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MABERRY BROTHERS, WILLIAM W. AND L. C.
MABERRY BROTHERS, WILLIAM W. AND L, C. farmers. Sec. 27, P.O. Athensville. Sons of Randolph J. Maberry, who was born in Tennessee, June 18, 1827, and came to this State with his parents at an early age, and were among the earliest settlers, having arrived prior to the deep snow, settling within the confines of Greene County. He was married to Agnes E. Ferguson, of which union four children were born; the two elder ones died, and the two surviving ones are the subjects of this sketch. Mr. Maberry devoted his industries to farming, but died Feb. 3, 1859, while yet in early manhood. Mrs. Maberry, mother of the brothers Maberry, died May 16, 1872. Wm. W. Maberry was born May 28, 1853; married Dec. 24, 1876, to Virginia A., daughter of George H. and Sarah E. Finley, Morgan County, born Sept. 12, 1858. This union has been blessed by one child, born Oct. 7, 1877, and died Nov. 22, 1877. L. C. Maberry was born Sept. 23, 1855, and is unmarried. The brothers devote their industries to farming, stock raising and dealing, and are worthy successors of the name, which is a prominent one in the early history of Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 606-7(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MABEARRY WILLIAM M.
MABEARRY WILLIAM M. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 1, P.O. Carrollton, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1833; is the son of William B. and Martha Mabearry, who were natives of Tennessee, living there till 1837, when they emigrated to Greene County; the family had no means and hired a wagon to bring them, not having one of their own; the father rented land till 1846, then bought 160 acres, and as he accumulated means bought more land, till at his death, in 1858, he owned 320 acres. His wife still lives, at the age of 68, on the old homestead. The subject of this sketch was married in 1856, to Georgianna E. Trimble, who was born in Pike County, Mo., in 1834, but reared in Greene County; their union was blessed with five children: Elvira, who married J. P. Wood; Agnes, William A., Susan M., and George A. Mr. Mabearry owns 350 acres; has followed the occupation of a farmer all his life; has been township treasurer eight years; was elected to the office of county commissioner at the last election in 1878, which he still fills
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 770(T9N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


MADDEN JOSEPH
MADDEN JOSEPH, harness maker, Greenfield, was born in Birmingham, Eng., Oct. 26, 1844; two years later, emigrated to this country with James and Susan Madden, his parents, landing in New Orleans, where they remained about one year; then to St. Louis, where they located permanently. The first work he remembers doing was driving cart at six dollars per month. In 1859, went to learn the harness maker's trade with J. B. Sickles; remained with him until completed. We next find him in Cincinnati in Aug., 1861, remaining there until June, 1863. Then went to Nashville, and was in the employ of the government, continuing until July, 1865. Returning to St. Louis, associated in the harness business with C. C. and H. M. Long; subsequently sold his interest to Burns, Degnar & Dunn; then returned to the old firm of J. B. Sickles, remaining until April, 1S66; then went to St. Charles, remaining a short time; then returning to St. Louis, remaining until Sept. 1866, when he went to Carrollton, Ill., and worked for Lawrence Retzeruntil Nov.; came to Greenfield, and worked for T. W. Wilson nearly three years. Was united in marriage, Oct. 26, 1870, to A. J. Wylder, born July, 1845; she is a daughter of W. H. Wylder; had one child, Henry T., born Oct. 2, 1870. Same year engaged in business for himself, on southwest corner of Square, and has since remained; began first in a small way, doing his own work; has now a good business, and keeps two hands constantly employed. Is the owner of Nellie Madden, the trotter
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 684(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MALOY JOHN
MALOY JOHN, engineer. Sec. 33. P.O. Rockbridge. John is a native of the Emerald Isle, born in Galway County, Jan. 6, 1840; son of Patrick and Hanora M.; Patrick is a well-to-do farmer, and is still living in his native country. John came to this country during his fourteenth year; he having had for some time previous a longing desire to come to this country, but his father did every thing to dissuade him from it, and would not consent to his coming but John secretly resolved in his mind that, the first opportunity which presented itself, he would turn his back upon the home of his father; so, on pretense of going to the Fair, and there finding a friend about to take shipping for America, he embarked with him, and in due time arrived in New York. He first went to Pennsylvania, and hired out at six dollars per month, remaining there one year. He having a cousin in this county, and learning his address, came out here, and worked for several men in the locality, first hiring to Jeff Dixon for one year; then to W. P. Witt; then to James Vallentine, with whom he remained nine years in all. He being an expert hand, his services were always in demand. Worked two years for James Vanarsdale; worked one year in Morgan County. In 1866, went to Brighton, remaining about one year. Jan. 2, 1866, was married at Alton, by Father Mangan, to Julia Crowley. The same year he moved to "Dublin,"where he farmed three years on some land that he owned. During the Winter was engineer at the Rockbridge Mills. In the Fall of 1870 he moved to Rockbridge, and worked on the section, in the employ of the Rockford Road, two years. During the war he was in Captain Mulligan's company for four months; was at the battle of Lexington; was taken prisoner by Price, and afterward parolled. Is a member of the Catholic Church, and "votes for men, not party". During the last six years has been in charge of the tank and pumping works, running the engine, and is deemed by the company a trusty and efficient man. He has never yet been discharged from any service in which he has been engaged. Has six children now living: Michael H., born Jan. 3, 1867; Mary E., John H., William A., Charles F., and Thomas P.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 684(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MANGER ANDREW
MANGER ANDREW, farmer and blacksmith. Andrew Manger is a native of Germany, where he was born on the 19th of March, 1833. At an early age he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith, in due course of time becoming a skillful journeyman workman. In 1854 he crossed the Atlantic for the new world, and after the usual voyage landed in the City of New York, where he remained but a short time, when he directed his footsteps to Illinois, and first located at LaSalle, La Salle Co., subsequently making his home at Peoria, and other points. In 1856, he came to Greene Co., where he first worked as a journeyman,and afterward as proprietor of a shop. In 1857, he was married to Miss Nancy Wood, by whom he had four children. Mrs. M. died in 1864, and was laid at rest in Greene Co. The following year Mr. Manger was married to Mrs. Emily Martin, by whom he has five children. Mr. Manger is the owner of eighty-nine acres of land in this township, and is well known as a skillful workman
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 657(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


MARKET V.
MARKET V. The above named gentleman, although established in business at Roodhouse but a short time has already secured a large share of public patronage, his prices low as the lowest, and work always first class. When in town don't forget to call; get your measure taken and get fits, good fits, and a perfect fit. Mr. Market was born in Switzerland in 1840; in his seventeenth year he emigrated to America; from New York City he went to Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cinncinati and St. Louis; in the latter city was in business some fourteen years as a boot and shoe manufacturer; there married Miss Victoria Stokker, a native of Germany. Three children blessed this union: Carroll, Edward and Victoria
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 573(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


MARTIN HENRY F.
MARTIN HENRY F. physician, Greenfield. Among the "young settlers" of the county that have chosen a profession, particularly in the line of materia medica, there are none whose future is more promising than the party whose name heads this sketch. Having already passed to graduation, and having four years of practice, the success attending the same foreshadows a prosperous career. Was born in Brighton, Macoupin County, June 22, 1852; son of Henry F. and Helen Martin, whose family name was Moore, and is a native of New Hampshire, while her husband came from Rhode Island. Henry, having the usual advantages afforded him, receiving his education in the common schools, and last at Blackburn University, he then decided to become a disciple of Esculapius, and to this end, at the age of twenty-two, entered the St. Louis Medical College, where he remained until graduation; after which he located at Athensville, April, 1876, and first began the practice of medicine, remaining there until April the following year, when he was induced to locate in Greenfield, and in June, 1877, associated with Dr. W. C. Day, under the firm name of Day & Martin, and is now in the active practice of his profession. May 24, 1877, was united in marriage to Harriet L. Metcalf, born in Macoupin County, March 12, 1853; she is a daughter of J. L. and Elizabeth Metcalf; one child has blessed this union, Mabel, born April 8, 1878. Is a member of the Knights of Honor, Greenfield, No. 1300
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 685(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MARTIN JAMES
MARTIN JAMES, agriculturist, was born in Kentucky on the 14th of June, 1814; during his youth he became apprenticed to the trade of a bricklayer, and worked for many years as a journeyman workman. In 1828 occurred the family removal to Greene County, where James Martin during the year 1833 turned his attention to the trade of a bricklayer, although subsequent years developed and aptitude for farming, and accordingly a purchase of property was made; with the exception of a short residence in Kansas, the greater portion of his days were spent in Greene County. In 1848 he was married to Miss Eliza Harwood, a daughter of Albert G. Harwood of Greene County; of this marriage ten children were born, two sons and eight daughters, all of whom are yet living. This sketch would be incomplete were we to omit to mention Mr. Martin's adherence to the union cause during the stirring scenes of war, when to a union man in many portions of Southern Illinois brought down the hatred and enmity of many known as bushwhackers; necessarily his early life was marked by poverty, but he was endowed with an unlimited stock of commendable energy which made him successful in his various enterprises; after an energetic and honorable career, both as an agriculturist and mechanic, he died at his farm residence in township 9, range 12, of lung fever, and his ashes now repose in the Mount Gilead Cemetery; the estate comprises 200 acres, a valuable tract of land pleasantly situated
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 757(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MARTIN JOSIAH
MARTIN JOSIAH, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 13, P.O. Roodhouse. Josiah Martin is a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1814; he was the third child of John and Delilah Martin; in his fourteenth year he accompanied his parents to Greene County where a settlement was made on what is now township 12, range 11, part of the property now owned by Josiah. John Martin first settled in Lawrence County, Illinois as early as 1818, where he lost his first wife; he was again married in 1828, the date of the location of the family in Greene County; on the farm young Martin lost no idle time; at twenty-two he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Vandeveer of Kentucky. On land purchased from the government he erected a log cabin, still a fixture of his present residence, here the youthful couple began housekeeping in an humble way, the articles of furniture entering therein being few and simple, but were' in time materially improved upon through the mechanical skill of the husband; after many years of self-denial Mr. Martin is now a prosperous farmer, at one time the owner of 320 acres, many acres of which have been generously deeded to his children; there were eleven children born of this marriage: Martha J., who married Daniel Jackson; Elizabeth, who married William Guthrie; Emily, who married James Cryder; John T., who married Arra Sullivan; Louisa, who married Joshua Guthrie; Frank W. who married Emily Cryder; George W., unmarried
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 591(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MARTIN NEWTON
MARTIN NEWTON, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 7, P. O. Carrollton. The father of our subject was Samuel Martin, who was of Welch origin; but little pertaining to his early life can now be gleaned; it is supposed that he was a native of Ohio, and afterward moved to Kentucky, where he followed farming to some extent, although by trade he was a cooper; it was here that he formed the acquaintance of, and married Miss Elizabeth Guntermon; from Kentucky Samuel Martin moved to Indiana, where he remained a short time, when he moved to Greene County, the date of his arrival is not known, but it was probably a very early day, as Jersey County still formed a portion of Greene County, and in the vicinity of the bluffs, where he settled, it was but thinly populated, scarcely a cabin dotting the surface of the prairie for many miles;, he became moderately successful in life, and died at an advanced age in Greene County in 1844. Mrs. Martin survived her husband some thirty years, and her ashes repose in the Hutchens Cemetery. The survivors of this family are ten, of whom our subject is the seventh child, who was born in Jersey County in 1827. October 3. 1848, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Thomasson, a daughter of William and Sarah Thomasson; by whom he had sixteen children, eleven of whom are living: William E., George O., John W., Samuel P., Stephen Douglas, Eudora A., Mary A., Jacob E., Frank, Elizabeth E. and Virginia A. After a long an honorable career Mr. Martin has become comfortably situated in life, and resides on his farm of 200 acres of valuable land situated in township 9, range 12
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 757-8(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MARTIN SAMUEL
MARTIN SAMUEL, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 26, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Martin was born in Logan County, Kentucky, October 20, 1826; third child of John and Polly Martin, who emigrated to Greene County in 1828. Young Samuel in his eighth year, through the limited means of his parents, learned to plow and do other hard work from this age until he attained his majority; while yet a youth he would make frequent trips to a horse mill, and there patiently wait for the corn he brought to be ground; the little schooling he obtained was by frequent trips to a log cabin, where a log taken from one side was filled in with window glass to admit the daylight, the benches, made of slabs, were awkwardly constructed; here the few studies were perused while the memory of many were sometimes refreshed by the use of long rods or withes in the hands of the expert teacher; in 1862 Mr. Martin enlisted in Co. I, 91st Ill. Vol., for three years service or during the war; entering the ranks as a private, through meritorious conduct, he arose to the position of a first lieutenant principal battles participated in were Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort; captured at Elizabeth by Morgan's men he was shortly after paroled; when the war closed he returned to Greene County. October 19, 1865. he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Lyden, by whom he had one child. Harry G. Mrs. Martin died August 9 1873. Samuel Martin is the owner of 180 acres, acquired by his own industry; he was lately elected to fill the office of justice of the peace of White Hall precinct
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 591-2(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MASON ABIGAIL MRS.
MASON ABIGAIL MRS. widow of William Mason, deceased, is a native of Greene County, born in 1823. Of her parentage it will be well to enter into more than a passing description. Her father, Capt. James Whitlock, was a native Virginian, born in 1800. It must have been that he was of an extremely adventurous disposition, for at the youthful age of eighteen we find him traversing the prairies of the far West. After some weeks of travel, he landed in Greene County, where he was destined to play so prominent a part in the boundless West, a cotemporary settler with , Samuel Thomas, John Huitt, and others. His struggle for an existence in the West, met with the many discouragements that confronted the early discoverers of the far West. For many years prior to the Black Hawk war, he held a position as a military officer, and when Black Hawk made war on the white settlers, he was appointed or elected a captain of militia. After the war closed, he returned to his farm in Greene County. A most successful agriculturist, he accumulated a large property in Greene County. For eighteen years he held the position of constable. He died of cholera at San Jose, Mo., on his way to the gold mines of California. Taking up the thread of our discourse, Abigail Whitlock, married in 1839 John C. Richey, a native of Greene County, a mason by trade, who died in 1848. Of this marriage, three children were born: James M., Susie Ann, and Juliette. In 1850, Mrs. Richey was married to William Mason, a native of Ohio, who came to Greene County in an early day—about 1827. He was well remembered by early residents here, who remember him as a man of fine military attainments, and a successful farmer. He died in 1870, leaving to the care of his wife three children: Jane, Elon E., and Jennette, deceased
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 738-9(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MASON JOHN
MASON JOHN, farmer. Sec. 33, P.O. Athensville. Born in Kentucky, May 18, 1812; removed to this State and settled in Greene County in 1830. Married in Kentucky, Jan. 1, 1830, to Rebecca Moss, born in Tennessee, in 1813. This union has been blessed by four sons and five daughters, six of whom are living. Mr. Mason enlisted in 1846 in the 1st Reg. Ill, Vol., and served in the Mexican War, returning home in 1847, since which time he has devoted his industries solely to agricultural pursuits. Farm comprises 120 acres, highly improved.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 607(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MAYBERRY JAMES V.
MAYBERRY JAMES V. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 36, P.O. Carrollton, was born Feb. 14, 1831; is the son of Wm. B. and Martha Mayberry, who came from Tennessee, in 1837. James was six years of age when he came to Greene County; has followed the occupation of a farmer all his life, and owns 1,300 acres of land; was married in 1859, to Elizabeth Clark, who was a native of Kentucky, but reared in Greene County; her father came from Kentucky in 1844, to Greene County, bought land and lived there for a number of years, then moved to Macoupin County, living there one year, then returned to Greene County, where the father died, in 1852. The mother still lives at the age of 79
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 718(T10N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


McADAMS SAMUEL
McADAMS SAMUEL, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 6, P.O. Carrollton. Mr. McAdams was born near the town of Troy, Madison Co., on the 9th of January, 1833, the fourth child of a family of ten children; during his fourth year his parents, William J. and Rebecca Ann McAdams, moved to Greene Co., locating on the farm now owned by Samuel, from whom this sketch is obtained. As our space is somewhat limited and confined principally to the narrator, the statement is given that the head of the family, after many years of usefulness, found a last resting place here; his wife, whose life has been prolonged through a long series of years, is a resident of township 10, range 12 — a living witness, so to speak, of the stirring scenes transpiring in western life on the prairies of Greene Co. or among the timber. Young Samuel followed the plow or swung the ax for many ayear during the early settlement of Greene; at twenty-five, in the year 1857, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah L. Kilpatrick, who departed this life six years later; three children were born : James B., Millie, and Sarah, deceased. In 1865, Mr. M. united his fortunes to Miss Barbara Duggan; of this marriage seven children were born, six of whom are living : Noah, Hattie, Jennette, William, deceased, Charley, Isaac T., and Ida. Mr. McAdams is the owner of over 200 acres of valuable land in this township. Further notice is given elsewhere in the general history of this work. Holds office of supervisor
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 520(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


McCANN THOMAS
McCANN THOMAS, blacksmith and dealer in agricultural implements, hitching grounds White Hall, Ill.; was born in Canada West, March, 1843. At twenty-one he emigrated to Greene County, locating at White Hall; he had learned the trade of blacksmitliing in Canada; in 1870 he bought out a party by the name of Fuller, and started in for business, at first in a small way, but soon his skill as a workman became known and orders for work began to come in rapidly. Perceiving the trouble that farmers here were frequently put to in the purchase of first-class agricultural machinery, he became local agent for all leading farm machinery, Studebaker wagons, etc., etc. In addition to this Mr. McCann himself makes wagons and plows to order, and, in fact, does a general blacksmithing business; horseshoeing a specialty. In 1865 he was married to Miss Julia E. Potts, a daughter of Dr. Potts; there are two children
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 533(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


McCLURE ROBERT N.
McCLURE ROBERT N. blacksmith. Sec. 29, P.O. Kane. Robert N. McClure is a native of Missouri, born at .St. Louis County in 1843, youngest son of Jas. and Lydia McClure, natives of North Carolina and Virginia respectively. Robert was quite young when his parents settled in Jersey County, this State, where he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith; becoming in due time a workman. On the 12th of December, 1867, he was married to Miss Catherine Haynes, a daughter of Adam Haynes, by whom he has two children: James and Anna. In 1867 he moved to Greene County, where he has since resided, and where he transacts a good business at his trade
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 739(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McCONATHY EDGAR
McCONATHY EDGAR, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 27, P.O. Roodhouse The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, born in 1S52; his father, Perry McConathy, an old settler of this county, is a native of Kentucky; he there married Miss M. J. Alverson, by whom he had fourteen children, and of whom Edgar was the eighth. Early in the thirties his father settled in Greene County, on farm property, where young Edgar became employed at an early age; August 27. 1876. he was married to Miss Elizabeth Allen, a daughter of William Allen, who is among the first settlers of this county; one child Rebecca, blessed this marriage. Mr. McConathy is the owner of 60 acres of valuable Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 592(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McCONATHY PERRY
McCONATHY PERRY, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 22, P.O. Roodhouse Mr. McConathy was born in Lexington Kentucky, August 17, 1813; he was the youngest son of Jacob and Eunice McConathy. At the age of fifteen he became apprenticed to the trade of a saddler, serving his time; in his twentieth year he became a journeyman; for a considerable length of time he worked as a journeyman, and also opened a shop for a time; while a resident here he was married to Miss Matilda Jane Alverson. In 1839 he made his way to Greene County where he worked in a co-partnership way with Benjamin Alverson; for a number of years he rented property and then moved on to the farm he now owns, consisting of 300 acres; in 1846 Mr. McConathy was appointed agent for the Internal Improvement Fund, his ability for any position he might aspire to being recognized, he was elected to the responsible office of county assessor and treasurer, and for twenty years; has been justice of the peace, and now holds the office of notary public; as a public officer Mr. McConathy has left behind him an honest record, that is held in grateful remembrance by the citizens of this county; in conclusion, it may be said that Mr. M. is one of the most liberal of men, whose large heart goes out toward all appeals of a public nature. Of fourteen children born of this marriage eleven are living; Benjamin F., John M., Mary Jane, Emma V., Clarissa, Jacob, Edgar, Robert Perry, Joseph H., Samuel R. and Lucy A.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 592(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McCONNELL ANDREW L.
McCONNELL ANDREW L. farmer. Sec. 29, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Mc-Connell was born in Ohio Co., Va., June 13, 1830, fifth child of Samuel and Olivia McConnell, natives of Virginia and there married, a farmer by occupation; he died in Virginia in his twenty-third year; the subject of this sketch came west and located in Scott County, where he first worked by the month in a flour mill, receiving as pay $25 per month, high wages for that day; in 1855 Mr. McConnell was married to Miss Elizabeth Armstrong, daughter of Geo. Armstrong, a Kentuckian; one child born of this marriage died in 1857; March 22, 1859, Mrs. McConnell was also laid to rest; June 27, 1860, Mr. M. was married to Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts, relict of Joshua Roberts and daughter of Vinas Hicks; there were born of this marriage eight children, six are living: Mary E., Elizabeth T., George G., Thomas J., Samuel N., and John L.; Mr. McConnell is one of our live, energetic men, who make the farm a success; he owns a nice property of 90 acres in township 12, range 12, one of the finest farms for its size in this township; for nine years school director
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 558(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


McCRACKEN W. H.
McCRACKEN W. H. renter, Sec. 35, P.O. Athensville. Son of Alex McCracken, who came from Pennsylvania in the early history of this county, and died April 6, 1866. W. H. McCracken was born in Greene County Oct. 3, 1848; married Feb. 13, 1870, to Josephine Sharp, of Macoupin County, born Aug. 11, 1849. Four children has blessed this union, viz.: Millie J., born Jan. 12, 1871; Charles E., Jan. 11, 1872; Sophie A., Sept. 13, 1874; MaryE., March 27, 1876, died Dec. 18, 1877; and George H., Dec. 7, 1877. Mr. McCracken enlisted in Co. B, 10th I.V.I., and served in Missouri; was discharged the same year; re-enlisted in Co. G, 38th I.V.I., and served under Gen. Thomas in the department of the Cumberland, participating in the battles of Franklin, Nashville, etc., and discharged March 20, 1866. Since Mr. McC.'s return home, he has devoted his industries to agricultural pursuits; rents 160 acres, showing evidences of thrifty husbandry on every hand
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 607(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


McEUEN DR. T.
McEUEN DR. T., a rising physician of Greene County, was born in Missouri, Oct. 30, 1832. Oliver McEuen, the father, was born in Pittsburgh, Pe. He was married to Miss Jane Hayes; by this lady he had twelve children; Thomas, the seventh child, whose footsteps we now follow, became liberally educated, and when quite a youth turned his attention to the study of medicine, as a student under his father and likewise Dr. Thomas Lewis of Union, Mo He graduated from St. Louis Medical College. Taking up his residence in Pike County at Milton, he began practice as a physician. He had been a hard working student and in consequence his professional skill was recognised and he secured a large practice. In Milton he married Miss Phoebe Baker; has two children: Olive L. and Mattie B. Mrs. McEuen died in 1867. In White Hall Dr. McEuen married Mrs. R.N. Hemming, relict of Henry Hemming. In Roodhouse Dr. McEuen has a large and lucrative practice, due to his untiring efforts and professional skill. Was post surgeon during the war
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 573(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


McFALL DR. A. C.
McFALL DR. A. C. office cor. W. 5th and Main sts., Carrollton. Dr. A. C. McFall, one of Greene County's most skillful physicians, is a native of Trumbull Co., Ohio, and the fifth child of Henry and Mary McFall, who emigrated to Wisconsin during the tenth year of the subject of this sketch, where, in after years, he attended the Plattville academy, where he received a liberal education; from this institution of learning he directed his footsteps to the great metropolitan city of New York, where he began the study of phrenology under Fowler & Wells, and afterward became a graduate of the Phrenological Institute of Fowler & Wells, and became a successful lecturer on Phrenology for a period of four years, and through well-directed energy and keen business tact in speculative matters he accumulated considerable wealth; he now determined to adopt the medical profession for a life work, and proceeding to New York City he entered the office of Dr. George M. Guernsey, the celebrated female physician, and subsequently attended medical lectures in Cleveland, Ohio, and afterward at the city of Chicago he attended lectures and received private and public instruction under the instructions of Prof. Ludlam, now professor of Hahnemann Medical College, where he has been for many years a lecturer on diseases of women and is the author of the well-known work in relation thereto. In closing this biography it may be said of Dr. McFall that he is not only a genial gentleman, but a well read and skillful member of the medical profession, and in the treatment of female complaints ranks second to none. Through adverse speculations and failures of parties formerly occupying positions of wealth, Dr. McFall, in common with so many of our more energetic men who have maintained a proud struggle for wealth, found his gains swept away, as it were, in an instant. He came to Carrollton in 1876, where he has succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice, and where he enjoys the respect and confidence of his many friends and patrons
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


McGILL. JAMES
McGILL. JAMES, farmer. Sec. 32. P.O. White Hall. Was born in Ireland in 1836. He was married Sept. 17, 1867, to Miss Nancy Heading, born Oct. 7, 1846. They have four children: Charles E.. born March 1, 1868; Minnie E., born Jan. 28, 1871; Mary A., born Sept. 28, 1873; Sarah J., born Feb. 5, 1876. He came to this country while quite young; has been twice back to the old country to see his relations. He is renting and living on land on south side of Long Lake, south of C. & A. R. R. He has traveled very extensively over the United States, having been in almost every State of the Union
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 617(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


McGLASHAN MATTHEW
McGLASHAN MATTHEW, blacksmith and wagon maker, residence Jalappa. Matthew McGlashan is a native of Ohio, and was born in 1822; the second child of James and Phoebe McGlashan. He passed many years of his life upon a farm, although the head of the family was by trade a carder and weaver. On attaining his majority, the subject of our notice became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and wagon maker. Becoming a journeyman workman, he became a resident of various points in the Union, eventually settling in what is now the village of Jalappa, where he was the first permanent settler; he was afterward married to Miss Emily Irwin, a daughter of Isaac and Rachel Irwin. Mr. McGlashan concluding to make of Jalappa a permanent abiding place, erected the blacksmith shop where he now holds forth, and here he has hammered away, while emigration has tended westward, and added materially toward his present prosperity. Of this marriage twelve children were born, five of whom are living: Clarissa L., Jas. F., Wm. L., Cora M., and Geo. W.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 739(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McKABNEY JAMES
McKABNEY JAMES, farmer and stock-raiser. Sec. 17, P.O. Kane. Mr. McKabney is a native of Ireland, born in 1820. In his native land he followed agricultural pursuits, and on attaining his 25th year, he united his fortunes to Miss Mary Forsythe. It was during the year 1850, that Mr. McKabney crossed the Atlantic for the New World, landing in Philadelphia on the 15th day of April, 1850. Remaining some five years, he removed with his family to the West, locating, after some time spent in traveling, in Greene County, where he first worked by the month for Samuel Armstrong. The following year he rented property, and continued to do so for a period of twelve years, when he purchased the property he now owns, consisting of 120 acres of valuable land. During the Summer of 1876, Mrs. McKabney was laid at rest in the cemetery designated as Kane, leaving to the care of her husband two children, Rebecca and Samuel
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 739(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McMAHON DANIEL
McMAHON DANIEL, saloon, Wrightsville. Born in Tipperary County, Ireland, Oct. 20, 1852; His father's name was Cornelius, and his mother's maiden name, Bridget Flemming. His father being in humble circumstances, Daniel was not sent to school; at the age of 15, he left the parental roof, to shape out his own fortune—began working for the farmers, at which he continued until he attained his 19th year, when he became satisfied that America would afford him better opportunities than the Emerald Isle, so, on April 14, 1871, he embarked for this country, landing in New York ten days afterward, stopped a short time in the city, then visited several Eastern cities; came to this State and visited his uncle, John McMahon, at White Hall; worked by the month for Adam Keohm and Thomas English, and Mr. Datty, on Apple Creek, two years; rented land on Mrs. Ryan's place, and subsequent to this he engaged to clerk for John English, at Wrightsville, at which he continued until he embarked in the business which he is now engaged. Has recently built him a very substantial brick building. Is unmarried, and is a sound Democrat
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 635-6(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McMICHAEL J. H.
McMICHAEL J. H. carpenter. Sec. 12, P.O. Fayette, was born in Walton County, Ga., Feb. 10, 1834; was the youngest child of a family of eight children born of William and Lucy M. The former was born in Virginia, and the latter in Georgia. At the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to learn the carriage maker's trade, which he completed at the time he was of age. On Dec. 24, 1857, he was married to M. B. Miller, daughter of Oliver Miller. They have had five children: William O., born in Jacksonville, Ala., April 19, 1860; John H., born at Cross Plains, Ala., April 16, 1862; Carrie M., born at Carlinville, Ill., June 3, 1863; Mary A., born at Athensville, Ill., Jan. 11, 1866; Emma M., born at Fayette, Ill., Jan. 21, 1877. In the Fall of 1864; Mr. McMichael loaded up all of his personal effects, which consisted of a feather bed, on an old wagon, and drove to Rome, Ga., where he took the train for this State. The war going on at the time, all of his property was destroyed, and he was left without any thing. Gen. Sherman once pitched his tent on his place, making it headquarters for a time. Upon his arrival in this State, he first located in Macoupin, then in Athensville, and finally in Fayette, where he has since remained. Mr McMichael's father served in the War of 1812. The subject of this sketch has for several years past worked at the carpenter trade. He now has a good home and pleasant family about him, and is highly respected in the community in which he resides
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 685(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


McNAMARA ANTONY
McNAMARA ANTONY, farmer, Sec. 20, P.O. Berdan, was born in Mayo County, Ireland, March 15, 1816. Came to Charleston, S. C, and has been in various localities from the time he first came, up to the date of his settlement upon the section on which he now resides; was engaged during the several years in railroading, being employed as foreman on different roads. In the year 1859, he located on the tract of land he now owns, and has, since that time, been identified with the interests of the county. On Nov. 15, 1855, was married to Elizabeth McFadden, by which marriage they have one child, William, born Dec. 7, 1857, in Batt County, Ky. Mr. McNamara owns 137 acres of land, which he has earned by "hard knocks," and expects to spend his days there, and enjoy the fruits of his past labors in peace and quietness
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 636(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McPHERRON AMOS
McPHERRON AMOS, farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Carrollton. Among those who are identified with the interests of the county, there are none in this township, coming at the time he did, that are now living on the same ground they entered. He came to this State in the year 1828, and bought a man's claim, and when the land came in market he entered it, and has since remained on it. He was born in Knox County, Tenn., Sept. 22, 1796; there were thirteen children in the family, born of Samuel and Elizabeth McPherron, who were natives of Virginia. At the age of 23 he was married to Hettie Morris; their marriage was celebrated in September, 1819; remained at home with his father a short time, then moved to Clinch River; remained there seven years, then made the trip in a wagon to this country. They have had ten children, six of them now living: Samuel, William, James, Henry, Hester Ann, and Eliza Adaline. William and Henry are in Texas, Samuel in Missouri, James near Carrollton; the two girls are in Macoupin County. Dec. 20, 1842, he lost his wife, and in August, 1843, was married to Mrs. Elizabeth Meldruni; by this marriage they have had two children: Margaret, born July 13, 1844, now the wife of James Hawkins; Charles W., born July 31, 1S46, now living on the farm. Amos McPherron is now 82 years of age, and is remarkably well preserved, and enjoys good health, and seems likely to live many years yet; has been a long-life Democrat; has been a member of the M. E. Church for over sixty years; has never taken any active part in politics but "votes straight." In brief, Mr. McPherron is one of the oldest, and there are none either young or old who are more highly respected than he; has long been identified with the interests of the county, and well deserving of the esteem with which he is held
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 711-2(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


McPHERSON JAMES
McPHERSON JAMES, farmer. Sec. 34, P.O. Athensville. Son of Patrick McPherson, who was born in Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, landing in New Orleans, but came direct to this country about forty years ago and engaged in farming, and continued to reside in this county until his death, which occurred June 17, 1877. He was married to Johanna Driscoll, born in Ireland by which union nine children were born, of which James, the subject of this sketch, was the second son, and was born May 14, 1847; married Sept. 19, 1869, to Catherine Craven, born in Greene County June 7, 1848. This union has been blessed by four children, two only of whom are living, viz. ; James P., born Nov. 2, 1870, and Julia C, born Aug. 13, 1874. Mr. McPherson has resided in this county all his life, and devoted himself solely to farming; homestead consists of forty acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 607(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


McQUERREY JOHN
McQUERREY JOHN, farmer. Sec. 9-15, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Garrett County, Ky., June 28, 1841; born of Joseph and Rachel McQuerrey; had very poor advantages in his youth. At the age of sixteen he ran away from home in com pany with William Stanton, of Carrollton and came to this county on foot; was at one time four days on the road and had but one meal in the time, and from Alton to Carrollton without anything to eat; he remained there two years; helped to burn the brick now in Pierson's bank building; returned to Kentucky a short time before the breaking out of the war; though of Southern birth, yet he was loyal to the Union cause, and at the outbreak of the war enlisted in the Home Guards, and was in the twelve month's service, and was on duty at Cumberland Gap; then went into the 7th Volunteer Cavalry, and served until the close of the war, and was in all the battles that the regiment participated in, and was always at the front; had two brothers in service with him; all were fortunate and returned home in possession of life and limb; in the Fall of 1866, he returned to this county, and began work in good earnest; on Dec. 29, 1866, he was married to Sarah J. Cooley, born in Kentucky, Aug. 5,1851. They have five children: Oscar, born Aug. 11, 1868; Avery, born Feb. 7, 1870; Effie, born Oct. 21, 1871; Neice, born April 17, 1874; Golden, born Feb. 21, 1876. When he began renting, had nothing but his team and willing hands; soon bought 22 acres of land; two years afterward bought 40 more; subsequently bought 80 acres of Wm. Cannedy, then 40 acres of S. Lemasters, and March 2, 1877, bought the Jackson farm, Sec. 9, and now has 309 acres of land in all. This be has attained by his own industry and good management
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 685-6(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MEEK MRS. JANE
MEEK MRS. JANE, Sec. 34. P.O. Carrollton, was married to John M. Meek April 6, 1849, who was born Nov. 23, 1823, in Greene Co., Ill., died July 19, 1876, leaving nine children, all of whom are living, six boys and three girls: James W., born Jan. 19, 1850; John H., born June 2, 1852; Anna E., born Sept. 2, 1854; Thos. M., born March 14, 1857; Robert M., born May II, 1859; Rufus H., born Oct. 4, 1861; Benjamin F., born Aug. 17, 1864; S. J., born Feb. 23, 1867; Caroline H., born Feb. 23, 1869. Mrs. Meek owns 240 acres of land; it is cultivated by her sons
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 648(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MEISTER DANIEL
MEISTER DANIEL, farmer. Sec. 31, P.O. Berdan. Born in Germany in 1835; came to this country at an early age; since been a resident of the county. In 1861 he enlisted in the 1st Missouri cavalry, Co. F, and participated in several hard fought battles. Pea Ridge, Corinth, Murfreesboro, and others during the Atlanta campaign; received several wounds as an evidence of his bravery and fidelity as a soldier, having lost one finger, and was shot in the leg; was in the service three years, and served his country faithfully, and received an honorable discharge. In June 25, 1871, was married to Ann Spare, had three children, but one now living, Sarah, born Aug. 10, 1873; now lives with her grand-parents, Elias and Sarah Meister. Was married second time on Easter day, 1874, to Meinn Anderson; have had two children, but one now living, Jacob, born Nov. 12, 1874. Mr. Meister has 40 acres of land, and is comfortably situated in life
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 636(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MEISTER ELIAS
MEISTER ELIAS, farmer, Sec. 29. P.O. Berdan, was born July 20, 1813, near Spaer, Rhine Falls, Germany; was married at the age of 23, to Sarah B. Bauman, born March 31, 1814. They have had six children, four boys and two girls, viz: John, born Sept. 8, 1837; Daniel, born Sept. 8, 1837—twins; George, born March 27, 1839; Jacob, born May 13, 1840; Sarah B., born Sept. 16, 1847; Elizabeth, born Jan. 3, 1853. Mr. Meister emigrated to this country in 1847, came to Alton first, remained one year, then came to this county, where he rented land for a term of years, and accumulated money to buy 320 acres, upon which he now lives; has raised a family that are an honor to him, being reckoned among the reliable men of the country, and excellent farmers. Mr. Meister and wife are now living in the enjoyment of their health, and have their children settled about them. John, being a bachelor, remains with his parents, and has charge of the farm
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 636(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MEISTER GEORGE
MEISTER GEORGE, farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Berdan. Born in Germany, March 27, 1839. At an early age he emigrated to this State, in company with his parents, and since 1872 has lived on the place he now occupies. In 1864 was mustered into the United States service, in Co. H, 144th Regiment Ill. S. V., where he served his country until mustered out in 1865. In July 6, 1874, was married to Josephine Darr, a native of this State, born Feb. 24, 1850, and have had three children, viz: Hattie E., born June 6, 1873; Elias, born Sept. 7, 1875; George, born Nov. 11, 1876. Mr. Meister has a farm of 80 acres, which, though small, is a model for neatness and order; and what may be said of him as regards his ability to conduct a farm, may be said of all the family of Meisters, who are truly model farmers,
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 636(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MEISTER JACOB
MEISTER JACOB, farmer, Sec. 29, P.O. Berdan, was born in Germany, May 13, 1840, and while quite young he emigrated to this country with his parents, and has since been a resident of the county, for about 31 years. In Jan. 23, 1877, he was married to Miss Louisa Schutz, born July 29, 1854, at Schutz's Mills. They have had two children, one of whom is now living, Lena, born Oct. 5, 1878. Mr. Meister is now engaged in farming pursuits, is settled on the home farm, and hopes, by rigid economy and patient industry to acquire a competence for himself and family, and leave behind him a character worthy of the emulation of his posterity
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 636-7(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MILLER ADAM E. M.D.
MILLER ADAM E. M. D., P. O. Rockbridge, was born in Cherokee County, Ala., Dec. 11, 1844; is the seventh child of a family of fourteen children; born of Oliver and Rebecca Miller. They emigrated to this State in 1857, and located in Perry County; the Doctor received the rudiments of his education at the district school, then attended Shurtleff College two years, taking the scientific and select course; he having a desire to study medicine attended Rush Medical College until graduation, which dates Feb. 3, 1866; he then came to Sheffield, where he engaged in the practice of medicine, and has since continued. In 1875, he built a fine store building and started in the dry goods business, in connection with J. Keeley, which enterprise is a success; the Doctor has a good practice, and is making a success. In May 16, 1876, was married to Geneve Ludwig, who was born in Fremont, Ohio, Feb. 15, 1853; they have had two children, but one now living—Neva, born June 24, 1878. The Doctor is Democratic in sentiment, and of the staunchest kind; he is now W. M. of Sheffield Lodge A. F. and A, M., No. 678
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 686(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MILLER ANSON
MILLER ANSON, farmer. Sec. 21, P. O. Greenfield. Mr. Miller moved to this State as early as 1818, in company with his parents, who came from Kentucky when Anson was about four years of age, he being born March 10, 1814; they located at Kincaid's Point, town 10, range 10; during his youth he thinks he attended the first school that was taught in this township; did not attend but about two years, all put together; after he was grown he contracted with John W. Hewitt three years, and in consideration of these services he was to receive two months' schooling, his clothes, and $100 in money, which contract was fully complied with by both parties. Mr. Miller was married Jan. 7, 1841, to Rebecca Mitchell; had one child, but died soon, his wife dying Sept. 9, 1843. He was married the second time to Mrs. Mary Allen, born Jan. 22, 1845, in Madison County. Mrs. Miller had five children by her first husband: Sarah C, born Dec. 10, 1847, since the wife of Elias Crane, died in February, 1875; Andrew M., born May 1, 1849; now in Kansas. In the year 1871, Mr. and Mrs. Miller moved to Kansas; remained three years, and then returned; they are not satisfied, and will probably return as soon as circumstances will permit; they are now living at their home, three miles south of Greenfield. Mr. Miller and wife are members of the United Brethren Church. Mr. M. is very retiring in his nature, and has never sought publicity; has been long known by the people of this community, and respected by all who have known him
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 686(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MILLER JAMES N. M.D.
MILLER JAMES N. M. D. Sec. 13, P.O. Fayette. The Doctor was born in Galesville, Cherokee County, Ala., May 17, 1841; he was the fifth child of a family of ten children, born of Oliver and Rebecca Miller; they were natives of Tennessee; the former was born in 1810, and the latter two years later. In the Spring of 1858, the family moved to Perry County, this State, remaining there until the year 1862, when they moved to Macoupin County, and there lived until he died, which occurred Feb. 22, 1873; he was an old-time Mason, and was buried at Carlinville with Masonic honors; his wife is still living, and is with her son, Adam, who resides at Sheffield, this county. The Doctor, James N., after leaving the district school, attended the McKendree College, and, having a desire to fit himself for the practice of medicine, entered Rush Medical College, where he remained until graduation. In 1862, he went to Camp Butler, and was appointed as 1st Assistant Surgeon; receiving his commission as such, soon started South, and was assigned to the Gulf Department, 13th Army Corps; was mustered out July 4, 1865, and returned home to Macoupin County. On Feb. 3, was married to Eliza Edmondson, daughter of William F. Edmondson, now residing in Missouri. Eliza was born Nov. 8, 1848; four children have blessed their union: John C, born March 16, 1868, died Nov. 23, 1870; William O., born Sept. 13, 1870; Adam E., born Sept. 14, 1874, died Aug. 24, 1877; James E., born Sept. 27, 1878. Oct. 8, 1865, the Doctor moved to Fayette, and engaged in the practice of medicine, which he has since continued, and is successful, and has a good practice; and his ability as a practitioner is unquestioned, and he possesses all those characteristics that pertain to a true and cultured gentleman, and has the confidence and esteem of the community in which he resides
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 686-7(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MILLER JOHN G.
MILLER JOHN G. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 12, P. O. Fayette, is a brother of James N., and son of Oliver and Rebecca Miller; John was born in Cherokee County, Ala., Dec. 11, 1843; his parents emigrated to Perry County, this State, and finally located in Macoupin; he was fourteen years of age when his parents moved to this State, he remaining with them until he attained his twenty-second year; his advantages as regards education were very limited indeed, his education being of a practical nature; attended a nine months, term at Alton; was married Feb. 1, 1866 to Emily P. Pervis; but little is known of her ancestry, she being an orphan; she dates her birth Jan. 26, 1846. They have had five children; four are living: Adam O., born Jan. 5, 1867; John C, born Dec. 15. 1869; Rebecca A., born May 14, 1873; James M., Sept., 1876. After his marriage he located in Macoupin County; remained four years, moved to Greene, staid two years, then returned to Macoupin, was there one year, then back again to Greene, where he has since continued; he is now engaged in farming and trading in stock for the last twelve years, beginning with $35; he not only has retained it, but added largely to it, being a successful business man, and is one of those men that is square in his dealing, and is above a mean act. He is a member of Fayette Lodge, 107, A. F. and A. M.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 687(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MILLION MARCUS W.
MILLION MARCUS W. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 15, P.O. Greenfield, Ill., was born in Stafford County, Vermont, in 1817; his father, Elijah Million, was a native of Vermont, living there till 1823, then moved to Kentucky, remaining there till 1830, then came to Illinois; was married in Vermont to Elizabeth Jemison; was in the Black Hawk War in 1832; was a carpenter by trade, but followed the occupation of a farmer most of his life; died in Greene County in 1875, his wife dying a few days previous to his death. The subject of this sketch was thirteen years of age when he came to Illinois; was married at the age of twenty-four, in 1842, to Miss Mary Drum, who was born March, 1817, in Madison County, Ill.; by this union eleven children, six living: Larenia, Hester A., Emma, Tempy, Eliza, Eleanor, and five dead: Lucean, Mary, Eliza, and two infants. Mr. Million's farm consists of 200 acres of well improved land, which he has made by his own exertions
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 624(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MILNES JOSEPH
MILNES JOSEPH, stock buyer and shipper; r S. Main St. Joseph Milnes is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born in 1841; he was in his sixth year when his parents crossed the ocean, eventually locating north of the present city of Carrollton, on farm property, where our subject remained until attaining his majority, the Rebellion then breaking out he enlisted in Co. G. 91st Ill. Inft. for three years service. When the war closed Mr. M. returned to Greene Co. where he followed agricultural pursuits on his farm east of Berdan until embarking in his present occupation of stock buyer and shipper. In addition to this branch of business Mr. M. is at the present writing a member of the firm of Lakin & Co.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


MINER EDWARD
MINER EDWARD, Deputy County Clerk, Carrollton, Ill. The subject of our notice is a native of Jersey ville, Jersey Co., Ill. born in 1835; he was the oldest of a family of seven children; some history will here be found necessary of the parents. Nathaniel Miner, the head of the family, was a native of Vermont, born in 1801, a resident of Vermont many years. In an early day he moved to the West, locating in Greene County in 1834, that part afterwards a part of Jersey County; he married at White Hall, Miss Louisa Jackson. As he is still a resident of Jerseyville engaged in agriculture, we now follow the fortunes of the gentleman who heads this sketch; who grew to manhood in Jersey County, where he received a very liberal education; on attaining his majority he proceeded to Carlinville, Macoupin County, where he entered into a mercantile business; this not proving remunerative, at the expiration of two years he abandoned this calling and turned his attention to farming, following this occupation for some time; he again returned to Jerseyville where he assumed the editorial dutiesof the Jerseyville Republican, as local editor he conducted this enterprise with marked ability. During the Spring of 1874 Mr. Miner concluded to cast his lot among the people of Carrollton and took possession of the Carrollton Patriot, its, former proprietor having signally failed to bring the paper up to any thing like a general circulation. To the trying task of resuscitating this waning sheet Mr. M. bent all the energies of his nature; that he succeeded admirably is well known to the people of the county. As further notice in reference to Mr. Miner's editorial duties we now state that he disposed of his interest to Mr. C. L. Clapp, the present proprietor of this live western paper. During the year '77, when Mr. L. R. Lakin was re-elected Clerk of the County Mr. Miner became his able deputy. In 1861 he united his fortunes to Miss Ella VanArsdale, a daughter of W. H. VanArsdale, by whom he has four children : James E., Nettie S., Willie and Lucy
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488-9(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


MITCHELL W. M.
MITCHELL W. M. farmer, Sec. 7, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch is a native of Nottinghamshire, England, born Dec. 12, 1824. He was the eldest of a family of seven children born of Wm. and Mary M.; her maiden name was Mathews. At the age of 13 he was thrown upon his own resources, and as a result he was deprived of any educational advantages. He began work at first among the farmers, at which he continued until the year 1849, when he was united in marriage to Ann Piatt, born April 27, 1822; their marriage was celebrated May 16, 1849. They have had eight children, but three now living: George, born 1850; Mary E., born Sept. 5, 1852, now the wife of George Dodson; Hattie, born May 24, 1857, now the wife of Samuel T. Slone; George was born in England, the remaining ones in this country. April 24, 1850, he bid adieu to his native shore and sailed for this country, arriving in New York just one month later. Upon his arrival to this State he began work with a resolution that he would have a home some day; he first worked out by the month, at which he continued some time; then he rented land several years, and by hard work and economy he finally accumulated enough to buy him 120 acres of land, which he now owns, and has since been engaged in farming pursuits. He has now excellent buildings, and is in easy circumstances, having acquired it all by his own industry and the assistance of his faithful wife
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 712(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MOLLOY C
MOLLOY C, saloon, East Railroad Street, Roodhouse. Mr. Molloy is a native of Kings County, Ireland; born in the year 1834; his father was a farmer in good circumstances and in the little Green isle by the seashore young Molloy spent a number of years, working on the old homestead. In his eighteenth year he embarked on board a sailing vessel bound for America; landing in New York City, he then made his way to New Jersey, thence to Kentucky. During the year 1870 Mr. Molloy came to Roodhouse; it was then a very small hamlet. His enterprise and forethought led him to build the first dwelling house in the town limits. As one of the earliest, residents of Roodhouse due notice will be given of Mr. Molloy in the general history of this volume. In 1861 he was united in marriage to Miss J. Maguire, by whom he had three children: Charles F., now attending college, M. J. and Mary L.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 573-4(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


MONTGOMERY ANDREW
MONTGOMERY ANDREW, farmer. Sec. 33, P.O. Rockbridge, was born Oct 8, 1816, in Antrim County, on "Erin's Green Isle," son of Andrew and Rosine Montgomery; her maiden name was Kelley, both of whom died when he was quite young. June 14, 1831, he, in company with his grandparents, set sail for America in a sailing vessel, which trip occupied thirteen weeks and three days, landing at St. Andrews, thence they went to Pittsburg, where he remained six years. At the age of fourteen was apprenticed to learn the shoemaker's trade; after its completion worked in Cincinnati, Louisville, Rising Sun, and various other places; in 1841 went to Indianapolis and worked as journeyman for Adam Knodle twenty-two years; May 12, 1847, enlisted in Company D, 4th Indiana Regiment, under Col. Gorman, and went to the Mexican war; received his discharge in July, 1848; after which he returned to Indianapolis and resumed his trade; Oct., 1849, was married to Mary Ann Keller, born in the city of Westhaven, Hesse Darmstadt, Oct. 18, 1818, who emigrated to this country in 1839. She is a sister of Mr. Peter Achenbach, of this township. After their marriage remained in Indianapolis; Mr. Montgomery and wife being very frugal and industrious, bought them a home, which they brought to such a state of improvement that when they concluded to come here to this State it brought them the nice sum of $14,000. September, 1876, came to Rockbridge and bought the property they now occupy, which they have built up and improved to its present condition. They have no children, but have raised a niece of Mrs. Montgomery's, Maggie, who lives with them; she was born while crossing the ocean, Sept. 18, 1861. Mr. Montgomery is a man that attends to his own affairs; very quiet and retiring in his nature, and a good citizen, and highly respected in the community
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 687-8(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MOORE J. R.
MOORE J. R. blacksmith, Sec. 12, P.O. Fayette, was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina, March 27, 1827; was the son of Alexander and Ann Moore, her maiden name was Ryan. The former is of English, and the latter of German extraction. They are native born Carolinians, and are still living. J. R. was raised as a farmer. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, is now a pensioner. At the age of twenty-one, J. R. started out for himself, learning the trade of a carriage-smith; worked at several places: Lincoln, Yorkville, Shelbyville and in South Carolina, Cherokee County, Alabama, and various localities. In April, 1855, was married to Lucian Miller, daughter of Oliver Miller; she was born Nov. 3, 1835. They have had five children, three of whom are living: Rosa B., born April 19, 1857; Anna L., born Aug. 23, 1863; Josephine R., born March 11, 1869. After his marriage worked at his trade at Galesville, Ala., for eight years. A short time before the war he made a trip to Perry County, remained a short time, returned and moved his family in the Fall of 1864 to Perry County, where he remained twelve years. In May 10, 1877, moved to Fayette, Greene County, where he has since lived, and is now engaged in general smith work. Is a member of the U. Baptist Church, and is striving to live a Christian life. Is also a member of Lamaroa Lodge 207, A. F. and A. M. During his short sojourn here he has established himself in business, and is esteemed by all who know him
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 688(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MOORE W. J.
MOORE W. J. blacksmith. Sec. 30, P.O. Rockbridge. Mr. Moore was born north of Greenfield, June 14, 1835; is the third child of a family of eight children, born of Langston and Sarah Moore; her name was Melton before being married. They came from Tennessee in 1831. She was born in North Carolina, and husband in Virginia. W. J. remained with his parents until he was twenty-three years of age, being engaged in the meantime with his father in farming pursuits, and attending the common district school. At the age of twenty-three he started out on his own account; first began farming, which he continued for two years, during which time he was married to Susan J. Dixon, born June 16, 1840. She is a daughter of Solomon Dixon, of eastern nativity. Their marriage was celebrated Nov. 26, 1858; six children have been born unto them, but three are now living: Andrew W.; born May 12, 1860; Elsie Loreine, born Dec. 15, 1870; Clyde, born May 19, 1876. Aug. 6, 1862, he enlisted in the 91st Regt. Ill. State Vols., Co. K, where he remained until the expiration of the war, when he received his discharge July 28, 1865. Upon his return home he began working at his trade, which he had previously learned before his entry in the army. He was five years in Macoupin County, then came to Rockbridge and has since continued at the same; has a healthy trade; is a member of the Knights of Honor, Lodge 1017
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 688(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MORFOOT JOHN F.
MORFOOT JOHN F. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 3, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch is not only among the earlier settlers of Greene Co., but takes rank as one of its wealthier residents; a native of England; he was born in 1818; two years later his parents, John and Elizabeth, crossed the Atlantic for America, remaining during the Winter at East. St. Louis; the following year locating in Greene Co., on the farm now owned by the subject of this sketch; it was during the year 1832 that the head of this exceedingly prosperous family was laid at rest in Greene Co.; his wife, who survived him many years, died in 1874, a notable type of the pioneer woman who worked with unremitting energy toward the general prosperity of the family. John, who heads this sketch, had but little on attaining his majority; had but scanty capital, but he set resolutely to work to acquire wealth and position; how well he has succeeded in life is well known to his many friends in this community; in connection with other near relatives he is the owner of a vast tract of land and a handsome farm residence, a monument as it were to the industrious habits of this prominent family
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 520(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MORLAND H. J.
MORLAND H. J. retired merchant. The subject of our notice, although now retired from active business, was formerly an extensive merchant of White Hall, and as such is worthy of more than a passing notice. Henry J. Morland was born in Tennessee, in 1816. He was quite young when he moved with a family to Louisville, Ky., where he passed the days of his early youth, becoming regularly apprenticed to the trade of a carpenter; for some time he worked as a journeyman on the completion of this vocation. Removing to St. Louis, Mo., he followed the same calling, until his removal to Booneville, Mo., in 1840, where he united his fortunes to Miss Martha A. Ferguson, a daughter of Benjamin Ferguson, of Maryland. In 1843 Mr. M. proceeded to Greene County, locating at White Hall, where for a number of years he worked as his trade. In 1849 he crossed the plains for California. At a place called Bidwell's Bar, on Feather River, he became a dealer in provisions and breadstuffs. In 1852 he took passage on board a steamer bound for New Orleans, reaching the Crescent City in due time. From here he made his way to Mason County, thence to White Hall, where, shortly afterward, he embarked in the mercantile business. As a merchant he became more than ordinarily successful, and now rests in affluence from his labors, at his home in White Hall
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 533(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


MORRIS JAMES
MORRIS JAMES, farmer. Sec. 22, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Morris was born in Morgan County, near Alexander, in 1849, the second child of Nehemiah and Matilda Morris, natives of Ohio and Illinois. Nearly all his life Mr. Morris has been a farmer. April, 1875, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Smith, a daughter of Isaac Smith, a wealthy farmer of this county. There are two children: Essie and Grace. During the present year he has rented farm property of Dr. Allen, where lie has entered actively into the manufacture of sorghum molasses. This finds ready sale, the supply not being equal to the demand; 100 gallons being manufactured daily. The cane crusher and evaporater is constructed on the most approved plan, and customers are not kept long in waiting
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 592-3(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


MORRIS LORENZO D.
MORRIS LORENZO D. retired farmer, residence Carrollton; was born in Virginia in 1805; growing to manhood on the old homestead, he received a liberal education; in 1826 he worked in the lead mines of Galena; in 1831 he became a permanent resident of Greene County; November 3d of same year, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Witt, a daughter of Ely Witt, one of the earliest settlers of Greene County, Mr. Morris had purchased a tract of 80 acres, on which he built a log cabin. This 80 is now included in the magnificent property of Mr. Morris comprising 500 acres. Mrs. Morris was born in East Tennessee, March 28,1812, and departed this life March 28, 1842, leaving to the care of her husband four children, John, George, Martha G. and Ely. Dec. 21, 1842, Mr. Morris was married to Miss Mahala Conlee, by whom he had 12 children, five living: Wellington, James, Edward S., Henrietta, and Mary E. Mrs. Morris was born November 23, 1823, and died in 1872. July 21, 1873, Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah Ann Witt, relict of Harrison Witt, and daughter of Nathaniel Scroggins. We now draw to a close in this brief outline of a life not devoid of interest. We have endeavored to show what energy, pluck and enterprise can accomplish. Mr. Morris has witnessed many vast changes in the West, and now, after many years of usefulness, has retired from active labor
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 489(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


MORRIS MARIA MRS.
MORRIS MARIA MRS. Sec. 26, P.O. Kane. Mrs. Morris is a native of Illinois, born at Rock Island in 1836; her parents Medad and Amelia Lyman were, years prior to this, residents of Greene County, and the year 1839 found them again residents of the place; we have only space to say that the lady above mentioned was married to Isaac Oliver; he was a native of Ohio; this marriage occurring in Scott County. Mr. Oliver was a wagonmaker by occupation, and while engaged in this vocation the war broke out, enlisting at the first call for volunteers, he remained until the close of the rebellion; the life of a soldier had undermined his health, and shortly after the war closed he passed quietly away finding a last resting place in Macoupin County. Of the marriage six children were born, one of whom, Mary, is the only one living at this date; in 1868 Mrs. M. was married to James Redding, a native of Michigan, who died in 1871; in 1872, Mrs, M. was united in marriage to Marvel Morris a native of Tennessee, who became a resident of Greene County, locating west of Kane in 1829, and in 1834 located on the farm property, now owned by Mrs. Morris; he passed away to that world of spirits to which we all are tending, February, 1876, leaving to care of his wife two children, Freeman and Rosa M. The estate comprises 160 acres, Mrs. Morris is the owner of 120
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 758(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MORROW JESSE
MORROW JESSE, retired miller, Sec. 26, P.O. Athensville. Born in North Carolina Aug. 4, 1 8 12, and removed to this State in the Fall of 1819, settling within the limits afterward contained in Greene County; he may thus be regarded as one of the earliest settlers, and one closely identified with this county's growth and development; married Nov. 19, 1836, to Margerie, daughter of 'Squire Allen, of Greene County, born Dec. 17, 1817. This union was blessed by two children, viz.: Marshall, born April 28, 1838, and Martha Jane, born June 28, 1840, died Aug. 5, 1864. Mrs. Morrow died Aug. 6, 1842. Mr. M. married again Nov. 19, 1845, to Elvira, daughter of Charles and Mary Bradshaw, Greene County, born Feb. 22, 1821. By this union eleven children were born, seven of whom are living, viz.: Alex R., born Aug. 27, 1846; George W., Feb. 9, 1851; Sarah Ann, Nov. 14, 1852; Nancy E., Nov. 10, 1854; John B., July 26, 1856; Zac. D., Sept. 15, 1838; and Oliver A., April 29, 1863. Their mother died March 5, 1866. Mr. M. married his third wife Dec. 27, 1868, Miss Nancy Nettles, Greene County, born Dec. 7, 1828. Mr. Morrow, during the greater part of his active life, has been engaged in the milling business, having first bought the old Ruyle mill nearly forty years ago; he has been retired from active business about ten years. He held various positions of trust, such as county treasurer, superintendent, justice of the peace, etc., etc., ever discharging his duties satisfactorily and with honor. Mr. M. recalls with vivid recollections many incidents of early settlers' life, having come here when this country was the hunting grounds of the Indians. He is now spending his declining years in ease, surrounded by his numerous family
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 608(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MORROW MARSHALL W.
MORROW MARSHALL W. (Morrow Bros.), miller, Athensville, eldest son of Jesse Morrow, born Greene County, April 28, 1838; married Nov. 2, 1865, to Elizabeth E., daughter of Benjamin and Lucinda Scott, Greene Co., born Feb. 22, 1839. This union has been blessed by one child, viz.: Benjamin F., born Feb. 22, 1869. Mr. Morrow commenced business as miller about twenty years ago, on Apple Creek, but in 1862 he went to California, and operated a quartz mill in Nevada for about two years; he then returned to this county and, in company with his brother, built a grist mill at Athensville. This enterprise has proved very successful, fast gaining patronage from a large area of surrounding country, due to the skill, perseverance, and integrity of its management. In 1869 this mill was destroyed by fire, was rebuilt on the same site on a larger scale the following year, containing all the modern improvements and appliances essential to a first-class mill. On their commencement of business the brothers had but little capital, and assumed considerable indebtedness, but by untiring industry and honesty in their dealings, they have surmounted all obstacles, and are now in possession of a fair allowance of this world's goods, with an increasing patronage and reputation
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 608(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


MURPHY L. C
MURPHY L. C manufacturer of stone ware for the past six years, at White Hall. Was born at Utica, New York State, July 12, 1846. When but four years old his parents moved to Chicago, and from there to Sheffield, Bureau County. The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Road had then been completed but one year, and but very little improvements had taken place in the county. The family afterward moved to Galva, Henry County, where he died. In his sixteenth year, the subject of this sketch was attending the High School at Galesburg; this was in 1860; one year later he enlisted as a soldier in Co. H,65th Ill. Inf.; he remained with the regiment three years, and became a sergeant-major; captured at Harper's Ferry; he was sent to Chicago, thence to East Tennessee; a participant in the siege of Knoxville; with Sherman from Kingston to beyond Atlanta; engaged in nearly all the principal battles of the war; honorably discharged in 1865; he returned to Galva, where he became a railroad contractor; in 1873 he came to White Hall as a permanent resident, entering into the manufacture of pottery ware with Charles B. Ebey, afterward admitting as a partner E. M. Bates, who retired two years ago, September, 1872. Mr. Murphy was married to Miss Anna Ebey; three children—Harry, Nettie, and Gertrude
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 533(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


MURRAY A. W. REV.
MURRAY A. W. REV. farmer and pastor M. E. Church of Barrow, was born in Monroe Co., Ill., March, 1821; while still a youth, his mother died; at seventeen, he concluded to go it on his own hook, so to speak, and accordingly made his way to Greene Co., locating near what is now the flourishing town of Roodhouse, procuring board with Thos. Thompson; for some time he worked as a farm hand; January, 1842, he was married to Miss Amelia Watson, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Watson; for a period of years he rented land, and then entered 80 acres. Mrs. Murray died in 1857, the family, on the decease of the mother, consisting of four children: Thomas J., Elizabeth, James, and George; in 1858, Mr. Murray was united in marriage to Miss Delila Thompson, a daughter of Thomas Thompson, of this county; there were two children born of this marriage: Elihu W., and Mason L.; after a residence of thirty-five years in Greene County, moved to Macoupin Co., where he owns 8 acres of land; for many years he has been pastor of the M. E. Church of Barrow
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 558(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


MYTINGER & HUSTED
MYTINGER & HUSTED, dealers in drugs, groceries, etc., etc. The above enterprising firm began business last Spring, and have already built up an important trade. The senior member, F. M. Mytinger, was born December 31, 1841, oldest son of John and Lucretia Mytinger. At an early age he became a resident of Greene County, where he completed his education; for seven years he served as clerk for the old established house of Dr. J. N. Israel; on leaving his old employer, he entered into a copartnership business with L. Oswald, remaining some five years. His next partner was Mr. O. J. Husted, a native of this county, and a live, wide-awake man. Mr. Mytinger was married to Miss Elizabeth Ayres, a daughter of Daniel Ayres, of Morgan County; six children were born of this marriage : Nora D., Katy L., Frances E., Albertus E., Frederick A., and Gracie. Mr. M. entered the service of the U. S. May, 1861, enlisting in Co. D, 14th Ill. Infantry, and became engaged in many battles; honorably discharged from this company on account of ill health; he afterward enlisted in Co. C, 61st Ill. Infantry, and toward the close of the Rebellion ranked as adjutant of the regiment through meritorious conduct
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 533-4(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt