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SANDERS BEN
SANDERS BEN, farmer. Sec. 14, P.O. Athensville; born in North Carolina, Sept. 30, 1803; came to Morgan Co. in this State 1827, and removed to Greene County 1831; married in Kentucky, June, 1826, to Elizabeth Strong, born Kentucky, April, 1805, and died March 6, 1872. Mr. Sanders married May 20, 1876, Mattie Brinkley, born Dec. 30, 1833, and widow of the late Thomas Brinkley, of Greene Co.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 610(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SANDERS H.
SANDERS H. deceased, was born in Kentucky, in 1810. Moving to Greene Co. in an early day he located on the farm property now owned by W. J. & Alonzo Allen, and started in for a western life made up of hardships and toil. His first wife was Miss Henderson (christian name not ascertained); one child born of this marriage, Eliza. By his second wife, who was Miss Elizabeth Allen, he had nine children: J. F., Martha, Elizabeth, Mary J. James H., W. A., Emma, Charles and Hardin A. Deceased, after a long life of usefulness spent on the prairies of Greene County, passed away to that world of spirits to which we are all hastening. During the Autumn of 1872 Mrs. Sanders departed this life. W. A. Sanders, from whom this narrative is obtained, is a resident of township 12, range 11, where he follows farming in connection with James H. Sanders. During the present year he was united in marriage to Miss Nora Heaton, a daughter of William Heaton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 594-5(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SANDERS NORTON
SANDERS NORTON, farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Greenfield. Among the "young settlers" of this county there are none whose present prospects are more flattering and who have a better "start" in life, and with judicious management and opportunities well improved, can become one of the most opulent agriculturists in the county. Having about 1,000 acres of land and the very best of improvements, and being a young man and in good health—all these aids present a phalanx of strength that will, if rightly utilized, make "circumstances" bend to his opportunities. Such are the conditions and surroundings of Norton Sanders, born in Jersey County, Sept. 5, 1849, son of Ben. Sanders, who is a native of Maryland, and came to this State at an early day, and by shrewd management and the exercise of business tact, accumulated property, has since retired and resides with his son at Kemper. Nov. 30, 1871, Norton was married to Joanna Landiss, daughter of Wm. Landiss, of this county. They have three children: George, Nyda, and Olla. Norton while in the prosecution of his farm duties is always ready to embark on a hunt, of which he is a dear lover, and in this capacity has his chief enjoyment
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 691(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SAUER AUG. JOS.
SAUER AUG. JOS. Catholic clergyman of Carrollton; born 1848 in Germany, grandduchy of Baden, emigrated to New York City in his third year; educated at the Christian Brother Schools of that city, and subsequently returned to Germany, where, in the year 1871, he received holy orders, after finishing the academic course at the Royal Academy at Munster, Westphalia; sent to Carrollton by the Bishop of Alton, Sept., 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 496; - transcribed by bmt


SAWYER JAMES A.
SAWYER JAMES A. livery, Jackson street, Roodhouse, first street west of new Kirkland Hotel. Mr. S. was born in Steuben County, New York, in 1845. In his fifteenth year he accompanied his parents to Illinois, locating in Madison County. During the Spring of 1870 Mr. Sawyer came to Roodhouse, where he first worked for John Roodhouse as a farm hand. Mr. R. was then the proprietor of the livery that Mr. Sawyer now owns. In 1873 the purchase was effected. Since this date Mr. Sawyer has bought largely, both of horses and the latest style of vehicles, which commercial travellers will do well to note. Special attention given to transient stock. Passengers conveyed to all parts of the county day or night. Mr. S. married Miss Laura Strate, of Roodhouse; children, Hattie, deceased, and Edna
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 576(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


SCANDRETT CHARLES S. Jr.
SCANDRETT CHARLES S. Jr. farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Rockbridge, was born in the City of Worcester, England, Aug. 16, 1827. He is the eldest of a family of nine children, born of Charles S. and Eliza S. Papps, who was born in 1804, and the former one year later. The family emigrated to this country' in June, 1836, and first settled in Edwardsville, where Charles S., the elder, was engaged in the land office as clerk. In 1878 he moved with the family to Carrollton, where he was engaged as a clerk in the recorder's office, was also engaged in teaching for some time, he having a good education, which combined with his business tact, made him a very desirable, and some times almost an indispensable aid; his duties he always performed to the satisfaction of those interested and with credit to himself. In the year 1841, he moved about two miles northeast of Carrollton, remained one year, then moved three miles east, remaining two years, then five miles southeast of Carrollton, where he bought land, and has since owned it. Since the death of his wife he has lived among his children, and is still at work at the desk, posting and keeping books for several firms in the county, making his home now mostly at his son Chas. S., Jr. The subject of this sketch remained under the parental roof until his twenty-second year, his educational advantages being quite limited indeed, graduated, as he says, "in long division. "The first year after he attained his majority rented a piece of land on his father's tract. Oct. 16, 1849, he hired out to work for James Vallentine, where he continued four years without any intermission. In 1853, went to Brighton, where he engaged in the employ of N. Hume, who was then engaged in the lightning rod business, remained with him about sixteen months. Nov. 26, 1853, was married to Sarah E. Dix, by whom he had seven children, viz.: Charles H., born March 5, 1855; Lucy M., born Oct. 20, 1856; William H., born Oct. 16, 1858; Laura A., born Nov. 17, 1861; David G., born April 21, 1864; Elias B., born Jan 8, 1867; Harriet E., born April 25, 1869, and died Nov. 1, 1875. Mrs. Scandrett died March 7, 1873. In April 30, 1874, he was married the second time to Dillie Irwine, born July 24, 1840, by this union they have had one child named Blanche, born July 20, 1876. After his first marriage he settled on "String Prairie," where he remained until the Spring of 1861, when he moved to section 27, one and a half miles northeast of Rockbridge, where he bought land and has since added to it until he now owns 260 acres; he has recently built him a fine residence, which, taken in connection with the beautiful surroundings, he has one of the finest locations in the township. Notwithstanding his meager advantages that surrounded him during the early part of his life, yet he has, by patient industry and rigid economy, acquired a competence; has been a great reader, being a subscriber to about seven papers and magazines, and but few men are better posted on the news and events of the past than he. He is now turning his entire attention to agricultural pursuits and the breeding of the celebrated stock of Norman horses. Mr. S. and wife are both members of the M. E. Church
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 691-2(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SCHAFER FREDRICK
SCHAFER FREDRICK, farmer and slock raiser, Sec. 23, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman, who ranks among the more successful farmers of Greene County, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born in 1823. At an early age he received a liberal education; at fourteen accompanying his parents across the broad waters of the Atlantic for the new world, landing in New Orleans; they took passage up the Mississippi to St. Louis, where they remained but a short time, when a permanent settlement was made in Calhoun County, where the subject of our notice passed his earlier years and grew to a vigorous manhood that paved the way for future success. At the early age of twenty- three, in 1846, Mr. Schafer was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Byrd, a native of Missouri, by whom he had three children: Roswell, Perry, and Jane. Mrs. Schafer died in 1855; during the Winter of the year mentioned Mr. S. united his fortunes to Miss Jane Byrd, by whom he has four children : Steven, Amos, Charles, and Minnie. In 1872 occurred the death of Mr. Schafer's second wife, who found a last resting place in the beautiful cemetery of Carrollton. In 1876, Mr. S. again launched upon the sea of matrimony, the lady in question being Mrs. Egelhoff, of Jerseyville. From a small beginning, Mr. Schafer has worked his way rapidly forward to a proud position in life, a leading agriculturist in Greene, the owner of over 500 acres of valuable farming land in the counties of Greene and Calhoun; in the latter Mr. S. officiated in the capacity of sheriff two terms, for four years holding the position of county treasurer, and for a period of eight years justice of the peace.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt

SCHEPPE J0HN
SCHEPPE J0HN, farmer, Sec. 24, P.O. Athensville, son of August Scheppe, who was born in Tennessee, March 22, 1801, and came to this State and settled in Morgan County, prior to the deep snow. John Scheppe was born in Morgan County Nov. 2, 1833; married May 12, 1860, to Mary Ann Fayette, daughter of L. A; and Lucy Fayette, of Sangamon Co., born July 6, 1838. This union has been blessed by six children, viz.: William, born March 21, 1861; Hessing A., Jan. 4, 1863; Mary B., April 24, 1869; Samuel A., Jan. 21, 1871; Walter H., Feb. 5, 1872, and Isaac T., March 19, 1876. Mr. Scheppe, purchased the land where they now reside, in 1857. He has devoted his industries solely to farming. Homestead consists of sixty-five acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 610(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SCOGGINS GEORGE W.
SCOGGINS GEORGE W. deceased. Many of our southern counties are densely populated by that energetic race of people known as Kentuckians. Greene, no ways backward in this respect, was once the abiding place of George W. Scoggins; he came to Greene County in his youth, and became a cotemporary with many who now bear a prominent part in county affairs; in 1849, he was married to Miss Margaret Daniels, by whom he had two children, of whom George was the younger. Mr. S. passed off the stage of action many years ago, and eighteen years ago witnessed the decease of his wife. Chilton, the only survivor of the family, was born Dec. 24, 1851, in Greene County, where he has principally been a resident from his earliest years; he is the owner of 40 acres of valuable land in this township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 742(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SCOGGINS J. H.
SCOGGINS J. H. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 18, P.O. Carrollton. Was born in Greene County, on the 15th of Nov. 1838; only son of C. J. Scoggins, who ranks among the early settlers of Greene County, where he was born, and where he married Miss Mahala Brown, a daughter of John Brown; two children blessed this union: Elizabeth, who married John Short, died on the eighth of May, 1859, and was laid at rest in the Hutchens Cemetery; John, from whom our narrative is obtained, grew to manhood in Greene County. In 1859, he was married to Miss Nancy E. Thomasson, a daughter of Spencer and Polly Thomasson; by whom he has eight children: Mary, who married Jacob Varble; Perry C, Hester E., John R., Alice M., Sarah E., Sophia E., and Joseph S. Mr. C, is the owner of 80 acres, and a wide-awake progressive farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 761(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SCOTT BENJAMIN
SCOTT BENJAMIN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 9, P.O. Greenfield, was born 1813, in Virginia. His father, Welcome Scott, a native of Virginia, was married in Kentucky to Elizabeth Allen, who was a native of Kentucky, and deserves more than a passing notice, for her husband died when they had a family of four children, and Benjamin, the oldest, was but four years of age. She reared her family on a farm in Kentucky till Benjamin was eighteen years of age, then they emigrated to Illinois in 1830; came in a one-horse wagon, and when filled with their beds and wearing apparel, there was but room for one to ride. One of her daughters rode and the rest of them walked. They were twenty-one days on the road coming 500 miles. Benjamin rented land near Winchester, and farmed for two years, then entered 80 acres of land from the government, in Greene County, where he now lives, and has owned 2,600 acres of land at one time, but now owns 536 acres, and is one among the best stock farmers in Greene County; has four living springs on his farm. He was in the Black Hawk War of 1830-31, where he made part of his money to enter land with; was married Oct., 1834, to Lucinda Ruyle, who was born in 1818, in Illinois; have nine children: James (deceased), Elizabeth M., Edward, Sallie J. (deceased), Louisa F., Polly, William T., and Anna, all of whom are mariied
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 626(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SCOTT FREDERICK
SCOTT FREDERICK, farmer, Sec. 28, P.O. Athensville, born in this township May 10, 1845. Mr. S.'s parents were among the earliest settlers of this county, having come here from Tennessee prior to the deep snow. Married April 14, 1866, to Emma L., daughter of Henry and Emma Hastings, Greene Co. Three sons have blessed this union, two of whom are living, viz: Fred. H., born Sept. 14, 1867, and Henry W., born Nov. 17, 1869. Farm comprises So acres beautifully located and well improved
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 610(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SCOTT TH0MAS, JR.
SCOTT TH0MAS, JR. manufacturer of stoves and tinware and dealer in stamped and japanned ware. West Fifth St. Thomas Scott was born in 1830, in the City of London, England. In his third year his parents moved to Liverpool, England, where at the age of 14 our subject was apprenticed to the trade of a tinsmith, at which he worked faithfully five years, when he sailed for America, landing at New Orleans. During the Winter of 1849 he secured employment. The weather now becoming sultry, he proceeded west to Cinicinnati, Ohio, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, and thence to St. Louis, where he worked at his trade for a short time, when he made his way to Carrollton, arriving in 1852. He first entered into the employ of his brother, with whom he afterward entered into a co-partnership business in the tinware trade, conducting a small trade at first. In 1861 he moved to Reach's Corner, where he remained until 1868, when he built the store in which he now does a prosperous business. In 1865 Mr. Scott obtained letters patent on a heating stove, which is acknowledged by all to be the best heating stove in the State and presents a handsome appearance. The stoves not only command a large sale in Illinois but are sold extensively in many Western States, notably Kansas and Missouri. Mr. Scott is not only an extensive dealer in stamped and japanned ware but also carries a full stock of very superior quality of graniteware, and makes a specialty of family goods for tin weddings. We know of no more reliable house than that of Thomas Scott, who transacts a large business to-day through strict attention to business and honorable dealing
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SCOTT WILLIAM
SCOTT WILLIAM, proprietor Metropolitan Hotel, Roodhouse, Ill. The above named gentleman was born in Highland County, Ohio, in 1824. When three years of age his father died; at nine his mother moved to Shelby County, Indiana, remaining but five years, and at the expiration of which time returned to Ohio. William, who heads this sketch, was the youngest of this family. Mrs. Scott was a very industrious woman, who was left in moderate circumstances; on the death of her husband she struggled hard for herself and boy, who, when old enough, attended to the duties of the small farm. In his twenty-second year he was united in marriage to Miss Mahala Good, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Good, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania. For some years after his marriage Mr. Scott followed farming. When the war broke out he entered the 100 day service, and was elected First Lieutenant of the company; honorably discharged at the expiration of ten days, as the company was organized as a relief corps for Cincinnati. Proceeding to Dennison, near Cincinnati, he became a sutler; from this point he came west and settled in Milton, Pike County, and became a stock buyer and grocer. In 1875 he came to Roodhouse, and renting the large establishment owned by Humphrey Armstrong; opened the first class hotel above mentioned. Mr. S. has nine children: Sarah, Daniel, George, James H., L. D., Lorenzo,. Charles F., William and Emma A.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 576(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


SCRUBY THOMAS
SCRUBY THOMAS, who began business as butcher in the city of Carrollton, some ten years ago, was born in Cambridgeshire, England, November 8, 1834. At the early age of 15 Thomas, possessed of an adventurous disposition, crossed the ocean for America, landing in New York City, where he remained a short time, subsequently proceeding to Sheboygan, Wis. Remaining here a short time, he went to Fond du Lac, where he first worked as a gardener; subsequently followed the calling of butcher, some six years; and during this time united his fortunes to Miss Elinor Pepper, by whom he has seven children : | Charles E., Annie E., Minnie, Maggie, Harry, Archie, and Nellie. At Sparta, Wisconsin, Mr. S. transacted a successful business until his removal to Owatonna, Minnesota, thence to Springfield, Missouri, and thence to Carrollton, Illinois, where his business qualifications and genial manners have won for him a liberal patronronage. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497-8; - transcribed by bmt


SECOR E. J.
SECOR E. J. farmer and stock raiser, Carrollton, is a son of Joshua and Tryphenia Secor, whose maiden name was Raynor, a native of Morristown, N. J. Joshua, the father of E. J. is a near descendent of a family who were compelled to leave their native country on account of religious persecution, and coming here, settled in the wilderness of New York, and named the place New Rochelle, in memory of the place they had been driven, and around which clustered memories not soon to be forgotten. Joshua was born in Westchester County, N. Y., in 1782, learned the trade of a cabinet maker, was a fine mechanic and an inventive genius; afterwards constructed in Illinois the first saw mill ever run in the State by wind as the propelling power. Was married in 1810; at that time he belonged to a "Union " that encouraged a "strike," and to become isolated from it, he not being in sympathy with it, went to Charlestown, S.C., and remained one Winter; returning, he went to Greene County, Pa., where he lived eighteen years, and in May, 1833, having a desire to try his fortunes in the West, emigrated to this county, and settled in town 10, range 11, section 24. Log cabins were like "angel's visits," few and far between; they camped at first, their covered wagon in which they came being their place of abode until circumstances afforded them better. First bought 240 acres in the prairie and 80 in the timber; the people ridiculed his idea of buying prairie Iand, they at that time deeming only the timber land of any value, but the sequel proved the wisdom of his selection. His father lived until he attained his 92d year. E. J. remained with his parents until his 22d year, then returned East to attend to some business pertaining to the estate; staid one Winter; made a second trip in 1841, and while there married his wife, Elizabeth A. Lockwood, of Belmont, Ohio, daughter of Judge L., a prominent jurist of that locality; she was born July, 1818. Upon their arrival West he bought the land he now owns, and has since lived there, and is about the only one in the township, with one exception, who is now living on the land purchased at the time. July 17, 1870, Mr. Secor's house was burned to the ground, a large portion of the contents were consumed—fire accidental. The family then moved in a house built for a tenant, and the 17th of July the same year, it was struck by lightning, killing his son Edward instantly; the entire contents were burned this time, leaving the family houseless in a drenching rain in their night clothes. Mr. and Mrs. Secor have now five children: Rebecca, now the wife of Geo. Robinson, now of Kansas; Eliza, now the wife of President Davis of McLeansboro College, this State; Luther, now practicing law in St. Louis; Ben. L. and Arthur at home. Mr. and Mrs. S. are both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; he is of Republican faith, but is not much interested in politics
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 713-14(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SEELEY A. STEWART
SEELEY A. STEWART, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 30, P.O. White Hall, one of the most prominent farmers of Greene County, whose generous nature makes him universally respected, was born at St. Louis, Missouri, December 27, 1812. He was left an orphan at the early age of eleven years, and thus early thrown on his own resources, he made his way to Illinois, locating in Greene County in 1823, near his present magnificent property. For a boy he developed an energy of character that accounts for his success in life. He first hired out as a farm hand. In his twenty-first year he was married to Miss Laney Hodges, a daughter of Samuel Hodges. About this time Mr. Seeley had for capital a wife, energy and perseverance. But in a short time he was enabled to purchase eighty acres of land. To break the stubborn soil he first used a Bull plow, subsequently a Carey, Borshire and Diamond. The young man worked hard, living in a simple way, his home being a rough cabin, where venison frequently graced the table. Often he would go miles to a horse mill to procure a little meal to supply the family larder. Mrs. Seeley relates that prairie chicken were so numerous that they were a burden. At this date, to use the language of Judge Seeley, Carrollton was but a hamlet, where some half dozen stores and dwellings went to make up the place, and here the early settler was wont to lay in his provisions. As years went by the orphan boy of former years began to accumulate property, and soon took a leading position as a farmer. He to-day owns over 2,000 acres of land, in township 12, range 12, township 12, range 13, and township 11, range 13. The success of the pioneer boy was something wonderful. For fourteen years Mr. Seeley was county commissioner, and for a number of years justice of the peace. Of ten children born of this marriage, what is somewhat remarkable, all are living: Rufus G., Louisa, John, William, Ann, George, Frank, Americus, Anthony, Emma, and Ada
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 562(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SEELEY RUFUS G.
SEELEY RUFUS G. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 21, P.O. White Hall. R.G. Seeley was born on the homestead of his parents, A. Stewart Seeley and Laney, in 1836. His preliminary education was received in the log cabin of by-gone days, where the seats were constructed of slabs, the writing desks of the same material. The first teacher of Mr. Seeley was Col. Richard Johnson, who was liberally educated for the period of time in which he lived. On leaving the school room young Seeley's time was fully occupied on the farm. In his twenty-second year he was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Bigham. His first purchase of land consisted of ninety-five acres. Adding to this yearly he now owns 240. Mr. Seeley has three children: Nora Jane, Maud and Eda B.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 562(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SEELY AMERICUS
SEELY AMERICUS, farmer and stock raiser, P.O. White Hall. The subject of this biography is the fifth child of Hon. Judge Stewart Seely, and was born on the farm homestead in Greene .County, the 9th of November, 1849. March 15, 1877, he was united in marriage, at Warrensburg, Johnson County, Mo., to Miss Dora Shackleford, a daughter of Benjamin F. Shackleford of Kentucky and Mary Frances Shackleford of Tennessee. One child, Claude E., blessed this union, born on the 4th of February, 1878. Mr. Seely is the owner of 160 acres of valuable land, and is an honorable man and a progressive, wide-awake farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 657-8(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


