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NESBIT ARCHIBALD
NESBIT ARCHIBALD, bakery and grocery. Main street. White Hall, Ill. Mr. Nesbit came to White Hall but a short time ago, but in that time has built up a large trade through his known skill and industry. He was born in the north of Ireland, April, 1835. The reader would, no doubt, from this statement, come to the conclusion that he was of Celtic origin. This is not the case, however, as his father was a Scotchman, while his mother was an English lady. After this necessary description, we now take up the thread of our discourse. At a youthful age young Nesbit left the home of his forefathers, and crossing the Atlantic landed in New York City, where he became apprenticed to the trade of a baker; he became a journeyman workman, and at the end of eight years moved to Litchfield Hill, Conn., where he took charge of a cracker bakery. From this point he went to Chicago, becoming foreman in a similar establishment. Going to Bloomington, he again superintended a large establishment; he then bought out a man by the name of Harvey, who owned a bakery, and for two years met with flattering success. This was destroyed in the big fire that devastated Bloomington, and he accordingly moved to Atlanta, Logan County, Ill.; in 1862 he went to Oregon, thence to California; stopping but a short time, came East to New York, thence to Monmouth, Ill. Ten years ago he came to White Hall, where he has a large run of custom in a first-class bakery. July 16, 1856, Mr. Nesbit was married to Miss Anna Andrews, a native of Norway
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 534(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


NETTLES WILLIAM
NETTLES WILLIAM, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 26, P.O. White Hall, is one of the oldest citizens of Greene Co., and one whose life has been characterized by more than ordinary energy. Born in Pennsylvania, January 10, 1794. In the old settled State of Pennsylvania he grew to manhood and there married Miss Margaret Branyn. He followed the occupations of carpenter and farmer until 1837, when he moved to Ohio. Three years later he came to Greene Co., and located in township 12, range 11, where he purchased land. Like nearly all who sought a home in Illinois, Mr. Nettles worked early and late to provide the necessities of life for his growing family. After many years he is now the owner of a valuable tract of land. At the ripe age of eighty-five years he quietly rests from the labors that marked his earliest years. Of nine children born of this marriage seven are living: Ross, Agnes, Eliza Anne, Sarah, Margaret, William H. and Joshua T.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 593(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


NETTLES WILLIAM H.
NETTLES WILLIAM H. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. I, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Nettles is the youngest son now living of William and Margaret Nettles. He was born in Greene County, on the 24th of January, 1845. Following farming from his earliest years, in 1871 he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Martin, a daughter of James and Hannah Martin. Of the children, Daisy E., Joshua C and James, whose voices once rang through the household, none are left to gladden the hearts of the bereaved parents. William Nettles is one of the most energetic men in Greene County, where he owns a valuable farm of 126 acres (township 12, range 11)
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 593(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


NIXON SIMON
NIXON SIMON, farmer, Sec. 32, P.O. Athensville; born in North Carolina, June 1, 1817, and came to this State when only seventeen years old; married July 4, 1838, to Lucy Jane, daughter of John and Lucy Patten, born Kentucky, Oct. 9, 1819; this union has been blessed by seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: John, born Aug. 29, 1839; Sallie J., Aug. 8, 1841; Samuel, Feb. 18, 1845, and Daniel S., Jan. 29, 1848. Mr. Nixon's father entered and bought land on their first arrival here, all of which is still in possession of the family. Mr. N. has been a farmer all his life, and has assisted by his labor and industry in the improvements of Greene Co. Homestead consists of 180 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 608-9(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


NORRIS EDWIN
NORRIS EDWIN, farmer, Sec. 21, P. O. Athensville; born in Greene Co., within half a mile of his present residence; son of Wm. Norris, who was born in Tennessee, and was one of the earliest settlers of this State; he died in 1848; Mr. Norris married Jan. 8, 1858, to Priscella Flemming, of Greene County, born Sept. 25, 1840; this union has been blessed by eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Marion, Jan. 3, 1859; Deborah, Jan. 1, 1866; Mary Ann, Dec. 15, 1867; Emma J., Feb. 13, 1872; Fannie F., Nov. 13, 1874, and Lizzie, Jan. 12, 1876. Mr. N. enlisted Aug. 1862, in Co. G, 102d I.V.I., and served in the Department of the Gulf, participating in the battles of Parker's Cross Roads, Nashville, Fort Blakely, etc., etc., and was mustered out at close of war. Since his return home Mr. N. has devoted his industries to agricultural pursuits; homestead consists of 100 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 609(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


NORRIS WILLIAM F.
NORRIS WILLIAM F. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 2, P.O. Greenfield, was born in 1842, in Greene Co., Ill.; is the son of Alexander Norris, who was born in Indiana, in 1820, came to Illinois in an early day, was married twice, first in 1841, to Rachel Noble, who was born in 1820, and died in 1854; Mr. Norris married again, in 1859, to Mary Pickard; four children by his first marriage, and two by his last. The subject of this sketch is the son of the first marriage; was married in 1867 to Nancy E. Bilderback, who was born in Blunt Co., East Tennessee; have six children: Olivia (deceased), Ada, Newton, Luther, Minnie, and Marshall. Mr. Norris owns So acres of land; was in the late rebellion; enlisted Aug. 14th, as private in Co. C, 124th Ill. Infantry, was in the battle of Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Jackson, and siege of Vicksburg; mustered out Aug. 19, 1865, at Camp Douglas, Chicago
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 624(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


NORTH MARCUS
NORTH MARCUS, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 8, P.O. White Hall, was born Nov. 1, 1854, in Greene Co., Ill.; was married to Martha Baldwin, daughter of F. M, Baldwin, April 18, 1876, who was born March 31, 1858; have one child, Walter F., born May 21, 1877. The father of the subject of this sketch was born, 1825, in Greene Co., Ill., and died Nov. 24, 1854; was married to Elizabeth Wales in 1850, as near as can be ascertained, who was born in 1832, in Vermont. Mr. North owns 175 acres of fine farming land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 648(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


NULTON COL. J. B.
NULTON COL. J. B. retired grain buyer, is a native of Washington County, Ohio; born in 1835. Of his parents it will be well to enter into a short description: Jacob Nulton, the father df our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, where he followed agricultural pursuits. In an early day he moved to Ohio, where he also engaged in farming, and while here a resident, formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Parmelia Cheedle, by whom he had 11 children, of whom Col. N. was the youngest, whose fortunes we now follow. In early life he followed agricultural pursuits, while a resident of Greene County, the family having emigrated here in 1843. When the war of the Rebellion came on, Col. Nulton disposed of his farm property, and was commissioned by Gov. Richard Yates Captain of Co. G, 61st Illinois Infantry. Marching from Illinois into Missouri, a temporary halt was made at St. Louis, from which city the company proceeded to Pittsburg Landing; assigned to Gen. Prentice's division; this company was the first under fire from the enemy. Col. Nulton became the participant in many important battles, and received the promotion of Major after the engagement of Little Rock, and when the noted battle of Murphreesboro drew to a close, through meritorious conduct, Col. Nulton was promoted Colonel of the 61st regiment, succeeding Col. Jacob Fry, mustered out. At the close of the war he returned to Greene County, locating at Carrollton, where he received the appointment of Deputy Revenue Assessor. Serving in this capacity two years, he entered into partnership with R. H. Davis, in the transaction of a grain business, controlling a larger trade than any other similar firm in the county. During this time, date 1872, Col. N. was elected to the House of Representatives, 39th District, serving one term. On his return from the Legislature he again entered the grain trade, but discontinued this in 1875. September, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Sieverling a daughter of H. C. Sieverling, whose biography appears elsewhere. Of this marriage two children were born, Guy, deceased, and Nettie
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 489-90(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


O'GORMAN TIMOTHY
O'GORMAN TIMOTHY, of the firm of Teter, O'Gorman & Co. mnfrs. and dealers in flower pots, vases, hanging baskets, and all kinds of terra cotta ware. The subject of this biography was born at Springfield, Illinois. Sept. 2, 1854. Mr. O'Gorman settled in White Hall in 1860, where he learned the trade of a potter, first working as a journeyman for John N. Ebey, one of the pioneers in the stone ware and pottery business. Mr. O'Gorman is a practical workman, understands every detail of his business, and lately entering into a co-partnership business with Mr. Teter, the above firm (Messrs, Teter & O'Gorman, successors to Wilcox, Teter & Co.), are now prepared to do as good work in their line as can be obtained anywhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 534(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


