Hamilton County, Illinois
Genealogy and History


HAMILTON COUNTY BIOGRAPHIES

Maj. John T. Anderson.
Maj. John T. Anderson, farmer, was born in 1886 in Hamilton County, the second of seven children of Edmund and Nancy [Turrontine) Anderson. The father, born in Union County, Ky., about 1812, and of Scotch origin, was the son of John Anderson, born in Virginia, about 1781, and who at fourteen removed to Tennessee with his parents. In 1818, John, Sr., having been married in Kentucky, located on the site of the McLeansboro fair ground, and assisted in laying out the town and roads, and organizing the county. Hamilton County's first court was held in his house. He served as deputy sheriff, and was elected coroner in 1830, receiving the commission from ex-Gov. Edwards. He was a farmer. Four of his eight children are living, all in Hamilton County. He died in 1873, and his wife in 1846. Edmund was married in Hamilton County when twenty-one, was always a farmer near McLeansboro, and died in 1864. His wife, born about 1818 in Alabama, died in about 1870, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject alternated teaching and educating himself, finishing at Princeton, Ky., after he was of age. In 1862 he married Mary, daughter of James and Sarah Barnett, native of Tennessee. Their child is James E. She died in 1863, and in December, 1866, he married Martha E., daughter of Hillery and Sarah Patrick. Their children are Charles L., Flora B., C. Hillery, Walter and Harry.
In August, 1862, he resigned his surveyorship, to which he had been elected in 1860, and enlisted in Company A, Eighty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, was made captain, and in 1864 major. After eighteen months in the regular, he was afterward in the mounted infantry, at Vicksburg and all through the Bed River Campaign. After three years' service he returned to farming and stock raising. Since 1866 he has been a resident of his present farm. He owns 275 acres of choice land near McLeansboro. He has been for many years a member of the school board, is an Odd Fellow, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Formerly a Democrat, voting for Douglas, he has since been a Republican.

Hierom Atchisson
Hierom Atchisson, farmer and miner, was born in Hamilton County in 1834, on the place where he now resides. He is one of nine children of Joseph T. and Margaret W. Hopper. The father, born in Port Tobacco, Md., in 1789, was in the war of 1812, after which he came to what was then Gallatin County, then in 1819 to Hamilton County. In 1863 he entered mercantile life, which he continued until his death in 1864 in Lynchburg, Ill. The mother, born in 1798 in North Carolina, came to Jefferson County, Ill., in 1816 with her parents, and in 1849 died in Hamilton County. Educated in Hamilton County, our subject began mining in California. He continued about eight years, when on September 19, he enlisted in Company I, Fourth Cavalry Volunteer Infantry, and was honorably discharged October 31, 1864, in Arizona. He remained there until 1869, engaged as government contractor in merchandise and mining, and then he returned to the old homestead and married Marietta, daughter of Isaac and Sarah E. Richardson, born in 1850, in Hamilton County. She died in 1884. Five of their seven children are living: Charles Harvey, Ada, Mary, Edgar, Sarah and Hiram are the names of all. After his wife's death, he was with his brother in Arizona in mining and merchandise for two years, when he returned home and married Eveline, daughter of Barton and Perlina Atchison. He had a fine home of 400 acres seven miles west of the county seat. In politics he is a Republican, voting first for Buchanan.
He is a member of the F. A A. M . G. A. R. and F. M. B. A. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Asher & Ledbetter.
Asher & Ledbetter, general merchants, McLeansboro, established their present firm in November, 1880, and have since successfully conducted it, carrying a large and well selected stock of staple and fancy goods, dry goods, clothing, shoes, hats, queens-ware, groceries, etc, and also handle a full line of wagons and plows, are agents for Blount's plows and wagons, with which they are having a large trade. They control a large share of city and county trade. John C. Asher was born in Crittenden County, Ky., December 11, 1850, the son of William W., and Narcissus (Nichols) Asher, both natives of Kentucky. He was reared in Kentucky, and graduated from the Evansville Business College. In 1874 he began the mercantile business in Claysville, Ky., and two years later in Union County, Ky. Since 1880 he has been engaged in his present business. June 5, 1877. he married Katie Ledbetter, a native of Providence, Ky. Their son is Virgil Mr. Asher is a Democrat, and has been a member of the city council for two
years. He is a member of the I. O. O. F, K. of P. and of the Baptist Church. E. W. Ledbetter was born in Providence, Ky., March 2, 1880, the son of Wiley and Nannie (Payton) Ledbetter. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county. Since 1880 he engaged in his present business, they being brothers-in-law.   He is a Democrat and a Knight of Pythias.

R. C. Atkinson.
C. Atkinson, a large farmer and stock raiser, was born October 13, 1881, in McMinn County, Tenn., the fourth of fifteen children (four deceased) of James and Winnie (Burner) Atkinson, the former born in 1797, in North Carolina, of Irish origin, and the latter in 1807, in East Tennessee, of English stock.   They were married in East Tennessee, where the father had lived from childhood, and in 1853 moved to Jefferson County, Ill., and settled on the farm where they died in 1876 and 1872 respectively.   Our subject educated in his native county and at college in Bradley County, began for himself at twenty, and after reaching Illinois, worked with his father until 1855.   He then married and settled on his farm five miles east of Mount Vernon, and after two years here and four years on his farm three miles south of Mount Vernon, he established a grocery business at Spring Garden.   In 1866 he merged this into a general merchandise business, and soon moved his stock to Middleton, Wayne County.   After four years here and a year at Belle River in Jefferson County, where he erected some buildings, lost a child, and through general sickness became disheartened, he sold out, and again established a general merchandise business at McLeansboro.   Here he successfully engaged in-business for twelve years, until 1885, when, after about twenty-one years of mercantile life, he moved to his present farm.   October 4, 1855, he married Lucinda E., daughter of Isaac Garrison, born September 16, 1836, in Saline County, Ill.   Three of their ten children are dead.   Margaret W., wife of J. P. Price; Angeline, wife of Will McConnell; David R., Lizzie B., William T., Calaway and John M. P. are living.   From a poor boy our subject has become one of the wealthiest citizens of the county, now owning 480 acres of land besides valuable town property.   Politically he is a Democrat, first voting for Pierce.   He is a Mason, member of Pope Lodge, No. 57, and his entire family excepting the youngest two children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is one of the county's leading citizens.

Valentine S. Benson.
Valentine S. Benson, M. D., of McLeansboro, was born in Gallatin County, May 22, 1834, the son of Charles R. and Mary (Riggin) Benson, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee. Grandparents Babel Benson and Nelly Soward, his wife, resided in Greenbrier County, Va. The father was born in Greenbrier County, Va., September 28, 1793. The mother, Polly Biggin Benson, was born in Knox County, Tenn., June 23, 1796, and was the daughter of James Biggin, a Methodist minister. They were married in Knox County, Tenn., April 5, 1821, and immigrated the following fall to Sangamon County, Ill., then St Clair County, and in 1830 moved to Gallatin County, Ill. The father served in the war of 1812, was in several hard fought battles, that of the Horse Shoe Bend being one of them. About the year 1821 he located in Sangamon County, then St. Clair County, and finally settled in Gallatin County on a farm, and followed stock raising and farming successfully until his death, October 16, 1847, while on a visit in Missouri. The mother died December 26, 1838. The father then married Mrs. Lovina Puddles, by whom he had two daughters, one living, Mrs. Anne de Journet, of Mount Vernon, Ill. By his first marriage were James M., of Johnson County; Andrew H., of Gallatin County; Ignatius M., of Johnson County; John F., of Benton County, Oreg.; Charles B., killed in the late war; Nancy H. (deceased); Mary R. (deceased wife of Dr. John De Webber), Gallatin County; our subject, and Francis A., who died at the age of seven or eight years. Our subject, reared and educated in his native county, also attended high school in Jacksonville. In 1858, he began medical study under Dr. Rathbone, of Harrisburg, and read also under Dr. Bishop, of Shawneetown. In 1855-56, he attended St Louis Medical College. He practiced in Hamilton County and McLeansboro, and in 1869-70 graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louisville.   He has practiced here ever since 1868, having practiced in Benton, Ill., for six yearn prior to this. He is deservedly successful and is the peer of any in his profession in the county. February 18, 1855, he married Mary E., daughter of Dr. L. Rathbone, an early and prominent physician. She died in February, 1864, leaving four children, two living now: Dr. John G. Benson, and Kittie, wife of J. R. Campbell. His second wife, Mariam H. Allen, died about eight months after marriage. In January, 1867, he married his present wife, Judith A. (Wilbanks) Parrish, a native of Jefferson County. He is a Democrat, and in 1865 represented the county in the State Legislature. From 1876 to 1880 he was a member of the State Board of Equalization, and for three and a half years on the local pension board. In August, 1885, President Cleveland appointed him physician to the Indians, in which capacity he spent a year at Fort Peck, M. T., and resigned. Since his return he has been also interested in farming and stock-raising on his valuable land. He has been prominently identified with municipal affairs for years. He is an Odd Fellow, and a man of recognized ability in his business and profession.

Isaac G. Berridge.
Isaac G. Berridge was born in Evansville, Ind., August 6,1845, the son of Joseph and Sarah (Grooms) Berridge, natives of England.   The father came to the United States a short time before our subject's birth and located at Evansville, Ind., their present home.   Isaac G. was raised and educated in his native city, and learned the dry goods business in a large wholesale firm in that city, first as clerk, then as traveling salesman. In 1873 he came to McLeansboro, engaged in his present business, and has contributed largely to the success of the well known firm of Berridge & Pake.   January 19, 1872, he married Sarah V. Burtis, of Evansville, Ind.   Their only child is Mabel. He is a Republican, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Honor. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Silas Biggerstaff.
Silas Biggerstaff, farmer, was born October 8, 1839, in Hamilton County, the second often children, three deceased, of Alfred and Evaline (Garrison) Biggerstaff, the former of German-French  descent, born in Ulenberg  County, Ky., in 1803,  and the latter of English origin, born in 1813 in Tennessee.   They were married in Hamilton County, and settled on a farm in Crooke Precinct, where the father died in July, 1861.   The mother is still living on the same place.   Our subject was educated in the common schools, and when twenty-two married and settled on a farm in Beaver Creek Township, where he remained twelve years. He then sold and moved to the  Ira Munsell farm " which he sold about two years later and bought an interest in the Belle City Grist and Saw Mill.   After six years' residence there in that business, he returned to his farm, and in January, 1885, sold it and bought the old Judge Crouch farm " in Crouch Township. His wife, Sidney, daughter of William and Sallie (Boyer) Fields, was born in 1841, in White County, Ill.   Their six children are John M. (deceased), Paris R. (deceased), William A., Mary L., Charles S. and Sallie.   In March, 1864, our subject enlisted in Company K, Eighteenth Illinois Infantry, at Enfield, White County, and was soon appointed second lieutenant, but resigned on account of ill health, and after but four or five months' service was honorably discharged. He has, by hard work, made the chief part of his property, and now owns 440 acres, about 200 of which are cleared and cultivated.   It is in Sections 27 and 28. Politically he is an independent Democrat first voting for Douglas.   He has been constable several years, and in Belle City was justice four years.   His Belle City Mill burned about 1880, and his loss was about $4,000, but he has recuperated from the financial loss.
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

James H. Brown.
James H. Brown, farmer, was born in Wayne County, Mo., in 1845, the son of Green and Margie (Mayberry) Brown. The father, born in middle Tennessee about 1805, came to Hamilton County in his youth and married, but in a few years he went to Wayne County, Mo. Here he was soon appointed deputy sheriff, and in 1846, while attempting an arrest, he was shot and killed. The mother, born in Hamilton County, in 1815, returned then to her birthplace and married James F. Gallihur, who is also dead. She is yet living, about seventy-two years old. Our subject, the youngest of six children, lived with his mother until nearly twenty, and in January, 1863, married Nancy, daughter of Aaron S. McKenzie, born in Hamilton County in 1832. Eight of their eleven children are living: Aaron G., Margie E. (wife of F.
Jennings), George 8., William S., Martha A., Robert W., Charles F. and John H. After marriage he began farming his own property in Mayberry Township. In 1883 he sold out and bought 360 acres in Sections 26 and 34, living in the latter section, his present home. His wife died August 12,1882, and in January, 1883, he married Martha E. Jennings, daughter of Nathaniel Martin, born in Kentucky in 1849. Thomas and Martha E. are their children. He is a Democrat, first voting for McClellan. He is a Mason and a member of the A. O. U. W. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

William W. Buck.
William W. Buck, farmer, was born in 1833, in Gallatin County, the son of John and Eliza (Cook) Buck. The father, of German descent, was born in 1793 in Virginia. His father,Warner, a native of Hesse, Germany, when eighteen, entered military service, and was among the Hessian soldiers bought by King George to suppress the. American Revolution. He was captured at Trenton and held a prisoner three years, and then exchanged.    During his imprisonment he and twelve others became so attached to the Americana that they attempted to desert to the American camp, but only he and one other succeeded.
He settled in Virginia, and afterward, in 1797, moved with his family to Bowling Green, Ky., and in 1805 to Gallia County, Ohio.   John was twelve years old when they came to Gallatin County, and in 1827 he married.   In 1840 he settled in Beaver Creek Township, Hamilton County, the next year bought 120 acres, and the last twenty years of his life were spent with his son, William.   He died August 4, 1883.    His wife, Eliza Cook, was born in 1803, in Gallatin County, and died in 1889. Three of her six children are living:    John J., of McLeansboro, ex-county clerk; our subject, and Alexander, of Beaver Creek Town-ship.   Our subject was five years old when his mother died, and the next year he came to Hamilton County and was educated in home subscription schools.   At twenty-one he left his father, and February 23, 1854, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Jefferson Garrison, born August 10, 1836, in Gallatin County. She came to Hamilton County when a child.   Their children are Eliza, wife of George Mason; Thomas, George, Masten and Cloid. He located on the eighty acres in Section 27, a gift from his father in 1833, and by his ability in business has made his possessions 340 acres, 240 of which is well improved and cultivated.   He is one of the leading farmers of the region, and a Democrat, first voting for Buchanan.   In November, 1876, he was elected county commissioner, and commissioned the 24th of November, by Gov. John. Beveridge, to serve three years.    He and his wife were members of the Christian Church.

James M. Burton.
James M. Burton, druggist and justice at Dahlgren, was born May 31, 1848, in Knight's Prairie, Hamilton Co.Ill. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at twenty began selling groceries at Walpole, but a few months later moved to Leovilla, where he established himself in general merchandise. He married, and at the end of two years made a final move to Dahlgren, and was for two years in the dry goods business. Since that he has been in his present business, excepting three years as constable of his precinct In 1880, when he began pharmacy again, he was also elected justice, and in 1885 he elected. His wife, Mary A. (Preston), was born in 1849, in Coshocton County, Ohio. Their children are Ella M., Charity and Flora 0. Three also are deceased. Mr. Burton is one of the leading men of Dahlgren, and politically is a Democrat, first voting for Greeley. He is popular in his party, and has always polled a strong vote when he has been candidate for two different county offices. He is vice-president of Tonti, Dahlgren Lodge, No. 37, and a member of Iron Hall, Branch Lodge, No. 124, in the latter of which he served four years as cashier, and has lately been elected chief justice for the second term. He is a charter member of both orders. His wife is a Methodist, and his oldest daughter is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

James R. Campbell.
Hon. James R. Campbell, of McLeansboro, was born in Crook Township, Hamilton County, May 4, 1853, the son of John and Mary A. (Coker) Campbell. The father was born in Armagh County, North of Ireland, came to America with his two brothers in 1844, railroaded in Georgia and the Southern States, and later traded in stock. About 1851 he married in Hamilton County, and settled on his present farm. His four sons are James B.; Bernard, now of Reno, Nev.; Charles, of Hutchison, Kas., and John L., of this county. Our subject's grandfather, John Campbell, was a soldier and officer twenty-one years in the British Army, was retired on a life pension, and died at the age of sixty-six years in the North of Ireland.   He was the son of Charles Campbell, a Scotch-Irishman, who was a loom-weaver and lived to be one hundred and four years old. Our subject's grand-father, Charles Coker, was a pioneer of the county and state, and married a daughter of James Crook, after whom our subject's native township was named.   Charles Coker was a Methodist minister, a lieutenant in the Mexican war, and died of consumption brought on by service in the war.   Our subject was educated at Notre Dame, Ind., in 1869-71.   He then assisted his father in the stock business, going by river frequently from Shawnee-town to New Orleans.   In 1874-75 he was principal of the New Haven schools and also the next year.   Daring 1876-77 he had
charge of the Phillipstown (White County) schools, and in 1877-78 the Ramsey (Fayette County) schools.   He had read law pretty thoroughly in the meantime, and in June, 1877, was licensed by the supreme court to practice.   In 1878 the Democratic convention nominated him by acclamation for the Legislature to represent the Forty-sixth District, but he was defeated at the election.   He was then a traveling salesman for a wholesale house until 1883.   In 1879, in company with his brother, Charles, be bought the McLeansboro Times, which his brother edited and managed until 1883, since when our subject has had complete and successful control.  In December, 1883, he formed a law partnership with Judge Cloyd Crouch, and practiced law in McLeansboro until 1884, when he was nominated as before and elected to the thirty-fourth General Assembly, in which he was prominent, assisting the speaker to make up committees, and was himself chairman of the insurance committee, and member of the revenue and judiciary committees. In 1886 he was re-elected and is now in the Lower House of the thirty-fifth Assembly.   December 19, 1879, he married Kittie B. daughter of Dr. Benson, a prominent physician of McLeansboro. They have one son, Valentine. He has been a life-long Democrat and have been his ancestors on both sides.   He has given much attention to stock raising and breeding, and was the first to introduce the Percheron Norman horses into this county, owning two magnificent stallions of that breed. He owns also the leading livery business in McLeansboro.

Ira B. Carey.
Ira B. Carey, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Hopkins County, Ky., in 1821, the eldest of eight children of John and Frances (Stokes) Carey, both natives of Kentucky and born in 1791 and 1799 respectively.   The grandfather, Joseph Carey, a native of Ireland, came to the United States when a young man, and is now buried in Kentucky, opposite Shawneetown. The father served two years in the war of 1812 and was married about 1820.    He remained in Hopkins County, Ky., until 1854, since then he has lived in Hamilton County, Ill.    He died in 1871, and had been class-leader in the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty years.   The mother, a daughter of Maj. Thomas Stokes, of Kentucky, died October 12, 1875.   Both are buried in St Mary's Chapel Cemetery.    Our subject remained at home until thirty years old, and March 19, 1850, was married to Lucy T. Nance. Their one child is Francis M., a farmer of Webster County, Ky. His wife died March 5, 1851, and May, 80, 1853, he married Isabella Sights.   Their three children are Parlee G., wife of David Thompson; Mahuldah A., wife of H. Barker, Posey County, Ind., and Sarah J., deceased.   His second wife died in 1860, and in 1862 he married Eliza A., daughter of Henry and Susan Mangis, born in East Tennessee in 1829.   Only one of their six children is living Mary E., wife of F. G. Freil.   In 1856 he came to Hamilton County, and his finely improved farm of one hundred acres lies near Hoodville, and all has been from his own efforts.   He served two terms as county commissioner, elected in 1879 and 1884. He is a public spirited man and a life-long Democrat, first voting for Polk.    He is a Mason and has long been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and both are respected people of the community.

Aaron G. Cloud.
Aaron G. Cloud was born in Dearborn County, Ind., November 1,1818, the son of "William C. and Elizabeth (Guard) Cloud, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Indiana. The family came to Illinois in 1832, and located on a farm in Gallatin County, where the father died in February, 1844. Our subject was reared on a farm and secured as good an education as was given to youths in that day in the country. When twenty-three he went to Hardin County, Ill., and acted as bookkeeper and financial manager of The Illinois Furnace for five years. He then began mercantile business in his native county at Lawrenceburg, Ind., and with success until September, 1852, when he engaged in the same at McLeansboro until 1876. During his business career he was involuntarily drawn into the real estate business to protect his interests, so that to-day he is one of the largest land owners in southern Illinois. Since 1876 he has done a general loan business on real estate securities with a just reputation for honesty and integrity in his transactions. November 23, 1843, he married Eleanor H. McCoy, a native of Hardin County, Ill.. She died December 24. 1886, leaving two children: Chalon G., a banker at McLeansboro, and Mary E., wife of Chalon G. McCoy. Mr. Cloud is a Democrat.

Chalon G. Cloud.
Chalon G. Cloud, banker of McLeansboro, was born December 24, 1846, the son of A. G. Cloud, whose sketch see elsewhere. He was reared to manhood here, and educated at Asbury University (now DuPauw), Greencastle, Ind., graduating in 1870. He Was trained in his father's mercantile business, and in the spring of 1871 graduated from Nelson's Business College, Cincinnati. In 1871 he established his present banking business. His elegant banking house, completed in the spring of 1882, and the Cloud residence, adjoining, on the southwestern corner of the public square, are the handsomest and best buildings of the kind in southern Illinois. April 18, 1888, he married Emma E. Blades, of this county.   He is a Democrat

Capt. Joseph Coker.
Capt. Joseph Coker, farmer and pioneer of the county, was born December 1, 1819, in Monroe County, Tenn.   The seventh of ten children, four living, of William and Catherine (Huffman) Coker, the former of Scotch parentage, born about 1765 in Virginia, and the latter German, born several years later. They were married in Blount County, Tenn., where they were brought by their parents, and when our subject reached man-hood they moved to Polk County, Tenn., where the father died about 1850, on his farm.   Soon after this their mother moved to Hamilton County, where she lived with her children until she died about 1858.   Our subject was educated chiefly in Monroe County, and after part of a season, when twenty-one, in Louisiana, came to McLeansboro, Hamilton County.   When twenty-three, he married and settled on a farm he had purchased near McLeansboro, where he lived about forty years, until his family were all married but one.   In October, 1861, our subject, Rev. Hosea Vise and W. L. Stephens organized Company D, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, of which he was made Second Lieutenant. In April, 1862, he was made first lieutenant, and in March, 1863, captain.   November 25, 1865, he was honorably discharged at Springfield.   He was at Port Hudson, Nashville and Franklin actions, besides many minor skirmishes.   He lived on his farm west of McLeansboro until 1885, when he sold and moved to his present farm in Sections 26, 34 and 35.   His wife, Harriett Biohardeon, was born in 1821, near the Virginia line in Ohio. Her parents came to Hamilton County in 1840, and the date of her marriage is July 4, 1844. She died August 18, 1878, leaving six of her seven children: William A., Mary C. (widow of S. Martin), Charles A., Sarah J. (wife of J. W. T. Scruggs), David A. and Harriett M. Our subject began with nothing, and now owns a fine farm of 160 acres, mostly cleared. Formerly a Democrat, and voting for Polk, he has been a Republican since the first attack on Fort Sumter, and has been an honored soldier and citizen. He is a Mason. Polk Lodge. William and the daughters are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and all the family are Methodists in sentiment.

William A. Coker.
William A. Coker was born in Hamilton County, March 28, 1845, the son of Joseph and Harriett (Richardson) Coker, natives respectively of Tennessee and Ohio.  Our subject was reared and educated in this county, and when seventeen accompanied his father in the war a year or so, and later went West and Northwest with a company of soldiers;
he was not a soldier however.   In 1867-68 he worked with a surveying party under Gen. Wilson, assisting to locate locks and dams on the Illinois River. In 1868 he returned home and taught school several terms, then engaged in the stock business dealing until 1874.   He built the city mills in company with Andrew J. Guill.   They operated the mill four years, since which our subject has operate and conducted them.   August 28, 1867, he married Emily J. Davis, a native of this county.   Their two children living are Eugene R. and Clarence. He is a Republican, but no aspirant for office.   He is a Master Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is one of the reliable business men and citizens of McLeansboro. His residence is one of the most tasteful and homelike in the city.

John H. Corn.
John H. Corn, farmer and notary public, was born in Princeton, Ind, in 1831, the ninth of twelve children of Hiram and Margaret J. (McMillan) Corn. The father, German in origin, and born in Kentucky, died in 1863 about eighty years old. He served as a Kentucky volunteer under Gen. Harrison in the war of 1812, and when a young man spent from 1824 to 1832 in Gibson County, Ind., where he married. Then with the exception of from 1837 to 1852 in Hamilton County, and two years in Morgan County, he spent the remainder of his life in Franklin County. He was always one of the substantial farmers of the county. The mother, born in Gibson County, is now living in Christian County, Ill., at the age of eighty-two. Both were long members of the Missionary Baptist Church, but formerly Methodists. Our subject went to school in the log building, with no floor, puncheon seats, clap-board roof, and the smoke from a fire in the center of the room finding its way through a hole in the roof. In 1850 be married Palina C, daughter of James and Sarah Metheny a native of Flannigan Township, born in 1835. Eight of their eleven children are living: Walter C, of Crawford County, Ark.; Arena J., wife of Thomas P. Waller, of Franklin County; David F.; John R.; Virginia, now Mrs. Adam H. Reed; Lizzie, Linzey H. and Samuel E. He has been a resident of Flannigan Township ever since his marriage, except from 1853 to 1855 in Morgan County. Since 1855 he has lived on his present farm of 190 acres, left after giving his sons, who are of age, each forty acres. It is well improved and twelve miles southwest of McLeansboro, and all the fruit of his own careful management and industry. August 2, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fortieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and after six months' service in Missouri and Kentucky, was discharged on account of disability. About 1865 he was elected justice and served four years, then three years after served an unexpired term for one year, and was re-elected making in all about seven years, and of several eases appealed all were confirmed by the superior courts. For eight years he has been notary public, commissioned by Gov. Cullom. Politically he is a Democrat, but otherwise non-partisan. His first vote was for Pierce. He is an old and prominent member of the I. O. O. F. and F. M. B. A. His wife was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, but recently of the Christian Church.

Warner D. Crouch.
Warner D. Crouch, sheriff of Hamilton County, was born there November 30,1849, the son of Cloyd and Eliza J. (Medley) Crouch, natives respectively of this county and Alabama. The subject's grandfather, Adam Crouch, a native of Virginia, came to White County, Ill., in 1816, and in 1817 located in this county in the township which now bears his name.   He was a farmer, a county commissioner, and, politically, a Democrat.   He died on his farm in Crouch Township.   The father, also a farmer in that township, was county judge nine years, and represented the county in the Legislature.   He was a magistrate several years, county surveyor, and sergeant-at-arms in the last constitutional convention.   He was a Democrat.   In the late war he was quarter-master of the Sixtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry.   Three of his six children are living: Adam, of Wayne County; our subject, and Hiram, deputy sheriff.   He died January 12, 1884, and his wife died March 12, 1887.   Our subject was reared to manhood on the old homestead and secured a good education.   For twelve years he was teaching in connection with his farming in Crouch Township.   He is a Democrat, and was elected sheriff in 1886. March 21, 1873, he married Sarah P. Proudfit, a native of Guernsey County, Ohio.   Mary I., James A, Cloyd C, David P., Hiram C. and Lattia W. are their children.   Mr. Crouch and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.   He is a reliable official and a popular citizen.

John H. Dale.
John H. Dale, farmer and mechanic, was born in Hamilton County in 1828, the seventh of twelve children of John, Sr., and Nancy (Hall) Dale, natives of Kentucky.  The father, of English ancestry, was twice married: first, in 1804, to Elizabeth Shirley, by whom he had four children; and lastly in December, 1816, after which he settled in Hamilton County, near the present home of our subject.   He was a farmer, and an exceptionally good pioneer mechanic in wood or iron.   He made the first cotton-gin, and some of the first mills built in the State.   He was a remarkably strong man, and hospitable, so that he was familiarly known as "Uncle John" among his hosts of friends.   He was captain of militia in times of general muster, and was once elected justice, but resigned.   He was born May 5, 1775, and died August 30, 1860.  The mother was born in 1798 and died April 16, 1870. Both were members of the Missionary Baptist Church.   With a common-school education our subject began life, and was married in 1848 to Nancy, daughter of John and Malinda McLane, born in Franklin County March 30, 1830.   Their seven children are Dr. Marion C, of McLeansboro; John W., a druggist at the same place; Fannie, wife of W. J. Mangis; Robert M., Emery T., J. Riley and Charles A.   He has since lived on his present farm, which adjoins his birthplace, and is three miles west of McLeansboro, and consists of 263 acres finely improved, and which has all been gained through his own efforts, and in quiet, hard work. He is a public-spirited man, and in all ways devoted to the welfare of all about him.   In 1887 he served as township collector. Reared a Democrat and first voting for Pierce, he has since the war been a Republican.   Since his fifteenth year he has been an active worker in the Missionary Baptist Church, of which his wife also is a member.

Marion C. Dale.
Marion C. Dale, M. D., was born in Hamilton County January 8, 1850, the son of John H. Dale (see sketch).   Our subject was educated in Hamilton County, the pupil of Prof. John Turreutine, and began the study of medicine in 1871 under Dr. A. De Foe, of this city. March 10,1874, he graduated from Chicago Medical College, and has been engaged in his present successful and lucrative practice ever since. He is a member of the Hamilton County Medical Society, and in President Arthur's administration he was one of the board of pension examiners. He is an Odd Fellow and a member of the K. of H. On October 8, 1875, he married Margaret A. Edington, a native of Tennessee. Their children are Omar, Harry W., Earnest A. and Edith. Dr. Dale is a Republican, and rather conservative in politics. He is a member of the city board of health. He and his wife are Missionary Baptists. Besides his professional duties he attends to his farm of 200 acres of good land. He stands high in his profession and as a citizen.

William J. Darnall.
William J. Darnall, farmer, was born in Franklin County in 1839, the sixth of twelve children of David and Anna (Leonard) Darnall. The father, born in North Carolina, the son of Jordan Darnall, was reared and married in his native State, and soon after removed to Jefferson County, Ill., then to Franklin County, and finally about 1845 to Hamilton County, where he died about 1878. He was a substantial farmer and stock dealer. The mother, born in South Carolina, died about 1882, nearly eighty-eight years old. Our subject, with no school advantages, was compelled to assist on the farm, and in August, 1881, he enlisted in Company A, Fortieth Regiment of Volunteers, for three years, and was at Shiloh, Fort Donelson, Missionary Ridge, Corinth, Jackson (Miss.), Vicksburg, and Atlanta when his enlistment expired. A gun-shot wound at Missionary Ridge disabled him for a time, during which he was at home. In 1864 he married Mary, daughter of Jordan and Elizabeth Fisher.    Four of five children are living. Clarinda C. Schuyler 0., Elizabeth and John H. His wife died in 1878, and in 1882 he married Mrs. Jane Dixon, nee Weathersby. He has since lived on his present fine farm of eighty-one acres of choice and improved land, which has been the result of his own management. Politically he is a Republican, and first voted for Lincoln. Mr. Darnall's eldest daughter, Clarinda, began teaching in 1884, and has been successful for several terms.

William C. Davis.
William C. Davis, farmer, was born December 15, 1825, in Muhlenberg County, Ky., the second of seven children of Amos and Elizabeth (Cain)  Davis, the former of Welsh descent, born about 1800, in Kentucky, and the latter of Irish parentage, and also a native of Kentucky.   They remained after their marriage in Muhlenberg County, until our subject was four years old, when they moved to Warwick County, Ind., where the father engaged in carpentering until 1834.    After that until their deaths, in 1837 and 1872 respectively, they lived in White County.   The mother afterward married John C. Lee, by whom she had two children one living.   Our subject, educated in the common schools of White County, came to Hamilton County after the death of his mother, and began work for Adam Crouch. In October, 1845, he married and lived on his farm, purchased near Belle City, for ten years.   He then bought the farm now owned by John Grier, a mile and a half south, and moved there. In March, 1865, he enlisted in Company L, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, and served about nine months; mustered out at Selma, Ala., and honorably discharged at Springfield.   In December, 1880, he sold part of his farm and moved to his present home in Section 35.   The most of his land is improved, and by hard work he has acquired altogether 200 acres.   His wife, Jane, daughter of John P. and Nancy (Ward) Warfield, was born June 15, 1827, in Hamilton County, Ill., and their marriage occurred October 29, 1845. She died July 9, 1874. But six of their eight children are living. Elizabeth, wife of William Walters; Rebecca, wife of William Standerfer; Mary; John A.; Nancy, wife of John Williams, and Alice, wife of Charles Smith. He is a Democrat, first voting for Cass. He has been constable of Crouch Township eighteen years, deputy sheriff two years, and township trustee thirteen years. His daughter Elizabeth is a Methodist, while Rebecca and John are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

R. Davis.
R. Davis, farmer and carpenter, was born in 1823 in Gallia County, Ohio, one of twelve children of Neamiah and Mary (Allison) Davis. The father, a farmer, of Welsh origin, was born August 20, 1778, in Maine, coming to Cincinnati's present site when nineteen, he cleared the land on which the water-works now stand in 1797. After a year here he lived in Athens, Ohio until 1817, in Gallia County; then, until 1839, he again removed to Hannibal County, Ill., where he died in 1854, having lived to see all his children with families of their own. The mother, born January 31, 1789, in Pennsylvania, and at the outbreak of the Indian war in 1790, came with her parents to Marietta, Ohio, where her father commanded the fort, and where she was made familiar with the hardships of frontier life and scenes of Indian cruelties for seven years of her childhood. She died October 29, 1882. Our subject was educated in the district schools of Illinois and Ohio, and is now living on the old homestead. April 14, 1847, he enlisted in Company E, United States Infantry, engaged in the chief battles of the Mexican war, and was honorably discharged in August, 1848. In 1849 he married Annie, daughter of William and Sallie Sturman, born in 1829 in Hamilton County. Their eleven children are Amelia P., Edwin E. Frederick A., Celeste A., Theresa J., Ona L., Elda W., Adella C, Stephen A., Samuel M. and Robert E. L. Three are deceased.  In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was engaged in the quartermaster's department and ambulance corps. He was wounded at Vicksburg June 29, 1863, and honorably discharged in December, 1868, on account of paralysis from his injuries. He is a substantial man, and owns 171 acres of fine land. He is a member of the Greenback party, casting his first vote for Polk. He belongs to the Primitive Baptist Church.