SHARON BROTHERS
SHARON BROTHERS, dealers in dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes, hats, caps, etc., etc. The above named enterprising firm became established in their present business as early as 1857, with the exception of the younger brother. As this is one among the older establishments in the city of Carrollton, we here append more than a passing notice. Nearly half a century ago, Wm. Pegram solicited the trade of the few inhabitants then in Greene Co., he being superseded by David Pierson, the well known banker, who conducted a successful business many years, when Dr. J. K. Sharon, deceased, and William Sharon, now senator from Nevada, and the well known California millionaire, entered into a co-partnership business, when Wm. Sharon retired, he was succeeded by Thomas L. Hudson. The present members of the firm are now, J. K., J. J. & C. C. Sharon, who have transacted a successful business for the past ten years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SHAW J. C.
SHAW J. C. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 11, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Shaw was born in the extreme north of Ireland, on the 9th day of November, 1802. At the early age of ten, he was apprenticed to the trade of a millwright; serving seven years, he became exceedingly skillful in this vocation. Crossing the Atlantic in 1832, he landed in the city of Baltimore, remaining eight months, he went to Wheeling, West Virginia, where he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Barkus. In 1834, he made his way to the southern portion of Illinois, locating at Montezuma, Scott Co., and thence to Manchester, where he erected many of the buildings, entering into the construction of the town. At this time the circumstances of Mr. Shaw were exceedingly limited, although he earned good wages. Like nearly all of his race, his generosity was unbounded. By the advice of his devoted wife he proceeded to Edwardsville, then a small place, where he entered land from the Government, and now began the quiet life of a farmer. A resident of this county forty years, he witnessed many changes, and has become a well-to-do farmer, owning 160 acres. Mrs. Shaw departed this life five years ago. There are ten children: John, Mary, Elizabeth. Thomas, Henry, James, Daniel, William, Benjamin and George
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 595(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SHAW JAMES
SHAW JAMES, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 10, P.O. Manchester, Scott Co., Ill. James Shaw is a native of Greene County, born March 5, 1844. the fifth child of James and Rebecca Shaw; a farmer from boyhood, Mr. Shaw still follows the occupation that he has been accustomed to from his earliest years. In 1862, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Stubblefield, a daughter of Easely Stubblefield, one of the first settlers of Greene County. Of four children born of this marriage, three are living: Ida May, Laura and Nora. Mr. Shaw is the owner of 80 acres of valuable land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 595(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SHAW JOHN
SHAW JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 4, P.O Roodhouse. The above named gentleman is a native of Virginia, born in 1833, oldest son of J. C. and Rebecca Shaw. He was but two years of age when his parents emigrated to Illinois, locating first in Scott County, and two years later in Greene on the farm property now owned by J. C. Shaw. John, on attaining his majority, rented a farm of Wm. Andrews, for six years, afterwards renting of E. M. Husted. During the flush war times he here procured his first start in life, having purchased a tract of 100 acres in 1868, he moved on to it, in after years becoming successful through great industry; his present farm comprises 200 acres, on which he has lately erected a handsome farm residence. His wife was Miss Sarah E. Allman, a daughter of Nelson Allman, a native of North Carolina
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 595(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SHAW W. A.
SHAW W. A. renter. Sec. 34, P.O. Athensville, born Pike County, Aug. 19, 1832; settled in Greene County 1850. Married Oct. 18, 1851, to Eliza, daughter of John and Louisa Bently, born Oct. 18, 1830. This union has been blessed by three children, viz.: Thomas G., born Nov. 11, 1852; Walter C, born Oct. 4, 1854, and Henry J., born Feb. 1, 1857. Mr. Shaw's occupation has always been farming; rents 110 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 610(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SHIELD FRANCIS W.
SHIELD FRANCIS W. foreman car repairs C. & A.R.W., Roodhouse. Mr. Shield was born in Scotland, April 29, 1829; his father was by trade a carpenter and joiner; with him young Shield was early instructed in the rudiments of carpenter work. On attaining his majority he emigrated to America; working his way to Chicago, where he completed his trade, working five years; he then went to Dubuque, Iowa, making the trip in a covered wagon; he there worked as foreman, and erected many dwelling houses; a resident three years of Dubuque, he there married Miss Margaret Miller, a daughter of Michael Miller, of Glasgow, Scotland, by whom he had eleven children, seven of whom are living: Phillis, Frank. Jessie,. Marshall, Uphemia, Agnes and Maud. During the war Mr. Shield served as foreman on the Sea Branch, Roanoke, Norfolk & Petersburg K.R., engaged in the transportation of troops. Before the close of the war he came North, entering the employ of the C. & A. Co., where he had worked previously, and at this writing has been a railroad man, so to speak, thirty years, and in the above capacity is regarded a superior workman. Seven years ago Mr. S. came to Roodhouse, where he invested in land, and now resides, living in very comfortable circumstances
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 576-7(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