ORERBREY JEFFERSON
ORERBREY JEFFERSON, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 30, P.O. White Hall. The above named gentleman was born in Greene County in 1833, the fifth of a family of ten children. His father, Archibald Orerbrey, was a native of North Carolina, who moved to Tennessee and there married Miss Sarah Barnard. The date of the family settlement in Greene Co. was probably 1828, when the prairies for many miles remained unbroken and from the door step of his father's cabin young Orerbrey was wont to watch with childish glee the graceful flight of vast herds of deer as they disported themselves on the prairie, or became lost to view among the timber. Mr. Orerbrey relates that during his earliest years the county was but thinly populated. At intervals in the timber was seen the pioneer's cabin, as few settlers had then ventured on the prairie. Jefferson was married in 1863 to Miss Emma Clark, a daughter of Ira Clark. By this lady he had two children: James Ira and Ida May. September 1859 Mrs. Orerbrey departed this life. Mr. O. is a resident of township 12, range 11, and there owns farm property. Like nearly all who bear the name his generosity and kindness of heart is Unbounded
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 593(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


ORR WM. D.
ORR WM. D. farmer, Sec. 17, P.O. Breese, and Bedford, Pike Co., Ill. He was born in Ohio, Oct. 17, 1835. He came to Pike County, Ill., with his parents in the Fall of 1839, 3.nd to this county in 1867. His father was born in Pennsylvania in 1806, and is living in Pike Co., Ill. His mother was born in Ohio in 1821, and is also living. He was married Feb. 7, 1861, to Mary E. Hubbs, daughter of Simeon E. and Hannah Hubbs, of Pike Co., Ill. She was born in Pike Co., Ill, April 14, 1843. They have five children living, and five deceased: Hannah A., born Oct. 2, 1861; James E., born Feb. 16, 1863, died September, 1870; Florence J., born Feb. 11i, 1866; William H., born Aug. 26, 1867; Leonard D., born July 19, 1873; Clifford J., born September, 1875, died September, 1876; Amos Sylvester, born Dec. 13, 1877. Mrs. Orr's father was born in New Jersey, May 17, 1793, died in Pike Co., Ill., September, 1871. Her mother was also born in New Jersey, Nov. 1, 1799, and died in Pike Co., Ill., July 10, 1851. Mr. Orr owns 80 acres land in Sec. 9, and rents 130 acres in Sec. 17
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 617(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


ORR WILLIAM L.
ORR WILLIAM L. abstract expert, residence North Main Street, east of Square. W. L. Orr is a native of Washington County, Pa., and was born in 1832. In an early day he moved to Wheeling, West Virginia, where our subject passed his early years, and received a liberal education, by diligent study in the public schools. On leaving the school room he looked about him for a profession or trade that would prove a source of income. Proceeding to Sligo, in his native State of Pennsylvania, he became apprenticed to the trade of machinist and engineer. For this vocation he developed an aptitude that marked his entire subsequent career; as a mechanic earning the reputation of acquiring a better knowledge of mechanics than the general run of aspirants, and on serving his apprenticeship secured employment as engineer on the steamer Josephine, plying between Pittsburg and Cincinnati. For nine years his home was on the Mississippi River, where he served through all the grades of engineering, to a high position. On quitting the river packets he made his way to St. Louis, where he became employed in various establishments, subsequently proceeding to Beardstown and Alton. While quietly pursuing his vocation here the war of the Rebellion came on, when he took an active part in the transferring of arms to the State Arsenal at Springfield; afterwards tendering his services to the Navy Department, he was assigned to duty as a commissioned engineer on board the gunboats Tyler and Pittsburg. Remaining in the service of Uncle Sam until 1866, he returned to Alton, where he remained until his removal to Carrollton, in 1867, where he engaged, first as clerk, and subsequently embarked in the mercantile business. As a Mason Mr. Orr takes a leading position, ranking as an officer in the Grand Chapter. He is well known for his kindly disposition, liberality, and his temperate habits of life tend to a hearty vigor that has made him a great lover of field sports, in which he has developed a skill that has made his name a familiar one in Southern Illinois
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 490(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


OSBORN R. M.
OSBORN R. M. farmer and merchant. Robert Osborn, the only merchant in the township 9, range 11, is a native of Kentucky, and was born in 1831, where he grew to manhood, early becoming inured to farm work. In 1849 he was married in Tennessee to Miss Eliza Clemmons, who was born in Kentucky. When the war came on he entered the service of the U. S., enlisting in the 22d Kentucky Regt. for three years service. A captain of State militia during the war, he officiated in various capacities, as orderly sergeant and deputy U. S. marshal; was engaged in various battles; taken prisoner on several occasions; at one time captured by guerrillas, he was sentenced to be shot, but escaped through the intervention of U. S. officers. March, 1864, his family had become residents of Indiana, owing to the troublesome times, and there, after the war, Mr. O. himself resided for a period of eighteen months; from Indiana removed to Macoupin County, Ill., where he remained one year, when he moved to Greene County, locating in town 9, range 11, where he transacts a good business as a grocer, and engages somewhat in agricultural pursuits. Of the marriage above referred to, six children were born: Martha, Sarah, Wm. B.. Mary Ann, U. S. Grant, and Radford N.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 740(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


OSBORNE M. L. MRS.
OSBORNE M. L. MRS. Among the many enterprises that have sprung into existence in the city of Carrollton, is the New York Store, conducted by Mrs. M. L. Osborne; but a few months ago Mrs. Osborne became established in business here, but during this brief time has built a large and constantly increasing trade in millinery and fancy goods, ribbons, flowers, feathers, gloves, ladies' furnishing goods, etc., etc.; west of Square. A notable feature of this already well and favorably known establishment is the five cent department, where a variety of articles are retailed for the small sum of five cents that anywhere else would be retailed for from 25 cents to one dollar. A visit to Mrs. Osborne's will well repay the customer, who can not complain of either styles or prices. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 490-91(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


OSWALD & COMPANY
OSWALD & COMPANY, dealers in groceries, drugs, hardware, queensware, etc. Mr. Oswald is one of the shrewd, honorable businessmen of White Hall, and in connection with his enterprising partner, Mr. Loehnstein, transacts a large business. Mr. Oswald was born in Germany, in 1839; at sixteen years of age he emigrated to America; from the city of New York he made his way to Pennsylvania, and with light capital and an enterprise far beyond his years, he began the selling of goods from house to house. From Pennsylvania he made his way to Illinois, locating near Peoria, taking up his old occupation; making considerable money for a time, he became a farmer; in 1862 he enlisted in Co. I, 91st Ill. Infantry, and became a participant in many important engagements; honorably discharged on the close of the war, he returned to Greene County; in 1860 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Moore, a daughter of Wm. Moore, by whom he had eight children, four of whom are living: William, Herman, Lena, and Ettie. Mrs. Oswald died during the present year; an estimable lady, her death was universally regretted by all who knew her. Ten years ago Mr. Oswald came to White Hall; he had but small capital, but he had pluck and energy, perseverance and honesty of purpose; these traits of character have carried him successfully through life
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 534-5(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


OVERBY DRURY
OVERBY DRURY, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Greenfield, born Aug. 31, 1814; his father, Nicholas Overby, was born March 2, 1776, in Virginia; was married to Elizabeth McKiney, a native of North Carolina; the family lived in Tennessee till December, 1829, then emigrated to Illinois, and stopped in Sangamon Co., near Springfield, and rented land; made a crop the Summer before the deep snow; was in the war of 1812; was at New Orleans at the time of the battle there, but was sick at the time, and did not participate in the battle; died in Illinois, September 6, 1857, at the age of eighty-two; his wife died in 1841 in Greene County. The subject of this sketch was married Dec. 24, 1835, to Sallie Scott, the daughter of Welcome and Elizabeth Scott, was born March 22, 1815; have nine children, seven living; Louisa J., born Oct. 7, 1836; Martha L., born June 8, 1838; Julia A., born July 5, 1840; Mississippi, born April 8, 1843; Elizabeth V., born Dec. 7, 1845, died Oct. 5, 1865; Louisiana, born April 17, 1848; Henry E., born Dec. 3, 1853; Lenda J., born Aug. 3, 1856; William T., born Dec. 25, 1860. Mr. Overby, at the age of twenty, entered land from the Government, entering 40 acres at a time, till he accumulated 140 acres, which he still owns
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 624-5(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


OVERBY WILLIAM A.
OVERBY WILLIAM A. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 21, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Tennessee, in 1844; came to Illinois in 1855; was married in 1870 to Miss Gilley C. Drum, who was born in Greene County, in 1853. They have four children, two living: Etsle, born Jan. 15, 1874, Leroy, born Feb. 23, 1878, and two dead: Pearly, born Feb. 8, 1872, and infant, born July 6, 1876. The father of the subject of this sketch, William Overby, was a native of Tennessee; was married to Maria Surles, also a native of Tennessee. The family came to Alton, Illinois, in 1855, and the father died a short time after landing, and the widowed mother was left with a family of five children, the oldest one being twelve years of age. She died in Dewitt County, Ill., in 1874
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 625(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


OWENS B. W.
OWENS B. W. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 15, P.O. Carrollton; the above named gentleman was born in the State of Tennessee, January 21, 1844; left an orphan at the early age of six years, adopted by his grandfather, who came west in 1854, settling in Greene County, where the youth grew to mature years. In 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Cavanaugh, a daughter of Dr. T. H. Cavanaugh, a prominent physician of this State, and father of T. H. Cavanaugh, Secretary of the State of Kansas; by this lady he had six children, four of whom are living : Charles, Nettie, Benjamin, and William
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 521(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PAGE, ELISHA B.
Benson County (ND) can boast some of the most beautiful as well as the most valuable estates in North Dakota, and among these none is more deserving of mention than that of the gentleman of whom this article is written. Mr. Page has one of the most pleasantly situated homes in Benson county, his residence being located on section II. of Leeds township.
Elisha B. Page was born in Greene county, Illinois, September 22, 1866. He was the eldest of seven children born to Elisha W. and Anna Williams Page, both residents of Girard, Illinois, where the early boyhood of our subject was spent and where he worked on the farm and attended the country schools until he was sixteen years of age.
He then spent one year in the Hibbard, Bryant & Stratton Commercial School and then was employed two years in a commission house in St. Louis, where he had charge of the shipping department. He spent the winter of 1878 in Alabama and in the spring of 1888 he came to Dakota, arriving at Church's Ferry April 4, with a party of about fifteen members. A heavy snow lay on the ground and as there was no shelter for the stock Mr. Page was compelled to tramp seven miles and shovel out an old barn to pass the night in. At that time he was the owner of two mules, one horse, an old binder, a wagon and seventy-five dollars in money. He located a pre-emption claim on section 1 and a school mate, William S. Fox, settled on land near by. Mr. Page built a shanty, 12x16 feet, and for over three years served himself as cook and housekeeper. In 1890 he moved his shanty on his homestead to the site of his present residence.
His first three seasons were disastrous and the winter of 1890-91 found him without money. Having taken up engineering in his early days, he now went to Minot, where he soon found employment, and having saved a little money he returned to his farm in the spring of 1891, determined to make a final effort. He put in two hundred acres of wheat and from this harvested six thousand bushels, which he sold at seventy-two cents per bushel. During the fall he followed threshing and this, with his crop, put him on his feet again financially. He has followed threshing each fall in Benson county and has found it profitable.
He has from time to time added to his land holdings and now is the owner of eleven hundred and twenty acres, one thousand of which is cultivated annually. His barn, 42x100 feet, with stone basement, affords shelter for his stock and storage for two hundred and forty tons of hay and is one of the finest buildings of the kind in the county. He has an elevator on his farm, erected in 1898, with a capacity of fifteen thousand bushels, equipped with modern machinery, gasoline engine, dump and loading bin, feed and cleaning mill, etc. His residence is protected by one of the finest groves in the northwest, upon which he has bestowed much care.
Mr. Page was married, in 1891, to Miss Birdie Atkins, and to this union three children have been born, namely - Laura W., Elisha H. and Walter St. C.
In politics Mr. Page is a Democrat. He has taken an active interest in public matters and wielded an influence in local affairs, although the Democrats are in the minority in Benson county.
Mr. Page is a member of the Presbyterian church and a Master Mason.

[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Dena Whitesell]


PARKER THOMAS S.
PARKER THOMAS S. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 14, P. O. Kane. Thomas S. Parker one of those whole souled gentleman, with whom it is a pleasure to meet, was born in Hampshire County, West Virginia, on the 28th of February, 1837; his father Jacob W. Parker was also a Virginian, a weaver by trade, he is described as a man extremely fond of traversing the forest in search of game; it is quite probable that he heard many glowing accounts of the West. Illinois was then settling up quite rapidly and thither the Virginian directed his footsteps during the Autumn of 1837; from Wheeling, Va., he embarked with his family on board a steamboat, and floated down the Ohio to its confluence with the Mississippi River, from the city of St. Louis his course lay up the Illinois River, and eventually he made his way to Greene County; he now found himself the possessor of some $5 in money, and realized that he had a large family of children that were to be clothed and provided for with the necessaries of life; he now set to work with a will and became moderately successful in life; living at a time when land rose rapidly in value he never attained that wealth that fell to the lot of many who studied the financial question more closely; he died at an advanced age, and his ashes repose in the cemetery situated in township 9, range 12. Mrs. Parker departed this life many years prior to her husband. Henry L. Parker, a prominent farmer of Greene County, and Thomas, from whom this sketch is obtained, are the only survivors of the family; as we have seen Thomas was quite young when his parents moved to Greene County, and here the youth grew to manhood, obtaining a liberal education in districts schools, he applied himself in subsequent years to the manifold duties appertaining to the farm; at the present writing he is the owner of 385 acres of valuable land in this township; March, 1878, he was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Gilliland, a daughter of Robert Gilliland, one of the older residents of the county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 758-9(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PARKER W. B.
PARKER W. B. dealer in groceries, queensware, glassware, woodenware, etc. William B. Parker, from whom this sketch is obtained, is the leading grocer of Kane. As related elswhere, this place was platted and founded as a town in 1865. Mr. Parker has transacted business only for the short space of two years, but during this time has built up, through his business tact and honorable dealing, a successful trade. Mr Parker is the only son of William P. Parker, deceased, a native of West Virginia, where he was born March 31, 1799. On his removal to Pennsylvania, having arrived at mature years, he was married to Miss Maria Backman; in 1848 he purchased property in Greene County, where some years later he settled upon a farm some four miles northwest of Kane, where he has since followed farming, and has also been extensively engaged as a stock raiser, ranking among the more prosperous farmers of Greene County. He is the owner of 473 acres of land that will compare favorably with any in the west. The subject of this sketch was born in Greene County in 1850, but passed his early years in Pennsylvania; in 1860, becoming a resident of Greene, where he received a liberal education; while the war was in progress he devoted his time to farming, his first business venture being made at Kane. Mr. Parker is married, having united his fortunes to Miss Fannie Tolman
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 740(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


PARKS JOHN CAPT.
PARKS JOHN CAPT. farmer and school teacher, Sec. 10, P.O. Greenfield, is the son of J. C. C. Parks, who was born in Tennessee, in 1802; was married, Oct. 22, 1833, to Minerva Yarnell, who was born in 1804. They came to Greene County, Ill., a few days after their marriage, and entered land from the government, and had accumulated, at his death, 646 acres; died March 4, 1874. His land was left to George and John Parks. The mother lives at the age of seventy-four, and is living with her sons. John was in the late rebellion; enlisted Aug. 7,, 1862, as private, and was elected sergeant and filled all the promotions of that office, except the fifth, then was commissioned as first lieutenant, filling that office a short time, then was commissioned as captain, which he filled till his discharge, which was July 28, 1865; participated in several battles. George Parks was married, in 1871, to Sarah J. Mason; have three children: Elmer W., Lulia E., Victor A.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 625(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


PATTERSON J. L.
PATTERSON J. L., attorney and counselor at law. The subject of this sketch is the second child of Lemuel J. and Anna E. Patterson, who deserve more than a passing notice. Settling in this county as early as 1844; the head of the family was born in St. Louis County, Missouri, he there married the lady referred to above. He became in after years a prominent man in this county. Of seven children born of this marriage all are residents of Greene County, of whom due notice will be given- J. L. was born August 29, 1846, in St. Louis County, Missouri. In early childhood his parents moved to Greene County, where he became liberally educated, applying himself vigorously to his studies and became a school teacher. In his eighteenth year he became a law student, studying under judges of Carrollton. Remaining five years, he became admitted to the bar in 1870. Previous to this he married Miss Mary Willmington, a daughter of Edwin Willmington, a native of England. Mr. Patterson became a successful lawyer, and an able one. A life-long resident of Greene County, he has held many important positions; deputy assessor nine years. In 1876 was chairman Democratic Congressional Convention. For the past year a resident of the live town of Roodhouse, where he receives, due his ability, a large share of public patronage there. Two children: Buell and Harry
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 574(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


PATTERSON L. J.
PATTERSON L. J. was born in St. Louis Co., Mo., June 19, 1816; resided till the Fall of 1843; married Miss A. E. Hume; moved to Greene Co., Ill., 1844, and in company with A. S. Seeley and George Schulz leased of John Coates the David Hodges mill on Hurricane Creek, and started a steam distillery, the first in the county, and a great novelty at the time; bought thousands of bushels of corn at 10 cents per but; ran it till the Spring of 1849, and sold out his interest to Geo. Schutz; moved to Wilmington and engaged in the mercantile business; was elected justice of the peace that Fall, served six years, and in 1856 was elected sheriff; served two years, living in Carrollton; 1858 had to discharge one of the most disagreeable tasks, that of hanging Hall and Goffner, for the killing of Curren Hinton; he then moved to his farm near Wilmington; in 1862 was appointed government inspector, and in the Fall of 1864 was elected one of the county judges of Greene County for four years; in 1860 was appointed postmaster at Breese, in Greene County; held the office ever since. Has a family of four boys and three girls, all living in the county and doing well
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 558-9(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PATTERSON T. S.
PATTERSON T. S. farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Athensville; born Madison Co., Ky., March 25, 1812; removed to this State in 1832, and settled in this county in Spring of 1836, where he has resided ever since; married Oct. 19, 1837. to Mary Wood, of Carrollton; this union was blessed by eight sons and seven daughters, eleven of whom are living. Mrs. Patterson died Sept. 9. 1868, aged forty-eight years. Mr. P. married again Aug. 20, 1872, to Sarah Jane Florence, born Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Sept. 23, 1838; two children have been born of this union, viz.: Perry Florence, July 9, 1874, and Laura Almeda, Oct. 7, 1876. Mr. Patterson has been a prominent business man in Athensville; he kept the leading grocery and general store for twenty years, was justice of the peace and postmaster for many years, and has always been a zealous Republican; he retired from active business about two years ago, and now devotes his attention to the direction of affairs on his farm, which consists of 283 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 609(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


PEPPERDINE BROTHERS: John and M. T.
PEPPERDINE BROTHERS. John and M. T. Sewer pipe, drain tile, and fire brick, factory Sec. 26, P.O. Athensville. John Pepperdine was born Aug. 2, 1849, at White Hall; married Oct. 11, 1871, to Miss Anna Athey, of Pittsfield, Pike Co.; this union has been blessed by four children, viz.: Lawrence C, Henry D., Earl and Pearl (twins). M. T. Pepperdine was born at Exeter, Scott Co., July 18, 1850; married Nov. 18, 1877, to Mollie E., daughter of William and Louisa Ballard, Greene Co. Pepperdine Bros, are engaged in the manufacture of drain tile and fire brick; they have all the facilities and practical knowledge necessary to ensure the production of a very superior article; they guarantee their tiles to be made of the best material; a full stock in all varieties and sizes constantly on hand and for sale at the lowest possible rates
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 609(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


PERLEY HENRY P.
PERLEY HENRY P. engineer C. & A. R. R. for the past eleven years; was born at Waterville, Maine, in 1841; at fourteen he entered the employ of the Androscoggin and Kennebec R. W. Co., afterward known as the Maine Central, remaining there through the years '59, '60 and '61; during the Spring of 1861 he enlisted in Company G, 3d Maine Infantry, under the command of Col. O. O. Howard; a participant in the famous battle of Bull Run; he served three months and received an honorable discharge from the service; he returned to Maine, where he again entered the employ of the Maine Central as a locomotive fireman on the Kennebec Road and became a very skillful engineer. In 1867 Mr. Perley came west and entered the employ of the St. Louis, Jacksonville & Chicago Railroad, afterward leased to the C. & A.E.R. On this road Mr. Perley was freight engineer one year. In 1868 he took up his residence at Mason City, Mason Co., Ill.; in 1871 moved to Jacksonville, where he run passenger engine No. 42; in 1872 he was running a passenger between Alton and Jacksonville; moving to Roodhouse, then just beginning to come into prominence, Mr. Perley shortly after built a substantial dwelling. He is well known for his generosity and is a very superior mechanic. April 24, 1863, he was united in marriage to Ann E. Morrill, of Maine, There are five children: John M, George P., Henry W., Anna R. and Francis C. As a railroad engineer Mr. Perley has been the actor of many stirring scenes, although owing to his skill as an engineer but very slight accidents have occurred on his route. Mr. Perley owns 80 acres of land in Kansas
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 574(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


PERRINE ISAAC N.
PERRINE ISAAC N. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Perrine is a native of New Jersey, born in 1844. In his ninth year, his parents, Joseph and Margaret Perrine, emigrated to the west, locating in Greene County, remained one year; moved to Sangamon County; resided in Springfield two years when they returned to Greene County, where Joseph Perrine passed the remainder of his life. He merited the respect of his many friends in this community, was a native of New Jersey, born in 1815. In 1851 he married Miss Margaret Myers, who with her children resides in township 12, range 11, where the subject of this sketch owns 100 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 593(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


PERRY AUGUSTIN T.
PERRY AUGUSTIN T. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 36, P.O. Kane. Augustin Perry takes a leading position among the wealthy men of Greene County; he was born in Christian County, Kentucky, on the 23d of December, 1829 His father, familiarly known as Col. N. M. Perry, to the residents of Greene County, where he removed in 1836, was a native of Orange County, Virginia, born November 30, 1806, and is the sixth of eight children of James and Ann Perry, who were of English descent. Passing briefly by the early years of James Perry, spent amid pioneer associations, we arrive at the year of 1776, when it became necessary for America to throw off the yoke of British tyranny. In that struggle for liberty, James Perry took an active part, and became a participant in many of the more noted battles of the Continental war. Honorably discharged at its close, he returned to the pursuits of husbandry. He was among the leading planters in the county in which he resided; he died in Virginia, in 1815,and three years later, in 1818, Mrs. Perry removed with her children to Christian County, Kentucky; her death occurred at the residence of her son. Colonel Perry, Greene County, Illinois, on the 7th of October, 1853. Colonel Perry's father having died during his early years, he was measurably thrown upon his own resources. His early culture was pursued in the schools of Kentucky, and by assiduous industry, he was enabled to attain to a thorough knowledge of the solid branches of an English education. Urbane in his manners, he evinced a determined spirit of perseverance, which enabled him to successfully grapple with the practical concerns of life. Completing his education, he was employed to teach a select school, at Nashville, Tennessee. During the Winter of 1828, he was married to Miss Frances A. Tandy, a daughter of Henry Tandy, of Virginia. Shortly after his marriage, he turned his attention to farming, in Kentucky. Four children were born of this marriage. After a sojourn of a few years in Kentucky, he sought broader fields, eventually landing in Greene County. In 1836, he located in the village of Kane, where he destined to play so prominent a part in the developement of the county; in 1837, he engaged in merchandising and farming until 1872. In 1855, he became a partner in a firm to build a steam grist mill, subsequently becoming its sole owner. In 1837 occurred the death of the partner of his youth, a sad stroke to the enterprising pioneer. In 1840, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Hill, daughter of the Rev. William Hill, of Virginia. They had five children, all of whom are living, and all comfortably situated in life. For many years he was a member of the Baptist Church, and an exemplary and honorable member. He was a fair type of the polished Kentuckian, and in the acquisition of his property the most honorable integrity marked his course among the more opulent farmers. His was a generous and liberal nature. In July, 1861, death again invaded his home, and Colonel Perry was called upon to perform the last sad rites for his second wife. In the Fall of 1864, he was nominated and elected, as the candidate of the Democratic party, to a seat in the Illinois Legislature. On the 2d day of October, 1872, he was married to his present wife, Mary, daughter of Martin Bowman, Esq., of Carrollton. October 5, 1875, witnessed the death of Col. Nathaniel Perry, of paralysis, after a life of almost unexampled activity and very unusual success in accomplishing the worldly objects of which he aimed. Through his well directed energy all of his children are well provided for, our subject ranking among the wealthier agriculturists of Greene County, owning the homestead property; he is also the possessor of some 800 acres of valuable land. At onetime in his career his name was put forward for county commissioner; having no ambition, however, in that direction, he declined the office, subsequently filled by John H.Greene
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 759-60(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PETER JOHN S.
PETER JOHN S. farmer and stock raiser. Sec, 34, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Peter has been a resident of Greene County forty-one years; he was the youngest son of John and Sarah Peter, and accompanied them to Madison Co., Ill., near Monticello in 1829, where the family remained two years, and then moved to Greene County, locating on the farm now owned by the subject of this sketch, who received a good common school education, partly under the instructions of L. E. Worcester; in his twenty-fifth year he was married to Miss Susan Culver, a daughter of S. H. Culver; by his father he was deeded an 80 acre tract of prairie and 30 of timber; this he disposed of to Anthony Potts; several years after purchasing the valuable tract he now owns; Mr. Peter once owned a thousand acres in Montgomery County. Feb. 1, 1863, Mrs. Peter departed this life, to the care of the husband nine children were left, six now living; in 1866 Mr. Peter was married to Mrs. Mary Smith, a daughter of Andrew Finley and relict of Jesse Smith, of Upper Alton; Mrs. Peter is the mother of two children by first marriage; the farm property now comprises 140 acres, considerable having been sold; in 1840 Mr. Peter made the brick and helped to build his present residence
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 559(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PEUTER PETER
PEUTER PETER, farmer. Sec. I7 P.O. Greenfield, is a native of County Clare, Ireland, was born 1813, of a family of nine children, born of John and Ann P. Peter remained with his parents until he was thirty years of age, the custom in that country being quite different than here, they generally remain at home until they marry, then they are free. He married Susan Cherry, born March 4, 1820; they have had eleven children, eight of them now living: Pat. born Jan. 29, 1848; John, born Aug. 10, 1849; Ann, born Nov. 2, 1852; Michael, born Dec. 10, 1854; Kate, born Aug. 10, 1S56; James, born Aug. 1, 1862; Thomas, born Sept. 10, 1864; Mary, born June II, 1867. In 1857, he emigrated to this country, landed at Quebec, came to Buffalo by the lake route; began working on the railroad with his shovel, and with it he has dug out for himself a good farm. He has worked on several of the largest roads in the United States, and has been very successful in retaining what he has earned; though it came slowly, yet he plodded on, and with the assistance of his frugal wife, they have now 160 acres of good land, and are comfortably situated in life. Was formerly Democratic, but has recently espoused the Republican principles, yet he is very liberal, takes but little interest in any election, save that of Presidential
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 688-9(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


PIERCE AUGUSTUS
PIERCE AUGUSTUS, manufacturer and dealer in tile and stoneware, pottery east of C, B. & Q. R. R. tracks. Mr. Pierce is the pioneer in the pottery trade of Greene County, having established the first pottery works in the present live town of White Hall; his experience here as a business man, his reliability in all business transactions, is too well known to need mention, and it is only sufficient to relate that his present success as a manufacturer of pottery ware is due to splendid workmanship and unflagging zeal. Augustus Pierce is a native of Wayne County, Ohio, born in 1828, where he grew to manhood and learned the trade of a potter; commencing at the early age of 16, he soon became an adept at his trade. While residing in this county he was married to Miss Margaret T. Routson, by whom he has two children, J. M. and Ada; in 1854, Mr. Pierce moved to Michigan, where he became employed as foreman in a pottery, and also shared in the proceeds of the establishment. During tlie .Spring of 1858, he moved to Greene County, first settling in the farm property owned by Stewart Seeley, afterward removing to White Hall where he has since been identified in the growth and prosperity of the town
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 535(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


PIERSON DAVID
PIERSON DAVID, the pioneer banker, was born in Cazenovia, Madison Co., N. Y., July 9, 1806, and when young received the rudiments of a common school education, but at the age of thirteen removed with his parents, Josiah and Naomi Pierson, to the then far West, arriving at St. Louis on the 3d of June, 1820, and after a short sojourn there moved across into Illinois, near Collinsville, in Madison County. In 1821 his father, Josiah Pierson, died of bilious fever, after an illness of only five days, leaving his widow and a family of five children, three sons and two daughters, in a strange land and among strangers, in rather destitute circumstances; but that God who cares for the widow and the fatherless watched over them, and they found kind, sympathizing friends among those with whom their lot had been cast. After the death of Mr. Pierson the family removed into Greene County, locating two and one half miles north of Carrollton, about the close of the year 1821. In the Spring of 1822 the subject of this sketch was taken sick with chills and fever, which finally terminated in a rheumatic affection and lasted, with more or less severity, for over three years; yet he continued to do such labor as he was able, in clearing up and improving the farm on which they resided, until his health became firm and he was able to do a large amount of labor. In the Spring of 1827, after having got a portion of the farm into a good state of cultivation, he rented it out and went with others to the lead mines near Galena, and engaged in mining, but returned to the farm in the Fall of 1828. living with his mother on the farm until her death, which occurred in September, 1829, and on the 25th day of August, 1830, was married to Miss Eliza Jane Norton (daughter of David Norton, an early settler of Illinois, from Herkimer Co., N. Y.), who has continued the faithful, trusting partner of his joys and sorrows for almost fifty years. Mr. Pierson continued to reside on his farm until the beginning of 1834, when he sold his farm and moved into the village (now City of Carrollton) and commenced merchandising, with a capital of less than $2,000, coming into competition with several experienced merchants, some of whom were worth more than ten times as much as he was, and all of them failed during the hard times from 1838 to 1843, which were the times that tried men's souls as well as their purses. One other firm, that commenced business some two years later than Mr. Pierson (also without a large capital), and himself being the only merchants in the place that went through the great revulsion, that broke ninety per cent of the merchants and nearly all of the State banks in the United States, unscathed —thus illustrating the value of integrity of character. Mr. Pierson has always held that death was preferable to dishonor; has always had decided opinions on all questions where morals was concerned, and been outspoken in their defense. In politics he was from early youth a Clay Whig, advocating protection to the laborer, mechanic and manufacturer; after the disruption of the Whig party he became a Republican, and acted with the Union party during the war of the Rebellion. After the return of prosperity to the country, dating with the high tariff of 1843, Mr. Pierson extended his business operations largely, purchasing hogs, cattle, and grain, sometimes on a large scale; was from 1848 to 1854 the owner of the capital and the leading member in the firm of Mark Pierson & Co. of Alton, who, in addition to a large dry goods trade, did a large business in the purchase and shipment of grain. About the commencement of the year 1854, Mr. Pierson, having an eye on the banking business, closed his connection with the firm of Mark Pierson & Co , and commenced doing a banking business in connection with the dry goods trade. In 1855 his banking business had increased so much that he had procured a new safe, happily just before the night of the third of April, 1855, when a gang of robbers from Calhoun Co. broke into the store, probably hoping to obtain a large amount of gold belonging to the sheriff of the county; but fortunately they were not able to force the safe, and escaped with only about $280, which they found in the desk. Mr. Pierson, after a careful examination of all the facts and circumstances, raised a company of ten men of his true and tried friends, crossed over into Calhoun, and captured the whole gang, five in number, all of which were finally convicted and landed in the penitentiary. It was said by the State's Attorney that he manifested a large amount of skill, not only in capturing the robbers, but in getting them convicted. Mr. Pierson continued his dry goods business, and his miscellaneous trading until the first of January, 1858, when he disposed of the dry goods, and turned his attention exclusively to banking, and in 1859 erected the large and commodious house, which has been occupied by the bank up to the present time; in 1860, having got established in his new and commodious quarters, he advertised his business more largely, and in 1861, notwithstanding nearly every bank in the State failed, he daily received the deposits of merchants and others, carrying his customers safely through the critical period without the loss to them of a single dollar, although at the end of the year the hundreds of thousands of dollars received on deposit, would not have been worth fifty cents to the dollar to the depositors had they kept their own money; and while all, or nearly all, the individual bankers in the country paid off their depositors at a discount, he continued to pay dollar for dollar, and as the broken bank money disappeared and national bank and treasury notes came into use, confidence succeeded the gloom and depression that had overspread the land, his business increased largely, having the confidence of not only the community in which he had so long resided, but that of the merchants and bankers in the neighboring cities, as well as that of the Treasurer of the United States; was appointed special agent for the sale of United States bonds during the time the Government was borrowing money to crush out the rebellion; and while many, who sympathized with the South, opposed and ridiculed the idea of loaning money to the Government to "coerce our Southern brethren," Mr. Pierson succeeded in selling about six hundred thousand dollars in bonds of the different issues, to the citizens of the county, which speaks volumes in his favor, when the large opposition element in the county is taken into view. He was collector of internal revenue for several years, and paid more taxes for the poor than his profits from the office. Remembering the time, when a penniless boy, he worked for one and a half bushels of corn per day, when 20 cents per bushel was the highest price that could be got in trade or store goods for it, and common calico was 37 1/2 cents, and thin domestic 25 cents per yard, salt $2 50 per bushel, sugar 20 cents, and coffee 50 cents per pound, and remembering how long and patiently he had to work before getting a start, he has ever been the friend and helper of the industrious poor. In 1862, Mr. Pierson purchased the Carrollton flouring mill, which he ran with great success for some years, clearing over $22,000 in less than four years; but others (hearing probably of his success) built mills in the city and county, until the competition became so great that nearly every miller in the county, except him, failed, some of them for a large amount. He still owns the mill, which has been quite successful for the last few years. His flour ranks first in market. In 1862-3 he aided in building a woolen factory, which was destroyed by fire (the work of incendiaries), in the Fall of 1872, causing a loss to Mr. Pierson of over $25,000. In May, 1830, Mr. Pierson organized the first total abstinence society (so far as known) in the State of Illinois, with only thirteen members, which prospered amidst the most bitter opposition for over ten years, having over six hundred members, when the " Washingtonians " came into the field and took the place of the first organization. In 1832, Mr. Pierson and wife became members of the Baptist church, and he has rarely been absent from his seat at any of its regular meetings, either on the Sabbath or week days, for nearly forty-seven years, and has always been foremost in his contributions for the support of the minister and other church expenses; and for many years was superintendent of the Sabbath school, and always a constant laborer, and has had the pleasure of seeing near one hundred of the scholars connected with the school make a profession of religion, and some of them have become eminent divines. During his superintendance of the school he made it a point to be punctual in his attendance, and more than five years have elapsed without his missing a single Sunday. When the church was weak, he bore the largest share of the expenses of keep-it up himself; has been noted for his generous and liberal impulses; has contributed liberally for benevolent enterprises or those of a moral or religious character. He aided liberally in the establishment of the Langston school at Holly Springs, Mississippi, for educating the freed men in that State, and in 1872 met, in the National Republican Convention that met in Philadelphia, three freed men who were slaves until freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of the President, and when freed did not know a letter in the alphabet, but after had acquired a good, solid, practical education; and one of them, James Hill has since been Secretary of State in Mississippi, being elected by both parties, and by both whites and blacks. Over 2,000 scholars have been educated at that school, which is still prosperous. In early life Mr. Pierson resolved so to live that no man could truthfully complain of any act of his; and that he would never stoop to contradict a slanders, to which resolves he has adhered through life. In a long life of extensive business transaction, and as president of a bank, doing the largest business of any in the county, it would be indeed a miracle if some offences were not given; and yet he is assured of the respect and confidence of the good men that know him best. And now, taking into view the poor pioneer boy, shivering with chills and fever, in the rough log cabin, partaking of the humble fare of the backwoodsman more than fifty-five years ago, and what he accomplished in life, it can but raise in the estimation of all good men the straightforward principle that has actuated his career as a business man through life. Mr. Pierson's strong traits of character are a steady perseverance in business, honesty of purpose, will and energy in carrying out his aims, generous and liberal in his impulses, always sympathizing with those in trouble, and often making large sacrifices to aid others, in trouble. Such in brief is the narrative of the life and career of one of the oldest citizens of Greene County. By his genial and kind manner he has won the respect and esteem of those who have acted with him in the growth and development of the county for over fifty years. He is ostensibly a self-made man, and needs no eulogy at our hands, as the work of his life speaks, more eloquently for itself
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 491-93(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


PINKERTON ANDREW
PINKERTON ANDREW, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 25, P.O. Berdan, born Dec. 31, 1799, in Kentucky, is one of the oldest settlers of Greene Co.; came in 1820, when he was twenty-one years old, and, like all of those industrious pioneers, has accumulated 200 acres of fine farming land, the most of which he bought from the government, and cleared it by his own industry, and has seen some of the hardships of pioneer life; was married to Ellen Johnson in 1825, in Kentucky. She was born in Kentucky in 1805. Have seven children, four of which are living: Mary J., born June 7, 1826; Catherine R., deceased, born Oct. 17, 1827; James G., born June 6, 1830; Isaac J., deceased, born May 11, 1832; Carrie A., born Nov. 26, 1836; Dicy A., deceased, born March 17, 1839; Eliza E., born Aug. 21 1844
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 649(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PINKERTON J. G.
PINKERTON J. G. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 36, P.O. Berdan, was born, 1830, in Greene Co., Ill.; was married to Martha M. Waltrip in 1853, who was born, 1837, in Greene Co., Ill.; has four children: Abigail, deceased, born May 7, 1855. was married to John L. Good; Sophia, born Feb. 11, 1858; Cordelia, born Sept. 10, 1863; Henry C, born Sept. 10, 1869. The subject of this sketch owns 240 acres of fine farming land, which is under good cultivation and well improved
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 649(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PINKERTON ROBERT B.
PINKERTON ROBERT B. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 36, P.O. Berdan, born Dec. 10, 1848, in Warren Co., Ill.; was married to Naomi Andrews, April 14, 1873, who was born Jan. 10, 1850; have three children: Sarah M., born Nov. 6, 1874; James F., born Dec. 20, 1875; Gracy B., born Sept. 2, 1877. The father of the subject of this sketch was born Sept. 1, 1797, in Rock Bridge, Ver.; he was married twice; the first to Hannah C. Marshall, March 18, 1819; had eleven children by that marriage; after the death of his first wife he was married to Mrs. S. M. Speaks, in 1847; have two children by that marriage. Mr. Pinkerton owns 163 1/2 acres of fine farming land (T11N R12W)
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 649; - transcribed by bmt


PIPER, ISRAEL
Birth: Nov. 29, 1810, St. Clair County, Illinois
Death: Sep. 5, 1850, Greene County, Illinois
Aged 39 Years, 9 Months, 8 Days.
Son of Thomas Piper (1776 - 1843) and Medusa Thomas Mathews (1784 - 1876)
He married Louisa Fair (1816 - 1906) on 29 April 1835 in Greene County, Illinois.
Children: Emily Jane, 1836, John W. (1837 - 1898), William (1839 - 1875), James A (1842 - 1911), Benjamin Franklin (1844 - 1909), George W. (1844 - 1888), Francis M. (1847 - 1923), Samuel M. 1849.

Israel Piper served in the Black Hawk War.
Second Regiment of Gen. Whitesides' Brigade, Second Regiment of Gen. Whitesides' Brigade Company of Capt. Samuel Smith, and also under Lt. Col. Jacob Fry and in Odd Company under Brig. Gen. H. Adkinson.

The first settlement in what is now Rubicon township was made in 1826, by Thomas Piper, a native of Kentucky. From his native state he removed to Indiana in an early day, and resided there until coming to Greene county. He settled on section 10, this township, where he lived until overtaken by the hand of death. He had a wife and five children when he came here.

Israel Piper, a son of Thomas, came with him. He was, at this time, a young man, having been born in 1813, in Kentucky. He helped his father for a time, but in 1833, was united in marriage with Louisa Fair, and started out for himself. He was a resident of this township until his death, which occurred Sept. 5, 1850.
Source: "1885 History of Greene and Jersey Counties" Page 879


PLOGGER T. M.
PLOGGER T. M. farmer. Sec. 28, P.O. Rockbridge. The subject of this sketch is a native of the "Old Dominion," born in Rockbridge County, July 19, 1832; his father's name was John, and his mother's maiden name was Martha Morris. He was the sixth in order of a family of eleven. The force of circumstances were such as to require his services at home during the time he should have been at school, and as a result his education was limited. He remained at home until his twenty-fourth year, at that time he resolved that he would try his fortune in the West, and arrived at Rockbridge Sept. 28, 1857. First hired out to Henry Rainey, and worked about until the year i860, when he farmed on his own account for two years. In Aug. 1862, he enlisted in the 91st Regt. of Illinois State Vols., Co. H, where he served until the close of the war, receiving an honorable discharge. During his term of service he was, in company with his regiment, taken prisoner, and paroled and sent to Benton Barracks; during this time he went home, and while there was united in in matrimony to Mary E. Coonrod, daughter of John and Nancy Coonrod; their marriage was celebrated May 14, 1863. June the i6th, he was exchanged and returned to his regiment. Upon his return from service he bought land of the Coonrod heirs and has since continued at farming, and has now bought out the entire heirs of the estate. Mr. P. lost his wife in Oct. 1872, leaving him three children: Martha V., born Feb. 1867; John H., born Aug. 1869; Chas. F., born Aug. 1871. Sept. 1875, he was married the second time, to Sarah Crawford, they have had one child named Lincoln, born April 2, 1876. Mr. P. is a member of the L E. Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 689(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


POINTER MARTHA MRS.
POINTER MARTHA MRS. farming. Sec. 16, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Garrett County, Kentucky, May 13, 1S34, maiden name was Simms, daughter of Jas. and Mary Simms. At the time and place of Mrs. Pointer's early girlhood she had no advantages that enabled her to secure any thing of an education. In the Winter of 1853, she was united in marriage to James Pointer, a native of Kentucky. They have had seven children, six of them now living, viz.: Robert J., born March 24, 1854; James W., born March 24, 1856; Mary S., born Oct. 30, 1860; Mason, born Feb. 13, 1864; Carrie, born Nov. 13, 1869; Arthur, born Aug. 31, 1871. Oct. 24, 1866, the family came to this county and engaged in farming. Sept. 4, 1874, she lost her husband and has since remained a widow, and with the assistance of her boys she is engaged in farming and endeavoring to keep her family together, which she has succeeded in doing up to the present. Mr. Pointer, before his death, was a member of the Biiptist Church, also a member of the Masonic order, Greenfield Lodge, No. 129
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 689(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


POPE SAMUEL
POPE SAMUEL, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 26, P.O. Kane. Samuel Pope is a native of Somerset County, New Jersey, where he was born on the 16th of July, 1832. Three years later his parents, Samuel and Mary Pope, emigrated to the west, and located at the town of old Kane. His family were the only residents of the place save a man by the name of Adams, who kept a small store and postoffice. The head of the family was born in New Jersey, and early in life became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith. He married in New Jersey Mary Geddes; in the town of old Kane found employment as a blacksmith; made money rapidly, and subsequently became a prosperous farmer, owning some hundreds of acres. In those days considerable emigration poured into the State, Samuel Pope was possessed of a good deal of enterprise, and accordingly built the hotel that swings the huge sign, S. Pope, tavern; the scene of many gatherings of pioneers, trappers, or adventurers. Mr. Pope on the 20th of April, 1846, was laid at rest not far distant from the scenes of his eventful life. Mrs. Pope survived her husband many years, departing this life in 1872. Samuel J. R. Pope, from whom this narrative is obtained, passed his boyhood in Greene County; followed agriculture from his earliest years. When the war broke out he enlisted in Co. C, 122d Ill. Vols., for three years' service, and became a participant in the battles of Tupolo and Paducah, and others of note. Honorably discharged after the close of the rebellion he returned to Greene County, where he has since been identified with the farming interest, and where he married. Miss Elizabeth English, a daughter of Thomas English, a native of Kentucky, by whom he has four children: Geddes, Revel, William J., and Mary. The estate comprises 200 acres of valuable land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 760(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


PORTER WILLIAM A.
PORTER WILLIAM A. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 26, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Porter was born in New Jersey, Feb. 14, 1822; he was the oldest of a family of seven children; at the early age of fourteen he became apprenticed to the trade of a stone mason and plasterer; on completing his trade, for a while he worked at White Hall, and then proceeding to Jacksonville, Morgan County; he there became employed on the State insane asylum, female seminary, and many other buildings of note; removing to Greene County, he was married to Miss Rachel Ann Auten in 1850; in 1846, when war was declared between Mexico and the United States, he enlisted as a soldier in Capt. Fry's company at Carrollton, a participant in the famous battle of Buena Vista; honorably discharged the following year, he returned to Greene County, working at his trade at White Hall, until his location above; on returning from the war, he made his way to Tazewell County, where he entered 160 acres by means of a land warrant for services rendered during the war; he also bought an 80 acre tract, remaining a resident of Tazewell County seventeen years, following the occupation of farming successfully; in 1867, removing to Greene County, he purchased a tract of valuable land near White Hall; at the present writing; owns 240 acres, 160 lying within the corporation of White Hall
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 559(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


POTTS ELAM A.
POTTS ELAM A. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 29, P.O. White Hall. Among the farmers of Greene County Mr. Potts takes a leading position; he is the oldest son of William and Margaret Potts. William Potts was a native of England, who crossed the Atlantic in an early day; he became a resident of Ohio, where he married in 1820; When Illinois was so deep in the wilderness that Chicago was unheard of, and the moccasined foot of the North American Indian trod with independent step the broad unbroken prairies, this family of pioneers made their way to Greene County mostly by river, on a keel boat, settling near what is now Carrollton; land was entered from the government, and soon there nestled amid the tall prairie grass the pioneer's log cabin, where many happy years were spent; Wm. Potts became a successful farmer, who passed away in 1862; Mrs. Potts died in 1871. Elam received a liberal education, and in 1846 was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ann Culver, a daughter of Dr. S, H. Culver; for several years he rented property until able to purchase; he now owns 330 acres, unparalleled in the West, on which he has erected a handsome farm residence; in 1867 Mrs. Potts died, leaving to the care of her husband two children, William H., and Julius E.; the same year Mr. Potts was married to Miss Naomi Zillinger, by whom he has two children: Clarence E.. and Maud E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 559-60(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


POWELL CHARLES M.
POWELL CHARLES M. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 31, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Powell was born in Madison County, Illinois, December 29, 1835. His father was James Powell, a native of Kentucky, who emigrated to Greene County in an early day, where he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Silkwood. He passed away when Charles was but twelve years of age, and but little can now be gleaned relative to his life career in Illinois. Mrs. Powell survived her husband many years. Charles, from whom this sketch is obtained, grew to manhood in Greene Co., plenty of hard work falling to his lot, as his parents' circumstances were limited, and this deprived him of educational advantanges. In 1860 he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Pear, who was born in Greene County. One child, Lorenzo, born of this marriage. Mr. Powell procured his first start in life in the following manner: In an early day, overflowed land on the bottoms was owned by speculators, who were often absent for years. On this land Mr. Powell raised some abundant crops, and made considerable improvements by means of fencing. In a short time so great was his industry that he was enabled to purchase an eighty acre tract of land. He now owns 247 acres which is nearly all under cultivation. Although quite a young man Mr. Powell is among our most substantial farmers, whose energetic nature has conduced very materially toward his present prosperous condition
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 560(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


POWELL. ROBERT
POWELL. ROBERT, farmer, Sec. 35, P.O. White Hall. Was born in this county Oct. 22, 1854. He was married August 8, 1871, to Miss Jennie Overturf, daughter of Andrew Overturf. She was born in the State of Pennsylvania, June 8, 1854. His father, William Powell, was born in this county, and died in January, 1865, at the age of about thirty years. Mr. Powell owns 36 acres of valuable and well improved land. They have three children: Lily G., born July 6, 1872; Mattie L., born August 10, 1875; Robert, born Oct. 21, 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 617(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


PRANT H. A.
PRANT H. A. grocer and tobacconist, north side of Square, Carrollton, Illinois. H. A. Prant is a native of Germany, and was born in 1837; at an early age he developed marked energy of character and accordingly at the age of twelve years he embarked on board a sailing vessel bound for New Orleans. On arriving here, the yellow fever then prevailing, made it incumbent upon the authorities of the city to prevent the departure of any and all passengers, and accordingly the subject of our notice remained there until the quarantine was removed, when he made his way to Memphis, Tenn. Having learned the trade of a tobacconist in Germany he now worked at his trade for a number of years. On leaving Memphis he proceeded to St. Louis where he worked as a journeyman and subsequently as foreman for a manufacturing firm. While a resident here he was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Groffe, a daughter of John Groffe, of Prussia. On leaving St. Louis he went to work at Jacksonville, Morgan County, where he was foreman for a tobacco firm four years, when he took his line of departure for Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill., where he embarked in business for himself; for a period of three years here he prospered, until his property was destroyed by fire in 1863; about 1865 he located at Carrollton, where he at first ventured in the tobacco trade, subsequently adding a stock of groceries. By strict attention to business and honorable dealing he now has a large and increasing trade. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 493-4(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


PRATHER JAMES
PRATHER JAMES, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 25, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Prather was born in Greene County in 183S, youngest child of Edward Prather, who settled in Greene County as early as 1820, when Chicago was so deeply in the wilderness as to be a mere trading, point for trappers or adventurers, and Carrollton a village where one or two log cabins stood. He is now a wealthy farmer, owning some four hundred acres in Greene County. James, in his twenty-first year was married to Miss Julia A. Thompson, a daughter of John B. Thompson, by whom he has five children: Louise, Mary E., Ida B., George R. and Lovell
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 593-4(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


PRATHER JOHN
PRATHER JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 6, P.O. Greenfield, was born Aug. 3, 1820, was married, in 1853, to Sarah Morrow, who was born, in 1825, in North Carolina, have three children: Edward, born May 29, 1854; James, born Oct. 28, 1856; Ann M., born Nov. 11, 1858. The subject of this sketch is the oldest son of Edward Prather, who is one of the oldest settlers of Greene County, Ill.; was born in Kentucky, Aug. 3, 1795, and at the age of twenty-one left Kentucky on horseback, in 1816, for the unbroken soil of Illinois, and worked by the month on a farm; staid in Illinois for two years, then went back to Kentucky and bought seventy- five head of cattle and brought them to Illinois to pasture, and about half of them died. He sold what was left near Alton, which was but a village then; then went back to Kentucky and was married, Oct. 18, 1819, to Maria Harrison, who was born April 26, 1802. They started for Illinois a short time after they were married; farmed in the American Bottom for a short time, then moved to Carrollton, in 1824, and leased land from Governor Carlin, staying there six years; then entered 160 acres from the government, where he now lives, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife died Nov. 13. 1878, at the age of seventy- four
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 625(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


PRATHER SAMUEL
PRATHER SAMUEL, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 25, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Prather was born in Madison County, Illinois, in 1830, and accompanied his parents to Greene County when but a child. A farmer from boyhood he is also a natural mechanic. In his twenty-first year he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Stubblefield, a daughter of Easely Stubblefield, by whom he has five children: Asbury, Mary J., Albert, Sarah Jane and Charles S.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 594(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


PRICE HENRY
PRICE HENRY, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 14, P.O. White Hall. Henry Price is a native of Germany, where he was born on the 4th of July, 1821. In early life he became employed as a farm hand, and spent the usual six years in the German army. Emigrating to America in 1848, after the usual voyage, he landed at New Orleans, thence to St. Louis, where he resided four years, and where he was married to Miss Mary Suitts. In 1852 he emigrated to Iowa. Remaining but a short time he returned to St. Louis, where he found employment in a large manufacturing establishment. During the year mentioned above Mr. Price located in Greene County, where he met with many discouragements but ultimately triumphed, through the well-known industry peculiar to all of his race, and at the present writing is the owner of 240 acres situated within the borders of Greene County, where he now lives in the enjoyment of honestly acquired wealth. Nine children blessed this union, eight of whom are living and whose names are, in order of birth, John H., H. C, Conrad, Dora, Frank, Willie, Mary, George and Albert
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 657(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt

PRINDEBLE & GREEN
PRINDEBLE & GREEN, dealers in clothing and gent's furnishing goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes, trunks, valises, etc., also merchant tailors, Carrollton, Illinois. The above named enterprising firm became established in business one year age for the transaction of a clothing business, and during this short time have built up a reputation for honesty in their dealings that has brought success. The senior member, Mr, Green, is a native of Germany; at the early age of 17 he left Germany for England, where he transacted a successful business in the city of Birmingham; in 1859 he crossed the Atlantic for America; transacting business for some time in Texas; on arriving in Carrollton he entered into the present business with Samuel Levy. J. P. Prindeble, the junior member of this firm, was born in Missouri, in 1854, and became a resident of Greene County, where he grew up on the old farm homestead of his parents, Patrick and Mary Prindeble. John continued agricultural pursuits until entering into a co-partnership business with Mr. Green. Further notice will be given in the other department of this work
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 494(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


PRINDEBLE PATRICK
PRINDEBLE PATRICK, farmer and stock raiser, r Maple Av. Patrick Prindeble is a native of Ireland and was born in 1818. Growing to manhood in Ireland he followed farming for many years, and at the age of 35, having met with many reverses of fortune, he concluded to better his condition in America. Landing in New York, he remained here a short time, when he made his way to Albany, thence to Troy. It should be stated that Mr. Prindeble was twice married in Ireland; his first wife was Miss Bridget Kelly, by whom he had two children; this lady died in Ireland. His second wife was Miss Mary Caton, by whom he had ten children. Twenty-five years ago Mr. Prindeble located in Greene County where he purchased farm property, and here his second wife died, in 1877. During the present year our subject was united in marriage to Mrs. Ellen Devier, whose maiden name was Danworth. Mr. Prindeble has been a very successful farmer and is the owner of 300 acres of valuable land.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 494(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


PRYOR FRANCIS M.
PRYOR FRANCIS M. farmer. Sec. 12, P.O. Breese. Was born in Scott Co., Ill., March 24, 1844. He came to this county with his parents, William and Rachel Pryor, while quite young. His father died in this county about twenty years ago, at the age of about 55 years. His mother also died in this county about thirteen years ago, aged about 63 years. He was married June 8, 1865, to Elizabeth J. Farmer, daughter of William and Anna J. Farmer. She was born in Gibson Co., Ind., Dec. 13, 1850. They have three children living and one deceased: Mary, born Oct. 1, 1866; Charles Francis, born Sept. 27, 1868; Nettie Caroline, born March 12, 1870, died May 15, 1870; John Philip, born Sept. 8, 1874. He is living on his mother-in-law's farm, one and one-half miles north of the town of Breese
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 617-8(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


PURDY M. C.
PURDY M. C. The pottery known as the Purdy, situated near the C. & A R. R.. White Hall, Ill., was built about the year 1868, by a man named Gorbet, or Garbet. For some reason he failed, and the property was purchased by James Gregory. This he disposed of to M. C. Purdy, who entered into a copartnership business with Abner D. Ruckle; with Mr. Ruckle he continued in business some years, when he purchased his interest, and is now sole proprietor; employs twenty men manufacturing stone ware exclusively; here may be found innumerable pots and jugs, manufactured from a good grade of clay, and made in a workmanlike manner. Mr. Purdy was born at Summit County, Ohio, in 1833; he received a liberal education, and there married Miss Sarah Jane Hall, of Ohio, by whom he had two children, Addie J., and Dwight. For a period of thirty-seven years Mr. Purdy was a resident of Ohio; apprenticed to the trade of a potter, he became a skilled workman; on coming West, he settled at White Hall. Mr. Purdy is one of our most public-spirited men
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 535(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt