, and during the Autumn of 1875, becoming engaged in the stove line of trade, forming a co-partnership business with O. B. Hardcastle, which was dissolved Feb. 1, 1879
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON, THOMAS
HOBSON THOMAS, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 29, P.O. Carrollton. One of the most energetic and wealthy citizens of Greene County is Thomas Hobson, a native of Cumberland County, England. In 1809, in his thirteenth year his parents, James and Elizabeth Hobson, whose maiden name was Goldsmith, a descendant of one of the best families of England, crossed the Atlantic. During the Autumn of 1822, land having been previously purchased, the little party of emigrants settled down to farm life in Greene County. On their arrival the family, consisting of the husband, wife and six children: Peter, John, Thomas, Robert, Mary and Jane; the homestead comprised 320 acres, was unbroken save three acres, on which was erected a small cabin comprised of logs; the neighbors of those days were few, but generous to a fault, and all were on an equal footing as regards finances or nearly so. During the first winter the family endured many hardships; of wheat they had none and consequently no flour, during the first cold winter mainly subsisting on corn bread or what was more familiarly known as corn dodgers. Years afterwards St. Louis became the trading point for supplies. In 1839 James Hobson departed to a home not made with hands. A true type of the hardy Briton, of an extremely energetic disposition, he accumulated wealth for the period of time in which he lived, erecting during the days of his earlier manhood the substantial brick building where the subject of this sketch now resides. Three years after the death of this pioneer the wife and mother, a most estimable lady, also passed away; Thomas was then in his thirty-third year, married, having united his fortunes to Catherine Choran, by whom he had two children, now living, James and John. Mrs. Hobson died March 6, 1854, and was laid at rest in the Mount Pleasant cemetery, a worthy monument marking the spot. March 11, 1858, Mr. Hobson was married to Miss Elizabeth Ann Tribble. by whom he had two children, not living, whose names were Elizabeth G. and Mary O. The career of Mr. Hobson on our Illinois prairies has been fraught with no ordinany interest. He is to-day a representative of his class and the owner of nearly 1200 acres of land; thus through great industry the pioneer boy who had in his early days scarcely clothing or shoes has reaped the reward of the diligent
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 518-19(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HODGES, WILLIAM
HODGES WILLIAM, farmer and stock raiser, residence old Kane. William Hodges is a native of Jersey County, and born in 1850, a son of Edward Hodges, deceased, who was a native of Texas, born in 1820, who became a resident of Illinois some 35 years ago, locating in Jersey County, where he was married to Miss Nancy Davis, who was born in Jersey County; twenty-five years ago the family moved to Greene County, where Edward Hodges became a successful agriculturist through the display of that energy inseparable from success. After a life of very unusual activity he was laid at rest in Greene County. The survivors of the family are Mrs. Hodges and eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fourth child. In 1877 he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Smith, of Jersey County, by whom he has one child, Harry Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 755(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOETZ, JOHN
HOETZ JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 3, P.O. Barrow. Mr. Hoetz was born near Chattanooga, Tenn., October 13, 1824; the oldest son of David and Hannah Hoetz; he was but six years of age when his parents moved to Illinois, settling near Winchester, Scott County, in 1831, prior to the deep snow. During this Winter the family, exposed to the rude blasts of winter through the chinks of their cabin, suffered at times terribly; when the Spring came the thaw that ensued caused the water to rise rapidly, carrying with terrific force the personal effects of the early settlers, in many instances washing the land and rendering it comparatively useless in Scott County. After many years of hardships, the old folks found a last resting place within its borders. John, whose name appears at the top of this sketch, moved to Greene County, thirteen years ago. In 1851 he was married to Miss Sarah Ann Hayney, by whom he had eight children, four of whom are living: David M.. Stephen A., Ephraim and Jasper. Seven years ago Mrs. Hoetz was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery near Barrow. September 3, 1872, Mr. Hoetz was married to Miss Mary E. Young, a daughter of Sandford Young, of Scott County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 555(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOGG, DANIEL
HOGG DANIEL, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 34, P.O. White Hall. The above named gentlemen, one of the most enterprising men in Greene County, was born in Hamilton County, Illinois, August, 1823. His father was Samuel Hogg, who was born in Illinois, and here married Miss Jane Gore, by whom he had nine children. Daniel, the second child, was but an infant when his parents located in the southern portion of Illinois. Samuel Hogg died some two years ago, in Madison County; his wife, who is still living, resides at Collinsville. Daniel has followed farming from boyhood. In 1846 he was married to Miss Mary E. James, a daughter of Gilbert James, of Missouri; married at St. Louis, the youthful couple proceeded from there to Madison County. For many years Mr. H. has been a resident of Greene County, where he owns 90 acres. There were six children born of this marriage: Charles, William, Clara, Luella, Jessie and Frankie
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 555-6(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOLBERT, AMOS
HOLBERT AMOS, renter, Sec. 7. P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman was born in Greene County, January 12, 1842, where from boyhood to manhood he has followed agricultural pursuits. At the present writing a resident of township 10, range 12. John W. Holbert, the head of the family, died in 1872. Mrs. Holbert is still living, residing with the subject of this sketch. There were nine children born of this marriage
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 519(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOLMES, ISAAC
HOLMES ISAAC, renter. Sec. 21, P.O. Kane. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, where he was born on the 13th of September, 1833; oldest son of William and Elizabeth Holmes'. Isaac grew up in Greene County; received a common school education, and became employed in farming from his earliest years. In 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss ' Martha Duggan, a daughter of George and Elizabeth Duggan. Of this marriage two children were born: Charles and William. At the second call for volunteers, on the 4th day of September, 1863, Mr. Holmes enlisted in Co. E, 32d Regt. Ill. Inft., and became engaged in the following battles: Shiloh, Corinth, Hatchie River, Vicksburg, Grand Gulf, Champion Hills, Kenesaw Mountains, Atlanta, Savannah, Raleigh, and Bentonville. Re-enlisting in this company, he remained four years in the service of the U. S. government. He was honorably discharged on the l6th of September, 1865
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 755-6(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOPKINS NANCY MRS.
HOPKINS NANCY MRS., wid. Geo. H. Sec. 29, P.O. Athensville. Geo.H. Hopkins was born in Kentucky in 1796, and came to this State when a young man; he was one of the earliest settlers of Morgan County where he entered land, but removed to Greene County shortly after, and bought and entered land in this township; was married in 1825 to Mary Ann Arnold of Tennessee, born in 1807; this union was blessed by nine children, five of whom are living, viz.: Abraham, John, Ellen, Mary Ann and Austin. Mr. Hopkins after a long life of toil and industry devoted to the improvement of his land, died Oct. 14, 1866, at the age of 70 years. Mrs. Hopkins still resides at the homestead, which consists of 120 acres, the original tract having been divided at Mr. Hopkins' death
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 605-6(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HOUSE, JOHN
HOUSE JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Breese. Mr. House was born at Hessen, Germany, December 2, 1827; when quite young he became apprenticed to the trade of a plasterer and stone mason. He became a skillful workman, and in his twenty-third year, 1849, emigrated to America. He immediately made his way to Pennsylvania, thence to St. Louis; remaining three years, working at his trade, he then made his way to Wilmington, Greene County, where he worked at his trade many years. While here he united his fortunes to Miss Sarah Granfield, by whom he has four children: Mary S., Laura, Adelia and John E. For twenty years Mr. House has been a farmer, owning 35 acres; he also rents. He is a member of the town board
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 556(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOWARD ELIZABETH J.MRS.
HOWARD ELIZABETH J.MRS. farming, Sec. 25, P.O. Rockbridge. Mrs. Howard is a native of Clarmount Co., Ohio; her maiden name was Shipman; there were but three children in the family, she being the youngest; her mother's maiden name was Winn, with whom she moved to this State, settling below Carrollton. Mrs. Howard was born June 15, 1824, and when she came to this State she was but six years of age. May 24, 1840, she was united in marriage to Elijah Howard, a native of Kentucky, born Sept. 27, 1816, went to Missouri during his sixth year, and at the age of nineteen came to this State and settled near Mrs. Howard, when they became acquainted, and in May, 1840, they were married; had eleven children: Catherine, born March 4, 1841; Columbus M., born March 2, 1843; Hester Ann, born May 8, 1845; Charles S., born Aug. 11, 1848; Emma J., born Jan. 19, 1851; John H., born Jan. 4, 1853; Samuel L., born July 19, 1855; James A., born July 1, 1857; Margaret A., born April 11, 1859; Mary L., born May 31, 1861; Hattie, born May 12, 1863. All of the above named are living except Columbus M., who died in the U. S. service, Co. K, gist Regiment I.V. The year following, Mr. Howard, her husband, enlisted in Co. A, 32d Regiment, for three years; died Dec. 1, 1863, of acute rheumatism. Mrs. H. has since maintained and kept the family together, notwithstanding she has but a few acres of land; and at the death of her husband she was urged to bind the children out and find them homes elsewhere, yet she refused to do so, saying that so long as she had a crumb of bread they should share it with her, and that her family should not be divided. And she set to work with a good will; has wove, spun, and sewed, and by frugal management kept them together, and without assistance from any other source; and her family owe her a debt of gratitude for the zeal and interest she has manifested in their behalf
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 678-9(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HOWARD, JOHN
HOWARD JOHN, farmer and stockraiser, Sec. 22. P.O. White Hall. Mr. Howard became a resident of Greene County in 1836, and was born in Ford County, Tenn., February 23, 1819; he was the fourth child of Henry and Charlotte Thompson, whose maiden name was Ballard. John was in his sixteenth year when he accompanied his parents to Greene County, locating east of what is now the flourishing town of White Hall. In his twenty-fifth year he married Miss Margery Ann Bell, a daughter of Francis Bell. At this time he had little save some small personal property. Twelve years from this time he purchased 100 acres from his father; disposing of this he purchased part of the property which he now owns, which consists of 195 acres. Mr. H. also owns property in the corporation of White Hall. Mr. Howard has by his first wife, who died in 1857, three children: Frances M., William H. and John A. In 1859 Mr. Howard was married to Miss Martha C. King, a daughter of Samuel King, by whom he has, now living, Thomas, Edgar and Herbert. Mrs. H. died in 1869. In 1870 Mr. Howard was married to Miss Harriet C. Smith, by whom he has one child, Catherine
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 556(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HOWARD, JORDAN
HOWARD JORDAN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 10, P.O. Carrollton. Among the early pioneers of Greene Co. whose hospitality invited and whose generosity partakes of the good old pioneer days of long ago we mention the name of Jordan Howard; a native of New York State, born in the year 1808; he there passed his earlier years. At sixteen he accompanied his parents, Sylvester and Lydia Howard, to the broad prairies of southern Illinois. The family settled permanently in Morgan Co. on a farm. Jordan, from whom this sketch is obtained, settled in Greene County as early as 1826, a period of time when scarcely a cabin stood between Carrollton and Jacksonville; on what is now comprised in the city of Carrollton there stood an old frame building erected for a tannery, and here the youth became instructed in the mysteries of the trade. Remaining for a number of years in this capacity he eventually became a clerk for David Pierson, the well known ex-banker, with him in after years transacting a successful mercantile business. During this time, in 1842, he was united in marriage to Miss Eveline Ryder, a daughter of John Ryder, one of the oldest settlers of Greene County, a native of New York. Two children blessed this union: Charles, who died in early infancy, and Mary, who married Thomas D. Price, the popular editor of the Carrollton Gazette. Since his retirement from mercantile pursuits Mr. Howard has devoted his time and attention to farming, owning 140 acres in one of the best townships of Greene County. Here he quietly rests from his labors, on the well cultivated farm, where he will no doubt spend the remainder of his days. September, 1857, Mrs. Howard, a most estimable lady, passed to that world of spirits to which we all are tending
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HUBBS, W. W.
HUBBS W. W., formerly proprietor of the Ebey pottery, was born in Pennsylvania in 1830. His father, Jesse Hubbs, is a native of Pennsylvania; he there married Miss Ann Wilson, by whom he had eight children, of whom Wm. was the youngest. He received a liberal education at Bloomsburg, on the banks of the Susquehanna River. He became apprenticed to the pottery trade; he was then 16 years old; at 20 he was a journeyman workman, in his 22d year he located at Ripley, Brown County, Illinois. Working as a journeyman a short time in a pottery he concluded to branch out for himself and became a manufacturer of stoneware and stone pumps. Moving to Frederick, Schuyler County, Illinois, he there constructed a building for the manufacture of pottery. At Frederick he was married, in 1860, to Miss Mary Ann Miller, a daughter of Joseph Miller, of Brown County. During the Spring of 1865 Mrs. Hubbs died and was laid at rest in the village cemetery, here also he buried the two little ones born of this marriage. Moving to Southwest Missouri, Mr. H. purchased a large tract of land containing extensive deposits of lead; part of this tract is still owned by him; also the owner of a pottery here; he disposed of it and came to White Hall, where he purchased the Ebey pottery, entering into partnership with David Boone and S. V. Moore; after some years purchasing their interests; he became a very successful merchant. October 11, 1868, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Ellen H. Given, relict of John T. Given, and daughter of John L. Harper, of Kentucky. Two children: Julia E. and Mary Ann; Gertrude, deceased; one child living by first marriage: John W. Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 529-30(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HUDDLE, F. E.
HUDDLE F. E., a rising attorney of Greene County, was born at Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio. March 6, 1856. His father was Benjamin Huddle, a carpenter and joiner by occupation, who married in Ohio, Miss Rachel Kagy, by whom he had nine children, F. E. being the oldest. When four years old his parents moved to Marion County, Illinois, where a purchase of land was made. On the old homestead young Huddle remained until he had attained his 16th year, when he received full permission from his father to go forth in the world. On leaving the parental roof he had fifty dollars in money. Proceeding to Tiffin, Ohio, he entered the Heidleberg College, where he worked for his board and tuition, remaining one year. In the meantime he received the news of a serious accident that had befallen his father; he returned home, where he obtained a position as clerk in a dry good store, afterwards becoming a school teacher he took up the study of law; the dream of the farmer boy was to become a successful lawyer, and he accordingly applied himself with diligence. June 8, 1877, at the June Term of the Supreme Court he was admitted to the bar, at Mount Vernon, Illinois. Locating at White Hall in July, he entered upon a very successful practice, but 22 years of age, his pluck and thorough knowledge of the law predict a bright success in the near future. Mr. Huddle married Ida B. Lester of Marion County; one child, Edwin B. Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 530(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


HUDSON, D. B.
HUDSON D. B. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Roodhouse. David Hudson was born in Greene County, in 1828. His father, a native of Virginia, moved to Kentucky in an early day, where he formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Mary Duncan. During the Autumn of 1827 he wended his way to Illinois, locating four miles northeast of Carrollton, Greene County, where an improved claim was purchased. After many years the head of the family became an exceedingly prosperous farmer; He passed away in 1852, a true type of the western pioneer; his loss was deeply deplored. Mrs. Hudson, who still survives, is a resident of Kansas, and is now upward of eighty years of age. David departed from the scenes of his earlier days in 1849, for California, crossing the plains by wagon. Arriving in California he proceeded to the Placerville mines, where he worked as a miner three years. Securing considerable of the shining metal, he returned to Greene County, where he was shortly after married to Miss Mary VanTyle, a daughter of Otto VanTyle. Since his return from California Mr. Hudson has followed farming, and very successfully, owning 380 acres. Of seven children, born of this marriage, six are living: Julia, Noah, Robert, Charlotte, Mary and Martha. Disbrow, deceased. Mr. Hudson was married in Scott County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 589(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HUDSON, GEORGE D.
HUDSON GEORGE D. farmer. Sec. 34, Rockbridge, is the tenth of a family of twelve children; born in this county, township 10, range 10, Aug. 14, 1844, His father, Peter B., is an old settler, he having, with Mary, his wife, whose maiden name was Settle, come to this county at an early period of the county's' history. George D.'s acquaintance with academic halls and college walls was principally from the outside ! At the age of twenty-two he embarked for himself and began farming. Nov. 4, 1869, he was married to Nora Keating, born June 9, 1849 Have now three children: Effie, born May 21, 1871; Georgia, born Jan. 14, 1874; Freddie, born March 11, 1877. Before his marriage, he rented land, but, subsequent to his marriage, moved to Sec. 34, Tp. 10, and bought 80 acres, and has since added to it until he now owns 560 acres, which he is getting well improved, and is at the present time investing a good deal of money in the way of tileing for and draining the same. Mr. Hudson has been a candidate for the office of Sheriff of the county; but as the county is strongly Democratic, and there having been less than a dozen men of the Republican faith elected to office in the county since 1840, an aspirant of the Republican faith for political honors stands in the minority, with but little hope of his election. Mr. Hudson is a zealous advocate of the temperance cause; is also musically inclined, and a lover of the harmony of sound; is now leader of the Rockbridge Cornet Band; is a member of the Carrollton Chapter, and of Sheffield Lodge A. F. and A. M., No. 687
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 679(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HUFF, JOHN
HUFF JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Rockbridge. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, where he was born in 1833, fourth child of John and Anna Huff. John was a Virginian by birth, who there married Miss Anna Cox, of Virginia, a relative of the late General Hancock. Long before a railroad run through the State, and scarcely a steamboat plowed our western waters, John Huff made his way to the then far western State of Illinois, locating in Greene County, where he subsequently became a successful agriculturist. He passed away in September, 1873; Mrs. H. died in 1862; the survivors of the family are eight. John passed his early years upon the old farm homestead, and received a liberal education. In 1854 he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Cox, a daughter of David Cox, of Pennsylvania. Like many of the more opulent farmers of this county, the secret of Mr. Huff's success lay in his ability to work persistently and energetically, He is to-day the owner of 160 acres of valuable land in this township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 723(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HUGHES, DR. I. S.
HUGHES DR. I. S. physician and surgeon, Kane, Ill. The above named gentleman is a native of Illinois; born in 1844; his parents, William S. and Maria Hughes, whose maiden name was Simmons, concluded to better their fortunes in the West, and accordingly located in Randolph County, about 1830; not long after their emigration West the parents of Dr. Hughes passed to that bourne from whence no traveller ever returns; thrown upon his own resources to battle with the world, the youth proceeded to St. Clair County, where he first worked as a farm hand, received the advantages of a common school education; in 1860, he wended his way to St. Louis, Mo., where he began the study of medicine under John D. Hodgen; an ardent student, possessed of an ambition beyond many who were more fortunately situated in life, he applied himself diligently to the prosecution of his studies; in 1862, he enlisted in Co. I, 117th Ill. Infantry; his advance in his medical studies were so rapid that from his first enlistment until the close of the rebellion he served in the medical department, where he gained a knowledge of materia medica that paved the way for future success; when the war closed he completed his studies at St. Louis, graduating from St. Louis Medical College in 1872, but prior to this date, owing to the rules of the establishment, he had practiced three years as a physician. Digressing a little from the subject in hand, shortly after the rebellion Dr. Hughes sought a new field of labor in Colorado, where he entered upon the mercantile business, under the firm name of Sickor & Co., a military clothing firm during the war. Returning to St. Louis in 1871-2, he practiced as a physician, while attending medical lectures, thence to Brighton, and thence to Kane in February, 1875, where he has gained a large practice among the prosperous people of Kane. Nov. 27, 1878, Dr. Hughes was married, at Springfield, to Miss Mary E. Freeman, a daughter of Abraham Freeman, one of the earlier settlers of Springfield
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 736-7(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


HUITT, JOHN W.
HUITT JOHN W. one of the first pioneers within the borders of Greene, is a native of North Carolina, born about the year 1798. His father, John Huitt, a native of Virginia, moved to North Carolina some time after the war of the revolution, where he married Miss Lizzie Radcliff, by whom he had, at the time of his emigration to Illinois, eight children. They setthed in that portion of the northwest now recognized as Madison county. Ill., as early as 1804. Think of it, gentle reader, and let your imagination carry you back to a time when the North American Indians' moccasined feet trod the tall prairie grass where you now behold those evidences of civilization, flourishing cities, towns and villages. St. Louis itself, that magnificent city, on the Father of Waters, a mere trading post, where the daring trapper exchanged his furs to the wily trader, for tobacco, whisky, and in some rare instances, money. In this primitive wilderness the family of Huitts, a hardy, adventurous race, settled down for an existence among the wolves and Indians. A cabin was rented, and the following year one erected. Here the hardy pioneer swung his ax among the timber, or broke prairie for many a year. John Huitt, jr., and now the oldest settler, living in Greene county, grew up among pioneer associations, his education necessarily limited, as the principal studies were a Dillworth spelling book and the New Testament. At the early age of 18, he was united in marriage to Miss Rosanna Hareford, a daughter of James Hareford, of Kentucky. In 1818 he moved to what is now Greene Co., where he made a claim, and when land came into market, purchased it. In the latter years of life Mr. H. became a large property owner. Mr. H., in his eighty-third year, once walked from the town of Kane, to his old homestead near Carrollton. There are few at his age who still have the old-time vigor of youth. Of this marriage there were 13 children, 9 of whom are living: Rowland, Sarah, Nancy, William, Louisa, Katy, Rebecca, Jonathan and Fanny
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HUNNICUTT, H. T.
HUNNICUTT H. T. farmer, Sec. 17. P.O. Walkerville, was born in Greene County in 1834, married Miss Sarah Butler, and on her decease, E. Purnell, his present wife. Of the first marriage four children, were born, Oscar, Mary. William and Julia. Mr. H. owns 160 acres Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 654(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


HUNNICUTT, ROWELL
HUNNICUTT ROWELL, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 16, P.O. White Hall. Few in western life have endured more of its trials and its hardships, than the wholesouled gentleman whose name heads this sketch. Rowell Hunnicutt is a native of South Carolina, where he was born on the fifteenth of June, 1807. Of the parents we have only space to say, that his father, Hartwell T. Hunnicutt, was born in South Carolina in 1781, and a millwright by occupation, and he married in South Carolina Miss Margaret Cunningham, who bore him fifteen children, fourteen of whom grew to mature years. He left the South for the far west Dec. 25, 1816, and after a most harassing journey overland in a covered wagon, he first landed at the mouth of Wood River, a short distance below the city of Alton, in Madison County. He remained here some four years, when he set out for Greene County, where he settled on the first of May, 1820, in what is familiarly known as the Bluff Region, where he remained until his removal to township 11, range 13, where he became a school teacher, the first who taught in this part of the county. He was a self-made man, and displayed considerable ability for the period of time in which he lived. He died in 1832, after a long life of usefulness and honor, and his ashes repose within the borders of Greene County. Mrs. H. survived her husband some eight years, and was laid to rest in the Hunnicutt cemetery. Rowell, passing his boyhood in Greene County, grew to a vigorous manhood among the pioneers of the west, and there learned that sturdy spirit of self-reliance that led to successful results in subsequent years. He acquired a good common school education solely by individual efforts, and became familiar with mathematics by means of problems worked in the ashes in a broad open fireplace, under the instruction of William Craten, In 1826 Mr. H. made his way to Galena, where he went for the purpose of seeking employment in the lead mines. The season had been unusually wet, and accordingly he voyaged down the Mississippi on a flatboat to New Orleans, where he became employed on the wharf, where vessels were moored and where freight was unloaded at all hours of the day and night. From the Crescent City he took passage on the steamer Liberator for St. Louis, the scene of many a stirring event in early western days, and where our subject for a period of three years had officiated as the commander of a small keel boat, which he would load with honey, beeswax, deer hides and furs, such as coonskins, mink and otter, and from the mouth of Apple Creek, where the town of Newport now stands, he would ply the little craft to St. Louis, where he would lay in a supply of dry goods, groceries and whisky, the latter a highly prized article, for the return voyage. From St. Louis he returned to Greene County, where he married on the 14th of February, 1827, Miss Mary Pruitt, a daughter of James Pruitt, who settled in Greene County in 1820. After his marriage he built a common round log cabin and followed farming to a limited extent. When the Blackhawk war broke out he volunteered as a soldier, under the command of Captain Fay, and witnessed the skirmish at the mouth of Bad Ax Creek, and was also an eye-witness of the peace treaty subsequently made at Rock Island. When the Indian troubles no longer agitated the Northwest he returned to his home, and there followed farming until 1834, when he moved north. He settled at Peru, where he purchased property at the land sale, and built the first house in the village for L. D. Brewster, and while residing here he had the pleasure of seeing the Hall girls, who, captured by the Indians in 1832, had but a short time previous to Mr. H.'s arrival been released from captivity. This event occasioned considerable excitement at the time, and we find frequent mention made of this incident in early histories of Illinois and the Northwest. In 1836 he returned to Greene County, where he resided until 1856, when he moved to Calhoun County, where he established a ferry and a commission business, and also transacted a remunerative business in the shipment of wood to St. Louis. After a successful business extending over ten years, he became a forwarding and commission merchant at the town of Newport. During the Spring of 1860 he plunged still farther westward, and eventually landed in Nevada, where he established a quartz mill in connection with Lewis W. Sink and a party by the name of Lorelen, given name unknown. In what is now Nevada City our subject built the first cabin. While the new firm were transacting a most successful business, with twelve stamps in running operation, the war broke out, and with its attendant consequences shattered the hopes of its enterprising projectors. Mr. Hunnicutt once again turned his face toward his old home in Greene County, where he now resides in comfortable circumstances, on a farm of eighty acres, after a life fraught with interest and very unusual activity. Mrs. Hunnicutt died on the first of April, 1877, and was laid at rest within a short distance of the home that knew her presence for so many years. There were born of this marriage ten children, nine of whom are living: Jane, who married Geo. Hostelton; Hartwell S., who married Sarah Butler, and on her decease was married to Elizabeth Purnell; Catherine, who married James Cade; Julia Ann, who married Shannon E. Collins; Diana, who married Joshua T. Crow; George, who married Miss Emma Young, and Laura, who married Abraham Young. In the above sketch of Rowell Hunnicutt, we have mentioned his trip to Galena in search of employment, and it will be well to mention in this connection, that the date given, 1826, offered no railroad facilities, and accordingly Mr. Hunnicutt, starting from the mouth of Apple Creek, where the village of Newport now stands, in company, with Davis Carter, William Beman, John Beman, Jonathan Hill and John Daniel, voyaged down the Illinois to its mouth on the Mississippi, when the little party of explorers paddled up the Father of Waters to what is now Quincy, by canoe. Here they remained for a short time, and camped out on the site of what is now the city of Quincy,' then not platted as a town, and even unknown as a village, for it contained but one log cabin partially built. Resuming their voyage, at the end of thirty-four days from their original starting point, this band of enterprising pioneers landed in Galena, a small hamlet containing one grocery store, one double log cabin used as a tavern, and a blacksmith's shop
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 654-5(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


HUNT, H. M. & CO.
HUNT H. M. & CO. grain and commission. Firm composed of H. M. Hunt and Ellis Briggs; copartnership formed in 1875. Handle grain at the following points in Greene County: White Hall, Roodhouse, Drake Station, Schultz Mills, and Wrightsville, also at Winchester and Alsey, Scott County, and Murrayville, Morgan County. During the year 1878 this firm bought and shipped over seven hundred cars of wheat. They have the confidence of the entire community, and have unlimited facilities for buying and shipping grain. Their two mam elevators are located at White Hall and Winchester. A large portion of their trade consists in supplying mills, but in the heaviest part of the season they are heavy shippers to all the large markets in the country. This is one of the most reliable grain firms in the State, and two more reliable and energetic men can not be found in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 571(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


HUNT, J. S.
HUNT J. S. livery and boarding stable, S. Main st., Carrollton, III. Over twenty years ago Mr. Hunt commenced a livery business at Carrollton. He was born in the State of New Jersey in 1827. His father, Theodore Hunt, was a farmer in good circumstances, and on the farm young Hunt put in his idle time. He received a liberal education, and at twenty-one, left the parental roof and worked for neighboring farmers. At twenty-five he made his way to Ohio, thence to Iowa, thence to Jersey County, Ill., where he worked at carpenter work. Making his way to Virden, he there opened a livery and transacted a successful business, for a short time, when he moved to Carrollton, where he opened a livery on State st., meeting with success from 1856 until 1860; he then purchased the lot where his handsome, substantial stable now rears its front, said to be one of the best in the State. Prior to this he erected a frame building that was destroyed by fire March 1, 1878. In 1857, Mr. Hunt married Miss Harriet Hartwick, a daughter of John Hartwick; four children living: Nellie, Clara, Mattie and Jacob. In 1862, Mr. H. crossed the prairies for California. His present partner, Mr. J. I. Johnson, was born at Alton, Sinclair county, Ill., October, 1854. When four years old, his parents, James and Zella, moved to Greene county, settling on a farm, where they passed the remainder of life. Young Johnson was then thirteen; he received his education at Blackburn College, Alton Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482-3(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HUPP, OLIVER PERRY
HUPP OLIVER PERRY, blacksmith and horse-shoer, is a native of Virginia, where he was born in the year 1833, and resided in the Old Dominion State for many a year, and where he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith at an early age. Residing in Virginia when the war broke out, he joined the Southern forces under Early, and was subsequently transferred to the brigade under command of Stonewall Jackson. Since the war he has resided in Kane, Greene County, in the latter he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ashlock, daughter of Jesse Ashlock, by whom he had one child, not living. See business card elsewhere  Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 756(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HURD, TIMOTHY
HURD TIMOTHY, Sec. 27, P.O. Rockbridge, was born in Bledsoe County, Middle Tennessee, Dec. 25, 1831. There were five children in his father's family, of whom he was the second in order. His father's name was Vernon Hurd; his mother's was Rebecca Maguire. When Timothy was quite young he moved with his parents to Cooper County, Mo. Timothy left the parental roof at the age of thirteen; his mother died and his father broke up housekeeping, and Tim had to "root" for himself. Crossed the plains during his fourteenth year; drifted about a good deal; he never attended school a day in his life. At the age of twenty-two he was married to Martha Vandaveer, who is a native of Kentucky, and was born Jan. 5, 1832. After marriage, they made a trip to Texas in a wagon, making it in six weeks and three days; remained there two years, got dissatisfied, and returned to Cooper County, Mo. Remained there until the breaking out of the war, when he loaded up his family, in April, and came to Illinois, reaching Taylor's Creek during harvest. He had used up all his provisions, and his money about gone, he could go no farther. He pitched his tent, or camped out, on the ground now owned by Norton Saunders, and worked out at whatever he could get to do. About a week before Christmas he got his family in a house. He worked until he got enough to buy him a team, and he "cropped "for three years, one year for Mr. Ballard and two for Mr. Thorpe. In the Spring of 1864 he enlisted in the 133rd I.V., and went out in the 100-day service; was gone nearly six months before he returned. The next year, went to Fayette, where he rented the land now owned by Thos. Brooks; stayed there two years. Then bought 40 acres of land of Mr. Thorpe; paid for the greater part of it by days work; he has since added to it another 40 acres. He has six children: Nancy L., born Dec. 14, 1854; Zachariah, born Oct. 25, 1856; Mary Jane, born Aug. 14 1858; William A., born April 11, 1860; Nettie O., born April 3, 1863; Hardin Orange, born March 31, 1866
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 679-80(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


HUSSEY & CO.
HUSSEY & CO., proprietors Carrollton elevator. This building was erected eleven years ago, by Simeon and Thomas C. Hussey, they continuing a successful business in the grain trade until the decease of the elder brother, which occurred in 1872. During this year, John Long, the well-known banker of Carrollton, became an active partner in this important enterprise. This elevator, perhaps the largest in the county, has a storage capacity of 20,000 bushels of grain, and a large trade is transacted. Mr. Hussey, a patron of this work, was born in Ohio, in 1841, a resident until 1861. During this year he came to Carrollton, where he ran a steam thresher, in connection with his brother, Simeon, mentioned above. This was, in all probability, the first steam thresher operated in the county. For two years the brothers transacted a successful business as proprietors of a sawmill. In 1863, Thomas C. Hussey was married to Miss J. Sanderson, a daughter of Joel and Olive Sanderson, a native of Ohio, where the marriage ceremony took place
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 483(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


HUSTED, E. M.
HUSTED E. M. farmer and banker. Was born in Addison County, Vermont, near the city of Vergennes, September 9, 1830. His father, Lyman Husted, was born in Vermont where he married Miss Maria Dennison; there were four children born of this marriage of whom E. M. Husted was the third. In 1836 the family arrived in Illinois, where, six weeks later, the head of the family died. The subject of this sketch early turned his attention to farming, and his systematic method of conducting business has made him a leading farmer of Greene County. In 1850 he purchased the property where he now resides. Mr. Husted, we believe, was the first to introduce drain tile in this section of country, and now has his entire farm, where necessary, drain-tiled. Mr. Husted is one of the most public-spirited men of Roodhouse and has held many important positions, as president Roodhouse Bank, justice of the peace, president Agricultural Society, etc. December 1850, he was married to Miss Harriet Swallow, by whom he had two children, Effie C. and Edgar. Mrs. Husted died March 23, 1864, and the following year witnessed the nuptials of E. M. Husted to Miss A. C. Bannister, of Vermont  Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 571(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


HUTCHENS, BRASWELL
HUTCHENS BRASWELL. Deceased was born in Greene County, July 8, 1832, and was the second child of Elkanah and Frances Hutchens. Elsewhere will be found a biographical sketch of Elkanah Hutchens, and we now follow the fortunes of Braswell Hutchens in Greene County, where he followed principally the occupation of a farmer, although early in life he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith, which he abandoned two years after becoming a journeyman workman. December, 1852, he was nnited in marriage to Miss Caroline Landon, a daughter of Edmund and Julia Landon, whose maiden name was Reynolds. Of this marriage eleven children were born: Horace.Elkanah, Mary, Lucius, Julius, Jasper, Julia, Augustus, Maria, Gilbert, Helen, and infant child. Mr. Hutchens passed away in 1878, and was laid at rest in the Hutchens Cemetery
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 756(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HUTCHENS, ELKANAH
HUTCHENS ELKANAH, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Carrollton. Our biographical sketch would be incomplete were we to omit to mention the whole-souled gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch. Many who sought homes upon the boundless prairies or among the timber belts of Southern Illinois, were natives of the Sunny South, and among this hardy people we class Elkanah Hutchens one of the veteran pioneers of Greene County. He was born in North Carolina in 1803, where he passed the days of his childhood, early youth and to grew manhood, receiving such education as a log cabin afforded. From youth he followed agriculture, and married in North Carolina Miss Frankie Pilcher, a daughter of James Pilcher. In 1829, when many favorable reports were spread abroad about Illinois and its prosperity, Elkanah Hutchens determined to make this new Eldorado his future home, and accordingly made his way overland in a pioneer schooner, or covered wagon; after a monotonous journey, occupying some weeks, he landed in Morgan County on the 7th of May, 1829, near the City of Winchester, in Scott County, and here he entered land from the government, and remained until 1831, when he crossed over to Greene County, and settled in town 9, range 12, the property he now owns, consisting of 160 acres. A cabin had been erected on the land, and here the emigrants made their home for several years. As many anecdotes and incidents of pioneer life find their way in our general history, and as Mr. Hutchens' life in Greene County was the common lot of all, it only remains for us to say that step by step Mr. Hutchens arose to a condition of independence. He is now the owner of 160 acres of valuable land, and has the respect and confidence of neighbors and friends in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 756(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HUTCHENS, ELKANAH D.