SHINNAULT JACOB
SHINNAULT JACOB, farmer. Sec. 27, P.O. Breese. Was born in this county July 14, 1845. His father and mother were born in Tennessee, and came to this county about fifty years ago. He was married June 10, 1868, to Mary Martin, daughter of Charles and Nancy Martin. She was born in this county May 10, 1848. They have five children: Lucy, born Oct. 12, 1868; William I., born March 15, 1871; Sarah E., born Dec. 19, 1872; Mattie B., born Dec. 9, 1877; Mary E., born July 25, 1875. He has 40 acres of land, on which he has lived seven years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 618(T12N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT J. A.
SHORT J. A. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 12, P.O. Fayette. Had the reader of this sketch been on the road leading from Summerton, Tenn., to Carrollton, Ill., in the Fall of 1829, he might have seen a rudely made wagon in which were densely packed a few household goods, and a goodly number of children. The remaining ones who were larger, were wending their way on foot following up an old dun cow who was also a member of the party. As this procession filed past, a close observer might have seen 'peeping out from beneath the curtains a countenance that would to-day be recognized as Alex. Short, Such it was, and was then in company with his parents who were emigrating to this country, and located at Woodman's Mound, where they remained about five years; then moved to township 11, R. 10, north of Greenfield, where his father spent the remainder of his days except three years, which he spent in Greenfield. He died Aug. 1876. The subject of this sketch had but meager advantages for schooling, his father being poor at that time, and having a large family to support, a large share of this responsibility fell upon J. A., and he was compelled to remain at home and assist in the home duties. At the age of twenty however, his father had now become in a manner forehanded, and J. A., embarked for himself. Began by renting land of his father, which he worked for three years; then bought 80 acres in Town 11, Sec, 12, and afterward added to it 80 more with a land warrant which he obtained by trading a horse; afterward entered another 40 under the "bit" act; he kept this land seven years and sold the 160 acres for $1,500; then moved east about two miles and bought 120 acres; staid six years, and having an opportunity to better himself, sold out at an advance and then moved to the Gilbert Edward's farm, one and three-quarter miles north of Greenfield, where he bought 200 acres, costing $4,000; kept the farm three years, and disposed of it for $8,000; while on this farm cleared $5,000, including $1,000 made on a crop of wheat one year. After selling out, went to northeast part of Christian County; where he bought 280 acres for $6,500; remained three years; then rented out his farm for $800 per year, and moved to Greenfield; subsequently to this he traded his farm in Christian Co., for the one he now owns, paying $2,250 in addition; has now 275 acres of excellent land highly improved, has built him an excellent house recently, and his building and every thing about him indicate the thrift and enterprise of the owner; he being as near a model farmer as the country produces. Been a man of energy and industrious habits, and a believer in the motto that "God helps those that help themselves." Mr. Short has been a member of the Baptist church for many years; is also a zealous member of the Masonic order, Greenfield Lodge No. 129, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Short was first married Dec. 25, 1846, to Charity Cheaney; had eight children, four now living: Emily Jane, born Nov. 11, 1847; John W., born June 13, 1855; George M., April 17, 1858; Martha L., April 13, 1861. His wife died Oct. 9, 1869. The following year married Tabitha Starks; she died Jan. 27, 1873, leaving one child: Virgil Alex., born Dec. 31, 1871. Was last married to Miss M. J. Barton, daughter of Isaac and Charity Barton, of Greenfield; born Sept. 10, 1837. They have two children: Wm, Leslie born Aug. 31, 1874
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 692-3(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT J. M.
SHORT J. M. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 18, P.O. Wrightsville, is the son of Thomas and Catherine Short; was born Oct. 12, 1839, and married Oct. 6, 1864, to Ann M. Furgerson, the daughter of James and Elizabeth Furgerson; was born Oct. 11, 1841; have seven children living: George L., Delia, Dora, Charley J. (deceased), Francis M., Maggie, Lewis H. Mr. Short has lived in Greene County all his life, except nine years, which he spent in Christian County; has farmed all his life, and now owns 200 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 626-7(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT JAMES
SHORT JAMES, agriculturist, was a native of Kentucky, where he was born in 1809. But little pertaining to his early life can now be gleaned. Raised upon a farm, where he toiled early and late, his life the every day routine of the farm, he obtained bub a limited education, such as the common schools of the day afforded. He married in 1830, Miss Eliza Self, and one year later, during the Autumn, he made his way to Greene County, and settled on the property now known as the Steve Taylor place. Financially, none were in a worse predicament than he, but he had an unlimited stock of energy to draw from, and it was not long before his prospects began to brighten, and the purchase of farm property feasible. The following Spring from the date of his arrival, Mrs. Short sickened and died, leaving to his care one child, Eliza Jane. His second wife was Miss Millie Stone, a daughter of Thomas Stone; by whom he had five children: John, William, Henry, Ann and George. In 1844, occurred the death of his second wife, and during the Winter of this year, Mr. Short was married to Mrs. Cynthia Rice, relict of Wm. R. Rice, and a daughter of Haman and Sarah Wood. Of this marriage five children were born: Benj. F., Perry, Joseph, Mary and Jasper. After a life of almost unexampled and very unusual activity, Mr. Short died suddenly at his home, July 8, 1871. He had become an opulent farmer, had added largely year by year to his possessions, and owned at the time of his death, some 400 acres of valuable land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 761-2(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT JAMES H.
SHORT JAMES H. circuit clerk, is a native of Greene County; born in 1839; the fifth of a family of eleven children. His early years were spent in agricultural pursuits; he received a liberal education in the common schools of his native place. In 1863, he united his fortunes to Miss Lenora Ferguson; a daughter of G. B. and Mary Ferguson, whose maiden name was Mabery, who were among the early settlers of Greene County. Mr. Short became a successful farmer, owning 157 acres in township 9, range 12. Two years ago he moved to Carrollton, where he purchased town property, and at the November election of 1876, he was elected circuit clerk, retaining the position at the present writing. Note : Mr. Short received the election above given, prior to his removal to Carrollton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT R. A.
SHORT R. A. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 18, P.O. Greenfield, was born Dec. 13. 1835. in Greene County; was married Sept. 7, 1859, to Emily J. Chaney, who was born April 11, 1841, in Mason County, Ill., the daughter of William and Mary Chaney; have six children: Catherine B., born March 15, 1862; John B., born Oct. 8, 1864; William S., born Dec. 8, 1867; infant son (deceased); Thomas J., born Oct. 23, 1871; Samuel S., born April 4, 1873. The subject of this sketch is the eighth child of Thomas J. and Catherine Short; has followed the occupation of a farmer in the summer and has taught school for eighteen winters; has been esquire for a number of years, and has united twenty two of his scholars in marriage; was elected County Treasurer of Greene County in 1S75-6, and owns 261 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 627(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SHORT WILLIAM S.
SHORT WILLIAM S. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 7, P.O. Greenfield, was born Sept. 16, 1832. His father, Thomas J. Short, was born Sept. 27, 1805, in Tennessee; was married to Catherine Overby, who was born in 1807. They emigrated to Greene County, Ill., in 1829, and rented land of Mr. Hubbard; remained there for five years, then borrowed money from Samuel Thomas to enter 80 acres of land, paying 25 per cent, for said money, and cut cord wood at twenty-five cents per cord to pay said interest. As he accumulated wealth he entered land, and bought from others, till he owned 1,000 acres at his death, which was valued at $35,000. He died in 1876, at the age of seventy. His wife died in 1849, at the age of forty-three. Having sixteen children by his first marriage, was married the second time to Rebecca Whittle; have two children by this marriage. The subject of this sketch is the sixth child; was married 1854 to Elizabeth M., who was born in 1830, in South Carolina; have thirteen children: Amanda E., Rosa A., Louis S., Martha J. Thomas J., Eliza B., infant son, Dickey, Elizabeth M., William S., Catherine, Samuel J., Mary A., and adopted son, James H. Mr. Short owns 357 acres of land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 627(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SIEVERLING H. C.
SIEVERLING H. C. wagon and buggy manufacturer, Carrollton, Ill. For over twenty years Mr. Sieverling has transacted a successful business in the above line, and machinery, and his very superior workmanship is recognized, and brings him a large patronage. Mr. S. was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1828. At thirteen he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and machinist, serving four and a half years. He was recognised even at this youthful age a first-class workman. He was then in his eighteenth year. Three years later he emigrated to America, locating in New Orleans; where he entered the employ of Henry Kage, a wagon maker. Here he worked three months, and then entered the employ of the Ponchartrain R. R. Co. Returning to New Orleans in 1851, he became a superintendent for the construction of canal locks. In 1853, he was attacked with yellow fever, and on recovering resumed work on the locks. These brought to completeness he proceeded to Baton Rouge, La., where he was united in marriage to Mrs. Ellinor Helmbold, by whom he had four children; three are living. Mrs. S. had two children by first marriage. In 1858, Mr. Sieverling, after a short residence in St. Louis, Mo., and Keokuk, Iowa, came to Woodville, Greene Co., Ill, where he transacted a large business for eight years. In 1866, he came to Carrollton, where he purchased the property owned by J. C. Kelly, including residence and wagon shop. Mr. S. is well and favorably known to our business men, and the farming community, who know him for his honesty and very superior workmanship
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SIMMONS W. L.
SIMMONS W. L. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 17, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Simmons ranks among our most industrious farmers. Invariably busy, he has made the farm pay. He was born in Randolph County, Ill., in 1849; oldest son of J. C. and Mary Ann Simmons, who were born in Illinois. Mr. Simmons was raised in the counties of Randolph, Monroe, and Sinclair. For the past eighteen years he has been a resident of Greene County, following the occupation of farming, owning 100 acres brought to a high state of cultivation, through the remarkable energy displayed by him. In 1874, he was married to Miss Maggie, a daughter of James Buckey, a prominent farmer of this township, whose sketch will be found elsewhere. One child born of this marriage, James Edwin, on the 12th day of Dec, 1875
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 595(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SIMPSON ALFRED
SIMPSON ALFRED, farmer, Sec. 16, P.O. Athensville, born in Sangamon Co., Ill., March 1, 1850, and has lived in Greene County since six years of age. His grandfather was one of the earliest settlers of the State, and came from Vermont. Alfred is the third child of a family of eight; was married Feb. 13, 1873, to Lydia J., daughter of Zac and Matilda Bean, born Greene Co., April 7, 1854. This union has been blessed by one child, Mary M., born Oct. 27, 1874. Mr. Simpson has devoted his industries solely to agricultural pursuits; homestead consists of 116 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 610(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SIMPSON DR. J. F.
SIMPSON DR. J. F. proprietor Occidental Hotel, S. Main St., Carrollton, Ill. Dr. J. F. Simpson is a native of Virginia; born in Rapahannock Co., Oct. 10, 1814. His father was Hendley Simpson, who was born in Loudoun Co., Virginia, growing to manhood with wealth and a position in society second to none. He married in Culpepper Co., Miss Elizabeth Farrow, a daughter of John and Margaret Farrow. James, whose fortunes we now follow, passed his early years in Virginia, where he entered upon the study of materia medica. In 1835, his parents moved from Virginia to the central part of Illinois, Macoupin Co., Medora, where he completed his medical studies under Dr. Farrow. In due course of time he became a practicing physician. In 1837, he moved to Carrollton, where he opened up a general merchandise store, where he continued several years. In 1840, he purchased the drug store of Buel G. Wheeler, and for eight years conducted a successful drug trade. Disposing of his interest, he now turned his attention to the practice of his profession. Since this date his honorable career here, where he has practiced as a physician for a period of thirty-five years, is well known. He has always been a warm advocate of temperance, and his unselfish devotion to the poor and oppressed, have made him an honored name. For twenty years he has been identified as an officer of the county's poor. In 1872, his name was put forward for the office of Penitentiary Com., on the Prohibition ticket; in 1874, he became the nominee for State Treasurer, and in 1876, his name was put forward for Governor of the State; a member of the Sons of Temperance, in 1860, he held, during one term, the position of Grand Worthy Patriarch of the division. As proprietor of the Occidental Hotel, of this city, his urbane manners and well known energy have brought him the patronage of the commercial and business public, who appreciate the kind attention vouchsafed by the Dr. and his excellent lady
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498-9(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SLONE ASA
SLONE ASA, county farm, Sec. 7, P. O. Carrollton. Prominent among the repsentatives of this county who hail from the State of North Carolina is Mr. Slone, who was born in Chatham County, N. C, Oct. 17, 1825. His father's name was Matthew, and his mother's name was Chloe Hews, both of them natives of same State. In the Fall of 1833 the family emigrated to this State in a wagon, locating at Carrollton, remained about eight years, then removed to Macoupin County, where they remained until the death of the head of the family, which occurred in 1845. The subject of this sketch assisted in maintaining the family after the death of his father, and was thus deprived of all educational advantages. At an early age worked out on a farm until nearly grown, when he went to learn the blacksmith's trade at which he continued up to the time of the outbreak of the Mexican war, when he enlisted in Co. "C " 1st Regiment, commanded by John Hardin, remained out two years, then returned to Carrollton and resumed his trade, hiring out to his former employer, staid with him seven years; then set up in same business by himself in Carrollton, continuing at same for eighteen years. July 6, 1848, was married to Ann M. Caldwell, born Sept. 3, 1830. In 1865 he abandoned the anvil and forge, and engaged in farming; first made a commencement on Macoupin Creek, bought him 300 acres of land, farmed about three years, then sold out and rented land until March, 1873, when he moved to the county farm which he has since run with credit to himself and the satisfaction of all concerned. Mr. Slone has six children: Margaret, born May 20, 1849; William, born July 10, 1852; Samuel T., born April 17, 1857; Robert A., born Feb. 11, 1860; John C, Nov. 27, 1863; Mary C, April 5, 1856; Maud A., Nov. 7, 1869. Margaret died Nov. 20, 1869
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 714-15(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SMEAD CHARLES K.
SMEAD CHARLES K. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. Manchester, Scott Co., Ill. Mr. Smead is a native of Vermont, born Aug. 30, 1826, and at the age of eleven accompanied his parents to Greene County, III., locating near White Hall, on Apple Creek prairie, where the head of the family followed farming up to the time of his decease; which occurred in 1840. One year prior to this the pioneer wife passed to a home not made with hands. Charles was then in his 14th year, and went to live with a neighboring farmer. He was to remain until his majority; he, however, remained but five years, as his employer gave him no advantages in the way of an education, to which his ambitious nature aspired. Proceeding to Jacksonville, Morgan County, he procured employment of Thomas Wiswall, where he received the advantages of a good common school education. Returning to Greene County, he entered the employ of Erastus Eldred, becoming busily employed on the farm during the summer, in the winter season attending school. In 1848, he proceeded to what is now the township 12 of range 10, where he taught school two years. In 1851, he married Miss Sarah G. Alverson, a daughter of Benjamin Alverson, by whom he had two children: Darius C. and Barkley. In 1854, Mrs. Smead was laid at rest in the county of Jersey. May 23, 1855, Mr. S. was married to Mrs. Mary Stowell, by whom he has three children: Laura, Herbert, and Edgar F. Mr. Smead is one of our most enterprising farmers, owning 140 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 596(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH BENJAMIN
SMITH BENJAMIN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 12, P.O. White Hall. The subject of this sketch deserves more than a passing notice, as he is one among the oldest settlers of Greene County; was born Sept. 25, 1799, in Connecticut; came to Alton, Ill., in 1818, when there was but two families in that place; is a carpenter by trade, and built the first house in that village; started from Connecticut in 1816, came to New York State and lived for one season, then to Fort George, Canada, where he stopped for some time, then a party of them came down the Ohio, on a flat boat, to New Albany, there left their boat and walked across the country to Alton. Was married to Miss M. E. Beacon, in 1820, who was born March 17, 1799, in Massachusetts; have nine children, six of whom are dead: Carrie A., born March 20, 1823; Minerva, born Dec. 1824; Harvey A., June 10, 1830; Theresa O., born Nov. 1, 1832; Angeline M., born April 9, 1835; Ira, born Nov. 26, 1838; entered land from the government in 1825, and owns 480 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 650(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH C. S.
SMITH C. S. dry goods merchant, Kane, Ill. The above named gentleman was born in Greene in 1846; oldest son of Dr. A. H. Smith, the well known physician and druggist of Carrollton; he passed his early years in Carrollton, where he received a liberal education; for a short time he became employed as a clerk; during the Autumn of 1870, locating at New Kane, where he entered into a copartnership business with John Greene. Both members were men of enterprise and sagacity, and their business soon became a large and growing one; the new firm sold goods for a period of two years in a large brick building owned by A. Felter; owing to increasing business, and desiring a better location, they decided to erect their present building, by far the best store house in the town, where a business is transacted that will compare favorably with any similar establishment in Kane. In September, 1875, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Hobson, a daughter of Robert Hobson. One child born of this, Florence
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 742(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt

SMITH, Judge Clement L.
Clement L. Smith was born in Bluffdale Township, Greene County, Illinois, on March 7, 1895. He attended rural schools and then the Carrollton Public Schools and was graduated in 1914 from the Carrollton High School.
He served in the Army during WWI. On April 12, 1928 he was admitted to the Bar and precticed law from the first of August, 1928 until December 1942, at which time he took the office of County Judge of Greene County, Illinois.
He served as Acting County Judge of Macoupin County during the absence of the Judge of that Court while said Judge was in the military service of the United States.
In June of 1945, Judge Smith was elecfted as teh Circuit Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit which comprises Greene, Jersey, Scott, Macoupin, Morgan and Sangamon Counties.
In September of 1946, he was assigned by the Supreme Court as a Justice of the Appellate Court for the, then, Fourth Disctrict at Mr. Vernon, Illinois.
He as re-elected as a Circuit Judge in '51, '57 and 1964. He has always resided in Greene County, with the exception of a period of three years in Morgan County when he was located there as a teacher and high school principal.
Judge Smith was married to the former Hilda Coats of Hillview, Illinois in 1925. They are parents of two children, Mrs. Doris Purdue and Clem Smith, Jr.
[Source: Carrollton - 1818-1968 - An Album of Yesterday and Today]
Transcribed by Koni Proctor

SMITH DAVID
SMITH DAVID, deceased, once a prosperous farmer of Greene County, was born in North Carolina, where he grew to manhood. Received a common school education. He early learned to rely upon himself, and on coming westward he first settled at Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The journey west was made in a covered wagon, which slowly wound its way over the tall prairie grass; on crossing small streams, it became necessary to transfer the household goods to boats, which on crossing were again placed in the wagon and travel resumed. For a period of fifteen years or more Mr. Smith remained a resident of Missouri, locating in Greene County in 1838. Purchasing 160 acres near White Hall and Wilmington, he settled down to farm life in Greene County. While here his wife died. His second wife was Mrs. Newton, by whom he had four children. This lady departed this life in 1866. In 1871 he married Mrs. Serena Manuel, a daughter of Cumberland James and relict of Thompson Manuel, who died many years ago. Mr. Smith died in 1875. He was a man of extraordinary energy, and this, added to great steadiness of purpose, made his life a success
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 562-3(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH ERVIN B.
SMITH ERVIN B. farmer and stock raiser, Sec 8, P.O. Greenfield, was born in 1853, in Greene County. His father, W. W. Smith, was born in 1825, in Indiana, and came to Greene County in 1832, and died Nov. 30, 1877; owned 240 acres of land at his death; was married twice; first, in 1852, to Mary A. Short, who was born in 1830; had four children by this marriage: Ervin, Henry, Elizabeth, and Amanda; married the second time to Lettence Whitlock, who was born in 1838
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 627(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH HARVEY A.
SMITH HARVEY A. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 2, P.O. White Hall, is the son of Benjamin Smith, one of the oldest settlers of Greene County. The subject of this sketch was born in 1830, in Greene County; was married to Eliza Kistler, who was born in 1831, in Madison County; have nine children: Addie M., born Jan. 12, 1853; William H., born Sept. 21, 1854; Anna B., born Oct. 1, 1856; Benjamin E., born Dec. 25, 1858; Carrie H., born March 16, 1860; Selinda V., born Dec. 14, 1862; Zella V., born April 24, 1867; Frank C, born Dec. 1, 1868; Lela, born April 16, 1876, deceased. Mr. Smith has followed the occupation of a farmer most of his life. He furnished 40,000 ties and posts for the C.B. & Q.R.R. Co.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 650(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH J. P.
SMITH J. P. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 1, P.O. Greenfield, was born in Greene County August 29, 1834; was married in 1853 to Martha A. Smith, who was born February 8, 1834; is the daughter of James and Peninah H, Smith; have five children, four living: Virginia A., James E., Caroline E., Robert L., and Albert E., deceased. Mr. Smith owns 211 acres of land, all fenced, which he has made by his own exertions. His father, Daniel Srnith, was married to Lucy A. Pace, and they emigrated to Greene County in 1834, and entered land from the government, to the amount of 160 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 627(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH JACOB
SMITH JACOB, farmer, Sec. 5, P.O. Rockbridge. Jacob Smith is a native of Greene County, born in 1828; tracing back this family we find that the grandfather of our subject Nicholas Cris, who was a native of France; like all of his race, of an adventurous disposition, he made his way to America, and settled in Greene County, as early as 1823, and here our subject was born in 1828; when the war came on he enlisted in Co. A, 61st Ill. Inf., and proceeding to the front, became a participant in the Battles of Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, Mission Ridge, Vicksburg. Pea Ridge, etc., etc.; at Shiloh he received a severe wound that caused the loss of one eye. Since the war he has lived in Jersey County and Greene County, where at one time in his agricultural career he became exceedingly prosperous. In 1856 he was married to Miss Phoebe Fleming, a daughter of John and Hannah Fleming; thirteen children blessed their union, one only surviving: Hannah, who resides at Jerseyville. Mrs. Smith died Feb. 21, 1871, was laid at rest in the Jerseyville Cemetery
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 724(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SMlTH JOHN R.
SMlTH JOHN R. farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Smith was born in Scott County, Ill., Jan. 8, 1843. oldest son of J. R. Smith, a native of Tennessee, who accompanied his parents to Illinois, when eight years of age; employed first as a farm hand, he afterward became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith. He was married to Miss Jane Six, by whom he had five children. Mrs. Smith died many years ago. His second wife was Miss Patsey Ann Overton. Mr. S. is still living, a resident of Scott County. John R., in 1873, was married to Miss Alice Cline, daughter of John and Julia Cline; one child, Birdie
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 563(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH, MOORE & CO
SMITH, MOORE & CO. dealers in boots and shoes, ne cor. Square, Carrollton, Ill. Of Messrs. Smith, Moore & Co.whocontrol one of the largest establishment of its kind in the West, we mention, with more than ordinary notice: In 1872, Samuel O, Smith and Harry S. Moore opened up shop, so to speak, in their present quarters, at first in an humble way, compared to their present extensive business. On entering this large establishment, one beholds an array of fine boots and shoes, that for quality, durability and style to suit the most fastidious, are unequaled in the West, or indeed, anywhere else. Three superior workmen are kept in constant employ making boots and shoes, from strictly French stock, which are sold at surprisingly low rates, considering the material of which they are composed. In addition to their boot and shoe department the firm are prepared to meet all demands of trade in their furnishing department, and parties contemplating purchasing will do well to remember that all's not gold that glitters, and instead of a trip to St. Louis in the purchase of goods, one and all will find that they can do equally as well at home
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 499(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH ROBERT
SMITH ROBERT, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29, P.O. White Hall. The above named gentleman was born in Greene County, March 24, 1839. Receiving a common school education, for a number of years he worked on the old homestead. In his twenty-third year he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Ballard, a daughter of Avery Ballard, a native of Tennessee and an early resident of Greene County, of whom an account is given elsewhere. Of this marriage four children were born, three living: Eva A., Ida M., Minnie O., and Charles O. (deceased). Mr. Smith is the owner of 128 acres prairie and timber, situated in Tp. 12, R. 12, and is one of the most industrious farmers in the county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 563(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH STEPHEN
SMITH STEPHEN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 6, P.O. Greenfield, was born May 22, 1809, in Vermont. His father, John M. Smith, was born in 1781, in Virginia, and was married to Rachel Pack wood, who was born in 1781. They emigrated to Kentucky in 1810, and remained there till 1840, then emigrated to Greene County, Ill. He died in 1858, in Greene County, and his wife died in 1836, in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was twenty-eight years of age when he came to Greene County; was married in Kentucky, Sept. 13, 1836, to Sallie M. Pace, who was born Feb. 22, 1816; have nine children: Thomas A., born Dec. 8, 1837; Greensville Z., born Aug. 31, 1839, died April 7, 1866; Nacy, born Feb. 26,; 1842; Edward, born July 11, 1844; James T., born July 30, 1847; William, born March 28, 1850; John C, born Feb. 24, 1853; George W., born Nov. 13, 1855; Martha B., born July 10, 1860. Mr. Smith came to Illinois with a borrowed team and wagon, and all he brought with him was his bed clothes and wearing apparel and cooking utensils, and with money enough to buy 106 acres of the unbroken soil of Greene County, and now owns 175 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 627-8(T11N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SMITH WILLIAM R.
SMITH WILLIAM R. minister of the gospel, and farmer, P.O. White Hall, is a native of Macoupin County, born in 1842, where he grew to maturity, early becoming inured to the hard work of a farmer. His father had died previous to his tenth year, and from this period to manhood he helped very materially toward the family maintenence. When his mother again married he moved to Greene County, where he married Miss Henrietta Jane Dunham, a daughter of Wm. Dunham, by whom he has five children: Mary E., Wm. A., Sarah A., Rena B. and Martha Jane. Four years ago Mr. Smith became a convert to religion, and two years ago was ordained a Baptist minister of the United Persuasion, and licensed to preach in this Circuit
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 596(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SNELSON JOSEPH
SNELSON JOSEPH, renter, Sec. 36, P.O. Kane. In relating the life history of Joseph Snelson, it will be well to enter into as full a description as possible of the ancestry of our subject. his grandfather, L. L. Snelson, was a native of Pennsylvania, of German origin; a farmer during the early years of his life. He married in Pennsylvania, Miss Mary McLoughlin. In 1820, he moved to Bond County, Illinois, where he became a prominent stock dealer and farmer; afterwards a resident of Missouri, where he was elected to the House of Representatives; he died in Missouri in 1858, after a long, honorable and energetic life. To the care of his wife he left a large family of nine children, although fourteen were born of the marriage. John C. Snelton was the second child; who passed his boyhood in Bond County, where he married Miss Ann Craig, of Bond, a daughter of Andrew Craig, of Alabama, who emigrated to the West in an early day. Joha Snelton became a prosperous farmer, who died in Missouri, where he afterwards removed. None of his success was due to chance, or what is called good fortune, but was the result of wise forethought, and prudent management. He left to the care of his wife, who died in 1865, a family of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third child, who passed the greater portion of his life in Missouri, removing to Greene County in 1873, where he has since followed farming. He was married in 1876, to Miss Susan White, a daughter of James and Mary White
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 762(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


SPEAR WILLIAM L.
SPEAR WILLIAM L., teacher. Sec. 33, P.O. Rockbridge. Among the successful teachers of this county, is the party whose name heads this sketch. Was born in Randolph County, Ill., Sept. 27, 1843; son of Lewis P., and Loureine Spear, whose maiden name was Stowe. The former is a native of Ashland County, Ohio, and the latter from Alabama. When quite young Wm. L., moved with his parents to Alton, where they remained until 1857, when they moved to Town 9, Range 11. Aug. 3, 1862, enlisted in the 122 Regt. Ills. Vols., Co. C; remained with them until the close of the war; was in the battles of Parkers-Cross-Roads, Paducah, Nashville, Siege of Mobile; received an honorable discharge Aug. 3, 1865; upon his return, went to Macoupin Co., where he was engaged in teaching a short time. In 1867, came to this county, and has since continued teaching. April 7, 1870, was united in matrimony to Fannie Dews; born Aug. 11, 1844; by this union they have had three children: Harry L., born Feb. 10, 1872; Loureine C, born Oct. 19, 1874; William F. born Nov. 5, 1876. Has twice been elected justice of the peace. Was commissioned as notary public, Jan. 25, 1874; has since been reappointed, and now fills said office. Is a zealous worker in the Red Ribbon movement. Has studied law, and expects to be admitted to the bar soon. Is a member of Golden Rule Lodge, No. 1017; also Fayette Lodge, No. 107, A. F. & A. M. Republican in sentiment
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 693(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


SPENCER JOHN
SPENCER JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Manchester, Scott Co. Among the leading farmers of Greene County, we mention, with more than ordinary noticet the energetic gentleman, whose name heads this sketch. Mr. Spencer is a native of Greene Co., born in 1837. At an early age his parents moved to Morgan County, where our subject passed his earliest years, following agricultural pursuits, and early developed that energy of character that paved the way for future success. During the Spring of 1858, Mr. Spencer was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Ann Banes, a daughter of Solomon and Caroline S. Banes, by whom he had eight children, six of whom are living and whose names are in order of birth: Franklin P., Mary J., Debby A., Charlotte, Nancy E., and Jennie. For over three years, to the satisfaction of all, Mr. Spencer has held the office of township trustee. His success in life is due to his own indomitable will and force of character. In the township 12, range II, he is the owner of 400 acres of valuable land, and a more live, capable farmer it would be a hard matter to find. Where necessary, in the way of public improvements or co-operation in church matters, Mr. Spencer has always born a helping hand
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 596-7(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SPERRY CHARLES W.
SPERRY CHARLES W. farmer, Sec. 33, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Sperry was born in Greene County, June, 1841. He was the fourth child of M. C. P. and Hannah Hodges. Of the head of this family it may be said that he became one of the first settlers of Greene County, and put in many a hard day's work within its borders. Locating near Kane, his land was entered from the Government, on which he built a log cabin. When Black Hawk made war on the few daring settlers of Illinois he volunteered as a soldier. After the war he returned to his pioneer home. He passed away during the Autumn of 1865. Mrs. Sperry died during the early infancy of him whose fortunes we now follow. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, 122d Ill. Inf., organized in Macoupin County. He became engaged in the following battles: Parker's Cross Roads, Tupello, Town Creek. Nashville, Fort Blakely, etc., etc. When the war closed he returned to Jersey County, III., where he married Miss Rachel E. Marshall. Remaining in Jersey County two years he then moved to Sangamon County, remaining one year, and also was a resident of Montgomery County. There are three children: Walter O., Emma J., and Lucy A.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 563(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


STANTON W. H.
STANTON W. H. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 2, P.O. Carrollton. William Stanton is a native of Garrett County, Ky., where he was born on the 27th of September, 1839; the youngest son of Reuben and Cynthia Stanton; he spent the days of his boyhood upon the old farm homestead; in his eighteenth year he made his way to Greene County, where he has since been identified with agricultural pursuits, and where he married, in 1863, Miss Susan A. Gaffney, a daughter of Jas. Gaffney, of Kentucky; of this marriage six children were born: John, James, William, Samuel, Jennie, and Claude J.; Mr. Stanton ranks among our more energetic farmers, and through indomitable will has succeeded well in the battle 6f life, and is the owner, at the present writing, of 130 acres in township 9, range 12
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 762(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


STATTS JAMES V.
STATTS JAMES V. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 21, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Statts is a native of New Jersey, born in 1822, and was in his 15th year when he accompanied his parents, Peter and Catherine Statts, to Greene Co., the family settling five miles north of White Hall. Peter Statts was the possessor of but little of this world's goods, but he had a strong will and physical endurance that few, if any, excelled; a successful farmer; he passed away seven years ago, after a long life of usefulness and honor, at the ripe age of 88 years. His wife, whose maiden name was Voorhees, departed this life twelve years prior to her husband, and thus slowly the pioneers of long ago, whose generosity and kindness of heart have been sung by poets, and whose praises have been well written by American prose writers, are passing away. James grew up on the old homestead, received a good common school education. At twenty-five he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wyatt, a daughter of William Wyatt, deceased, once a prominent farmer, and well remembered by early settlers of Greene and Morgan Counties. There are seven children: Tobias, Peter, Abraham, Martha J., Sarah, Augusta, and Jessie. Like his worthy father, Mr. S. has acquired property through indefatigable effort, the homestead comprising two hundred acres, is among the best in the county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 597(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STEELE JOSEPH
STEELE JOSEPH, proprietor Headrick House, Carrollton. The subject of this sketch was born in Balman Co., Ohio, on the 11th of December, 1821. When he was four years old his parents, Joseph and Nancy Steele, moved to Muskingum Co., Ohio, where our subject grew to manhood, and where he was united in marriage to Miss Ann Puff, of Ohio, a daughter of Henry and Sophia Puff, of Maryland, Alleghany Co., by whom he has four children, William R., Jacob H., Reasoner, and Sophia D. Mr. Steele followed farming until his location in Greene County in 1852, and first followed farming in Tp. 10, R. 12. Two years ago Mr. Steele came to Carrollton where he has established for the past two years a first-class boarding house, where permanent or transient boarders will find a satisfactory table and neat, clean, comfortable beds, opposite the Methodist Church, southeast of the Square; also stable accommodations and feed for horses
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 499(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


STEELMAN A. L.
STEELMAN A. L. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. Barrow. Mr. Steelman is one of the leading farmers of Greene County, and was born in Surrey County, North Carolina, April 19, 1824, He was the second child of James and Catherine Steelman, who emigrated to Illinois from Tennessee in 1851. It should be stated, however, that Ashley Steelman became a resident of Greene County prior to this settling, in 1843. He was then married, his family consisting of a wife and one child, his capital thirty-five cents. Renting a house in Wilmington, he now looked about him for work. Becoming employed as a farm hand, working at the rate of $10 per month, for the late Judge Woodson, he worked one year; when war was declared between Mexico and the United States he enlisted in Company D, 2d Ill. Reg. as 3d sergeant, and was afterward elected by the company orderly sergeant, serving under General Scott; mustered out of Uncle Sam's service at Alton, Illinois. He was married, on his return home, to Martha J. Ford, a daughter of James Ford. In 1851 or 1852 Mr. Steelman entered 80 acres of land, which is comprised in the property he now owns, and 40 acres north of this. From this small acreage came an estate of over 500 acres. In conclusion, it may be stated, Mr. Steelman's success in life is due to no lucky chance, but to solid hard work, uniting energy and honesty. His marriage took place in 1849
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 563-4(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


STEVENS CLARKE
STEVENS CLARKE, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 9, P.O. Carrollton. It was a full half century ago that Clarke Stevens made his advent in this portion of Illinois, then at the age of six years; his father was John Stevens, a Virginian by birth, who removed to Kentucky in an early day, and there married Miss Elizabeth Terry, who was born in Virginia; lived in the States of Ohio and Tennessee and subsequently removed to Missouri, where he followed farming until his removal to Illinois, in 1828, near Otterville, in what is now comprised in that portion set apart and known as Jersey County; for the most part the Illinois prairie was unbroken, and for many years the family roughed it among those hardy men who ventured to Illinois, when to be a settler was to realize untold hardships; amid pioneer surroundings young Stevens passed his boyhood, and grew to a vigorous manhood, attaining the same energy that characterized the people among whom he moved; in 1841, he was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Ann Cooper, a daughter of E. S. Cooper; by this marriage they had thirteen children —nine of whom are living. Mrs. Stevens died on the 24th of January, 1877, and the November following Mr. Stevens was married to Mrs. Elizabeth Buck, a daughter of Jacob Alabaugh, and relict of Wm. Buck, of Virginia. After many years Mr. Stevens has become the owner of a valuable tract of land in this township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 742(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STINNETT JAMES H.
STINNETT JAMES H. farmer, Sec. 1, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in this county, May 10, 1835; was the second son of David and Margarina Stinnett, who were natives of Kentucky. Mr. Stinnett was married Oct. 9, 1856, to Miss Mary J. Ferguson. They have had six children, Eunice E., Pleasant M., James A., Charles H., William T. and Bertha Ann, all of whom are now living. Mr. Stinnett has 120 acres of land, and knows very well how he got it—as the good Master said we should obtain our bread—" by the sweat of his brow." Mr. Stinnett is of Democratic principles, and holds to those principles very tenaciously
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 638(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STOCKWELL DANIEL
STOCKWELL DANIEL, farmer. Sec. 22, P.O. Athensville, born in Tennessee, Aug. 11, 1840; came to this State when an infant, with his parents, who settled in Macoupin Co. Married June 28, 1867, to Esther Wright, daughter of Thos. and Nancy Wright, born in Morgan Co. in 1843. This union has been blessed by five children, viz.: Esther S.,born June 20, 1868; Lucy J., May 12, 1869; John T., April 3, 1871; Frederick, Oct. 7, 1872, and Nancy C, March 6, 1875. Mr. Stockwell has devoted his industries solely to agricultural pursuits; farm consists of 60 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 611(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


STOCKWELL. R. M.
STOCKWELL. R. M. farmer, Sec. 29, P.O. Athensville, born in Tennessee, Sept. 26, 1841, and was brought to this State when only three years of age; has resided in Macoupin Co. until four years ago, when he purchased his present homestead. Married Nov. 9, 1864, to Mary Ann, daughter of Thomas and Emily Spring, Macoupin Co., born March 26, 1843. This union has been blessed by three children, viz.: Wm R., born Sept. 29, 1867; Lemuel M., Oct. 21, 1863; and Emma A., born Dec. 2, 1871. Mr. Stockwell has devoted his industries solely to agricultural pursuits; homestead consists of 80 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 611(T12N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


STONE JAMES
STONE JAMES, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 6, P.O. Carrollton. James Stone is a native of Greene County, where he was born in 1826; son of John and Anna Stone, who become cotemporary with the early settlers of Greene County, the date of their arrival being sometime between the years 1818 and 1820. Many of our readers will, no doubt, look for some notice of John Stone in these columns, and I will here append a short notice of him. He was born in North Carolina, it is supposed, and during the early settlement moved to Tennessee, and probably married there, although nothing definite can now be obtained; from Tennessee he eventually made his way to Greene County, Ill., at the date given above, where he had, so to speak, a hard row to hoe; but he subsequently became successful in life, and died in October, 1853, having acquired a comfortable competence; his wife survived him many years, and died in 1873; eleven children blessed this union, of whom James, the third, passed his early life upon the old farm homestead, and received a common school education; in 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Allen, a daughter of William Allen, an early settler of Greene County; of this marriage seven children were born, of whom six are living: Viola, Luela, Orville, Marietta, Ozias and Charles O. Mr. Stone is the owner of 173 acres of valuable land, and is a thorough-going, reliable farmer. Mrs. Stone died on the 6th of January, 1878
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 762-3(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


STONE MARTIN
STONE MARTIN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 17, P.O. Carrollton. Martin Stone was born in Greene County, April 10, 1832; second child of William and Lucinda Stone, who accompanied their parents to Greene County in an early day; among the associations of pioneer life young Stone passed his boyhood, and grew to a vigorous manhood; Feb. 13, 1856, he was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Pond, by whom he had seven children, six of whom are living: Herbert, Alvin, Frank, Nellie A., Josephine and Laura L. Mr. Stone is the owner of 80 acres, and is a thorough-going, prosperous farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 763(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


STONE N. M.
STONE N. M. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29, P.O. Roodhouse. Mr. Stone is a native of Tennessee; born in 1830; the third child of Micajah and Matilda Stone, who emigrated to Greene County in 1836, where land was settled upon. The head of the family passed away during the early infancy of the subject of this sketch, who it then became incumbent upon to contribute toward the family support. When the war broke out with Mexico he enlisted in Co. C, 1st Reg. Ill. Volunteers; a participant in the famous battle of Buena Vista. He was an intimate friend of that daring officer. Col. J. J. Hardin. When the war closed he returned to Greene Co., renting farm property until such time as he became enabled to purchase. In 1848 he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Hicks, a daughter of Vinas Hicks, by whom he had eleven children, eight of whom are living, whose names we here append: William A., Robert, James, Angeline, Winnie C, and Jessie B. Mr. Stone is the owner of 80 acres of valuable Land
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 597(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STOUT H. C.
STOUT H. C. carpenter, Wrightsville. The subject of these lines is a native of Greenfield. Greene Co., born May 16, 1836. Is the son of Dr. J. M. Stout, who was born and raised in Ohio. The Stout family are of German descent. Mr. Stout's mother's name was Lodicy Drum, daughter of John Drum, who was an old pioneer of this county. Mr. Stout's father resides in Kansas since 1870. At the age of twenty-four Mr. Stout left the parental roof, and, at this time, concluded that to be successful he must first secure nature's great helpmeet— a wife; and solicited and won the hand of Lauretta Thaxton, daughter of Dr. Clay Thaxton; their marriage being celebrated August, 1860; had three children, but one now living, Florence, born May, 1868. Sept. 2, 1862. Mr. S. enlisted in Co. I, 91st Regt. Ills. Vol. Infantry, and served his country faithfully until the close of the war; mustered out at Mobile. Was once taken prisoner by John Morgan but was released four months afterwards. During the time he was in service engaged in nearly all the engagements the regiment participated in. Since his return has been engaged at his trade, that of a carpenter and joiner; is a good workman and does satisfactory work. Is a man of quiet and retiring habits and an excellent citizen
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 638(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STRANG ALEXANDER D.
STRANG ALEXANDER D. farmer. Sec. 5, P.O. White Hall. Mr. Strang was born March 19, 1S35; son of Solomon and Elizabeth Strang, who were early settlers, Solomon having, in an early day, worked in the lead mines at Galena, where he earned the money which gave him a start in this county, and was afterward successful. He died Sept. 6, 1848. Alexander D., the subject of this sketch, was first married Jan. 15, 1856, to Olive Wood, had one son, William S., who now lives with his father. Mr. Strang was married the second time Dec. 29, 1869, to Rebecca Waghorn. They have three children, viz: Lizzie R., born Sept. 2, 1871; Mary J., born Jan. 2, 1875; Thomas A., born Feb. 2, 1878. Mr. Strang is a member of White Hall Lodge, No. 80, of A. F. and A. M. Cares but little about political matters, but votes the Republican ticket. Mr. Strang and brother own 682 1/2 acres of land, 272 in Sec. 5, 240 in Sec. 4, balance in 9 and 10. They are men of energy; upright and excellent citizens
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 638(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STRANG B. D.
STRANG B. D. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 33, P.O. White Hall. The subject of this sketch, who has been more than ordinarily successful as a farmer, was born in Greene County in 1839; his boyhood was passed on the old homestead of his parents, Benjamin and Martha Strang; his father passed away in 1843. December, 1863, the subject of this sketch was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Crist, a daughter of David Crist, whose biographical sketch appears elsewhere, by whom he had one child, Benjamin F., who died in early infancy. Mrs. Strang died in 1864; three years later Mr. Strang was married to Miss Minnie Bean, a daughter of Frederick Bean, one of the earliest settlers of Scott Co., and a native of Kentucky; of five children born of this marriage, four are living: Leslie H., Frederick, Martha A., and Walter Benjamin. In connection with C. F. Strang, a brother, he owns 1400 acres in the counties of Scott and Greene; an achievement surely for two young men who are still in the prime of life
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 597(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


STRINGER WILLIAM M.
STRINGER WILLIAM M. farmer and stock raiser, who takes a leading position among the more prominent settlers of Greene County; is a native of Kentucky, where he was born April 6, in the year 1807; but little can now be gleaned, relative to the ancestry of Mr. Stringer; his father died during his sixth year, his mother Elizabeth Stringer was laid at rest many years after, within the borders of Greene County. While Illinois was still a territory, probably about the year 1817, young Stringer an adventurous youth, directed his footsteps westward in company with his uncle, and first landed in Madison County, where he remained six years, employed as a farm hand; his mother had married the second time, and while a resident here, he received the news of his foster father's decease, and accordingly went back to his old home in Kentucky, where he took charge of the home farm; it was during this time that he united his fortunes to Miss Elizabeth Joslyn, a daughter of Elindor Joslyn, of Kentucky; the year 1829, found this family en route for the West, where a settlement was made in what is now Scott County, then designated as Morgan, close to the city of Winchester then but a hamlet; he remained until 1833, the date of his removal to Greene County, he found the country but little improved, comparatively few were here to improve it, the native prairie grass at times growing to a height of from three to five feet. He had entered his first land 40 acres in 1834, on which he built the usual rough cabin, where he lived the frugal life of the pioneer for many years, while his children grew up around him and became valuable assistants in bringing the farm to a proper state of cultivation. We can not describe in detail the hardships endured by Mr. Stringer, and perhaps it is only necessary to state that his present good fortune was secured by no lucky chance or event, but by persistent energy; of his marriage, eight children were born only two of whom are living: Leroy and Levi, the latter enlisted at the breaking out of the war, in the U. S. Service, and serving through the Rebellion, received his commission as Lieutenant
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 724-5(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


STRONG S. L.
STRONG S. L. dealer in dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, etc., Roodhouse. The subject of this sketch was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1848; his father, C. A. Strong, a native of Greene County, Ohio, there married Miss Elizabeth Bruck, a daughter of Juen and Elizabeth. C. A. Strong was a successful farmer, who died in Ohio in 1869; his wife died some years previous. By the death of his mother young Strong was left to battle with the world; he thus early learned to rely upon his own resources. At nineteen he became the proprietor of a grocery store, in which he became moderately successful; in 1874 he moved from Ohio to Illinois, and first located in Milton, Greene County, where he became firmly established in a general merchandise store, in which he met with great success and accordingly established a branch store at Roodhouse. Owing to the rapid growth of this town the branch store has long since overtopped the one at Milton, making rapid strides to public favor, through the well known courtesy and liberality of its proprietor. Good goods at low prices distinguish this establishment. Mr. Strong married, in 1869, Miss Clara B. Adams, a daughter of Reuben and Matilda Adams, of Greene County, Ohio; three children were born of this marriage: Maud M., Claudie B. and Sylvester L.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 577(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


SULLIVAN W. A.
SULLIVAN W. A. deceased, was born in the State of Indiana, Jefferson Co., May 30, 1833; in his fifth year his parents settled near Carrollton, Greene County; here he shared the hardships of pioneer life. In his twenty-fifth year, March, 1858, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Heaton, a daughter of Samuel Heaton, who became well known as a surveyor during the early history of Greene County. Mr. Sullivan was a gentleman of liberal education, teaching school for a number of years in Greene County; while yet in the prime of life he was stricken down, and now quietly rests amid the scenes of his labors; to the care of his wife he left two children: Orrie, who married John Martin, and William,who resides on the homestead. Mrs. Sullivan is a native of Greene County, born in 1837; a lady of liberal education and the owner of 60 acres of land in Tp. 12, R. 11
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 598(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


SUTTLES JESSE
SUTTLES JESSE, Sec. 10, P.O. Walkerville, was born in Greene County, Jan. 28, 1837. His father was John Suttles, who was born in 1810 and came with his father's family to Illinois, in 1821, settling in Madison County. In 1831 he moved to Greene County, and in 1835 married Mrs. Elizabeth Powell. By this marriage five children, of whom two are living: Jesse, whose name heads this sketch, and William, who also lives in Greene County, Sarah J., Susannah, and Lucinda, deceased. In 1863 Jesse married Letitia, daughter of Ashley and Eliza McClellan of Greene County, who are since deceased. The father of Mr. S. died in 1863; his mother in 1849. Four children living: William A., born Dec. 26, 1867; Eliza J., born Aug. 2, 1869; Mary C, born Dec. 28, 1871; John H., born May 2, 1874: George L., born Oct. 15, 1865, died Dec. 24, 1865; James A., born Dec. 21, 1871, died in Oct., 1872
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 658(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


SWAN C. A.
SWAN C. A. master mechanic of the C. & A.R.W. Although not among the early pioneers of this county, Mr. Swan occupies a leading position as a mechanic, at Roodhouse, and is therefore worthy of more than a passing notice. Oldest son of William and Judith Jackman; he was born in New Hampshire, May, 1824; in his sixteenth year he entered upon the calling of a blacksmith, or rather apprentice, becoming in a short time a skillful workman, entering the machine department of Alchize, Tyng & Co., of Lowell, Mass. Rapidly he rose in this calling. His next venture was to become a locomotive engineer, and he accordingly entered the employ of the Boston & Wooster Railway, as a fireman, and became an engineer on the Lowell and Lawrence road. In New Hampshire, where he afterward moved, was employed as engineer on the Sullivan Road. He was married to Miss Maria Hill, of Charlestown, N. H.; six children were born of this marriage, whose names are: Mary A., Maria E., Charles A., Carrie J., Belle and William H. In 1873 Mr. Swan moved to Ohio and was employed on the Cleveland & Toledo R.R., afterward consolidated and known as the Lake Shore Road, as master mechanic; he served fifteen years. Ten years ago he entered the service of the C. & A. as a master mechanic; now takes charge of the Roodhouse department, a responsible position which he is well qualified to fill. Was president of village board of Roodhouse; also township trustee
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 577(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt