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TAFFNER JOHN B.
TAFFNER JOHN B. farmer, Sec. 11, P.O. Wrightsville, was born in Prussia in 1852; at an early age his parents emigrated to St. Louis, about the year 1864, and in 1865 came to this State. He is the son of John and Anna Taffner, who came to this country about fourteen years ago. On March 2, 1878, John B. was married to Margaret L. Caine. He owns 50 acres of land. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and is a Democrat
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 638(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TANDY W. S.
TANDY W. S. photographer, Carrollton, was born in the State of Kentucky, December, 1843. During the same month and year, his parents, Willis and Martha H. Tandy, emigrated from the State of Kentucky to southern Illinois, settling in the vicinity of Jacksonville, on farm property. Jacksonville was then but a village, where the grandfather of the subject of this sketch owned a large tract of land, extending from what is now College Hill to the Mauvaisterre. On the old homestead young Tandy passed the days of his youth, until the death of his father, when he became apprenticed to the trade of a carpenter, and becoming in due course of time a journeyman workman. During the war in 1862, Mr. Tandy turned his attention to photography, in the city of Jacksonville, where he conducted a successful business, with a younger brother, until his location at Carrollton in 1865, where he has since resided, and where his skill as a photographer is well known. May 5, 1859, Mr. Tandy was united in marriage to Miss Eliza J. Johnson, by whom he had three children: Ella, Ida A., and Mattie. Mrs. Tandy passed away in the year 1870. In 1872, Mr. Tandy was united in marriage to Miss Julia Freer, by whom he has three children: Maud, Lulu, and W. Scott
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


TATE GEORGE
TATE GEORGE, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 9, P.O. Rockbridge. George Tate is a native of England, where he was born August, 1830, and there followed agricultural pursuits until his emigration to America, which occurred on the 12th of November, 1851. Landing in the City of New York, he eventually made his way to Albany, thence to Rochester, thence to Buffalo, where for a period of time he followed boating. Plying his vocation for years on the broad waters of the Mississippi, Lake Huron, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, at the expiration of this time he wended his way to Greene County, where he subsequently married Miss Phoebe Ann Wolsey, a daughter of Amos Wolsey. Since his arrival here, Mr. T. has been quite successful as an agriculturist, and has now been a resident of the county for a period of twenty years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 725(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR ALONZO P.
TAYLOR ALONZO P. farmer, Sec. 9, P.O. White Hall, was born March 19, 1853, is a native of this county; is a son of Joseph and Rebecca Taylor, who were natives of Kentucky, and came to this county at an early day. Alonzo was united in matrimony Dec. 26, 1872, to Lizzie Davis, daughter of J. W. Davis; as a result of this marriage they have now two children, viz.: Warren, born Aug. 9, 1873; Nora, born July 11, 1875. Mr. Taylor owns 80 acres of land, and although young, he has had considerable experience with the world, and expects, if spared, to grow up to be one of the wealthy, and to rank among the most respected of his township
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 638-9(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR B. F.
TAYLOR B. F. farmer, Sec. 33, P.O. Rockbridge. The subject of this sketch, now resides on the above named section; was born on the identical spot where he now lives. The record he gives as to the lime of his arrival on this stage of action, is dated July 7, 1850. His parents are natives of the "Blue Grass" country, Kentucky, and came to this State and county as early as 1826, and were among the early pioneers in this country, And there being two or three of the name settling there at the time, gave the name which it now bears, Taylor's Prairie. Log cabins were the only houses when they settled here, and they were very scarce at that. Corn bread, hominy and hog, was the daily bill of fare. His father died in March, 1864. and left a clear record behind, and well worthy of the example of those who succeed him; he was a member of the old Baptist Church many years before his death. Benjamin F. is now owner of the farm formerly owned by his father; having bought out the heirs. His sister Hannah L., is keeping house for him
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 693-4(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR BURGESS
TAYLOR BURGESS, deceased, was a successful farmer in Greene County. He was married, in 1844, to Miss Martha Record. Of this marriage three children were born, two are living: Lucy J. and William P. Mrs. Taylor owns 120 acres of valuable land. As a matter of history, Mrs. Taylor's father was a soldier in the Black Hawk War. Samuel Baird, a patron of this work, was born in Scott County, in 1829, third child of Zebulon and Belinda Baird. He was but seven when his parents moved to Greene County, near Barrow. Receiving a district school education, at twenty-one he was married to Miss Lucy J. Taylor, a daughter of Burgess Taylor. Five children blessed this marriage: Martha S., John B., James Z., Alonzo C, and William O.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 564(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR CANDIS E. MRS.
TAYLOR CANDIS E. MRS. farming, Sec. 33, P.O. Rockbridge. Is a native of this county, and a daughter of Franklin and Hannah Barrett; her parents were native born Kentuckians, coming here at an early period of the county's history. In the year 1850, on Easter Sunday, she was married to Ambrose Taylor; after their marriage they settled near the place Mrs. Taylor now lives, and engaged in farming, which he carried on up to the time of his death. Several years before his demise he was employed in the store of Messrs. Vallentine— his boys carrying on the farm in the meantime. During his life time, was a consistent member of the regular Baptist church; was clerk of the official board of same for sixteen years; was also a member the Masonic order, Sheffield Lodge No. 687, His death occurred in April 1876. They have had ten children, four of whom are now living: John F., born Aug. 28, 1855; Stephen A. D., born Dec. 25, 1857; Olive A., born March 20, 1865; Henry O., born Aug 10, 1868; Albert F., born Jan., 10, 1871. Stephen died Jan. 1, 1878. A short time previous to his death sickness, made a profession of religion, and was admitted into the church. Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Taylor has carried on the farm with the assistance of John F., who remains at home with his mother. John F., is a member of the Rockbridge Brass Band
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 694(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR JOHN
TAYLOR JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 8, P.O. Rockbridge. To some extent we trace back the ancestry of John Taylor. Ambrose Taylor, his father, was a native Kentuckian, where he was born as near as can be ascertained, in 1800. It must have been that he was of an extremely adventurous disposition, for in the year 1819 he wended his way across the prairies to the southern portion of Illinois. He settled at Madison County, Ill., finding employment in breaking the prairie soil; but little land being then under cultivation. The following year we find him en route for Greene County, where he was destined to become a successful agriculturist. Here he formed the acquaintance of and married in 1822, Miss Nancy Courtney, a daughter of Wm. Courtney, whose ancestry were Irish; in what is now town 10, range 10, he built a two-story hewed log cabin, a novelty in its day, and one of the best and most substantial buildings erected in Greene County. We naturally suppose that he lived the frugal life of the pioneer for many years, his energetic struggles carried the day in after life, and he became not only a well-to-do farmer, but one who merited the respect of his many friends in this section; he died at the age of 60 years, and was laid at rest on the broad prairies where so many years of his life were passed. Mrs. Taylor survived her husband eighteen years, departing this life at an advanced age. John, from whom this sketch was obtained, grew to mature years, blessed with a hardy vigor and energy, from his earliest years sharing in the hard work of the farm. In 1846 he was married to Miss Mary Jane Dixon, a daughter of Jefferson Dixon, by whom he had eight children, four of whom are living: Allen, Henry J., Jas. F., and Ida J. Mrs. Taylor departed this life on the 22d of March, 1874, and on the 17th of August, 1876, he was married to Mrs. Mahuldah Livingston, a daughter of James Manis, an early settler of this county. John Taylor is the owner of 373 acres of valuable land, and takes a leading position as a farmer and stock raiser
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 725(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TAYLOR PRESTON
TAYLOR PRESTON, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 10, P.O. Roodhouse. Preston Taylor, who ranks among the whole-souled farmers of Greene County, was born within its borders July, 1830; his associates, the pioneer boys, like them he acquired a hardy vigor that laid the foundation for his present success. On attaining his majority in 1851 he was united in marriage to Miss Roxanna Thompson, a daughter of Thomas Thompson, who ranks among the first settlers of Greene County. After many years of labor Mr. Taylor finds himself the owner of 200 acres of valuable land in Tp. 12, R. 11, on which he erected, eight years ago, a handsome farm residence. With the same bustle and activity that marked his youth he now attends to his farm duties, and where he will, undoubtedly, pass down the stream of time to that great unknown to which we all are drifting
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 598(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TENDICK ARNOLD
TENDICK ARNOLD, boots and shoes, Sec. 33, P.O. Rockbridge, was born in Rhine Province, Sept. 26, 1847, is the third of a family of seven children born of Peter and Margaret Tendick; her family name was Brookhouse. At the age of fifteen, he went to work on a farm for one year; was then apprenticed to learn the shoemaker's trade, at which he continued for three years. After he completed his trade, he went into the Prussian army, cavalry department; was in the service two years and a half. After his return home, he went to work at his trade, doing journey work the most of the time, until the Spring of 1870, when he emigrated to this country. Sailed on the Weiser, of the Bremen line; term of voyage fifteen days. Came to Jacksonville, Ill., where he worked for his uncle, Godfrey Tendick, of that place, for one year; then went to St. Louis, where he remained six months; then to Pittsfield, Pike County, where he engaged in business for himself, remaining there until July, 1875; then removed to Rockbridge and engaged in business; manufactures and keeps on hand ready made goods in his line, and is doing a good business; was married Aug. 12, 1874, to Elizabeth Jacobi, sister of Phillip Jacobi. She was born April 14, 1854. They have had three children, Anna M., born Sept. 14, 1875; Mattie Lou, born Feb. 18, 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 694(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TERPENING JOHN
TERPENING JOHN, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 2, P.O. Kane. John Terpening is a native of Ulster County, in the State of New York, and was born in 1817; was the third child of David and Hannah Terpening in New York State; his time was principally spent in agricultural pursuits, and while here a resident he united his fortunes to Miss Mahala Roe, a daughter of John S. Roe, a native of New York State, by whom he had nine children, seven of whom are living: Simon, Hannah E., Sarah M., Rachel, Ellen and Jerusha, and Uriah D. Mrs. T. died in New York State in 1 865, and the following Spring Mr. Terpening emigrated West, and located in Greene County, where he first worked as a farm hand; in 1873, he was married to Mrs. Julian Terpening, relict of Jesse Terpening, and a daughter of Joseph Stevens. Mrs. Terpening is a native of Ohio. The estate comprises 40 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 743(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TETER, O'GORMAN & CO.
TETER, O'GORMAN & CO. manufacturers and dealers in flower pots, vases, terra cotta ware. The above named firm became established in business June, 1878, but are rapidly taking a leading position in the manufacturing of this ware. Fine skilled workmen are employed by the firm, who turn out a vast array of flower pots and vases daily, of very superior material and finish. Its present proprietors are Messrs. T. O'Gorman, William Teter, and Henry Hubbard. Mr. Teter, from whom this sketch is obtained, was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1834. When fifteen years old he moved to White Hall, where he settled down to farm life. In 1864 he enlisted in the 91st Reg. Ill. Inf. Remaining in the service one year, he was honorably discharged; a participant in the battles of Spanish Fort. Fort Blakely, and engagements of smaller note. In 1855 Mr. Teter was married to Miss Susannah Pinkerton, a daughter of James E. Pinkerton. Of nine children born of this marriage, five are living: Mary, Ellen, Eva. Alice, and William
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 536-7(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


THAXTON CLAY DR.
THAXTON CLAY DR. farmer. Sec. 28, P.O. Wrightsville, was born near Richmond, Va., Aug. 5, 1799, was the " seventh son " of William and Mary Thaxton. William having served seven years in the Revolutionary War. In 1819 the subject of this sketch came to this county, at which time it was but a wilderness. Indians roamed across the prairies, and it was in the days of horse mills and "hominy mortars," the nearest mill at that time, being at Alton. Large game, such as bears, panthers, elk, wolves and deer in countless numbers could be seen almost at any time. Chills and fevers were among the indispensables at this time, and it is related that there was scarcely a house during these times but what some members of the family would be down with the "ager," and in many instances, all of them—none being left to care for the sick. People speak of hard times now, but they are nothing in comparison to the times in which those early pioneers lived, and the trials which they passed through would daunt and dishearten the hearts of the most hardy at the present time had they to pass through such scenes as related by those hardy pioneers, who opened up the country, and prepared the way for the present generation. The subject of this sketch was married Nov. 9, 1827, to Caroline Whitaker, who was born March 1, 1811, was the daughter of Robert and Anna Whitaker, from this union they had eleven children, have raised nine: Sarah Ann, born Jan. 1, 1829; Martha Jane, born Dec, 29, 1830; Robt. M., born July 9, 1835; Elizabeth, born Oct. 11, 1839; Lauretta, born January 27, 1842; William, M. born May 2, 1844; John Francis, born Aug. 20, 1847, Joseph H. born Jan. 4, 1850. Mr. Thaxton and wife have divided up their land among their children, have reserved 80 acres for himself and wife, which they are now located upon. John and Joseph are still single, and live with their parents. Mr. Thaxton and wife are consistent members of the United Baptist Church, have been members of that body during the last forty years. They are in unusual good health for people of their years; are sprightly, and seem to be in the full possession of their mental as well as physical faculties, to an extent that gives promise of several years yet; they are ready to go, and are like shocks of corn ripe for their Master's use, and when He calls they are ready to enter into the joys prepared for His people before the foundation of the world
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 639(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


THAXTON LARKIN
THAXTON LARKIN, nearly sixty years ago, came to the State of Illinois, accompanied by wife and five small children. He was a Virginian by birth, who moved to Breckenridge Co., Ky., in the early settlement of that State, and there married Miss Catherine Dudley. Glowing reports of the fertility of Illinois, reached him, and accordingly he determined to emigrate, and after many weeks of travel, located near Edwardsville, Madison County. From this point, in 1820, the family settled three miles southeast of White Hall, near Apple Creek. In this primitive wilderness of prairie, Wm. B. Thaxton was born, Aug. 9, 1820, and here were passed many years of his life. When twelve years of age, his father died; at fourteen he ventured forth on his own resources, hiring out to a man by the name of English, to work by the month, he remained five years, working through the summer months for twenty-five cents per day. During the Winter he was contented to work for his board. Going to Chesterfield, Macoupin County, he worked for a farmer of considerable enterprise, who kept a small store. While here Mr. Thaxton frequently made trips to Alton and St Louis, and showed considerable skill in the purchase of butler and eggs, etc. Leaving the employ of this man, he became employed in a saw-mill on Apple Creek. The following Spring he worked for Col. Gregory at ten dollars per month, for ten years; he then rented property, and from the profits of this procured a sufficient start to purchase eighty acres of land. Years have passed since then, and Mr. Thaxton is now a prominent man of Greene County, a wealthy citizen, due to the vigor, energy and pluck displayed during his younger days. He has been twice married: first to Miss Helen M. McGoffey, Nov. 25, 1852, who, seven years later, passed to a home not made with hands. She was the mother of three children, the oldest and only one living, Mrs. Ella Jane Morrow, wife of John A. Morrow; resides near Roodhouse. Jan. 1, 1860, Mr. T. was married to Mrs. Damon Griswold, whose maiden name was Swallow, a model lady, who is a worthy helpmate of a noble husband and father. Mr. Thaxton owns a magnificent residence at White Hall, also one on his splendid farm near Roodhouse
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 537(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


THAXTON PARHAM
THAXTON PARHAM, farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Carrollton. Mr. Thaxton first saw the light of day Jan. 8, 1826, on a spot of ground on the land he now occupies, and which is now used as a cornfield, and off of it grew corn, which took the blue ribbon at the Greene County Fair this year; so much for association. Mr. Thaxton was the seventh child of Larkin and Catherine Thaxton, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Scotland. The subject of this sketch had but few educational advantages, for while in his minority there was not, he relates a regularly organized district in the county, and what education he did get was by walking several miles to the rude structures incident to those pioneer days. Mr. Thaxton learned the trade of an operative mason, and worked at it for a number of years in Virden and various other localities. In Jan. 27, 1858, he concluded that he had lived a bachelor sufficiently long, and solicited the hand of Anna Drum, and as a result of the alliance have had four children: Florence, born Dec. 26, 1859; Luella, born March 7, 1861; Jennette, born July 5, 1868; Clifford born Nov. 25, 1869. Mr. Thaxton is a man whose honesty and integrity are unquestioned; has held office of Coroner and Township Trustee to the satisfaction of the People
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 639(T11N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMAS A. PROF
THOMAS A. PROF, insurance agent, liberal lecturer and public reader, was born in Mead Co., Kentucky, on the 6th of April, 1826; the second child of Benjamin and Hepsibah Thomas. At the age of two years his parents emigrated from Kentucky and settled at the Saline Salt Works, Gallatin Co., Illinois; it was here our subject passed his boyhood upon a farm, where it was frequently his lot to plow all day with a yoke of unruly steers. During the winter season he acquired a liberal education in the common rough, round log cabin school house. When war was declared between the U. S. Government and Mexico, Mr. Thomas, then in the flush of early manhood, enlisted in the 14th U.S. Infantry Regt. at Shawneetown, Gallatin Co., Ill., under the command of Col. Truesdell. On reaching the scene of carnage he afterwards became a participant in those battles so famous in history as Cherubusco, Molino del Rey, and Chepultepec. When the war closed he returned to Illinois and settled in Brown County, afterwards proceeding to Pike County, he became a teacher of district schools; locating in Scott County during the Spring of 1849. On the fifth of October, 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Anderson, a daughter of Andrew Anderson, of Delaware. March, 1856, Mr. Thomas became a resident of Greene County, locating at the village of Wilmington, where he was destined to play a prominent part in its growth and development, and for the long period of time in which he has lived here he has proved himself a wide-awake business man, and has gained considerable local celebrity as a public reader and lecturer. The marriage of Mr. Thomas to Miss Anderson was blessed with five children, two of whom are living, whose names in order of birth are: George and Charles; children not living: Eugene, Josephine, and Julia
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 564(T12N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMAS JOHN H.
THOMAS JOHN H. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 3, P.O. White Hall. The genial and liberal gentleman whose name heads this biography is a native of Germany, where he was born on the 25th of April, 1835. In early youth he became apprenticed to the trade of a weaver, and at 17 concluded to cast his fortunes in America, and accordingly during the Autumn of 1852 he embarked on board the sailing vessel Georgia at Liverpool; shipwrecked off the coast of Long Island Sound; after the usual delay incident to a shipwreck our subject landed in New York City. Until the Spring opened he lay ill at the hospital at Ward's Island, and on recovering remained in New York City a short time. He afterwards hired as a farm hand. Leaving Albany in the Winter of 1854 Mr. Thomas directed his footsteps westward, and first located in what is now termed East St. Louis. When the Spring opened he sought employment on the Mississippi, as a fireman on the Adriatic, one of the largest boats on the river. In 1856 Mr. Thomas located permanently in Greene county, in Tp. 11, R. 13, where he first worked for George Schutz. In 1858 he united his fortunes to Miss Nancy Paire, a daughter of Hiram Paire, one of the first settlers of Greene County. Mr. Thomas possessed no capital at this date, financially speaking, but he had an unlimited fund of energy that laid the foundation for the success that greeted his efforts in after years. Step by step he accumulated his present farm property of 240 acres of well-cultivated land, which will compare favorably with other tracts of similar size in Greene County. Mr. Thomas has never aspired to office, yet has ever taken a deep interest in the advancement of education. Of the marriage, ten children, four only of whom are living and whose names in order of birth are Sophia Jane, John H., Martha A., and Ortey M,
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 658(T11N R13W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMAS JOHN I.
THOMAS JOHN I. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 33, Tp. 10, R. 12. Mr. Thomas was born in Madison County, Ill., March 15, 1818. During the Autumn of this year, his father, the late Honorable Samuel Thomas, settled on the western prairies of Illinois, that portion now comprised in Greene, locating three miles, from the present city of Carrollton. John Thomas, who heads this sketch, relates that, at this early day, within 600 yards of his father's cabin, he at one time counted twenty-six deer. Bears were also frequently seen. Deer abounded, while wild cats and panthers were frequently seen. One incident here, as related by Mr. Thomas, is worthy of remark. Close to the Mississippi, on the margin of a small stream in Pike County, there stood an old mill, used by the early settlers for pounding grain; it was made in a similar manner to the mills in use, with the exception that a large wheel, revolving through the water, kept the mortar in motion, rapidly or otherwise owing to the rising or lowering of the tide. One day, at low tide, an opossum, discovering no one near, made his way to mill, discovered the corn or other grain, and, heedless of danger, proceeded to help himself. While doing so the mortar, slowly descending, snuffed out the life of the poor 'possum, the inanimate remains being found by the pioneers shortly after. John I. Thomas received his education in a log cabin, where greased paper was in use for window glass, and a large fire-place occupied one end of the cabin. Mr. Thomas has followed farming from boyhood up to the present lime, and now takes rank among the leading farmers of the Northwest. But those early days of log cabins, of the many happy days of pioneer life, are vividly impressed upon his memory. His wonderful success in life is due to untiring efforts in the agricultural walks of life. In 1840 he was united in marriage to Miss Ann Corn, by whom he had five children, four living: Elmira, Alice, Samuel, and Lenora. Mr. Thomas owns over a thousand acres of as good land as lies in the State of Illinois. During the present year he was elected to fill the responsible position of president of the Carrollton Banking Institution, one of the soundest organizations in the West
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 521-22(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMAS WILLIAM D.
THOMAS WILLIAM D. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 29, P.O. Carrollton. The subject of this sketch, it may be truly said, is one of the old settlers of Greene, the fourth son of Samuel Thomas, the first settler north of Macoupin Creek, and one of the most prominent farmers of Greene County, whose loss was deeply deplored by a host of friends who knew him as a generous, whole-souled citizen and a prosperous farmer. William grew to manhood in Greene County; received a liberal education in the district schools of his native place and the higher graded schools of Carrollton. In 1860 Mr. Thomas was married to Miss Mary J. Rainey, a daughter of Major Rainey, by whom he has eight children : Frederick W., Leslie C, Charles R., Harry S., Jane E., Mary S., Lewis H., and John H. Mr. Thomas is the owner of 760 acres of land in one of the best townships in Greene County. It would perhaps be superfluous here to state that he ranks among the leading agriculturists of this prosperous county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 522; - transcribed by bmt


THOMASSON JOHN
THOMASSON JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 18, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, where he was born in 1833; second child of William and Sarah Thomasson; his boyhood was spent amid pioneer associations, and from early to mature years he has followed agricultural pursuits; when the war broke out he became enrolled in Uncle Sam's troops, and remaining a short time, he subsequently returned to the duties of the farm; in 1868, he was married to Miss Sarah C. Varble, a daughter of George Varble, by whom he has five children: S. Pasey Elizabeth, Sophia J., George T., John N., and infant child. Mr. Thomasson is the owner of 120 acres, and is a thorough-going, hard working farmer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 763(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMPSON DAVID A.
THOMPSON DAVID A. is a gentleman of rare energy, and comes from a numerous and respected family. He was born in 1847, on the old farm homestead of his parents, near the village of Old Kane, where he passed his early years; from his father, who became an exceedingly prosperous farmer, he inherited that force of character that laid the foundation for his present success. In September, 1869, he was married to Miss Margaret Race, who was born in Virginia, and who died in 1871, leaving to the care of her husband one child, Charles. On the 19th of February, 1873, Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Sarah Race, a sister of his former wife; five children blessed this union, two of whom are living, Georgie and Susan S. Mr. Thompson is the owner of 160 acres of land, town property in New Kane, and is extensively engaged in stock Shipping
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 743(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMPSON GEO. W.
THOMPSON GEO. W. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29, P.O. Roodhouse, is a native of Logan County, Illinois, where he was born in 1853; his father, John Thompson, whose ancestry are traced back to Ireland, followed farming from his earliest years, and where the subject of this sketch spent his boyhood on the farm homestead; for the past four years he has been a resident of Greene County; Mr. Thompson is a gentleman of genial manners, a warm friend, and a liberal citizen
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 598(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


THOMPSON GEO. W.
THOMPSON GEO. W. who is one of the oldest residents of Greene County, was born September 7, 1829, near Barrow Station. Eighth child of James and Susan Thompson, natives of Kentucky, who emigrated to Illinois during its earliest settlement. Growing to manhood, having for associates the pioneer boys of long ago, George attended the same log cabin, studied the same simple lessons, composed principally of Webster's speller and the New Testament; on the old homestead property he received a full share of the hard work of the farm. December 13, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Perkins, a daughter of William Perkins, of Scott County; seven children were born of this marriage, six of whom are living: Alice Ann, Samuel A., John H., William M., James E. and Eliza A. Mr. Thompson followed farming many years, and witnessed many hardships, incident to those good old days of long ago. In 1867 Mr. Thompson located at Roodhouse, where, in connection with S. L. Simmons, he put up the first dry goods and grocery store in the place. The business prospered far beyond the expectations of its proprietors. In 1876 Mr. Thompson was elected justice of the peace of Roodhouse, an office he is well qualified to fill. There were of the first marriage of Mr. Thompson no children. His first wife died in 1863. The following year he was united in marriage to Miss Emily McNemer, a daughter of Robert Kidney and widow of Landford McNemer; seven children born of this marriage. As written above it would appear to the general reader as though the children named were of the first marriage. We take this means of correcting this impression
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 577-8(Roodhouse); - transcribed by bmt


THORPE J. MARTIN
THORPE J. MARTIN, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. Greenfield. Prominent among the representatives of this township who are self-made, and have worked their way up to wealth through their own industry and individual exertions, is Mr. Thorpe, who was born in Drax, Yorkshire, England, Nov. 23, 1814. His father, William, was twice married; the second time to Ann Petly, who gave birth to J. Martin; his parents dying when he was quite young, and by their demise, he was thus left alone. At the age of 14, he embarked for America in company with Adam Allinson, now of Morgan County, and upon their arrival, located west of Jacksonville, Martin remaining with Mr. Allison until he became of age, in consideration of the amount of his passage money and a horse, saddle, and bridle; then hired to Mr. Allinson two years—first year, $10 per month; second year, $12 1/2 per month. February, 1843, was united in marriage to Anna Hembrough; one child, William H., born July 3, 1844, now in Missouri. Subsequent to this marriage, rented for two years of Mr. Allinson, then moved to Apple Creek Prairie, near White Hall; expected to remain here for good, but after contracting for some land, the trade not being consummated, he then moved to the place he now owns in 1846. His wife dying in 1845, he was united in marriage to Mrs. L. N. Bibb February, 1846. Five children have blessed this union. James H., born July 9, 1848; Benjamin F., born April 30, 1850; Mary A., born February, 1852; Sarah Allinson, born Oct. 1854; Maria Otis, born Feb. 10, 1856. After his location, he first bought 120 acres, and began work with a right good will. He has since added to it until he now has 600 acres of choice land; also 440 acres in Cass County, Mo.; has been a man of great energy, and possessing, in a large degree, that ingredient so essential to success — "pluck!" — has been a tireless worker, and always considered his word as valid as his note; has been engaged in stock-trading for several years past, and in this capacity been of much service to the county. His early education and association with a class of people whose honesty and integrity were unquestioned, has caused him to rely too much confidence in some who have taken advantage of this trust, and in consequence, he has become temporarily embarrassed; but not to an extent as to deprive any of his creditors of their just dues, having property enough, if disposed of at anything near its value to liquidate all his indebtedness, and then leave him a competence. There is no man in the county whose commercial honesty stands higher, or is more highly respected. Himself and wife are members of the M. E. Church. Republican in sentiment
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 694-5(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TOLMAN W. O.
TOLMAN W. O. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 28, P.O. Kane. W. O. Tolman ranks among the wealthier earlier residents of Greene County, is a native of White Hall, born in 1829; of his parents it will be well to extend more than a passing notice. Cyrus Tolman was a native of Massachusetts, born in 1796. Wending his way westward as early as 1817, and proceeded to Utica in the State of Indiana; one year later, although comparatively without means, he landed at Edwardsville, in this State, and first secured employment in helping toward the survey of the town of Gibraltar. In 1821 he entered a piece of land near the present town of White Hall. In connection with Carl Gregory he erected the first two frame blocks in Greene County. Jan. 30, 1828, he was married to Miss Polly Eldred, a daughter of Jehosophat Eldred and Polly. In 1830 he was elected assessor and treasurer of Greene and Macoupin Counties, receiving for his services $75. A short time after he was elected judge of Greene County, and in 1840 moved to Jerseyville, where, during the Fall of the year he was elected to fill the same office. As a farmer. Judge Tolman was more than ordinarily successful, few of the old settlers having come to the State under more trying circumstances. Mrs. Tolman passed away in Oct. 17, 1860. Mr. T. was laid at rest two years ago, after a long life fraught no ordinary interest. The subject of this notice, whose name heads this sketch, is the third child born of this marriage. Like nearly all who grew up in the West, he attained the usual primitive education in the old familiar log cabin. In 1857 he was married to Miss Eliza Pope, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Pope. Mr. Tolman started in life under many discouragements; the prairie everywhere remained unbroken, but as the years flew onward, his industry paved the way to success. At the present writing he is the owner of 210 acres of valuable land, and a farm residence that will compare very favorably with any in the county. Of nine children born of the above marriage, all are living: Fanny, Emma, Polly, Anna, and Chloe, Cyrus, William, Curtis, and Elon
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 743(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TRASK GEO. W.
TRASK GEO. W. lumber dealer, whose yards are located near the C.B.& Q. R.R., became a resident of White Hall but a little over a year ago, entering into the above business, where he takes the leading position in the lumber trade, and has shown himself to be not only a man of generous impulses and height of character, but a reliable business man; born at Paterson, N. J., Sept. 30, 1834. When quite small, his parents moved to New Orleans, remaining there four years, and then moved to Louisville, Ky., where the head of the family became a cigar-maker; moving to Missouri, thence to California, from whose golden shores he went to Cuba, where he died. Geo. W. Trask, in early life, became a R. R. contractor, in which he accumulated wealth, and a large experience, which have paved the way for his present success in life. He afterwards became a stock buyer and trader, in Kansas. Sept. 16, 1860, he was united in marriage to Julia A. Greene, of Macoupin Co.; two children were born of this marriage, not living. In 1869, Mrs. Trask died; during the Autumn of 1871, Mr. Trask was married to Miss Mary L. Terry, of Greene County; one child : Harry E. When the war came on Mr. Trask enlisted in Co. A., 97th Ill. Inft.; was promoted 1st sergeant for meritorious conduct; battles: Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Jackson, Carthage, Grand Gulf, Fort Gibson, and many others
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 537(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


TRIMBLE HARVEY
TRIMBLE HARVEY, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 6, P. O. Carrollton. Not many of the veteran pioneers of Greene County are left to tell the story of frontier hardships, but among those whose settlement in Greene County occurred in an early day, we mention with more than ordinary notice the name of Harvey Trimble, born in Nicholasville, Kentucky, on the 17th of November, 1810. His father John Trimble a native Virginian who moved to Kentucky in an early day, from his earliest years he followed agricultural pursuits; he married in Kentucky Miss Polly Guy also of Virginia, of this marriage eleven children were born, of whom our subject was the fifth, and of whom we have only space to say that he grew up amid pioneer associations. In 1832 he moved to Missouri, and thence to Greene County in 1834 as a permanent resident, but the year 1833 had witnessed his marriage in Greene County to Miss Margaret A. Rice, a daughter of Jefferson and Nancy Rice. In his own language there was plenty of hard work to be done and he had little capital, but strong will and some little energy, and he now set resolutely to work to obtain a livelihood in Illinois; for several years he lived in a rough round log cabin, and necessarily lived an economical life; the regular bill of fare, except on Sunday, was principally corn dodgers or corn bread; when Sunday came, warm biscuit, a rare treat for old and young; of times it happened when the wheat became more generally grown young Trimble put in considerable time hanging to the end of a sheet, and kept in rapid motion for the purpose of winnowing or separating wheat from chaff; to be more particular, two men holding a sheet kept it in rapid motion while a third held aloft an old sieve, the contents of which were chaff and wheat violently shaken in the hands of the operative, in its fall the sheet kept in constant motion served as a separator of the chaff from the grain; in after years horse mills came into vogue for the grinding of grain and vast numbers congregated awaiting their turn, and enjoying themselves meanwhile; we have related the above in order to show what industry and economy will accomplish from poverty. Mr. T. has become comfortably situated in life, and is now the owner of 240 acres of valuable farm property; elsewhere we have spoken of Mr. Trimble's marriage, his wife Miss Margaret H. Rice, was born in Kentucky; of this marriage twelve children were born, of whom eight are living: Georgianna, Jane, Aggie, Napoleon Bonaparte, Susan, Ellen, Lafayette and Augusta; deceased, John R., Jefferson R., Thomas P. and James H. (twins). For ten years Mr. T. worked as a tanner at which he served four years apprenticeship
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 763-4(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


TUCKER DAVID M.
TUCKER DAVID M. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 18, P.O. Rockbridge. David Tucker was born in Tennessee in 1833. In an early day his parents moved to the West, locating in Greene County, where the youthful years of our subject were spent upon the farm homestead. In 1855 he was married to Miss Rhoda Whitlock, a daughter of Henry and Hannah Whitlock, by whom he has five children living: Henry B., Thomas A., Sarah S., Melvina J. and Bertha B. Like nearly all of those whose boyhood was passed amid the scenes of western life, David Tucker found a hard row to hoe for many years. He now resides in comfortable circumstances in township 9, range lo, the owner of 80 acres of valuable land. The only office he has ever held or aspired to he holds at present, that of constable of this precinct
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 725(T9N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


TUCKER JOHN A.
TUCKER JOHN A. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 1, P.O. Rockbridge. John A. Tucker is a native of Clayburn County, East Tenn., where he was born July 22, 1820, third child of Obadiah and Elizabeth Tucker, whose maiden name was James. In the famous old State of Tennessee, those who bore the name, so far as we have any knowledge followed agricultural pursuits. Obadiah Tucker was a renter of land in his native State, and consequently living in moderate circemstances; to better his condition in life he concluded to cast his fortunes in the West, and accordingly, the year 1843 found him en route for the fertile prairies of Illinois, where he settled in due time in Greene County. He never became opulent as many have in Greene County, but he became moderately successful through well directed energy, and an honesty of purpose that never wavered. He died in 1850, and thus there passed to a home not made with hands, another pioneer who helped to pave the way for the prosperity that we of to-day enjoy; many of us scarcely realizing the hardships undergone by the people of the South and East, whose restless ambition have carried them ever onward. Mrs. T. died many years prior to her husband, finding a last resting place in the Witt Cemetery. John was in his 23d year when the family arrived in Greene County, and the head of a family, having united his fortunes to Miss Rachel Graves, a daughter of Henry Graves, in Tennessee; to use his own language, his capital, financially speaking, consisted of seventy- five cents, and for many years he held his own remarkably well. His first purchase of property was made in 1861, and consisted of ten acres, known as Bottom Prairie. Since this date he has gone steadily forward to a successful career, and from the little patch of ground has come an estate of over 300 acres, acquired by the same energy of character that distinguished Obadiah Tucker and his estimable wife of eleven children that blessed the union of Mr. Tucker and Miss Graves, six only are living: Martha E., James H., Nancy C, Eva E., Jacob M., and Samuel O.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 743-4(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TUNISON J. E.
TUNISON J. E. farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 5, P.O. White Hall, was born in Greene County, in 1846; was married the first time to Minerva Baker, Dec. 24, 1867, a native of Kentucky, and died Oct. 26, 1869; was married the second time, Sept. 14, 1871, to Mary H. Ledford, who was born in 1849; have four children: Julia E., born March 16, 1873, deceased; William H., born July 14, 1874, deceased; George E., born Oct. 1, 1876, deceased; Minnie M., born 1878. The homestead contains 200 acres of well improved land, and is well stocked with fine breeds of cattle
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 650(T11N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


TURNER DR. W. D.
TURNER DR. W. D. physician and surgeon, Carrollton, was born in London, England, June 21, 1843; left an orphan at five, when eight years old he was placed in charge of a family, who crossed the Atlantic for America. In due course of time the little waif became a resident of Pike Co., Ill., where he received a liberal education. When the war broke out he enlisted in Co. E, 50th Ill. Inf., becoming a participant in the following battles: Pittsburg Landing, where he received a severe scalp wound, Corinth, siege of Atlanta, and battle of Nashville, etc., etc.; elected First Lieutenant by a large majority, owing to his youth he did not accept; afterward he received the appointment and served as Sergeant Major. Honorably discharged, he returned to Pike County, where he began the study of medicine, under G. C. Pitzer, now Professor American Medical College and editor American Medical Journal, St. Louis; remaining one year he then attended three courses of study at the Cincinnati, Ohio, Eclectic College, and two clinical courses at Commercial Hospital; on leaving the college he went to Waynesville, Dewitt Co., Ill, where he obtained a large practice. In 1871 he came to Carrollton, where he has a large and constantly growing practice; Oct. 1st, 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss S. J. Peebles; two children, Walter P. and Frank
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


TUTTEROW BALSAR
TUTTEROW BALSAR, farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Carrollton, is a native of Knox County, Tenn., was born Sept. 23, 1820, son of Jacob and Susan T.; her maiden name was Probst. There were five children in the family, Balsar being the eldest. His father dying at the time when his parental aid was the most needed, the care of the family from that time devolved upon him and his mother, and he was thus deprived of the privilege of attending school. Remained with his mother until he attained his 27th year, when he was united in marriage to Caroline Gowan; they had four children, namely, Arthama Ann, Orpha C, John P., Battle and Willie A. Moved to this State in October, 1851, and first located one mile and a quarter south of Carrollton, where he began renting land, which he continued for about nine years, until the year 1857, when he bought eighty acres of land. His wife died the same year; was married the second time to Celia E. Pinkerton, March, 1858. She was born May 16, 1832. They have three children—Alva C, Rhoda J., and Lavina C. Member of the M. E. Church, is a strong advocate of temperance principles; was formerly a member of the Whig party
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 715(T10N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


TYAS RICHARD
TYAS RICHARD, blacksmith, Greenfield, born in Halifax, Yorkshire, Jan. 9, 1840, son of James and Mary Tyas, whose family name was Riley. Parents dying, he was under the care of relatives; left school when eight years of age, and went to learn the blacksmith trade with his uncle. In the Spring of i860 emigrated to this State, and after stopping with his uncle in Sangamon County one year, came to Greenfield, and soon after enlisted in Co. D, 30th Regt. I. V. Infantry; and after three years and two months faithful service in behalf of his country, received an honorable discharge, and returned to peaceful pursuits, working at his trade for Broadmarkle and others; then went to Waverly, Morgan County, where he engaged in business for himself for six years. In 1872 sold out, and made a trip to England. Upon his return to Greenfield, went into partnership with Charles Boring, a comrade in the service, in 1875, bought his partner out, and has since been conducting the business himself. The worst thing that can be said of Richard is, that he is a bachelor !
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 695(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


UNDERWOOD J. H.
UNDERWOOD J. H. book -seller and dealer in stationery, picture frames and miscellaneous articles, west side Square, Carrollton. Mr. Underwood was born in Harrison Co., Kentucky, July 31, 1825; he was but eight years of age when his parents immigrated to the West, settling in Sangamon Co., Ill., in 1833, where the subject of our sketch passed the days of his youth and grew to manhood. Receiving a liberal education in Schuyler Co., he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Smith, a daughter of James Smith, by whom he has seven children. For one year Mr. Underwood became a resident of Mt. Sterling, Brown Co., where he taught the public school of this enterprising town; in 1862 he moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., where he became engaged in the drug business for a period of three years, when he moved to Carrollton, where he began, in a small way, the business mentioned above; slowly but surely, however, success attended his energetic efforts, and today he has the only regular establishment of its kind on a permanent basis in Greene Co., and a look through his well-stocked store, by those intending to purchase, will well repay the visit
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500-1(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


UNDERWOOD WILLIAM
UNDERWOOD WILLIAM, manufacturer and dealer in the celebrated Underwood Spring Mattress, is a native of Harrison Co., Kentucky, born in 1826, where he remained a resident until he arrived at the age of thirteen years, when he accompanied his parents, Francis and Margaret Underwood, to Greene Co., date 1839, and locating near Woodville, where our subject was early instructed in the rudiments of hard work upon the farm homestead, receiving his education principally during the winter season. April 11th, 1850, when the California excitement ran high, he crossed the plains for Placerville, arriving Aug. 31, 1850, where he entered upon the rough life of a miner, but at this critical period he was taken ill, and his success as a miner was in consequence seriously impaired. Remaining four years on the Pacific coast, on the 16th of March, 1854, he again became a resident of Greene Co., going back to the old homestead farm. The following year, Oct. 22d, he united his fortunes to Miss Angeline Varble, a daughter of Henry and Sarah Varble. Of this lady, who subsequently became the inventor of the above mentioned mattress—a Spring Dress Pillow and Clod Pulverizer, of which a description is given elsewhere—it may be said that she is a native of Greene Co., born March 26, 1838; she early manifested a taste for mechanics, that marked a successful era of invention in after years. And now, as our narrative draws to a close, we may here state that Mr. Underwood became a farmer of prominence in Greene Co., who met with misfortune through the liberality that was an inherent part of his nature. Three years ago he moved to Carrollton, where for a period of time he entered into the grocery trade, embarking in above business but a short time ago. In this success is not far distant when the merits of important inventions are readily recognized. There were born of the marriage above referred to seven children; Edward B., deceased, Robert, Alice C, Eunice, Mary, Ida, Amy J. and William A., deceased
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 501(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


VALLENTINE J. H.
VALLENTINE J. H. dry goods and groceries, and general store, Rockbridge. John Henry first saw the light of day, in town 10, range 10, December 7, 1840; is the first child in a family of five children born of James and Martha Ann Vallentine, her maiden name was Vanarsdale; both of the above named families are favorably known in the county. The subject of this sketch had excellent educational advantages which were improved. In 1862 he embarked in business for himself, first engaging in agricultural pursuits, at which he continued two years. During this time he was in command of the Yates Guard, a company of militia that was in organization since the outbreak of the war, a portion of which company went with him into the one hundred days service, joining the 133d Regiment, J. Henry receiving a commission as 1st Lieutenant. Upon his return from service he embarked in the mercantile business with his brother, Edward S. Vallentine, October 24, 1864, which partnership continued until the Spring of 1867. He then associated with Albert Bowman, his brother in- law, they doing business together until 1869, when he bought his partner out, and his father, James Vallentine, became one of the firm, and remained with him until 1876, when Joseph Mead bought his father's interest, and the firm is now known as J H. & J. M. Vallentine. They have one of the largest and best arranged business houses in the county, being 75x25 feet, main building two stories high, having a cellar under the entire portion, and attached to the main building in the rear, is an agricultural room, one story and a half high, 32x22 feet. They carry a large stock of goods, having every thing that is needed: dry goods, groceries, clothing, boots and shoes, stoves, hardware, and fancy goods, and are doing a thriving business. On June the 20th he was united in marriage to Susan B. Ryan, daughter of W. E. Ryan; she was born November 15, 1844. They have been blessed with five children, three of whom are now living: James W., Birdie M. Claudie M., Edward M., Lucy W.B. Mr. John H. is a member of the Masonic Order, Sheffield Lodge, No. 687, also of the Knights of Honor, Golden Rule Lodge No. 1017. From the present outlook we predict for him a bright and successful career, and he will no doubt become one of the most opulent commercial men in the county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 696-7(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


VALLENTINE J.M.
VALLENTINE J.M. grain and lumber Sec. 34, P.O. Rockbridge. Joseph Mead, is a son of James Vallentine, a well-known self-made man of this county. Joseph first beheld the light of day in T 10, R 10. His educational advantages were good; aside from the common schools he attended the high school at Carrollton, and the Iowa State University. Having an inclination to study materia medica, entered Rush Medical College, with the intention of taking a thorough course, but only attended one year, when in consequence of ill health was compelled to relinquish his studies for a time, to return home and recuperate; but was restrained from following out the bent of his inclination, as his father's health not being good, and having at the time a large amount of business on hand, he importuned Joseph to engage with him in business, and on July 25, 1870, began business with Jas, Vallentine & Co,, dealers in general merchandise, grain and lumber; firm composed of James, John H., George R. and J. M. Vallentine, he continuing with them until November 1, 1871, at which time he withdrew from the partnership, and taking the grain and lumber business as his, then associated himself with another brother, E. S. Vallentine adding the stock trade also. This partnership was of short duration, terminating in April, 1872, by the withdrawal of E. S. Vallentine. The grain business, also the lumber, has since been controlled by him alone. July 1, 1876, he bought his father's interest in firm of James Vallentine & Co., and the business has since been conducted under the firm name of J. M. & J. H. Vallentine, each being equal partner. March 2, 1871, he formed a matrimonial alliance with Anna Rhodes, born March 26, 1852. She was a daughter of John Rhodes, an old resident of the county. Their association together was short, though very happy, as they had congenial temperaments and were "mated" as well as married; but Joseph was caused to "pass under the rod." Death, the grim monster, Aug. 14, 1873, invaded his happy home and bore off, on his icy bosom, his first born, named Rhodes, and, not being content with this invasion, Aug. 11, 1874, returned and bore away to the Spirit land his wife, Anna, thus leaving his home desolate indeed. After her death he continued keeping house until 1877, and has since been boarding with Wm. Rhodes. Mr. J. M. is now doing business in the first house building that was erected in the town. He is doing a good business, and well deserving of the high regard and esteem with which he is viewed in the community in which he resides
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 697(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


VALLENTINE JAMES
VALLENTINE JAMES, farmer. Sec. 31, P.O. Rockbridge. Were it possible for the reader to take a retrospective view of the locality and its surroundings, of the place now occupied by its present owners, during the first few years of its occupancy, could have seen a little, low log cabin with "cat-and-clay chimney," and split boards for a roof, which was held to its place by being weighted down with poles. Parlor, sitting, dining, and bed-room up stairs, and cellar, hall, pantry, and wardrobe, being embraced in one room. Its owner having just returned from a trip to St. Louis, took a load of wheat and pork thither, for the wheat he got 33 cents per bushel, and $1.25 per one hundred lbs. for the pork, taking scrip in payment; and, as we take a peep inside this structure through a crevice in the logs, we see the fair matron plying industriously at her wheel, while just across on the other side of the fireplace, sits her husband on his bench, making a pair of shoes for a neighbor; and, as he is stitching and pegging away, he is sending up a harmonious bass to "home, sweet home," which his wife has "struck up, "while John and Edward S. are stretched out on the puncheon floorregaling themselves with a chunk of corn bread, this being the regular article of diet, wheat bread the exception. This is no overdrawn picture, it was but the true state of things as they existed, when Mr. and Mrs. Vallentine began life, yet from these unpropitious and unfavorable surroundings have, by economy and industry, attained their present condition, as we find them today. Mr. Vallentine was born in Dover, New Hampshire, Sept. 11, 1812, was a son of John Vallentine and Anna Plant. At an early age James moved with his parents to Taunton, Mass., where they continued up to the year 1837, when they moved to Greene County in this State, first settling in Carrollton. On September 11, 1838, was united in marriage to Martha A. Vanarsdale, born June 24, 1818, in Mercer Co., Kentucky. Left Carrollton in 1840 and moved on the place he now lives, having loaned a party $500, which he could not pay, he took the forty acres in lieu of the money, and began farming. He being raised up a mechanic, this new vocation was very distasteful to him, yet he plodded on and having in the person of his wife a very efficient helpmeet, he was doublehanded. They remained at this place about eight years, when at this time there was a piece of land that he desired, but not having the money, he, to pay for it, traded his horses and implements for the land, and returned to Carrollton and resumed his trade, where he continued two years, then returned to his farm and began again, and has since continued farming, yet during the time of driving stock to St. Louis, has traded quite extensively in that line. Subsequent to this he engaged in the commercial business at Rockbridge, where he built the storehouse now occupied by J. M. & J. H. Vallentine. He continued in business there for about eight years, when he sold out his interest to its present occupants, and he is still carrying on his farm, but considers himself partially retired. Having divided up his property among his children, is not attempting to do much business, being more interested in their success than of his own at the present. Mr. and Mrs. Vallentine and daughter are members of the Presbyterian church. He is also a member of Sheffield Lodge A. F. & A. M., No. 687. Mr. and Mrs. Vallentine have had eight children, but five are now living: John H., born December 7, 1840; Edward S., born January 29, 1843; Ellen J., born November 25, 1844; J. Meade, born August 7, 1849; Cora B., born April 3, 1857. Edward S. is now settled in Christian County in this State, Ellen J. is now the wife of A. Bowman, Cora B. is at home.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 695-6(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


VANARSDALE J. H.
VANARSDALE J. H. farmer. Sec. 31, P.O. Rockbridge, was a native born Kentuckian, having first beheld the light of day in Mercer County, June 28, 1816. His father, Peter, married Miss Charity Demerce, both of them being of Dutch descent. The father of J. H. being a man who believed that slavery was morally wrong, and advocating this idea, with a fervency characteristic of the man, his ideas were not entertained by those people as being orthodox, and Peter, like the Pilgrim Fathers, emigrated to a clime more congenial to his conceptions of right, where he could exercise his opinions and principles un trammeled by that sectional or partisan feeling so rife in that locality, and in the year 1836 moved to Carrollton, where he remained about two years, when he removed to the country, as he had become unpopular on account of his (what was then styled) "Abolition" principles. He never lived to see the triumph of the principles which he advocated so zealously, but his children have witnessed with pride the final victory of the tenets to which he adhered, and which have now become governmentally the chief corner stone. After J. H. had arrived at his twenty-first year, he engaged for himself at farming pursuits, at which he continued up to the date of his marriage, which occurred Dec. 9, 1839, to Susan Demere, by whom he had two children: Alfred H., who is now in Colorado, and James, who died in the service. Mr. V. lost his wife in 1854; was married second time to Mrs. Sarah S. Batchelder, by whom he has five children: Sue F., born April 28, 1856; Hattie E., born March 29, 1858; Harry P., born March 29, 1858, twins; Allie J., born July 11, 1859; Ernest S., born Sept. 29, 1862, all of whom are now at home. Miss Sue is music teacher and Hattie teacher in the public school. Mr. Van was elected justice of the peace, in 1849, which office he continued to hold by re-election until the year 1862, when he was appointed U. S. district assessor internal revenue department for the county, and in 1867 received an appointment as a member of the board of equalization for this Congressional district. Mr. Vanarsdale has always been an uncompromising temperance man, and politically is of his father's belief, and says he voted the anti-slavery ticket when there was not another voter to bear him company; voted for Martin Van Buren in 1836. He and family are members of the Presbyterian Church. Still engaged in agricultural pursuits; has been school director twenty-five years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 697-8(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


VANGIESEN JAMES
VANGIESEN JAMES, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 8, P.O. Roodhouse. For a period of thirty years the above named gentleman has been a resident of Greene County, where he is well known for his kindly disposition and success as a farmer; he was born in Somerset County, New Jersey, in 1822; the youngest of a family of ten children. In his fifteenth year he accompanied his parents to Greene County. The year 1838, although not an early one in the history of the county, it had yet to witness many changes; as deer still roamed at will and wild fowl were abundant, being frequently found on the table of the backwoodsman; the family first settled on the Sand Ridge, being the third in that neighborhood; here were passed the last days of the head of the family, Cornelius Vangiesen, who died at the advanced age of seventy-seven years. James, then in his twenty-second year, was in limited circumstances; his first purchase on the Sand Ridge consisted of 160 acres; here he resided fourteen years, and, during this time, united his fortunes to Miss Elizabeth Hudson, a daughter of the late William Hudson, by whom he had five children, William, Mary Jane, Minnie Belle, an infant child, and Dora, the only surviving child. In 1852 Mr. V. moved to his present farm, consisting of 220 acres
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 598(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


VAN TUYLE ROBERT
VAN TUYLE ROBERT, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 32, P.O. Manchester, Scott Co., Ill. Robert Van Tuyle was born in Somerset Co., New Jersey, on the 26th of November, 1832; he was in his fourth year when his parents, Otto and Charlotte Van Tuyle, immigrated to Illinois, settling in Greene County. Remaining during the winter northeast of White Hall, thence to Manchester prairie; remaining until 1851, when a location was made on the property now owned by Robert; on this property were passed the last days of Otto Van Tuyle, who became an exceedingly prosperous farmer through industry, whose worth was appreciated by the early residents of Scott and Greene Counties; he passed away to that world of spirits to which we all are hastening, on the 3d of June, 1852. Mrs. Van Tuyle who is still living, a most estimable lady, is a resident of Jacksonville, Morgan County. Robert, from whom this sketch is obtained, has followed farming from boyhood; on the 3d of May, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. Clark, a daughter of E. J. Clark, a successful farmer of Scott County, an earnest minister of the gospel and president of the Manchester Bank of Scott County; three children born of this marriage, Frederick, a student of the Commercial College of Jacksonville, and Edward and Lottie. Mr. Van Tuyle, from a small beginning, has become a successful farmer, owning 460 acres; in addition to fanning Mr. V. is also extensively engaged as a stock buyer and shipper; one of the most popular men of Scott County, he there holds the position of bank director, and was lately nominated for probate judge
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 599(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


VARBLE GEORGE
VARBLE GEORGE, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 17, P. O. Carrollton. George Varble was born in Oldham County, Kentucky, on the 15th of March, 1822. His father George Varble was a native of North Carolina, by occupation an agriculturist; in an early day he became a resident of Kentucky, and there formed the acquaintance of, and married Miss Sarah Cravens, a daughter of Annan Cravens and Abigail Hathaway; by whom he had nine children; John, who died in infancy; Charles, who grew to maturity, moved to Greene County, where he died; William, who died in Jersey County, Illinois; Bourbon, who died in Kentucky; Lewis, who also passed the remainder of life in Kentucky; Anderson, who also lies at rest in the same cemetery; Elizabeth, who died in Greene County; Melinda A., who was laid at rest in Greene County, and George, the last of his race, who became a resident of Greene County; permanently located during the Spring of 1849; prior to his arrival Mr. V. had purchased a tract of land comprising 280 acres, on which he now bent all the energies of his nature to bring to a proper degree of cultivation. March, 1843, in Kentucky, Mr. Varble was married to Miss Hannah Admayer, a daughter of Henry, who died on the 28th of September. 1878, and was laid at rest in the Hutchens Cemetery; to the care of her husband she left a family of six children: Nancy Jane, who married John Barrett and resides in Greene County; Sarah, who married John Thomasson; Elizabeth, who married James Pope; George S., who married Miss Martha Heron; James B., who married Louisa Stone; Lafayette and James A. who reside on the old homestead. George Varble is well known in Greene County as an honest upright citizen and of generous impulses, that a detailed statement of his life would be superfluous, and it is only sufficient to say that he has become an exceedingly prosperous farmer, the owner of 355 acres of valuable land in Greene County, and merits the respect and confidence of his many friends
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 764(T9N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


VARBLE JOHN H.
VARBLE JOHN H. farmer and blacksmith, Sec. 15. P.O. Kane. John Varble is a native of Greene County, born in 1847. His father, William Varble was a native Kentuckian, he was quite young when he emigrated and located in Greene County, where he married Rebecca Jane Reynolds, by whom he had eleven children, three of whom are living, whose names are: William, Henry, John, and Joseph D. John became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith, in due time becoming a skillful workman. In 1872, he was married to Mrs. Sarah J. Hodgson, a daughter of R. M. Osborn and relict of Benj. Hodgson, by whom he has four children: Robert J., Wm. J., Eliza R., and Louise M.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 744(T9N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


VAUGHN JOHN
VAUGHN JOHN, farmer. Sec. 24, P. O. Fayette, was born in Sangamon County, Ill., Feb. 2, 1834. His father, Harberd, is a native of Virginia; his mother's maiden name was Jane Young, and claims a birthplace in the same State as her husband. They lived but a few years after their arrival in Sangamon County, and at the age of seven years he was left an orphan, and had to battle alone in life, without a father's aid or a mother's counsel. At an early age he went to live with a man in Mason County, by the name of Harder, who agreed to give him good advantages in school and clothe him, and at his majority to present him with a good horse and equipments in consideration for the services he would render. The result was he got about six months' schooling in all, and on his departure received $1 95, and the horse and bridle and saddle he never got. He then came to this county, worked a while for his brother gratis, then hired by the month at low wages, working for Mr. Eldred, then David Wright and C. N. Brace. In the Fall of 1856, Oct. 16, was married to Catherine E. Hill, born in Tennessee, Jan. 1, 1835. They have had eight children, but four now living: Maggie, born Sept. 12, 1864; Edie, May 7, 1869; Ella, Sept. 15, 1871, and Ota, July 3, 1878. After his marriage, rented land of Mr. Brace, for three years, then moved to Fayette, and rented land of Mr. Bostick two years, and subsequently bought the land he now occupies, and improved it, and though a small farm, yet it is sufficient for him. He owes no man a dollar, and will hand down to his children a name and character for honesty and integrity that none can gainsay or disapprove
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 698(T10N R10W); - transcribed by bmt


VEDDER A. F.
VEDDER A. F. dealer in drugs, hardware, farming implements, paints, oil stuffs and dyes, Main St., White Hall, Ills., for the past eighteen years a merchant of White Hall, and during this time has carried on a very successful business. He first became a partner of Judge Worcester; the firm became widely known. On the retirement of Mr. W., he entered into partnership with a younger brother, Mr. F. I. Vedder, continuing together three years. His next partner was Mr. A. D. Rucker. Mr. Vedder was born in New York, in 1835, receiving a liberal education. In his 19th year he came West, locating at White Hall, where he first became a clerk with Davis & Veddel; since this time his movements and enterprise are so well known as to need no further mention. In 1861, he was married to Miss Virginia Drish, a daughter of Dr. Drish. of White Hall; two children were born of this marriage: Alice, not living, and Linnie. In 1865, Mrs. Vedder died, and was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery at White Hall. In 1867, Mr. Vedder married Miss Nellie Bullock, by whom he has one child, Florence. Mr. V. is a member of the town board of White Hall
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 538(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


VEDDER ISAAC D.
VEDDER ISAAC D. retired merchant and acting notary public of White Hall. Mr. Vedder was born in Onondaga Co., N. Y. State, June 5, 1820. At nineteen he set out for Illinois, locating at White Hall, Greene Co., Ill. He first worked in a small grocery store kept by a man by the name of Lawson. Richard W. Young was then U. S. Land Commissioner; by him Mr. Vedder was tendered a clerkship. Proceeding to Washington, he entered upon the duties of his office. While there he formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Sarah E. Prettyman, Feb. 15, 1849. Shortly after this important event Mr. Vedder returned to White Hall. He now opened a dry goods store, admitting as partner Asbury Davis. Both were young men of sagacity and business tact, and immediately entered upon a successful business career. In 1857, the firm dissolved partnership, the store being continued by Mr. Davis for a short time, when Mr. V. again became a partner, and continued so until 1864, when he again retired. In 1869, he bought out the wagon shop of L. E. Worcester; this proved an unfortunate speculation. Mr. Vedder is a gentleman of education and culture, whose impulses are generous to a fault
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 538(White Hall); - transcribed by bmt


VERMILLION THOMAS
VERMILLION THOMAS, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 31, P.O.White Hall. Mr. Vermillion is a native of Virginia, born in 1822; sixth child of Charles and Nancy Vermillion. At the early age of sixteen Thomas made his way to Greene County, locating near present farm residence of James Rawlings; remaining three years he returned to Virginia, and while here a resident was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Carr. Sixteen years later he again set out for Illinois, locating first in Marshall County, he proceeded to Decatur, in Macon County, and thence to Greene, where he has since resided; owning 44 acres. Having thirteen years experience in the manufacture of sorghum molasses every autumn finds him busily engaged in the manufacture of a superior grade of this article that finds ready sale owing to its superior quality. Of seven children born of this marriage five are living, Henry R., Charles, Frank B., Althea, and Ferrell
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 599(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt


VIGUS JAMES W.
VIGUS JAMES W. in his time a somewhat prominent farmer and merchant of Greene County, was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia. But little is known of his early history or to a date prior to his removal to Greene County. Becoming a resident of this county in 1840, he first entered into a general merchandise business in connection with his father, Pettis W. Successful in this calling, for his honesty was never brought into question. On abandoning the mercantile business he purchased valuable farm property, where he passed the remainder of life, finding a last resting place in the Steth Cemetery, a handsome and worthy monument marking the spot. Mrs. V. is still living, a resident of Carrollton, a native of Greene County. Of this marriage five children were born : George W., Paul W. (deceased), Josephine, who married Christopher Doyle, of St, Louis, and Hattie E. and Titus E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 522(T10N R12W); - transcribed by bmt


VIVELL FRANK
VIVELL FRANK, baker, confection, er, and dealer in fancy groceries and notions, Carrollton, Ill. Among the live business men who have contributed very much toward the present prosperous condition of Greene Co., the above enterprising gentleman is worthy of more than a passing notice. Frank Vivell is a native of Baden, Germany, born in 1830; passing his earlier years in his native land, where he early learned the trade of a baker; attaining his majority he concluded to better his fortunes in the New World, and accordingly he embarked on board a sailing- vessel in 1852; after a tedious voyage of some weeks duration he landed in the great metropolitan city of New York. Remaining but a short time, viewing the sights and scenes of the city, he made his way to Philadelphia, and taking passage on the Erie Canal in a crowded canal-boat to Pittsburg, for he was then in very straitened circumstances. During the passage by canal-boat the cholera became a sweeping epidemic; of twenty-eight passengers twenty-five died from cholera. At Canalton, Indiana, he was detained a short time, and now determined to make his way to St. Louis. A little incident here is worthy of note: taking passage on a mail boat down the "Father of Waters" for St. Louis, it touched at various points; at one of them our subject jumped off and laid in a small supply of provisions; hastening to the wharf, he was just in time to see the vessel gliding away for St. Louis. Discouraged he sat down and awaited the arrival of another boat. A stern-wheeler hove in sight; having no money, he however stepped on board and was soon on his way down the river; but here commenced an act of cruelty unparalleled; he was given instiuctions to attend to the pump until relieved; taking his station here, morning fled away and no breakfast, noon and no dinner, night and no supper; he began to feel rather lonesome. A clerk on board being a German, he now made a bolt for the cabin to procure something to eat, but was dragged back by the mate, suffering untold misfortunes. He determined when the vessel touched at St. Louis to make his escape, and accordingly jumped from the vessel when it landed and made his way into the city, in a ridiculous fashion. In St. Louis he became fourth cook and bootblack at the American hotel. Here a laughable episode occurred - a drunken man sauntered in for the purpose of handing Mr. Vivell his whip; he made several staggering attempts to do so. It occurred to our subject, who understood little English, that to suffer innumerable misfortunes on his passage down the river and now to be horse-whipped, to use his own language, was " too thin." His whole nature rose up in rebellion against this outrage, and making one desperate spring for his victim, subjected him to a pommeling that he remembered for many a day. Owing to limited space we cannot follow step by step, as we would wish to, many interesting passages in the life of Mr. Vivell. At Jacksonville and other points he worked as pastry cook. In May, 1856, he made his way to Carrollton, where he entered into business as baker and confectioner, and dealer in fancy groceries. Through indomitable energy he soon entered upon a prosperous career, and now to-day, after many years of hardship and self-denial, he has built up a trade unequaled in the West; the owner of magnificent property in Carrollton, and the finest residence in Greene Co. And in conclusion we may safely state that a more live, energetic man than Mr. V. it would be a hard matter to find
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 501-2(Carrollton); - transcribed by bmt


VLIET WILLIAM S.
VLIET WILLIAM S. farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 22, P.O. Roodhouse. The above named gentleman is a native of New Jersey; born in 1825, eldest son of Simon J. and Elizabeth Vliet. In the small but enterprising State of New Jersey, Young Vliet passed his early years, upon the old farm homestead. At twenty-five he was united in marriage to Miss Dorotha Thorp, a daughter of John Thorp, a successful farmer. In 1853 Mr. Vliet made his way to Illinois, where he first located in Marshall County, and became a dealer in grain. In 1864 he moved to Greene County, where he has since followed farming, owning 86 acres in one of the best townships in Greene County. Although not among the older residents, Mr. V. is well and favorably known in this county. Of this marriage nine children were born, three of whom are living: Helen Josephine, Charley, and May. Mrs. Vliet departed this life on the 14th of June, 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 599(T12N R11W); - transcribed by bmt