Benjamin F. Douglass.
Benjamin F. Douglass, farmer and stock raiser, was born near Broughton in 1841, the third of twelve children of James and Elizabeth (Gregg) Douglass.   The father, born in Tennessee in 1811, of Scotch origin, is the son of John Douglass, a soldier under Jackson at New Orleans in the war of 1812. John settled in Maury County, Tenn, where he remained until 1825, when he removed to what is now Saline County, Ill., and continued farming and stock raising until his death in 1846. With ordinary school advantages, James came with his parents to Illinois, married when twenty-six, and settled near Broughton. He has since made his home in Hamilton County with the exception of a year in Saline County.   In 1865 he located on his present farm near Walpole.   He served as associate justice in the county court.   The mother, born in Saline County in 1814, died in 1875.    Educated in the log schoolhouse, and three terms a teacher, our subject with eight others made a 112-days' overland journey to Virginia City.   After four years he boarded a steamer in the headwaters of the Missouri River, and twenty-one days later he landed at St Louis.   After two years' farming at home he was four years engaged in merchandising at Walpole. He then spent a few months in California, but returned to Hamilton County, where he engaged in merchandising until 1885, since which time he has been a farmer, and always succeeded so that he now owns 180 acres of choice improved land. He is a Democrat and first voted for Tilden. Since 1869 he has been a Mason. In 1872 he married Margery, daughter of Anthony W. and Lucinda Gott, a native of Hamilton County. Their six children are Lawrence (deceased, buried in Oregon), Otta M., John F., Susan E., Amy and James H.

Louis Eswine.
Louis Eswine, farmer, was born in Hamilton County, April 18, 1844, the fourth of five children (two living) of Albert and Rosena (Karcher) Eswine, natives of Germany, born in 1812 and 1818 respectively, and of that company of Germans who settled in Hamilton County in 1842. The mother died on their farm in Section 82, Town 3 south, Range 6 east, about 1848. The father's second wife having died several years previous to 1880, he then left the farm to live with his children. By his second wife he had four children, one dead. Our subject attended the common schools, and began life for himself when twenty-one. He enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, at Vandalia. At the war's close, and after eight months' service, he received his honorable discharge and returned home. After two years' railroading he married and settled on his present farm of 140 good acres, mostly cleared and improved, which has been of his own earning. His wife, Mary, daughter of Godfrey and Christina (Haller) Rubenaker, was born December 7, 1850, in Hamilton County. September 21, 1869, is the date of their marriage. Their children are Stephen, Ludwig, John, Dora, Joseph, Rosena, Elizabeth, Emma and Charles. Politically, our subject is a Republican, first voting for Grant in 1868. His entire family are members of the Catholic Church. He has been trustee of St John's Church for the past five years, and school director for fourteen years.

William R Flannigan & Co.
David O. Flannigan emigrated to near Charlotte, N. C., from Kings County, Ireland, prior to our war for independence.   He was the father of ten sons and one daughter.   David O., together with seven of his sons, participated in the Revolutionary war, and was himself seriously wounded by a gun shot at the hands of a Tory.   Samuel E. Flannigan, twin brother of David O. Flannigan. Jr., intermarried with Nancy Sharp, only daughter of Col. Richard Sharp, an exile from Ireland, immigrated to Illinois in 1818, and settled in Flannigan Precinct, Hamilton County. The precinct, now township, is named Flannigan in his honor. James W. Flannigan, his eldest son, intermarried with Sarah Cantrell, to whom was born Jane, who intermarried with Capt M. Fittz; Constance, intermarried with Capt. J. H. Hogan; Samuel E., by profession a lawyer; Sarah M., intermarried with Dr. Thomas D. Ray; Richard C, miller and merchant; James W., farmer,   and William   R., the subject of this sketch. Samuel E., the grandsire, was in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans.   James W. Flannigan. his eldest son, was engaged in the Black Hawk war in 1832, in the Mexican war, and was also a first lieutenant in Company C, Fifty-sixth Illinois, in the war for the suppression of the Rebellion.   He was appointed by Gov. Yates as enrolling officer for Hamilton County, Ill., under the conscription act of 1864. Our subject was born June 1, 1851, and March 30, 1871, married Mary J., daughter of Josephus and Margrett (Minor) Davis, a native of Hamilton County.   Their two children are Joseph Wallace and William R, Jr.   The subject of our sketch has been engaged in farming, milling and merchandising since his marriage.   In 1885 he established his general merchandise business.   Since 1886 he and his brother, R C, have been engaged in genera! merchandising and the tobacco trade.   From 1882 he served four years as justice of the peace, giving universal satisfaction. In 1887 he was elected supervisor. He is a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church. Politically, a Republican, having cast his first vote for Grant Robert C. was born June 7, 1844, in Flannigan Precinct, and June 29, 1863, married Eliza M., daughter of Rev. J. T. F. and Phebe Lewis. Two of their four children are living: John M. and Robert F. May 15, 1871, his wife died, and in September he married Elsuda, daughter of Reese D. and Nancy Roberts, a native of Twigg Precinct. Two of three children by this union are living: Eliza M. and Reese D. In December, 1863, he enlisted as a corporal in Company F, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, and was in a twenty-six days' fight in Alabama, then at Nashville, and back to the Tennessee River in all the engagements of his company. After the war he returned home, resumed farming and stock raising until 1880, when he began milling at Walpole, Ill. In 1886 he entered his present business, which has been successful. He is a Republican, voting first for Grant. He is Past Worshipful Master of the F. & A. M. and Noble Grand of the I. O. O. F. He is also a member of the F. M. B. A. and of the Christian Church.

Thomas J. Garrison.
Thomas J. Garrison, farmer, was born May 30, 1844, in Hamilton County, one mile from his present home. He is the son of Jefferson and Frances (Drew) Garrison. The father, a farmer, born in 1811 in East Tennessee, came when a boy to Shawneetown where he was reared and married. In a few years he moved to Hamilton County, and located in section 29, Beaver Creek Township, where he passed his life. He laid out the town of Jefferson City on his farm, and built a storehouse and carried on merchandising for many years. He was a successful man and a Christian, and died in 1873. He owned 240 acres of land. His wife, born in 1811 in Coles County, Ill, was twice married, her first husband being Abner Ellis.   Their one living child is Caleb. By her second marriage she had five children, our subject being the third, who was educated, besides in subscription schools, at Bloomington, Ill., and four months at a commercial business college in Chicago. When twenty he taught four terms. October 13, 1866, he married Elsie J. Lane, who was born in McLeansboro, Ill. Their children are Eda, Ida, Mary, George, Susan and Walter. In 1872 he located on his present farm of 170 acres of fine laud. In 1869 he began with a horse-power threshing machine, and for the last three years has been running with steam power, making from $600 to $1,000 per annum. For a year he has also been engaged in saw-milling. He is a Democrat and an influential man. In 1886 he was tax-collector. He is president of Lodge 155, F. M. B. A., and for twelve years has been deacon in the Christian Church, of which his wife and one child are members.

Samuel E. Gates.
Samuel E. Gates, M. D., was born on Simms' Creek, Gallia County, Ohio, August 10, 1814, was raised at the same place, and probably received his education at Marietta, Ohio, as it was a custom of his father, Stephen Gates, and the uncle Samuel Gates, of Gallipolis, Ohio, to send the sons of their families there to college. He received the principal part of his medical education at Washington City, D. C. He came from Jackson County, Ohio, to McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., in the fall of 1851, returned to Jackson County, Ohio, in the fall of 1852, to consummate a settlement of his business, and was offered, by the prominent citizens of his acquaintance, a present of a new two-story residence then building, finished and complete, with grounds, if he would return and continue the practice of medicine. He could not be prevailed upon to have the deed to the property made to him, and returned to McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., where he lived until his death.   He achieved marked success in his profession both as a physician and surgeon; stood at the head of his profession at the age of twenty-eight in the State of Ohio, and was considered by the majority of the people, the foremost physician of his time wherever he practiced.'   He was a life-long Democrat Out of a family of six sons, only he and one brother were Democrats.   He and this brother (Hon. Nathaniel H. Gates, of Oregon) were always the warmest friends as well as kinsmen, and corresponded with each other during his lifetime upon all the political issues of the day.   This brother was the fourth son of the family, born in Ohio, February 17,  1811, went to Oregon when a young man comparatively, and became a noted lawyer and politician, and eminently successful financially. Samuel E. Gates, M. D., belonged to no religious denomination. He was a member of the Masonic lodge for many years. He was recommended May 13, 1851, by the Master and Wardens of Unity Lodge, No. 132, of the town of Jackson, Ohio, to the kind offices of all Masons around the globe, this recommendation certifying that he had been raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, and that he had conducted himself as a true and faithful brother during his continuance with them.   He was a member of Polk Lodge, No. 187, at McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., until his death.   He was at one or more times Master of this Lodge, leading it, and doing a great deal of good.   He was buried with all the honors of a Masonic funeral service.   He was married, in the State of Ohio, December 24, 1885, to Miss Lucinda A. Napier, who was born in Virginia, April 29, 1817. Six children were raised one son and five daughters: Erastus Monticello, the son; Nahwista A., Josephine Romain, Irena A., Genevieve May and Emma Virginia, the daughters. Josephine died at the age of fifteen.   The son and the four remaining daughters are still surviving, three of the daughters being married: Nahwista A., to Charles H. Heard, Sr.,who was born in Rutherford County, Tenn.; Irene A., to C. W. Pape, born in Goettingen, Germany, and Emma Virginia, to Silas A. Whittey, born in Saline County, Ill. Samuel E. Gatee, M. D., died at McLeansboro, Ill., Novembers, 1806. Ho was an affectionate husband, a devoted, indulgent father, made friends wherever he went, was kind, sociable, clever, esteemed and loved by his friends, and especially by his patients, who would come to his home some time after his death, and talk of him and shed tears over their loss. He was the fifth son of Stephen Gates, who was born in 1774, and married, in the State of Maine, May 14, 1798, to Miss Jerusha Perry, of the same State, whose ancestors were titled English families.   She was born February 1, 1777.

R. M. Gowdy.
R. M. Gowdy, farmer, was born in 1845 in White County, Ill., one of ten children of T. C. and Sarah (Grimes) Gowdy. The father, a farmer, was born on February 27, 1803, in Sumner County, Tenn.   After 1820 he lived in White County, Ill. He died in 1878. The mother was born in Kentucky in 1817. When a child she came to White County, and is now living in Hamilton County with her son, James. Educated in White County, our subject in 1807 married Sarah, daughter of W. M. and Eliza Fields, born in White County in 1849.   She died July 19, 1875. Their two children are Eliza M. and Harriett A.   In 1876 he married Permelia A., daughter of O. T. and Jane Anderson, born in White County in 1854.   Their five children are William, George, Elvis, Infant and Henry. In 1880 he moved to Hamilton County and bought his present fine farm of 126 acres, on which he gives much attention to the breeding of fine horses.   He is a stanch Democrat, casting his first vote for Seymour. He is a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Hon. Louis Jasper Hale.
Hon. Louis Jasper Hale, attorney and farmer, was born in Sparta, Tenn., November 25, 1839, the son of Peter and Sarah (Manning) Hale. Peter was of English stock and born in Virginia in 1809. His father, Thomas, also a native of Virginia, was a soldier under Gen. Marion during the entire Revolution. Peter went to White County, Tenn., in 1837, and at once married. In 1851 he came to Hamilton County, located northwest of the county seat, and died in 1882. The mother, of like stock and nativity, born in 1818, died in 1883. Our subject, the eldest of nine children who lived to maturity, was about twelve years old when he came to this county, and was educated in the public schools. He left the home farm when of age, and March 3, 1861, married Sophia, daughter of John Hay'se. She was born in Hamilton County June 15, 1845. Their children are Florence (wife of Thomas Browning), Alice, Laura, Rosa and Bessie. After marriage he began farming near the old home place, and in 1870 began studying law under Judge T. B. Stelle. In 1871-72 he attended a course of lectures at Chicago University, and in the spring of 1872 began practice at McLeansboro. He was elected State's attorney in the fall and served four years, and at about the same time began a partnership with Hon. L. Walker, present incumbent of that office, with the present firm name of Walker & Hale. The firm receives a good practice and are able men. Mr. Hale owns 135 acres, 55 being the old homestead. He has about 1,000 apple and other fruit trees of which he makes a specialty. He is a Democrat, an Odd Fellow and a member of the Christian Church, while his wife is a Baptist

Wilford F. Hall, M. D.
Wilford F. Hall, M. p., was born in Hamilton County, March 31, 1851, the son of Col. Hiram W. Hall.   He was educated medicine in 1872.   In 1874 he graduated from the Chicago Medical College; and has since been at McLeansboro in his deservedly successful practice.   In the spring of 1888 he took his brother, W. W. Hall, M. D., into partnership. December 29, 1885, he married Sophronia R. Cole, who is a graduate of Champaign University and a native of McLeansboro. Jennie L. is their only child.   He is a Republican and a Mason He is secretary of Hamilton County Medical Society. William W. Hall, M. D., was born August 80, 1861, in Franklin County, Ill., and educated at Hamilton College, McLeansboro.   He began reading medicine in 1879, and in 1888 graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago.   He is a Republican, a Mason, and a member of the city board of health.   He is a young physician of promise, and an enterprising citizen.

Hon. H. W. Hall.
Hon. H. W. Hall, farmer and trader, was born in 1825 in Hamilton County, one of seven children of John and Nancy (Sherley) Hall.   The father, born in 1799 in Union County, Ky., came to Hamilton County about 1818, one of the earliest settlers and very large land owners.   He died in Union County, Ill, in 1882. The mother, born about 1808 in Barren County, Ky., died in Hamilton County, Ill., in 1872. Our subject left home in June, 1846, and enlisted in Company I, Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry; was soon appointed sergeant and served in some of the most important battles of the Mexican war.   He was honorably discharged in June, 1847,when he located on his present home then 160 acres by a Mexican land warrant   He now has a fine home of 600 acres six miles southwest of the county seat   In 1848 he married Julia A., the daughter of James A. and Lydia McLean, born in 1831 in Franklin County, Ill.   Their nine children are John C, Wilford F., Columbus M., Cassander, Margaret, Patrick, William, Andy and Lydia.   In July, 1861, he enlisted and was commissioned captain of Company A, Fortieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; June 13, 1863, appointed major of his regiment; June 27, 1864, promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and was in command of the regiment the appointment as major until the war's close. He was actively engaged at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Jackson, Chattanooga, Mission Ridge and through the Atlanta campaign, before which Utter city he was wounded by a ball through the arm. He was honorably discharged in July, 1866. He was appointed commissioner by the governor of the State for building the insane asylum at Anna, Ill. In 1874 he was elected to the State Legislature, serving one term. He is a Republican, and first voted for Lewis Cass. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

C. M. Hall.
C. M. Hall, farmer, was born October 14, 1862, in Hamilton County, the third of nine children of Col. H. W. and Julia (McLean) Hall, the former Scotch-Irish in origin, born in Hamilton County, in 1827, and the latter of the same descent, born in Franklin County. In 1848 they were married in Franklin County.and settled in Knight's Prairie Precinct, now Flannigan Township, where they have since resided. The father served in the Mexican and civil wars, in the latter of which he was twice wounded. Our subject was educated at Ewing College, Asbury University, Ind., and graduated from the commercial department of Hamilton College. When seventeen he began teaching, and continued five winters successfully. He also engaged in trading, and when twenty-nine left home and married, settling on his farm in Knight's Prairie, where he remained until 1884. He then exchanged a portion of his farm for one in Sections 18 and 19, where he settled. His wife, Mary, daughter of J. William D. Huntinger, was born about 1861 in Jefferson County, Ill. Their children are Arthur, Fred and John. Although having received some help our subject has accumulated much by his own ability. and now owns about 450 acres of good land. He is now situated on a finely cultivated farm of 287 acres. He is a Republican and first voted for Grant in 1872. He is a member of the F. & A. M., Polk Lodge, No. 137, and the wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

David Hamill.
David Hamill, general merchant, was born in County Londonderry, Ireland, February 1, 1836, the son of William and Elizabeth (Crawford) Hamill, natives of Ireland, and born about 1800.   They died in 1875 and 1847 respectively.   The father, a farmer, came to Philadelphia about 1848 and in 1855 came to St. Clair County, Ill.., and resumed farming.   In 1863 he returned to Philadelphia where he died.   His wife died in Ireland. Five of their eight children are living.   Our subject was eleven years old when he came to America, and was educated chiefly in the public schools of Pennsylvania.   When seventeen he was apprenticed at Morocco finishing, but two years later, on account of delicate health, was compelled to give it up for out-door life. In 1857 he came to St Clair County, and taught one term. November 15, 1859, he married Sarah A., daughter of Isaac Phillips, born in St Clair County, in 1840.   Their children are Clara A. (wife of C. L. York), Mattie L., Mamie E. and Samuel T. In 1865 he bought 240 acres near McLeansboro.   Since 1871 he has been in his present business at Thackeray its first merchant and postmaster.   From 1872  to the present time he was railway agent at Thackeray, and resigned June 13, 1885, rather than attend to railroad business on Sunday.   He is a good business man, and carries a well-selected stock of goods.   Politically he is a Democrat, first voting for Douglas.    After ten years as director he was in 1886 elected school trustee.   He is a Mason, of Polk Lodge, McLeansboro.   He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he has been Sunday-school superintendent for the past eight years.

William Hamill.
William Hamill, attorney at law, of McLeansboro, was born in County Londonderry, North of Ireland, June 7, 1842, the son of William, Sr., and Elizabeth (Crawford) Hamill, natives of the same county where the mother died.   When our subject was a child they came to Philadelphia, where he secured a fair education in the common branches.   In 1857 he came West, with a married sister, and entered McKendree College, St. Clair County, Ill. A few months before graduation he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Seventeenth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served three years as private, now a commissioned officer, and was seriously wounded in the right arm, on Sherman's raid to Meridian, Miss., in 1864.   While wounded, he remained at Jackson three months a prisoner of war.   While in college he studied law under ex-Gov. French, who had charge of that department, and since the war has practiced continuously ever since, and with success.   November 17, 1870, he married Maria E. Randall, a native of Missouri.   He has always been a Democrat, though no political aspirant   Besides his profession he owns and manages several good farms at present   He is an Odd Fellow, and is recognized as one of the able members of the Hamilton County bar, and a citizen of high standing.

Daniel Hanagan.
Daniel Hanagan, farmer, was born in Queens County, Ireland, in 1815, the son of Hugh and Margaret (Duley) Hanagan. The father, born in 1770, in Ireland, a farmer by occupation, passed his entire life in his native country, and the mother, born in 1780, in Ireland, had twelve children, five of whom came to America, Daniel being the first one. He lived and was educated in his native county. When about twenty-one left his home, and in 1836 came directly to Middleton, Conn., where he worked in the stone quarries.   September 1, 1842, he married Margaret  at Asbury University, Greencastle, Ind., and began reading Miller, who was born in Queens County, Ireland in 1825. Seven of their eleven children are living: Michael C, William, Lizzie D., Daniel F., Patrick H., Mary A. and Thomas.   He immediately bought eighty acres of his present farm in Crook Township, and although beginning as a poor man he has acquired about 1,200 acres of land, making him the largest land owner in his township and one of the largest in the county.   He has given so much to his children, however, that he now owns 320 acres, 160 being in White County.   He is one of the old and most esteemed citizens of the region.   He is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Polk, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

Prof. James J. Hassett.
Prof. James J. Hassett, principal of the select school at Thackeray, was born in 1862 in Henderson County, Ky., the son of James and Frances (Church) Hassett   The father was born in 1812, in Ireland, and was a farmer who, in 1840, left his native country and settled in Union County, Ky., where he lived at the time of his marriage.   Twenty years after he settled in Henderson County, Ky., and in 1875 came to Hamilton County where he died five years later.   The mother, born of English stock, in 1835, in Henderson county, Ky., died in 1871.   Three of their eight children are living: Mary (widow of John Fenan), Maggie (wife of John Griffin) and our subject   James J. received his education at McLeansboro and at Ewing College, and since his seventeenth year he has been teaching continuously in winter seasons and during two summers, always in Hamilton County. In 1884-85 he was principal of the Dahlgren schools, and in 1886 of the Thackeray school.   In March, 1887, he and Prof. D. J. Underwood opened a select school in Thackeray for a term of twelve weeks, and have met with marked success, averaging fifty pupils, eleven being experienced teachers, and most of whom are preparing to teach.    Prof. Hassett is one of the leading educators of the county. He is a Democrat, and first voted for Cleveland He is a Roman Catholic.

Newton C. Henderson.
Newton C. Henderson, farmer, was born in Monroe County Tenn., in 1837, the eighth of fourteen children of Robert N. and Winnie (Eudaley) Henderson.   The father, born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in 1796, and of Irish origin, was the son of Andrew Henderson, and was married when twenty-eight. Soon after he settled in Monroe County, where he remained until 1864, when he died at Chattanooga while en route for Illinois. He was buried at Nashville.   He was a farmer.    The mother, born in Virginia in 1806, is still living, and both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.   With a country school education, one subject came to Hamilton County in 1862, and on January 9, 1867, married Mary, daughter of James and Mary A. Carey, born in Kentucky.    She died, March 24, 1884. Six of their seven children are living: Lillie B., Andrew H,, Nellie W., Sumner W., Isa C. and Winnie A.   July 9, 1884, he married Julia, daughter of John and Hannah Duval, and a native of Hamilton County.   Their only child is Newton C.   His present farm of 160 acres of finely improved land is the result of his own good management, from a beginning of nothing. Politically he is a Republican, casting his first vote for Bell. For twenty years he has been a Mason, and is a member of the F. M. B. A.   He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a man of ability and information.

Hiram Hinkle.
Hiram Hinkle, farmer, was born in Butler County, Ohio, in 1836, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Debolt) Hinkle. The father, of German stock, was born in Pennsylvania in 1788, and in youth   went to Butler County, Ohio,  there married and lived, one of the pioneers of that county, and died in 1883. He owned 160 acres of land. The mother, born in Butler County, Ohio, died in 1858. Twelve of seventeen children are living. Our subject, the youngest, was educated in the public schools, and left home after he was of age. In 1857 he married Ellen Green, a native of England, born in 1889. Their children are Charles, Sarah J., Joseph, Albert and "William. He moved to Randolph County. Ind., the next year, and bought his farm of eighty acres. He lived there thirteen years, and in 1876 sold and came to Hamilton County, Ill., and bought 260 acres, where he settled and has since resided. His wife died in 1872, and the following year he married Sarah J. Hampton, born in North Carolina in 1854. Their children are Laura, Clara, Lizzie, Lillie, Edward and Amanda. He has a good farm, ornamented with good buildings. He is a Republican, and first voted for Lincoln. He is a Methodist, as is his wife also.

John T. Hunt, M. D.
John T. Hunt, M. D., was born in 1844 in Hamilton County, Ill., and received his literary education principally at Benton. He has done for himself since thirteen, first as merchant's clerk until within about a year of the late war. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fortieth Illinois Infantry, and was honorably discharged at Atlanta in September, 1864. He served as private and quartermaster's sergeant, and was at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Mission Ridge, where he was wounded by a pistol ball in the wrist, and with Sherman to Atlanta. Immediately after his discharge he returned to Hamilton County, where he farmed for seven years, and then attended a session of the medical college at Keokuk, Iowa. He then returned to Macedonia and began practice, and in 1877 began another course of lectures, graduated and again began practice. In 1880 he bought a farm of 130 acres in Knight's Prairie, Hamilton County, which is finely improved and cultivated.   Since 1881, when he established his drug store, he has superintended his farm, run his store and practiced.   In 1865 he married Sarah E., daughter of William and Nancy (Oglesby) Flannigan.   Their children are Telitha, wife of T. J. Rogers; Julia, wife of James Shirley; Emma and Martha A. (deceased in infancy).   His wife died in 1872. He next married Martha, daughter of Joshua and Sarah (Townsend) Morris.   Their children are Casander (deceased). Flora, Lillie, Edgar E. and Goldie.   This wife was born in February, 1848, in Hamilton County.   From a penniless boy of thirteen our subject has become a leading physician, and owner of one of the best farms in Hamilton County, a house and lot in Macedonia and a good stock of goods.   Since 1882 he has been postmaster, and is one of the "rascals" not yet "turned out."   He fought for abolition, and is now a stanch Republican, first voting for Lincoln.   Our subject is a member of Macedonia Lodge, I. O. O. F., and of the G. A. R.   He, his wife, Telitha, and Julia are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, while Emma and Flora are Methodists.

John E. Irvin.
John E. Irvin, of McLeansboro, Ill., was born in Galatia, Saline Co., Ill., January 8, 1857, the son of Oscar F. and Sarah (Kittinger) Irvin, natives respectively of New York and Kentucky. The father came to Illinois at an early day when a young man, and followed mercantile pursuits until his death in April, 1860.   Our subject was reared and educated in his native place, and learned the printers' trade at Harrisburg, Ill., working on the Chronicle three years.   After working at his trade in Carmi, Ill., in 1876 he came to McLeansboro and was foreman of the Times until 1882, when he, in company with Dr. 0. M. Lyon, established the Leader, to whose success Mr. Irvin has largely contributed, by his careful management and experience of twenty years.   October 8, 1879, he married Rachell. Frazier, of Hamilton County. Their four children are Roy (deceased), Lena Pearl, John B. and Addie D. Mr. Irvin is a stanch Republican in political matters, is a Knight of Pythias, and is justly recognized as one of the enterprising and reliable citizens of the county, and a newspaper man of experience and ability.

W. B. Johnson.
W. B. Johnson, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Flannigan Township in 1843, the fifth of fourteen children of George W. and Eliza J. (Waller) Johnson.   The father, English in ancestry and born in Kentucky in 1814, was the son of Robert Johnson, who became a pioneer of Hamilton County about 1821. George W. was but seven years old when they came to Hamilton County, where he was educated in the common schools, and when twenty-three married and settled in Flannigan Township, where he spent his life, with the exception of about three years during the war, in Perry County.   He was a leading farmer and stock dealer, ran a general store for many years, and died in 1879. His wife, born in 1820 in Illinois, died in 1881. Both were members of the Regular Baptist Church.   Our subject was educated in the common schools, and in 1803 married Mary, daughter of Charles and Elnora Hungate, a native of Hamilton County, born in 1842.   Six of their eight children are living: Amos, Arzona E., Eliza O., Cona A., William E. and George W. He has since been a resident of the vicinity of his birth and of his present finely improved farm of 240 acres, for five years, and secured it by his own ability and work.   He served several years as constable, and is at present township treasurer.   His first vote was for McClellan, and he has always been a Democrat. His wife was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Capt. Charles A. Johnson.
Capt. Charles A. Johnson, a prominent farmer and stock raiser, was born in Flannigan Township in 1829, the tenth of twelve children of Robert and Elizabeth (Lewis) Johnson, The father, English in origin, born in 1792, was the son of John Johnson, who removed to Kentucky and then to Hamilton County, where he died.   Robert was married in Kentucky, and in about 1819 settled some ten miles southwest of McLeansboro, and through life was well known and esteemed in his county. He died March 20, 1872, and his mother, born in 1798 in Christian County, Ky., died September 21, 1865.   They were married in 1811, and both were members of the Regular Baptist Church. Educated in the county schools, our subject in 1849 married Nancy C, daughter of John and Nancy Irby, born in Tennessee in 1832.   Their seven children are John W.; Martha J., wife of Robert T. Hungate; Mary L., wife of G. Sneed, of Kansas; Ruth E., wife of E. Herrelson; Nancy E., wife of J. L. Sneed; Elizabeth and Laura, now Mrs. Lee.   Since his marriage our subject has lived on his present farm, and transformed and increased the original tract of Government land to about 800 acres, making him one of the most extensive land holders in the county.   He has one of the finest orchards in the county, of about thirty acres.   In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fortieth Illinois Volunteers, as second sergeant, and became successively second lieutenant, first lieutenant and captain, which command he held until the war closed.   His command was in the Army of the Tennessee at Shiloh, Mission Ridge, where he was shot through both thighs and disabled for a time; all through Georgia with Sherman, on to Washington, where in the review he had command of a division. He was with his regiment during the entire service, except while disabled from his wound. In July, 1865, after four years service, he was mustered out at Louisville, and resumed farming.   He is a progressive man, and has given two of his children a college education and all a good one.   He was a Democrat, and first voted for Pierce, but since the war has been a Republican.   He is a member of the F. & A. M., the F. M. B. A. and the G. A. R. His wife and four children are members of the United Baptist Church.

John W. Johnson.
John W. Johnson, farmer, born in Hamilton County in 1850, is the eldest son of Capt Charles A. and Nancy C.(Irby) Johnson. The father, born in Hamilton County in 1829, and the son of Robt. Johnson, a native of North Carolina who went to Kentucky where he married and became an early pioneer of Franklin County, Ky., but was driven back by the Indians. In a few years, however, he went to Hamilton County, where he spent his life as a farmer. (See the biography of Charles A. Johnson, the father, elsewhere.)  Our subject was reared at home with a good common-school education. In November, 1871, he married Nancy L., daughter of Benjamin W. and Sidney Harrelson, born in January, 1854, in Franklin County. Their seven children are Charles W., Benjamin W., Robert E., John Arthur, Lorana J.,Laura A.and Nancy E. From 1875 to 1882 he was in Kansas, but has since lived on his present farm of 161 acres of finely improved land seven miles southeast of McLeansboro. He is becoming one o the first farmers of the county. Politically he is a Republican, first voting for Grant   He is a member of the F. M. B. A.

John Judd.
John Judd, county clerk of Hamilton County, Ill., born in Burlington, Ohio, September 3, 1839, is the son of Chester and Mary (Burch) Judd, natives respectively of New York and Ohio. The father came to Illinois in 1864 locating on Moore's Prairie in the western part of the county, where he now resides with his wife. (See sketch.) One subject was educated at McKendree College, Lebanon, Ill., and Jones' Commercial College, of St Louis. For two years he followed teaching, and from seventeen to twenty-six he was wool-carder in his father's null, except while at and teaching school. His father established the first steam flouring-mill in the county. Confinement not agreeing with our subject, he settled on the farm, and in 1867 was elected county surveyor, an office which be filled for seventeen consecutive years. In 1886 he was elected county clerk, and is now filling the office in an efficient manner. September 26,1862, he married Lucy S. Bennett of Athens County, Ohio. Their four children are Burch J., Chester O, Lydia B. and Giles G. His party, the Democratic, elected him to his various offices, not with- standing they were at times in the minority. He is a Master Mason, and justly recognized as a reliable citizen and popular official.

Lieut. Henry A. W. Kipp.
Lieut. Henry A. W. Kipp, farmer, was born in Prussia, December 8, 1843, the second of seven children of Herman H. and Christina E. (Stockdiok) Kipp, natives of the same country, and born in 1816 and 1818 respectively. The grandfather, William Kipp, and all the ancestors were probably of the same nationality. The father received a good business education and married about 1839. In 1845 he came through Baltimore to Dresden, Ohio, where he engaged for seven years in buying stock, but afterward farmed, living there, with the exception of three years in Licking County, Ohio, until his death in Hamilton County, August 29, 1883, while on a visit to his son. The mother died near Frazeysburg, Ohio, May 17, 1876. Both were for over thirty years devout members of the Methodist Church. Besides his education at Dresden, our subject took a course of three months at Zanesville, Ohio, Commercial College. At eighteen he enlisted in Company G, Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was in the battles of Dutten Hill, Ky., in pursuit of Morgan through Indiana and Ohio, the siege of Knoxville, London, and numerous minor engagements, mostly in Tennessee and Kentucky.   He remained in his command until made second lieutenant of a colored company of heavy artillery. After eleven months he was made first lieutenant, and so continued until his discharge March 81, 1866.   After a tour through the West, he returned home and took a three months course at the Zanesville Commercial College, and next year was a bookkeeper for a firm in Cincinnati   In November,   1868,  he married Melissa J., daughter of Charles and Anna Morrow, and born in 1845, in Muskingum County, Ohio.   Their seven children are, Anna, Elizabeth, Louisa, Milton A., Henrietta M-, Frederick W. and Clarence N.   He sold the farm he had settled on in Muskingum County, and in 1881 came to Hamilton County, where he has since lived on his present fine farm of 190 acres, two miles south of McLeansboro.   He has also about 110 acres about eight miles northeast of McLeansboro, all of which is the result of his business ability.   Politically he was reared a Democrat, but has been a Republican since the beginning of the war, voting first for Lincoln.   He is a prominent and active member of the G. A. R. and the F. M. B. A.   He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Johnson H. Lane.
Johnson H. Lane, superintendent of schools of Hamilton County, Ill., is a native of the county, born December 13, 1858. He is the son of John W. and Theresa (Mitchell) Lane, both natives of the county. The grandfather, Lewis Lane, a native of North Carolina, came to Illinois in the fall of 1818, and located four miles east of McLeansboro, then White County. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 and a lieutenant in the Black Hawk war. He was the first sheriff of the county, and a prominent officer of early militia companies of the State. He was a true Jackson Democrat, and a Methodist in religion. He died in 1876. He married Mary Prince, who died, leaving three children:   Joel P., our subject's father, both deceased and Eliza, wife of Lewis Prince, of this county. He afterward married Jane Myers. Their two daughters Sarah and Bettie married and went to Arkansas. John W. was a farmer until his death. He was a Democrat, a Methodist and a Mason. He died in July, 1865. He first married Eliza Shirley and had seven children: Mary, wife of Joseph Wright; Martha, wife of James Mangis, of east Tennessee; George W., of this county, and Moses S., of Posey County, Ind., are the four now living. By his second marriage with our subject's mother, there were five children, four of whom are living: John W., Jr., of Missouri; Alice E., wife of A. L. Baker, of Fulton County; our subject and James M., of Knox County, Ill. Stephen D. is the one deceased. your subject's grandfather, Ichabod Mitchell, a native of Virginia, came here about 1820. He was a well-known pioneer, a justice, and a member of the county court for several years. He was a Democrat, and a Baptist in religion. He died in 1874, in his eighty-sixth year. Our subject was reared to manhood on the farm, and besides a good preliminary education, he attended Hamilton College, McLeansboro. He began teaching in 1876 and continued ten years. He was principal of the McLeansboro schools from 1883 to 1886, when he was elected to his present position, which he has efficiently filled. He is an unswerving Democrat and as such was elected to this office. In 1879 he began reading law, and was admitted to practice in 1881. The same year he entered the senior year in the law school of Washington University and graduated in 1882. He has practiced somewhat irregularly ever since, first as partner of Judge Stelle and now of I. H. Webb. May 13, 1885, he married Carrie Harvey, of this county. He is a Knight of Pythias, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

James Lane.
James Lane, of McLeansboro, Ill., was born in Sumner County, Tenn., June 28, 1814, the son of James and Mary Phipps Lane, both natives of Craven County, N. C.   The father came to Illinois in the fall of 1818,   located with his family three miles east of McLeansboro, and followed farming the remainder of his life.   He was an early member of the county court, and a Jackson Democrat.   He died, while on a visit in Peoria County, in the spring of 1846.   Six sons and four daughters were reared to maturity, but two of whom are now living: our subject and Lemuel B. of Marysville, Mo.   Our subject was reared to manhood in the county, securing a good education in the common branches in school, and much more by desultory reading and study.   He studied law under John McElvain, but was not licensed to practice until 1863.   He was a captain and lieutenant-colonel in the militia, and was elected justice in 1852, an office which he has held almost continuously ever since.   In 1847 he was elected coroner serving two years.   In 1867 he was elected county judge, serving one term of four years, and again re-elected in 1865 and 1869.   In 1866 he was appointed United States commissioner by Judge Treat, and still acts in this capacity. He has also practiced law considerably since the war. March 2, 1887, he married Frances Crissell, a native of Hamilton County, who died in March, 1861.   The following children are living: Minerva J.   (wife of Henry Green), Andrew J., Elsie F. (wife of Thomas Garrison), Eliza E. (wife of D. W. Holland, all of this county, and John W., of Wayne County, Ill. In March, 1863, he married Rity M. Jordan, of Jefferson County, Ill..   Their five children are Lucy A. (wife of E. A. Burton), Harriett M., Ida (wife of Thomas J. Holley), Anna and James. The Judge is a Democrat, first voting for Van Buren.   He is a deacon in the Baptist Church and has been since 1862.   He is a Mason and encampment member of the I. 0. 0. F.

John R. Lee.
John R. Lee, a prominent farmer and pioneer, was born in Tennessee in 1830, the eon of Rev. Robert and Rebecca (Mitchell) Lee.   The father, English in ancestry and born in North Carolina in 1808, died in 1850.   His father, John, also a native of North Carolina, was a volunteer at New Orleans under Jackson in the war of 1812, and when Robert was a boy moved to Rutherford County, Tenn., then to Alabama, back to Tennessee and to Illinois, about 1832, locating in Shelby County, afterward in White County,  where he died.   Robert was married when about twenty-five in Tennessee, and about 1835 moved to White County, and some time after to Hamilton County, where he spent the rest of his life.   He was a farmer and mechanic, and while a resident of Tennessee, was licensed to preach.   His removal to Illinois, and the division in the church, led him  to join the General Baptist Church, by which he was ordained to preach the gospel.   He organized and built a church on the site of Thackery, which was admitted to the Franklin Association of the Missionary Baptist Church, which more nearly accorded with his belief.   His work was in Hamilton and White and the adjoining counties in Indiana. The mother was born in Giles County, Tenn., about four years her husband's junior, and died about 1889.   She was of Irish ancestry.   Our subject's education was very limited. May 20, 1850, he married Elizabeth Sneed.   Four of their five children are living: Rev. Robert W., of Franklin County; Elijah, deceased; Cleory J., wife of J. B. Reed; James M. and Perry S.   His wife died September 3, 1860, and in March, 1861, he married Mrs. Martha A. Plaster, daughter of John and Nancy Irby. Their six children are Nancy E. (wife of A. D. Phillips), Louisa Ada C. wife of R. T. Dixon, of Posey County, Ind.), Emberton M.. Minnie E. and Lillie B.   He soon located on his present farm, which he has improved and added to until he now has a fine farm of about 200 acres.   He has always been an active and esteemed man, formerly a Democrat and first voting for Pierce, now a Greenbacker. He is an Odd Fellow, and nearly all his family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Dr. Charles M. Lyon.
Dr. Charles M. Lyon, a physician, of McLeansboro, and the owner and one of the editors of The Leader, was born at Cuyahoga Falls, Summit Co., Ohio, October 8, 1848. He came to Illinois in 1850, and in August, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company I, Forty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He .was promoted captain, and mustered out October 20, 1865. He was a member of the Thirty-first General Assembly of Illinois, and in December, 1881, was appointed postmaster at McLeansboro. He was reappointed by President Arthur in December, 1883, and removed by President Cleveland in August, 1885, for being an "offensive partisan. " He has been a resident of McLeansboro for twenty years.

Will McConnell.
Will McConnell, of McLeansboro, was born in Pittsburg, Penn., March 8, 1860, the son of Robert and Jane (Hamill) McConnell, both natives of Ireland.   Our subject lived with his parents in Pittsburgh, and later in Philadelphia, Penn.   In 1876 he came to McLeansboro and attended Hamilton College, where he completed his education, residing with his uncle, William Hamill, the attorney.   He followed clerking one year, and also taught school at Thackery one term, and in 1883 engaged in the book and stationery business in company with Theodore Puckett. In 1885 Mr. Connell withdrew from this business and engaged in the grain and seed business.   In March, 1887 he leased the People's Grist Mill, of McLeansboro, which he is now conducting in a most successful manner.   October 14, 1885, he married Angie, daughter of R. C. Atkinson, of this county.   Their only son is Robert R.   Mr. McConnell is a Democrat in politics, was city clerk in 1884, and for three years has been city treasurer. He and "the wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and esteemed and respected people.

George W. Mangis.
George W. Mangis, farmer, was born in Monroe county, Tenn., in 1880, the son of Henry and Susannah (Wagoner) Mangis. The father, of German descent, was born in 1709, in Virginia, was the son of John Mangis, one of the thousand Hessians captured by Washington at Trenton. He was never exchanged, and afterward settled on the farm now owned by his son and daughter, Andrew J. and Martha. He became owner of 200 acres before his death in 1888. The mother, born in Virginia, about 1809, died in 1882. Henry married twice and of his seventeen children sixteen lived to be grown and fourteen are now living, the oldest sixty-eight and the youngest thirty-six. Our subject, the twelfth child, was educated in Tennessee, and lived with his parents until twenty-three. Two years after their arrival in Illinois he returned to his native State and in 1853 married Elizabeth L. Miller, born in Monroe County, Tenn., in 1834. He then settled in McLeansboro Township for four years and then, after ten years in Beaver Creek Township, in 1858, bought his present farm (then eighty acres) in Crook Township. Beginning as a poor man he has now become owner, by his business ability and care, of 550 acres. He also has his home place of 180 acres well improved. For three years he ran a threshing machine. Politically he is a Democrat, first voting for Fillmore. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and are esteemed people of their community.

Hon. Samuel S. Marshall.
Hon. Samuel S. Marshall, of McLeansboro, Ill., was born March 12, 1821, near Shawneetown, Gallatin "Co., Ill. He is the son of Daniel and Sophia  (Walker) Marshall, both natives of the North of Ireland, where they were married. The were both of that Scotch-Irish stock which has furnished many sturdy patriots  and able men to the American Nation. They came to the United States in 1818 locating in Gallatin County, to which county two of Daniel Marshall's brothers: John and Samuel had already come; the former a well known and successful banker and business man of Shawneetown.   Daniel Marshall came to Hamilton County about 1825, locating at McLeansboro and engaging in mercantile pursuits which he successfully followed for about thirty years.   Politically he was originally a Jackson Democrat, but in the Harrison campaign became a Whig, with which party he acted until it ceased to exist. He was county clerk of Hamilton County for four years. During the late civil war he was an ardent advocate of the Union cause, and died shortly after its close.    Both himself and wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.   Daniel and Mrs. Marshall have three sons and four daughters who grew to mature age, those now living being John W., Samuel S. and Mrs. Elizabeth Millard.    Daniel Marshall  was married the second time to Miss Sarah Holmes, by whom he had one daughter, Edith M., now the wife of C. M. Wiseman, of McLeansboro.   The subject of this sketch, was reared to manhood in Hamilton County.   He spent two years at Cumberland College, Princeton, Ky., now Cumberland  University, Lebanon, Tenn., but his advancement in knowledge was due more to assiduous private study than to educational facilities.   He began reading law in 1842 with Judge Henry Eddy, of Shawneetown. his cousin by marriage, and having been licensed by the supreme court to practice in all the courts of the State, he opened an office in McLeansboro. and immediately achieved deserved success at the bar. In 1840 he was elected to the Lower House of the General Assembly, and though its youngest member took an active find conspicuous part in all its proceedings and deliberations. In March, 1847, he was unanimously elected by the Legislature State's attorney for the Third Judicial District, comprising the counties of Marion, Jefferson, Hamilton, Williamson, Jackson, Union, Alexander, Pulaski, Massac, Pope, Hardin, Gallatin and Saline. In one of these counties, Massac, the people were in open and organized resistance to the enforcement of the laws, and in another, Pope, there was considerable trouble, but affairs were not in so deplorable a state. In Massac County, bands of regulators had been organized, originally for the purpose of driving out a set of thieves, but at length bad men joined the regulators and eventually secured control; hence many good men refused to unite with them and the people were almost equally divided into two parties, "Regulators" and " Flatheads," between which there was little to choose. But the result was that society was without protection through the general suspension of the laws, for juries could not be found within the limits of the county to render verdicts against either their friends or their enemies. To meet this condition of things the Legislature passed a special act in session of 1847, by which the entire Third Judicial Circuit was made one trial district, and parties arrested in Massac County, could, under this special act be taken to any other county within the trial district for trial, where juries would not be influenced by either friendship or fear, and thus with a fearless prosecutor and impartial juries, determined to protect the people and vindicate the supremacy of the law, the troubles ceased and society resumed its wonted peace.
After serving two years as State's attorney, Mr. Marshall declined a re-election, and resumed the practice of law. In March, 1851. he was elected over the late C. H. Constable, of Mount Cartel, Ill., judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, then newly created, and composed of the counties of Marion, Jefferson, Hamilton. Franklin, Saline, Gallatin, White, Wabash, Edwards and all the Democratic members of the Legislature for that position, though not a candidate for the position, absent from the capital, and without any knowledge on his part until after the vote, that his name would be used in that connection as a candidate for the position, and was defeated by only a few votes. While in Congress he was at one time candidate for speaker of the House. Mr. Marshall was brought up in the Presbyterian faith, but never has affiliated with any sect, though he freely contributes to all. He has accumulated a comfortable competency, owning about 2,000 acres of good farming land in Hamilton County, nearly 1,000 of it lying contiguous to McLeansboro. He also owns considerable city property.

John W. Marshall.
John W. Marshall, postmaster, McLeansboro, was born November 10, 1814 in Ireland, and came to the United States with his parents, at the age of five years. He was reared and educated at Shawneetown, and in 1880 came to McLeansboro, where his father had already engaged in the mercantile business. After three years' clerking with his father he started a general merchandise business of his own, at which he continued more or less regularly for fifteen or twenty years. In 1848 he was elected county clerk and served four years. In 1850 he was re-elected and served by re-election until 1872. He was justice of the peace and police magistrate several years. September 1, 1885, President Cleveland appointed him to his present position. April 25, 1835, he married Mary Lockwood of this county. She died September 25, 1858. Six of ten children are living: Rebecca (wife of A. M. Sturman, of Dahlgren), Daniel, Joseph, Thomas, Rosalie (wife of T. M. Eckley, an attorney, of McLeansboro), and Sophia (wife of R. T. Meador). He is an unswerving Democrat in politics. He is a Mason, having passed all the chairs in local lodges, being master several times.

Robert L. Meador.
Robert L. Meador was born in Sumner County, Tenn., January 18, 1828, the son of Joseph and Lucinda (Latimer) Meador, natives respectively of Virginia and Connecticut.   The father came to Gallatin County in 1828, then to Marion County, and finally in 1835 to White County, where he farmed successfully until his death in 1853.  The mother died at the residence of Robert L., in McLeansboro, in 1872.   Their surviving children (of nine born) are Satyra J., widow of N. J. Sallee, late of White County; our subject; Caroline, wife of P. F. Orr, farmer in White County, and Mary L., wife of John Madden of Kingman, Kas. In 1849 our subject came to McLeansboro and started a tanyard, which he and a brother (deceased) conducted three years. He then started in the tinware business, learning the tinner's trade, and conducted that three years.   Mercantile business next occupied his attention, until in August, 1862, when he enlisted as first lieutenant in Company A, Eighty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was mustered out in October, 1864.   He was in Banks raid up Red River, and was wounded.   He then resumed merchandising in McLeansboro until 1868 when he became a member of the firm of Hood, Bowers & Co., in the woolen-mill, and in 1877 became sole proprietor, and has successfully conducted it ever since.   He has lost three wives by death; by his first marriage, with Ann Wallace, he has one child, Jasper N.; by his second, with Lucinda Barnett, he has two, Robert G. and Joseph S.; and by his third, Louisa Hobbs of Mount Vernon, Ill., he had no children.   They were married in 1872, and she died in 1876. April 15, 1880, he married Mrs. Carrie (Pyle) Page, native of Maryland.   Formerly a Democrat, he is now a Prohibitionist, and in 1870 came within- nine and one-half votes of the State Legislature.   He is a Mason, Odd Fellow, and Royal Templar. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Aaron S. McKinzie.
Aaron S. McKinzie, farmer, was born January 22,1820 in Hamilton County, two miles from his present home.   He is the son of George and Betsy Ann (Vickers) McKinzie.   The father, born in 1771 in Canada, and a farmer by occupation, went to Tennessee when a young man, married, and his wife died leaving one child.   He appointed a guardian for the child, gave it $1,000, all he possessed, and came to White County, Ill., to clear and build a home.   All the settlers in a radius of eight miles were needed to raise a house, and wild animals and Indians infested the wilderness.   In 1819, he came to Hamilton County, Mayberry Township, and in 1834, sold and established a dairy in Marion County, but his health caused him to soon return and buy property in the same township, where he died in 1836.   He was a pioneer,  a man of good sense, a skillful deer hunter, and a good business man.   For thirteen years he was justice. His second wife was born in 1783 in Tennessee, and died in 1843. Four of their ten children are living.   Our subject, the fourth, was educated in subscription schools, and after the death of his father, had the care of his mother, one brother and three sisters. November 12, 1841, he married Elizabeth Brill, born in White County in 1825.   Eleven of their fourteen children are living: William M.; Clarissa, widow of Henry Beck; George S.; Julia, wife of George P. Phelps; Susan A., wife of W. Lasater; Samuel M.; Clarinda, wife of H. Campbell; Daniel P.; Amanda E., wife of J. S. Fairweather, Alexander and John H. In 1842 he bought forty acres in Section 36, Mayberry Township, his present home, and increased his possession until at one time he owned 1,300 acres, the largest land holder in the county, and one of the largest in the country.   He divided it among his children so that he owns 290 acres now.   He is an old and esteemed citizen; and a Democrat, first voting for Polk.   He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, he being a member for thirty-two years.

William McGehee.
William McGehee, farmer, was born March 30,1831, in Gibson County, Ind., the son of Benjamin and Mary (Owens) McGehee. The father of Scotch-Irish descent, and born in Tennessee in 1812, went when a small boy with his father, Jacob, to Gibson County, Ind., where the latter spent his life, a pioneer of southern Indiana. Benjamin was married in Gibson County, and in 1841 moved to Hamilton County and bought eighty acres in Beaver Creek Township. He was a successful man, and at one time owned 360 acres, all excepting eighty acres being in White County. For twenty years before his death, in 1875, he was a resident of White County. The mother, born in Kentucky in 1812, died in 1844 in Hamilton County, Ill. Our subject, the oldest and only one living of five children, was ten years old when they came to Illinois, and about thirteen when his mother died. His education was in subscription schools, and he lived with his father until over twenty. In 1851 he married Loranie A., daughter of James Moore, and born in 1830 in Hamilton County. Their eight children are Bailey, Benjamin, Henry, Mary E. (wife of Romelia Bister), William H., Maggie D. (wife of John Rose), Rhoda Belle and Albert. Since Ins marriage he has lived in Beaver Creek Township, near his present farm, excepting five years which were spent near Springerton. In 1854 he traded for eighty acres in Section 13, where he has lived mostly ever since.
The eighty acres and 860 received from his father he has increased to 760 acres, 420 of which are in White County. He erected his home in 1886 for $500. He is a Republican, first voting for Fillmore. About 1856 he was elected constable and held the office for two years, and has served as school director a number of years. He is an esteemed man and reliable farmer. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

I. N. Mercer.
I. N. Mercer, justice, farmer, and proprietor of the Broughton Hotel, was born May 28, 1888, in Green County, Ohio, the tenth of thirteen children, six deceased, of John and Rebecca (Dalby) Mercer, the former of English origin, born in 1790 in Frederick County, Va., and the latter of Scotch and German descent, born in the same county in 1796. After their marriage they settled on a farm in Greene County, Ohio, where they died in 1881 and 1877 respectively. Our subject was educated in Jamestown and Antioch College (now Wilberforce College, colored,) and at twenty-two went to Clinton County, Ind., where he married Elizabeth Clark, and soon established a merchandising business in Colfax and farmed some also. In 1862 he moved to Vermillion County, Ind., where he engaged in live-stock dealing, farming and merchandising. His wife died in November, 1864, and 1866 he married again, and sold out and moved to Hamilton County and settled on his farm one and a half miles southeast of McLeansboro. Eight years later he moved to Broughton and engaged in merchandising, but since 1885 his attention has been devoted to superintending his farm. He was postmaster also for some time. By his first marriage his children are Daniel, Luretta J. (wife of Henry Kanier), John W., Abram and Lanford N. Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel and Harriett (Crawford) Shroyer, the second wife of our subject, was born September 4, 1847, in Lawrence County, Ill., and reared in Vermillion County. August 12, 1866, is the date of their marriage. Their only child was Amy I., deceased at thirteen. Our subject now owns about 300 acres of land besides town property, which is the result of his active and careful career. Politically he is independent, first noting for Fremont He was postmaster after 1877 until he abandoned mercantile life. Since 1881 he has been justice. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, while the children are all Methodists.   He is a great-grandson of Gen. John Mercer, of Revolutionary war fame. He is a leading business man of the county.

E. N. Miller.
E. N. Miller, farmer and teacher, was born in White County, Ill., in 1848, the son of Mark A. and Harriett L. (Rice) Miller. The father, born in 1818 in White County, is a retired capitalist of Enfield. His father, James, a native of South Carolina, came to White County in 1814, one of the pioneers of southern Illinois, his nearest neighbor, eighteen miles, at Carmi or the Crouch settlement Mark A., a farmer, married in White County in 1838, and with much business ability accumulated property. In 1887 he began merchandising in Enfield. Since 1874 he has been devoted to speculation in real estate and the commission business. Besides liberal gifts to his children he now owns 460 acres of fine land. Enfield has been his home for twenty nine years. His wife, Harriett L. Rice, was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1820, and when three years old came to White County, where she died in 1885. Our subject is the fifth of eight children. Besides the public school advantages our subject had a year at Lincoln University. Since his sixteenth year he has taught continuously, except two winters, chiefly in Hamilton and White Counties and in Gibson County, Ind. In December, 1867, he married Emma J., daughter of Judge W. Garrison, of White County, her native place. Their only child is Charles E. After marriage he located in Enfield, and in the summers of 1872 and 1873 he contracted to grade on the Louisville & Nashville Railway. In August, 1873, his wife died, and in February, 1877, he married Mary E., daughter of P. Gowdy, born in White County in 1854. Mildred, Mark A. and Mary E. are their children. Since 1876 he has lived in Beaver Creek Township, his present home. He is a local leader in the Republican ranks. In 1878 he was elected constable and served four years, and in 1880 was appointed deputy sheriff and served six years. He is a Mason and Odd Fellow of Enfield Lodges, having taken all the degrees. He has been elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at West Union since its organization. His wife is also a member.

Abner R. Moore.
Abner R. Moore, farmer and carpenter, was born on the 26th of August, 1829, in Henderson County, Ky.    He is the third of seven children of Haywood and Nancy (Russell) Moore. The father, Irish in origin, was born July 3, 1805, while his parents were en route to Kentucky from North Carolina, and died in 1879.   His father, William, spent the remainder of his life in Henderson County as a farmer and mechanic, and died in 1834. Haywood had country school advantages, and at eighteen married our subject's mother.    In 1855 he married Elizabeth Pirtle. One of their two children is living.     In 1843 he moved to Hamilton County, his permanent home, was always engaged in carpentering and farming through life, and was a member of the Baptist Church.   The mother, born in Henderson County, Ky., in 1805, died about 1875.   Our subject received a good business education, and October 7,1852, married Eliza J., daughter of Milton Gallaher, born in Beaver County, Penn., August 8, 1829.   She died in March, 1870.   Only one of their eight children lived to be married, and she has since died.   He then married Lucinda Moore, widow of R. E. Vincon. Their two children are Emma and Haywood, Jr.   In 1854 he moved to near New Haven, Gallatin County.   From 1855 to 1857 he was in Iowa City, and in 1874 returned to his present home in Hamilton County.   He began with the county's infancy and has succeeded, by careful management, in securing the possession of his present fine farm of eighty acres. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry, and was at Cumberland Gap, Nashville, Blountville, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and other engagements, and after 1864 was on guard duty at Nashville. Since 1885 he has been justice, with but one case appealed. Formerly a Democrat, and first voting for Pierce, he has since the war been a Republican. He is a prominent Mason and member of the F. M. B. A. His family are all members of-the Methodist Episcopal Church, and among the best citizens.

P. W. Morgan.
P. W. Morgan, farmer, was born October, 11, 1836, in Livingston, Ky., the youngest of six children one living of Friby and Nancy A. (Thompson) Morgan.    It is thought that the father was Scotch, born in New York, and the mother English in origin, born in South Carolina, and were married in Kentucky.   The father died in Hamilton County, when our subject was three years old, after he had been there but a year or so. The mother then married Squire Hillman, of Ohio, a soldier of 1812 and of the Black Hawk war.   He died in 1875, and the mother in 1878.   One of their two children is living.   Our subject was reared and educated by his uncle, Phillip W. Bearden. When eighteen he began for himself at merchandising, at Leovilla.   He remained there three years and married and settled on the farm on which he was raised, and of which he has since become possessor.   It is one of the finest 280-acre farms in the vicinity, and well improved.   His wife, Harriett J., daughter of Owen Damon, was born June 29, 1840, in Vermont.    Their children are Mary A., wife of August E. Irvin; Lewis C; Florence O.. deceased; Nora N., wife of John Grigg; William G., Emaline W., Owen A. and Alice M.   Our subject began as a poor boy and has accumulated his property by hard work.   Formerly a Republican, casting his first vote for John Bell, he has, since the Greenback movement of 1875, been independent in politics. Although not active as a politician, he was elected county commissioner in 1876, and served satisfactorily three years.    He is a Mason, McLeansboro Lodge, No. 157, and a member of the F. M. B. A., Moore's Prairie Lodge. His wife, Lewis Carson, and Nora are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Capt. James P. Moorman.
Capt James P. Moorman, farmer and teacher, was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1841, one of eight children of James and Jane (Wilson) Moorman. The father, born in Virginia in 1812, was the son of James Moorman, Sr., a native of Virginia, of French origin, and who served in the war of 1812, first living in Kentucky and finally in Ohio. The father, educated, married in Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1853, settled and purchased about 600 acres of land in Flannigan Township, this county, and afterward bought several hundred acres in Hardin County. While in Ohio he was a merchant for a time, then engaged in milling, then coal contractor the last several years. His later years were given exclusively to farming, and his ability in business showed in all. He died in 1856, and the mother, born in Ohio in 1820, is still living in Hamilton County, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. With common school advantages, our subject began teaching at nineteen, continuing every winter until 1884, since then he has been devoted to his fine farm of nearly 800 acres of the old home, which has been nearly all his own accumulation. In January, 1864. he married Mary, daughter of Alfred and Elizabeth Moore, born in Hamilton County in 1842. Seven of nine children are living: Amy, James A., Howard H., Emma F., Sarah, Nellie and Hattie. He has since lived on his present farm. In December, 1863. he enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry, as private, but soon became first lieutenant, and from June to September. 1865, captain, when his company was mustered out. He was in a scouting party chiefly, at Pine Bluff, on the Arkansas River. His brother, William H. of Company A. Fortieth Illinois, died in the service in December, 1861; John V., who enlisted in the One Hundred and Tenth Illinois, in 1862, and was with Sherman, am,l Zachary T., who was in his brother's command, and killed at Douglas Landing, Arkansas River, in December, 1864, were all brave soldiers. Two of his mother's brothers were killed at Cerro Gordo, in the Mexican war, and one of the father's brothers, in an Ohio regiment, was killed at Chickamauga. Our subject stands among the first teachers of Hamilton County, and is an able man. He is a Republican, first voting for Grant. He is a member of the G. A. R. and the F. M. B. A. His wife and four children are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Dr. E. G. Neel.
Dr. E. G. Neel, physician and surgeon, was born in Butler County, Ky., May 24,1838, the son of Wade and Lucy (Wand) Neel.   The father, of German descent, was born in Butler County, Ky., March 5, 1805, where he married, lived, and died in 1873. He was sheriff of Butler County for one term.   The mother, of English origin, was born in Bowling Green, Ky., in 1815, and died in 1847.   Their eight children are all living.   Our subject was educated in the home schools, when sixteen left home, and for about four years was in the grocery business. November 18, 1856, he married Mary E. Dempsey, born in Fincastle, Va., in 1838. Their children are John, Vara (wife of T. P. Stephenson), Wade, Mary (wife of James A. Ball), Bartlett R. and Hallie.   After marriage he located in Greenville, Ky., and in 1864 began the study of medicine under Dr. Dempsey, with whom he remained five years. In 1872 he took a course at Louisville Hospital, and in 1877 graduated from the American Medical College of St Louis.   In 1869 he was appointed deputy United States revenue collector, of the Second District, Kentucky, and afterward appointed United States gauger and inspector of the same district, serving in both four years.   He began practice at Greenville, Ky., and in 1873 settled it Henderson, but since 1880 he has had his present practice at Thackery. He has been here longer than any other physician, and is a leading member of his profession in the county. He is a Republican, first voting for Lincoln. He is a member of the I. 0. O. F. at Greenville, and of Encampment, Mount Olivet, No. 55. He and his wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for twenty-five and thirty years respectively. In 1877 he was made honorary member of the Missouri State Medical Society.

Dr. John S. Organ.
Dr. John S. Organ, of Walpole, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1844, the eldest of seven children 6f Col. Dr. James T. and Amanda (Cartwright) Organ, natives of Wilson County, born in 1822 and 1826 respectively. They were married October 24, 1843, and about 1848 removed to Wayne County, Ill., where the father resumed blacksmithing. In 1857 he went to Marion, in 1859 to Arkansas, and in 1862 joined a Missouri regiment of volunteers. He first took his family back to Wayne County, Ill, and in the meantime being cut off from his company, Gen. Blair, in command at St. Louis, commissioned him first lieutenant, to raise a company of which he was made captain. He then joined the Thirtieth Missouri, and was in active service until the close, operating in Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, etc. He was made captain of a company in the Sixth Mississippi Heavy Artillery, and afterward lieutenant-colonel of the Seventieth Mississippi (colored), and afterward colonel. After three years of distinguished service he returned home, and in a few years moved to Harrisburg and resumed the study of medicine, began before the war. From 1869 he practiced there and in neighboring counties until his health forbid it, about three years before his death, which occurred October 7, 1879. The mother died in September, 1874, a member of the Christian Church. Our subject had an ordinary education, and when seventeen, in June, 1862, enlisted in his father's company, served about eighteen months, and was discharged in 1864. In 1867 he began medical study under Dr. Oheany, of Harrisburg, and two years later, in 1871-72, he attended lectures at, the Medical College of Louisville, and graduated in 1879 from the Medical College of Evansville. He entered upon his practice at Broughton in 1872, and since 1874 has made Walpole and vicinity his home, where he has become one of the leading practitioners in the county, and has an extensive practice. He has acquired ninety acres of choice land, well cultivated and with excellent buildings, all this from a beginning of no means. He is a Republican, first voting for Lincoln. He is a Mason. January 18, 1877, he married Nancy, daughter of David and Patsey Smith, natives of Wilson County, Tenn. Their only surviving child is John R.

Samuel J. Pake.
Samuel J. Pake was born near Belleville, Canada West, April 27, 1842, the son of Samuel S. and Sarah (O'Reilly) Pake, natives respectively of Canada and Ireland.   Our subject was reared and educated in his own county, and at the age of twelve years entered a mercantile house as clerk, in the town of Belleville, Canada West   Three years later he removed with his employer to Madoc, Canada West, where he remained two years more in the mercantile business, after which he removed to Birmingham, Conn., and was actively engaged in the mercantile business for two years more.   He then entered the employ of a large manufacturing firm as bookkeeper, and remained with them until the year 1864, when he enlisted in the Fifth New York Heavy Artillery, then under the command of Gen. P. H. Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, and was mustered out one year later as lieutenant   On December 25, 1865, he married Mary A. Holmes, of Plattsburg, N. Y., and removed to Evansville, Ind., in September, 1866, where he accepted a position as traveling salesman in a large wholesale dry goods house.   In 1878 he came to McLeansboro, Ill., and actively engaged in his present business, which he bad started in company with Mr. J. G. Berridge some four years before, and which he has largely increased by his strict attention to business and his knowledge thereof, learned during the past thirty-three years he has been engaged therein. He has one son. Royal G., now seventeen years old; is a member of the Masonic order, and has been master of his lodge for several years; is a Democrat in politics, and he and his family are Episcopalians.

C. W. Pope.
C. W. Pope, proprietor of the McLeansboro saw-mills, was born August 13, 1844, in Goetingen, Germany, the second of four children of William and Lucinda (Smith) Pope, natives of Germany and born near the same place in 1807 and 1816 respectively.   The father, a cutter, died in 1885, and the mother is still living at the old home.   Our subject was educated in the schools of his native home and at a mechanical  college at Goetingen.   When fifteen he was apprenticed for three years as a machinist; after two years' travel was impressed into service; after eighteen months, in which he was in the battle of Langen Salts, he embarked at Bremen, and after a rough voyage and being nearly wrecked, they reached New York, December 17. 1867, after twenty-one days.   He at once settled for eighteen months in Equality, Ill., and learned blacksmithing and carriage making.   Then, after a year in Shawneetown, in July, 1870, he came to McLeansboro.   In 1872, he went to St. Louis, engaged on the river bridge a short time,  went to Natchez and began traveling for cotton ties.   In the fall of 1872, he worked in the railway shops at New Orleans, and the following year again began blacksmithing and carriage-making at McLeansboro.   In 1882 he built a saw mill, and began manufacturing a patent coiled hoop, and, in 1884, bought the Daily, Rice & Co. mill, and has converted both into saw mills, doing now a $4,000 to $5,000 business annually, with all their products in demand. The mill in town is run but about four days per week, the one north of McLeansboro continuously. July 4 1876, he married Irene, daughter of Dr. S. E. and Lucinda Gates, born in 1848 in McLeansboro. Their only child is Reginald. He owns about seven acres with his mill in the corporation, and 120 acres with his other mill, and is now one of the leading men of McLeansboro. He is a Democrat, and voted for Seymour. He is an Odd Fellow and Knight of Honor.   He and his wife are Old School Presbyterians.

Robert Proudfit.
Robert Proudfit, a pioneer farmer, was born January 18, 1811, in Fayette County, Penn., one of a pair of twins of nine children the only one living of David and Sarah (Patterson) Proudfit, the former born in York County, Penn., in March, 1770, of Scotch blood, and the latter in 1773, in Bedford County, Penn., of Irish origin. Soon after their marriage in Bedford County, about 1798, they lived in Fayette County, and, twenty-six years later, moved to Guernsey County, Ohio. The father was an Associate Reformed Presbyterian Minister, and never missed but three Sabbaths during his ministerial life and that was unavoidable preaching two sermons the last Sunday of his life. He died in 1830, and the mother in 1842. Our subject was educated in his native county chiefly before thirteen, and remained at home, helping manage the farm, until thirty years of age, when he married and settled on his own farm in the same county. His wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Jane (Patterson) Wilson, was born in 1820 near Elizabethtown, Penn., and married August 29, 1841. She died December 8, 1855, at the before mentioned home. But one of their eight children are living, Mary I., now at home with her father. The oldest son, David W., was shot at Shiloh, April 6, 1863, and another, Samuel M., a City, where he has since engaged in farm managing and steel dealing. He introduced for the first time in 1883 the Gold Dusstock of horses, bringing two yearlings from Kentucky, and in 1885 two two-year olds. Politically he is a Democrat and fire voted for Seymour. He is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church as is also the mother and sister, Tudie, living with them. His father, David, was a son of Rev. David Proudfit, he was a brother of Rev. Robert Proudfit, LL. D. Their father Andrew, was a brother of Rev. James Proudfit, who emigrated from the highlands of Scotland in 1754, the third minister sent out as missionary by the synod to the colonies of North America.

David Proudfit.
David Proudfit, farmer and stock raiser, born August 17, 1842, in Guernsey County, Ohio, the second of seven children of David and Mary J. (Walker) Proudfit, the former of Scotch origin, born in 1813 in Fayette County, Penn., and the latter near Belfast, Ireland, in 1820. The mother came with her parents to Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1830. The father came with his parents to Guernsey County six years before, and in 1839 they married and remained in Guernsey County until the fall of 1864. They then settled on the farm near Piopolis, now owned by R. C. Atkinson, where the father died March 23, 1880. The mother is still living with our subject. After his father's death he remained on the farm, superintending it and dealing in stock until the fall of 1885, when he traded his farm and moved to Bell City, where he has since engaged in farm managing and stock dealing. He introduced for the first time in 1883 the Gold Dust stock of horses, bringing two yearlings from Kentucky, and in 1885 two two-year olds. Politically he is a Democrat and first voted for Seymour. He is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church as is also the mother and sister, Tudie, living with them. His father, David, was a son of Rev. David Proudfit, who was a brother of Rev. Robert Proudfit, LL. D. Their father, Andrew, was n brother of Rev. James Proudfit, who emigrated from the highlands of Scotland in 1754, the third minister sent out as missionary by the synod to the colonies of North America.

Alex. H. Pulliam.
Alex. H. Pulliam, a pioneer farmer, was born in 1828 in Lincoln County, Tenn., the fifth of eight children of William P. and Frances J. (McNalla) Pulliam. The father, native of Virginia, and a son of William P., Sr., a soldier of the Revolution, lived in Lincoln County, Tenn., until 1844, when he moved to Illinois, and settled on our subject's present farm. A few years before his death in 1859, he became a resident of Harrisburg. His literary attainments were excellent, and besides being one of the best educators of the State, was long a public official, magistrate many years, sheriff two terms, and county clerk at Raleigh, but removed to Harrisburg before the term was finished. He was a merchant at the latter place the rest of his life. The mother died about 1854, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject, with the education of pioneer days, was married in 1847 to Mauare W. Durham. Four of their ten children are living: Sarah E. (wife of Zach. Pemberton), Alexander H., Jr., Almond H. and Ulysses G. In April, 1879, his wife died, and in December he married Sarah A., daughter of John H. and Emily Lane. He has since lived on the old farm which he purchased after his father's death and increased to nearly 400 acres, but has divided all but 210 choicely improved acres, among his children. His Success is in hard work and able management In 1802 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Tenth Illinois Infantry, and was at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Peach Tree Creek, through the Atlanta campaign, with Sherman in his famous march to the sea, and discharged in Nashville in 1865. Since then he has been devoted to agriculture. Reared a Democrat and first voting for Douglas he has since the war been a Republican. He is an old and prominent Odd Fellow.

William Rickcords.
William Rickcords, of McLeansboro, was born in Deal, County Kent, England, March 21, 1819, and was "a man of Kent," which gave certain privileges over what was known as "a Kentish man." He is the son of John and Elizabeth (Morris) Rickcords, natives of England. Our subject came to America with his parents in 1834 and located at Buffalo, N. Y. He had secured in his native county, what would here be called a high school education. Until 1844 he followed bookkeeping in the American Hotel of Buffalo, then came west to Chicago and engaged in the Lake House in the same capacity for three years. He then conducted the Sherman House for three years, and afterward followed the business in New York State and city. In 1855 he came to McLeansboro and started E. I. Tinkham Company's bank, in which he was cashier until it closed out in 1888, paying up in full. Since then he has been engaged in loan and real estate business here, with deserved success, and was always interested in the growth and welfare of city and county. He is a large land holder, owning about 1,500 acres of good Hamilton County land. June 1, 1857, he married Sophronia Lockhart, born in Saline County May 20, 1827. They have adopted two children: John Frazier, and Alice, wife of R. D. Lasater. He has always been a stanch Republican and an active Union man during the late war. He is an Episcopalian in religious faith, and was instrumental in organizing and building the church here.

James E. Robinson.
James E. Robinson was born in New Albany, Ind., September 17,1850, the son of Matthew J. and Elizabeth (Butler) Robinson, natives respectively of Indiana and Kentucky.   Our subject was reared and educated in his native city. In 1870 he went to Evansville, Ind., and was employed as clerk and traveling salesman for a dry goods house of that city until 1878.   He then came to McLeansboro and engaged in dry goods and general merchandise, and has since continued in it successfully, carrying the largest and best selected stock, and controlling the leading trade in his line in the city and county.   February 16, 1875, he married Jennie L. Sackett, of New Albany, Ind.   He is one of the live, energetic men of the city, and has been an alderman of it ever since its incorporation. He is a member of the K. of P. and K. of H. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Besides his fine two-story business house (20x120), his residence on the southwest corner of Broadway and Washington is one of the handsomest in the city.

John B. Standerfer.
John B. Standerfer, treasurer of Hamilton County, was born in that county December 24, 1830, a son of Job and Mary (Dailey) Standerfer, natives respectively of Tennessee and Kentucky.   The father was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1802, and in 1816 with his father, Arch, settled in Auxer Creek, Crouch Township, afterward moving to Shelby County, where he died. Job followed farming, and for six years was county treasurer and associate judge for several years.   He was a Democrat in politics. Eleven of their twelve children are now living, with whom the parents now reside in this county.  John B. was reared to manhood on the farm, and has followed farming most of his life, now owning a good farm in Crouch Township, three and a half miles west of McLeansboro. From August 13, 1862, to November 16,1868, he served as private in Company A, Eighty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, when he was disabled by rheumatism during service. He has been a life-long Democrat. He was county treasurer and assessor two terms, and two years later was elected sheriff. In 1886 he was elected treasurer of the county under the new organization. January 16, 1851, he married Elizabeth Shirley, who died in 1865 leaving five children: Job; Wilbern; Hamilton; Amanda, wife of H. L. Maulding, deputy circuit clerk; Reuben, and John F. (deceased). He next married Nancy J. Deitz, who died April 25, 1884. Their children are Robert, Marshall, Edward, Ehington, Charles, Elizabeth and John T. March 12, 1885, he married Nancy J. Myers, of this county. They are both Missionary Baptists, and are esteemed members of the community.

Thompson B. Stelle.
Thompson B. Stelle, attorney at law, McLeansboro, was born in Hamilton County, January 23, 1845, the son of Jacob and Judith (Farmer) Stelle, natives respectively of New Jersey and Tennessee. Our subject's grandfather, Thompson Stelle, Sr., was of the old French Huguenot stock, and came to Illinois Territory from New Jersey in 1816.. He located near Knight's Prairie, and later on the " Ennis Maulding Farm," four miles west of McLeansboro, where he died in 1864. His wife, Elizabeth Lawyer, died in 1873. They had fifteen children, eleven raised to maturity, three of whom were sons. Jacob was a successful farmer, as was also his father, and he served in Company A, Eighty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, throughout the His two brothers were also soldiers. Jacob's family of nine children has only five living: Thompson B., William C, Milton C, Eliza (wife of W. Smith) and Alice (wife of John L. Cross).   Jacob and his wife live five miles west of McLeansboro.   Our subject received a good common-school education and at sixteen began teaching.   After five years as pedagogue he attended Asbury University (Ind.), and later McKendree College, Lebanon, Ill., where he graduated as LL. B. and B. S. in 1868.   He was licensed in June of the same year, since which time he has had a lucrative practice.   In 1869 he was elected county judge, and served four years.   He has been identified with most of the enterprises of the city and county, and especially the schools.   He is president of the school board, and mayor of McLeansboro.    He is a Democrat.    February 11, 1878, he married Laura L. Blades, of this county.    Their children are Edith E, Eleanor M., Cyrus B., Raleigh B. and William H. He is an Odd Fellow, and a recognized leader and lawyer of ability.   He has a farm of 800 acres adjoining McLeansboro on the west   He is warmly attached to the interests of the agriculturist and stock raiser, and devotes much attention to these important industries.

Alexander T. Sullenger.
Alexander T. Sullenger, coroner, of Hamilton County, Ill., was born in Gallatin County, January 15, 1814, the son of James and Mary (Trousdale) Sullenger, natives, respectively, of Guilford County, N. C, and Montgomery County, Tenn.   The parents married, in 1812, in Kentucky, and soon went to near Shawneetown, where the father farmed until his death, about 1816.   He was a soldier of the Revolution, and some coins he received a 3 shilling scrip of March 25, 1776, saying the penalty for counterfeiting is death, and a $5 piece of January 14, 1779 are held as relics by our subject   Alexander T. was reared in his native county on the farm with his mother and step-father, J. S. Pattillo, and secured but a limited education. December 10, 1835, he married in this county.   His first wife, Eliza, daughter of John Anderson, an early settler of the county, died in 1880, leaving twelve children, seven of whom are living. In November, 1882, he married Mary Jones, a native of Herefordshire, England.   He is a Democrat, and first voted for Jackson, one of the few now living who cast their first vote for Old Hickory.   He was made coroner of Hamilton County in 1887, and has held the office half a century.   He was justice over twenty years.   He was a soldier of the Black Hawk war, under Capt. Joel Holliday, of Gallatin County, in First Regiment of the First Brigade, commanded by Gen. Posey, and is now one of the four survivors of this war in the county. He has been a Mason thirty-eight years, and has been in the marble business thirty-five years.   He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a most respected pioneer.   He tells the following well-vouched story:   Robert Page, Alfred Moore and Moses Shirley were to survey a road from Old Frankfort to McLeansboro, when Moore suggested probably the cheapest and most novel method ever used. Each of these gentlemen had a mare and colt, the former of which each rode to Frankfort, leaving the colt at home. The mares were turned loose when they arrived, and the bee lines they made for their respective offspring is said to have answered every purpose.

John M. Suttle.
John M. Suttle, farmer, was born in Tishomingo County, Miss., in 1833, the son of John W. and Mary (Steward) Suttle, the former born in North Carolina, and the latter a native of Wales. They located in Mississippi, where he died about 1850. She afterward married and went to California, where she died in 1868. Our subject went to White County, Tenn., when a young man, and in 1861 served in the Thirteenth and Seventeenth Corps, first as wagon-master for six months, the same length of time as forage-master, and finally as master of transportation, until 1864. In 1863, in Putnam County, Tenn. he married Martha, daughter of William and Anna Andrews, born in Prince Edward County, Va., in 1886. The next year he came to Hamilton County, and since 1874 has lived on his present farm. He now owns 180 acres in one tract, and 160 in another, all of which are the fruits of his own efforts. He engaged, with considerable ability, in the general produce and grain business, at McLeansboro, for two years, and also extensively engaged in stock buying and shipping for many years. Politically, he was a Democrat, first voting for Buchanan, but since the war he has been a Republican. He is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and a member of the F. M. B. A. He and his wife are members of the Regular Baptist Church. Eleven of their thirteen children are living: Mary S. (wife of W. L. Carey), John W., Florence A., Henry C, Orvel A., James C, Charley O., William S., Nancy A., Phillip S. and Marion C.

Charles S. Todd.
Charles S. Todd, carpenter, farmer and postmaster at Belle City, was born November 6, 1831, in Stratford, Conn., the youngest of three children (two deceased) of Edward and Esther Todd, the former born about 1809 in Redding, Conn., of Scotch origin, and the latter a few years later in Danbury, Conn. They were reared and married in their native State, and after marriage moved to Stratford, where the mother died when our subject was an infant. The father, a coal dealer, came to Madison County, Ill., in 1856, and there, at Highland, his second wife died the next year. He moved to Mount Carmel, Ill., married the third time, and engaged in farming until his death, which occurred in 1879. Our subject was educated at Stratford, and when seventeen was apprenticed to a carpenter in New Haven. When twenty, he began for himself, and at twenty-two married and settled at Waterbury, where he was engaged in a cotton-gin factory.   In 1855 he came to Highland, Ill., and purchased a farm, remaining on the same, with the exception of eight months as army sutler, until 1863, when he went to Belle City. Here he had an interest in a grist and saw mill for a year.   He then worked at his trade until 1878, when he began farming. In 1880 he purchased his farm adjoining Belle City, which he superintends, occasionally works at his trade, is postmaster, notary public and also police magistrate of Belle City. His wife, Jane M., daughter of Nathan S. and Prudence Fowler (both living in Connecticut), was born in March, 1838, in Branford, Conn.    Their children are Arthur E., Edward A., Charles S., Harry H., Mary A., Benjamin F. (deceased) and Asa S. His farm of 140 acres, a couple of town lots and his residence are his own acquirements chiefly, and he is now one of the leading business men of the county.    He is a Republican, and voted for Fremont. He was elected justice in 1867, and about the same time was appointed postmaster, and says he is one of the "rascals not yet turned out." He has been police magistrate since the city's incorporation, and notary public since 1879. He is now Worshipful Master in Hickory Hill Lodge, F. & A. M.. When Belle River Lodge was chartered, he became Worshipful Master for twelve years, or until he changed his membership to his present lodge. Our subject and his children, except the youngest, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while his wife is a Presbyterian, but has no church near of which to be a member.

Squire James Twigg.
Squire James Twigg, a wealthy farmer of Twigg Township, is the eldest of seven children of Timothy and Catherine (Mason) Twigg. The father, born in Ireland, came to the site of Nashville, Tenn., when but a boy, and assisted in building the first houses ever erected in the city. For eleven years he made his home with Andrew Jackson, of whom he was a great favorite and for whom he worked some.   He was engaged in flatboating on the Cumberland River several years.   He was with Gen. Jackson in the war of 1812, and was wounded at the battle of Talladega.   He was twice married: first to the mother of our subject, in about 1803, and secondly about 1822 to Catherine Roberts, by whom he had two children.   Immediately after his first marriage he settled amongst the cane eighteen miles southeast of Nashville, where he was devoted to farming in the summer and distilling the products in the winter.   His first house was built of slabs he split from a single linden tree, in which he spent several summers.    With indomitable will and energy he soon had a fine farm, and was one of the leading farmers of the State. In 1846 he died, a member of the Old Baptist Church. The mother was probably born in Pennsylvania,   and died April 18, 1818, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. James was born in Rutherford County, in 1804, acquiring a good education in common schools, and when eighteen began work in White County, Ill., on a farm at 25 cents a day. In 1824 he came to Hamilton County and taught school about two miles south of where he now resides.   In 1825 he married Polly Barker. Six of their eleven children lived to be married, but Nancy, wife of John Davis, is the only one now living. He soon settled on a farm adjoining, but in April, 1829, he settled in the woods on his present farm.   With excellent business ability and no capital he added little by little to the original tract until he owned 3,000 acres, and could walk for three miles from his house on his own possessions.    For about fifteen years he was running a grain mill, and for over forty years has carried on a general store, his first stock being a remnant stock bought of his brother who was then peddling.   He has still held to his farming.    He has led an active, uneventful life, totally abstaining from tobacco and intoxicants.   He is the eldest of his family and the only one living, while his eldest is, besides himself, the only survivor of his family. He is highly esteemed throughout the county, and the township was named in his honor. Although past four score he is as vigorous as ever, and has a remarkable memory. He was one who heard the pistol shots of the Jackson-Benton duel at Nashville. He is a public-spirited man, devoted to the welfare of his State, and has been a Democrat in earnest for more than sixty years, and a worker in their ranks. He first voted for Jackson. His last wife was for many years a member of the United Brethren Church.

Joseph H. Upchurch.
Joseph H. Upchurch, circuit court clerk of Hamilton County, Ill., was born in White County, Tenn., April 11, 1847, the son of Enoch S. and Louesa (Shuster) Upchurch, both natives of Tennessee. Our subject came to Illinois with his parents in 1860. The father located on the farm in this county, and followed farming until his death, August 30, 1882. Here our subject was reared and educated. He has followed a farmer's life. Teaching school in the winter and farming during the summer as his father, grandfather and great-grandfather had done before him, up to the present, and still lives on his farm three miles south of McLeansboro. He has always been an unswerving Democrat and actively engaged in political affairs since 1871. He was deputy assessor from 1871 to 1877. In 1876 he made an unsuccessful race for sheriff. In 1877 he was elected treasurer of the county, and in 1879 re-elected for the following term, which held over until December, 1882. In 1884 he was elected circuit clerk, which office he has filled in a highly efficient and faithful manner to the present time. He has lost two wives by death, they were Susan and Ida Hutson (sisters). One child by each wife is living: Francis R. and Nora. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and is justly recognized as one of Hamilton County's enterprising citizens and popular officials.

John H. Upton.
John H. Upton, farmer, was born in 1837 in Hamilton County, Ill., the son of David and Hannah (Moore) Upton. The father, of Dutch origin, born in Chatham County, N. C, in 1809, was brought with his parents and nine children to Smith County, Tenn., in 1818. The mother soon died, and their home and goods were completely burned. The father, John, married again, and in 1817 came to White County, Ill., and located on the site of Enfield, one of the pioneers of southern Illinois. He was the father of twenty children. David was eight years old when he came to White County, and in 1880 he married, and located near Springerton, in White County, where he lived about two years. He then came to his present home in Beaver Creek Township. His wife died in 1876, and in 1879 he married Elizabeth McNabb, who died in 1884. David was skillful with the rifle as a hunter, and in one winter he killed 105 deer. Of his seven living children the oldest is fifty-six and the youngest forty-two.   John H. was educated in subscription schools, and made his home with his parents until twenty-seven.    August 15, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and fought at Wilson Hill, Carroll Hill, Mark Hill, the Red River expedition and numerous severe skirmishes.   In September, 1864, he was captured near the mouth of Red River, and imprisoned nineteen months at Camp Ford.    July 5, 1865, he was discharged at Springfield.   December 28, 1865, he married Ann E. Derrick, born in 1851 in Arkansas, who came to Illinois when thirteen years old.    Their nine children are Rachael S. (wife of W. Wheeler), Thomas A.. David C, Flora M., George N., Sarah A., Walter M., Lawrence B. and Felix Z.   He owns 145 acres, but since the fall of 1884 he has been living on his father's 160-acre tract.   Politically he is a Nationalist, first voting for Douglas. He is a successful farmer and esteemed citizen.

Thomas B. Vaughn.
Thomas B. Vaughn, farmer, was born on the site of Eldorado in 1880, a son of Daniel and Anna (Castleberry) Vaughn. The father, born in Tennessee in 1804, of Scotch ancestry, was the son of John Vaughn, a native of Maryland, and a soldier killed in the battle of New Orleans in the war of 1812.   Daniel, born in 1824 in Caldwell County, Ky., came to Saline County in 1818, and then permanently in 1828, farming until his death in 1856. The mother, born in Kentucky about 1806, died in 1863. Educated chiefly at Benton, he joined Capt (now Gen.) Lawless cavalry at the age of fifteen, and for over fifteen months fought in northern Mexico.   In 1849 he went West and successfully mined for three years.    In 1852 he returned and the following year married Miriam Jones.   Two of their three children are living: Napoleon A. (a merchant near Braden) and Eliza A.   He soon entered the merchandise and tobacco trade at Raleigh, and in 1861 enlisted in Company E, Third Illinois Cavalry, and was in many large and smaller engagements for three years.   Of his company of 101 men 55 were killed.   Until 1876 he was engaged in milling in White County, and then traded for a mill in Walpole, which was burned three years later.   Since then he has been engaged in farming and threshing, being the owner of 480 acres of land two farms near Walpole.   In 1860 he became assistant marshal of Saline and Hamilton Counties, and had charge of the census taking.   He was reared a Democrat and first voted for Buchanan.   He was formerly an Odd Fellow, and is a member of the F. M. B. A.   His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Leonidas Walker.
Leonidas Walker, State's attorney of Hamilton County, was born in Butler County, Penn., May 2, 1842, the son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Slater) Walker, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and New York.   Our subject was reared to manhood in his native State receiving an academic education and a fair knowledge of the languages. He came west in 1860, and located at McLeansboro, where he finished the law study began in Pennsylvania. He studied under John McElvain, a well-known early lawyer of the place and noted for his humor. Our subject was admitted to the bar in 1864, and has practiced ever since with well-deserved success. For a time he was partner of Hon. R. W. Townshend, and later with R. S. Anderson now of Oregon, and still later with L. J. Hale. He taught a school here from 1860 to 1865, and from 1868 to 1865 was county superintendent In 1872 he was elected to the Twenty-eighth General Assembly, in which he served with honor. In 1880 he was elected to his present office, and re-elected in 1884, serving both terms most efficiently. He is a Democrat, and has been elected by that party to his various offices. April 4, 1871, he married Amy Carpenter, of this city. Their six children are Chester C, Alice E., Samuel A., Pauline, Carrie and Lawrence S. He is a member of the L O. O. F. lodge, and is one of Hamilton County's leading citizens and officials.

Albert Walters.
Albert Walters, farmer and stock raiser, was born in 1834 in Montgomery County, Tenn., the son of Anderson and Elizabeth (Joyner) Walters. The father, born in Pittsylvania County, Va., May 10, 1794, went to Middle Tennessee in his youth, where he lived at the time of his marriage. About 1840 he left Montgomery County, where he had settled, and came to White County, Ill, settling near Morris City. He was a soldier at Norfolk in 1812, and became the owner of 200 acres of land. He died in 1863. The mother born in Sumner County, Tenn., in June, 1795, died in October, 1853. Five of her ten children are living. Our subject, the eighth, was about six years old when they came to Illinois, and he "lived with the parents until eighteen. When twenty-one he became a teacher in White and Hamilton Counties continuing about five years. In November, I860, he married Margaret Riley, who was born in White County, HI., December 12, 1837. Their children are Sarah E., Laura A., Harriett L., Susie (wife of Edward Allen), Charles 0., Anderson and Ellis R. In January, 1858, he purchased 160 acres in Mayberry Township, where he has since resided. November 9, 1874, his wife died, and July 25, 1876, he married Margaret Glenn, born in 1846 in Monroe County, Tenn. Their children are Jane, Frederick, Herbert and James G. He has succeeded from a poor beginning in becoming owner of 820 acres, some of which is in White County. In 1881 be erected his home at a cost of 11,800. Politically he is a Democrat, first casting his vote for Buchanan. He served four years as justice, and three years as county commissioner, elected in 1875. In April, 1887, he became tax collector. In 1870 he was ordained an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a member for twenty-nine years, and of which his wife and one child are members.

Dr. Charles W. Weaver.
Dr. Charles W. Weaver, oculist and physician, was born in Tippecanoe County, Ind., in 1836, one of nine children of John and Catherine (Honer) Weaver, natives of Darke County, Ohio,  and born in 1807 and 1806 respectively. They received but a limited education. John's parents, Jacob and Elizabeth Weaver, were natives of Germany, as were also the mother's people. John, the father, was married about 1838, moved to Tippecanoe County, Ind., among the early pioneers, and settled on Government land. He was a well-to-do farmer, and died in 1874, and the mother died in 1882. Both were for some years members of the Baptist Church. Our subject is largely a self-educated man, he began life as a farmer, and in 1858, began the study of medicine under Dr. J. Leslie, of Elwin, Ill. In November, 1863, he dropped study and enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in active service six months when his enlistment expired. In November, 1864, he again enlisted in the Twelfth Indiana Battery, and remained stationed at Nashville, Tenn., until the close of hostilities. He soon resumed study in Macon county under Dr. Leslie at Elwin. From 1867 to 1869 he practiced near his old home in Carroll County, Ind. He then located at Neoga, Ill., made a special study of the eye, and has since been most successful in various parts of the State. He has also a large general practice. October 9, 1857, he married Catherine Leslie. Their two children are Sarah K.. wife of Lewis Walter, and Joseph P., both of White County. His wife died in 1865. In 1867 he married Mrs. Nancy Hudson, nee Overly. Their three children are Minnie O. (wife of H. D. Cheek), Flodie E. and William C. This wife died in 1877, and in 1878 he married Mary A. Shaw. Their child is Charles W., Jr. This wife died in August, 1881, and in August, 1883, he married Mrs. Amelia Harvey. Their child is Mary E. Since 1882 he has lived on his present choice farm of eighty acres, which he has made remunerative, notwithstanding misfortune. Politically he is a Republican, but cast his first vote for Douglas. He was formerly a member of the United Brethren Church.

Jakes K. P. White.
James K. P. White, farmer, was born in Coles County, Ill., in 1845. the son of Thomas J. and Amy (Jones) White. The father, of Irish descent, was born in 1807, in Baron County, Ky. Soon after he married, in 1828, he went to Coles County. Ill., where he lived until 1858, after which he located in Beaver Creek Township, Hamilton County. The mother, born in Jackson County, Tenn., November 7, 1808, died in Coles County, in 1851. In 1853 he married Amy Canteberry, born in Kentucky in 1818. She died in 1881, since when he has lived with his children. He is one of the oldest men in the county, and a courteous gentleman.   Our subject, the eighth of nine children, was thirteen when be came to this county, and left home in August, 1862, to enlist in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty-first Illinois Infantry for three years or for the war.   He was made corporal, and fought at Arkansas Post, Blakely, Spanish Fort, Vicksburg and many skirmishes.   November 6, 1865, he was honorably discharged at Hamstead, Tex.   April 22, 1866, he married Sarah J. Springer, born in Hamilton County, March 15, 1848. Albert M., Tabitha A. (deceased), John M., Mary E., Sarah J., Lora D., Maudie M. and James W. are their children.   He began with eighty acres after his marriage and now has 279 acres slowly acquired.    In 1882 he erected an $800 two-story dwelling. Politically he is a Democrat, first voting for McClellan.   April 5, 1886, he was made highway commissioner and re-elected in 1887. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

John H. Wilson.
John H. Wilson was born in McLeansboro, February 8, 1845, the son of John A. and Eliza (Grady) Wilson, natives, respectively, of Shawneetown and Pennsylvania.    The grandfather, James Harrison Wilson, was a pioneer of Shawneetown, and the father was a saddler by trade.   In 1840 the father came to McLeansboro, and after following his trade and being a merchant, died there in 1861.   He represented the county in the Legislature one or more sessions, and was sheriff three terms.   He was a Democrat and highly respected as an official.   Our subject was reared to manhood here, and educated at McKendree College, Ill., graduating with the degree of A.B. in 1868.   For three years he was employed in the United States Engineer Department on western rivers.   In 1871 he engaged in contracting with railroads in ties and timber, building up the business until he employed 500 persons in Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Indiana in getting out timber.   He has been extraordinarily successful, also owning 400 acres near town which he manages, besides other valuable city and town property. November 27, 1878, he married .Alice J. Randall, of Hamilton County, Ohio. Their children are Eugene A., Francis R. and Carrie. Mr. Wilson is a prohibition Democrat, and has successfully fought for prohibition in McLeansboro. He has been a member of the city council a number of years. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

John J. Wood.
John J. Wood, farmer, of Dahlgren Township, was born in Meigs County, Ohio, June 10, 1840, the third of eleven children four deceased of Caleb and Anne C. (McDowell) Wood. The father, English in origin, was born in the same county in 1800. The mother, Scotch  and  German in ancestry, was born in 1809, in Gallia County, Ohio.    They were married in Meigs County, where the mother's parents had settled in 1824; the father was a farmer, and both died in that county in 1879 and 1881, the latter the date of the mother's death.   With a limited education, our subject when nineteen began a roving career by first making for Pike's Peak.    He finally came to Hamilton County, and in July, 1861, enlisted in Company G, Fortieth Illinois Infantry, at Leovilla, was at Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, and with Sherman to the sea.    He received four wounds:   One in the mouth, at Jackson, Miss.; the left thigh and knee at Missionary Ridge, and in the lower right leg in Grizzleville, Ga,  He was honorably discharged at Louisville, in August, 1865.   He then began farming in Hamilton County,  and in January, 1868, married, and after a year's visit in Ohio, settled on his present farm in Section 18, Township 4 south, Range 5 east.   His wife, Catherine, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Oglesby) Burton, was born January 8, 1845, in this county.   Their eight children are John T., Sarah C, Emma T., William P., Edward E., Jennie D., Carrie L. and Lewis C. A boy and girl are also deceased. Although hindered much in life by sickness, our subject has succeeded in owning a finely cultivated farm of 100 acres, nearly all improved. He has been locally prominent as a Republican, casting his first vote for Grant, and has held the office of school director for sixteen years, and justice for eight years. He is an Odd Fellow, Dahlgren Lodge, in which he has filled all the chairs, a member of the encampment at McLeansboro, and of the F. M. B. A., Moore's Prairie Lodge. He and his wife are Christians, but have no church near of which to be members.

Alvin A. Young.
Alvin A. Young, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Virginia in 1838, the thirteenth of fifteen children of Michael and Emilia (Kazei) Young, natives of Virginia, where they were reared and married, and about 1841 went to Missouri, where the father died in 1877, and where the mother still lives. She is a member of the Free Baptist Church. With an ordinary education our subject left the Missouri home in 1861, and for some years was engaged at Cairo in contracting and building, his leading occupation. He served about three months in the navy in 1864. In 1867 he married Louisa C. Stephens, daughter of Elisha and Nancy Mann, a native of Hamilton County. Their four children are Julia A., Mattie (deceased), Jessie M. and Alvin E. First locating on a farm adjoining, he has since 1879 been on his present fine farm of 120 acres, which is well improved, three miles south of McLeansboro. He is an active and energetic man and public spirited citizen. He has always been a Democrat, first voting for Douglas.



Source: FHL Film No 0873820, "History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin, and Williamson Counties, Illinois : from the earliest time to the present, together with sundry and interesting biographical sketches, notes, reminiscences, etc., etc." Evansville, Ind.: Unigraphic, 1887
Transcribed and Contributed to Genealogy Trails by Barb Z.



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