HUTCHENS ELKANAH D. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 7, P.O. Carrollton. Many of those comfortably situated in the agricultural walks, of life were born in Greene County, and grew to the mature years of manhood surrounded by pioneer influences. Among this class we mention the subject of this sketch with more than a passing notice. He was born in the year 1845. From his earliest years followed farming. November, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Bell, who bore him one child, Clara Belle, who died in infancy. Mrs. Hutchens died in 1874, and was laid at rest in the Providence Cemetery. In 1876, Mr. Hutchens was united in marriage to Miss Lucy J. Anderson, a daughter of Samuel and Purnell Anderson, by whom he has one child, Eva. Mr. H. is the owner of 480 acres of valuable land, and a valuable property in Carrollton. As a farmer he has become exceedingly prosperous. For a number of years he seved in the capacity of a school teacher, and evinced considerable ability in this profession
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 757(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


HUTCHINSON, J. W.
HUTCHINSON J. W. banker, Greenfield, is a native of Pike County, born Sept. 14, 1841; son of Samuel and Laura B. Hutchinson, whose maiden name was Batcheller, who are esteemed people, and came to this State about the year 1835. His mother died when he was quite young, while his father is still living. The subject of this writing launched out on his own account at the age of fifteen, came to the town north of Greenfield, and worked for Joel Edwards for two years; the first year was on the farm, and the second year worked at the carpenter trade. We next find him at Naples, engaged as a clerk for Wallace Parker. In the Fall of 1859 he went to Philadelphia, where he entered the Polytechnic College, and remained until his graduation, which dates June 28, 1861, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineers. On Nov. 5, received an appointment as Third Assistant Engineer, and was ordered to the U. S. steamship Tuscarora, which was sent to the Azores, then to Southhampton, Eng., in pursuit of the Confederate steamer Nashville; next sailed to Gibraltar, Spain, where they spied the Confederate steamer Sumpter, which vessel being in English waters, and the Tuscarora in Spanish, the latter held her in blockade during the space of four months, eyeing her in the meantime with an eagle gaze, having steam up the entire time, and the result was, the Sumpter never escaped, but was finally sold; next they sailed up toward Liverpool to intercept the Alabama, but she did not reach her destination soon enough, and the Alabama escaped; subsequent to this the Tuscarora was cruising about in various waters, in pursuit of the Alabama; returned to the States in April, 1863. During the Summer they were out on several expeditions visiting various places, Newfoundland, and others; then returned to Boston during the Fall of the same year, and was sent to Wilmington, N. C, and took part in the blockade, where they remained until the following May, 1864; from here she was sent to Baltimore to undergo repairs. From here, J. W. was detached, and reported to Philadelphia to undergo examination for a commission as Second Assistant Engineer, which promotion he received in July; he was ordered to the Susquehanna, and sent to Fort Fisher, and assisted in its capture. He resigned, April, 1865, and returned to Philadelphia. During the time J. H. was attending school at the Polytechnic College, he was a member of the Keystone Battery, commanded by J. O. Winchester; he is now an honorary member of that body. This battery played a conspicous part in the late railroad strike, in subduing the strike in that locality with her Gatlin gun. In June, 1865, Mr. H. went to Colorado, and was in the employ of the Colorado Gold Mining Company of Philadelphia, in which remained about a year. He was then appointed Deputy County Clerk and Assessor of Park Co. In August, 1867, went to Cheyenne; where he was appointed Clerk of the United States and Territorial Dist. Court, also Clerk of the Supreme Court of same Territory. In Sept. 16, 1868, he was united in marriage to Mary Ann Sheffield, daughter of G. T. W. Sheffield, who was born August 8th, 1843. They have had four children, three are living: Samuel S., born Sept. 2, 1869; George A., born Oct. 10, 1872; Florence, born Oct. 7, 1875, After his appointment as Clerk in the above named Courts, he served four years, and in Feb. 1872, resigned and came to Waverly, Morgan Co., and engaged in the banking business in the firm of Sheffield, Hutchinson & Co., where he remained three years. In March, 1875, he moved to Greenfield, Ill., and engaged in same business with same parties, and has since been engaged in the above named business. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and of Carrollton Chapter No. 77. Also present W. M. of Greenfield Lodge No. 129  Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 680-1(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt