Hamilton County, Illinois
Genealogy and History




History of Goshen Trail Baptist Association
1856-2006

Donated by Kyle Shoultz

INTRODUCTION

HISTORY OF GOSHEN TRAIL ASSOCIATION


CHURCHES CURRENTLY ACTIVE IN THE ASSOCIATION

HISTORY OF ANTIOCH-- written by Emogene F. Glass

HISTORY OF BELLE PRAIRIE

HISTORY OF BLOOMING GROVE

HISTORY OF BROUGHTON

HISTORY OF DAHLGREN

HISTORY OF DELAFIELD

HISTORY OF DITNEY RIDGE (White County)

HISTORY OF ENFIELD (White County)

HISTORY OF HICKORY HILL

HISTORY OF HOPEWELL

HISTORY OF KINGDOM

HISTORY OF MACEDONIA

HISTORY OF MCLEANSBORO FIRST

HISTORY OF MIDDLE CREEK.

HISTORY OF NEW PROSPECT

HISTORY OF NEW SALEM

HISTORY OF NORRIS CITY

HISTORY OF SUGAR CAMP

HISTORY OF TEN MILE

HISTORY OF UNION

HISTORY OF WALNUT GROVE


MISSION CHURCH

HISTORY OF NEW FRONTIER COWBOY CHURCH


CHURCHES NO LONGER ACTIVE IN THE ASSOCIATION

HISTORY OF DALE

HISTORY OF ELLIS MOUND

HISTORY OF MCLEANSBORO SECOND

HISTORY OF SMITH CHAPEL

HISTORY OF TENNESSEE BEND



SKIT FROM 150th MEETING


I’ve been to Annual Associations all my life but none more meaningful or enjoyable as the 150th year celebration. Looking back, I can see God’s hand on the entire day in the way everything flowed together, from the beginning “Historical Moments” to the end of the day’s sermon. Dressing in old fashioned clothes really set the theme for me to enjoy the day. I truly felt the Spirit of God during the Right Hand of Fellowship. I felt myself thinking the entire day about my grandparents and other Christian men and women who have already celebrated the “Great Homecoming” who set the example for me then and whose examples I still strive to follow. One of my favorite parts of the day was singing in the Associational Choir. We had spent many weeks practicing together and I really enjoyed all the fellowship and old fashioned harmony that went on during those practice sessions. I would do that again anytime. My only regret about the entire day was that all of our churches in our association should have been represented. They missed out on a great blessing. I feel like I received my blessing and part of theirs too. Thanks to everyone who participated in any way to make the day special.

Cindy Phillips

GOSHEN TRAIL

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

CELEBRATING 150 YEARS

Long before automobiles and most other modern conveniences that we enjoy today were invented, Baptists were being obedient to the Lord Jesus Christ in making disciples of all nations. As Baptist congregations began establishing their churches in the Hamilton county area, they were not only faithful to the Lord in worship and evangelism. The believers in these churches saw the need to unite with their sister churches to cooperate in sharing the Gospel in their area and around the world. Therefore, in 1856 an association of Southern Baptist Churches was formed, and was named the Fairfield Association. Many changes have taken place over the last one hundred and fifty years concerning which churches were a part of the association and the name was changed to Goshen Trail Baptist Association. However, our goal remains the same, to share the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ with a lost and dying world and to grow in the grace and knowledge of the same.

We in the Goshen Trail Baptist Association have taken great joy in celebrating the legacy of faithfulness in the churches that make up this association. Our 150th annual meeting was held at Sugar Camp Baptist Church. Sugar Camp has been a part of the association longer that any other church that is now affiliated with Goshen Trail. This annual meeting was about more than taking care of business, we rejoiced with great gratitude over the wonderful way God has blessed us over the past 150 years.

On Saturday September thirtieth we congregated at Sugar Camp at 10:00 am for the beginning of the celebration. One of the highlights of the morning session was a “Historical Moments” presentation. Members of the association came forward in groups of three and read information about the different time periods that have taken place over the last one hundred and fifty years. Each group represented a twenty five year time period starting in 1856 through 2006. The participants dressed in costumes that represented the clothing that would have been worn during the time period the presented. Each group shared highlights that took place in the world and in the association during the time period they represented. There were some minutes from the associational records read and each presentation ended with a special song that was sang by one or more of our members. The morning session was concluded as our Director of Missions, Bro. Steve Hamson, led us to share in a right hand of church fellowship with one another.

An old fashioned brush arbor was constructed on the church grounds and some outdoor activities had been planned, including “dinner on the grounds”. The cool damp day did not keep the children from enjoying the horse and wagon ride through the woods that Bro. David Schlag provided. We had a delicious meal in the church fellowship hall and enjoyed the many historical displays that the churches of the association had set up inside.

After the noon meal we gathered together in the sanctuary once again, where we took care of a few matters of business but mostly worshipped and prayed. We are thankful for Bro. Bob Dickerson bringing us greetings from the IBSA and participating in the “Historical Moments” presentation. We were also blessed to have Bro. Bob Morrison share a message from God’s word that was truly inspirational.

The association would like to thank Sugar Camp Baptist Church and their pastor, Bro. Seth Schlag. We appreciate their hard work and hospitality in allowing the Goshen Trail Baptist Association to meet at their church and celebrate this event.

Most of all we owe our thanks to God, for without the Lord Jesus Christ, all of our celebrating would be in vain.

History of the Fairfield Baptist Association 1856-1997

Goshen Trail Baptist Association 1998-2006

Fairfield Baptist Association was organized in 1856. The History of Illinois Baptists states that the earliest minutes they have are 1880. The first minute book we have is 1872.

There were 31 churches listed that came into the Association this year: Arrington Prairie (North of Sims), Bethel (Burnt Prairie), Beaver Creek, Belle City, Big Mound, Blooming Grove, Ellis Mound, Ham’s Grove (Jefferson County), Hickory Hill, Hopewell, Knight’s Prairie, Little Prairie (Dahlgren), Long Prairie (Wayne County), Middle Creek, Mt. Horeb, Mt. Tabor, Mt. Zion (Carmi), New Hope, New Prospect, Parker’s Prairie (Hoodville), Pleasant Grove (Fairfield), Poseyville, IN, Providence (Wayne County), Salem (Burnt Prairie), Six Mile (Wayne County), Sugar Camp, Walnut Grove, Zion, Belle Rive, Carmi, and Antioch (Burnt Prairie). There were 215 baptisms, 49 members added by letter, 16 restored, 95 were dismissed by letter, 60 were excluded, and 26 deaths. Mt. Horeb wasn’t represented at the Association and a committee was appointed to visit them to find the cause. A motion was made to not take a collection for Foreign and Home Missions at the Association. The motion didn’t pass.

In 1873 there were 32 churches listed. Olive Branch (Wayne County) came into the Association. There were 212 baptisms, 26 added by letter, 10 restored, with 23 lost by letter, 73 excluded, and 44 deaths. Parker’s Prairie didn’t report.

In 1874 there were 34 churches listed. Springerton and Mt. Olivet (Carmi) came into the Association. There were 212 baptisms, 70 added by letter, 84 added by restoration and experience, with 91 lost by letter, 87 excluded and dropped, and 41 deaths.

In 1875 there were 35 churches listed. New Zion (Gallatin County) came from Big Saline Association. There were 125 baptisms, 47 added by letter, 6 by experience and restoration, 29 were lost by letter, 49 excluded, and 28 deaths.

In 1876 there were 32 churches listed. Barnhill came into the Association. Barnhill was constituted in 1876. A motion was made to drop Carmi, Mt. Horeb, Springerton, and Belle Rive. There were 110 baptisms, 37 added by letter, 11 added by experience and restoration, 88 were lost by letter, and 49 deaths.

In 1877 there were 32 churches listed. Liberty Branch (Wayne County) and Macedonia (Sacramento) came into the Association. There were 147 baptisms, 59 additions by letter, 16 by experience and restoration, 99 were lost by letter, 43 by exclusion, and 47 deaths.

In 1879 there were 36 churches listed. Roland (?) and Pleasant Valley (Southeast part of Hamilton County) came into the Association. There were 115 baptisms, 38 additions by letter, 8 by experience and restoration, 80 were lost by letter, 66 by exclusion, and 34 deaths.

We have been unable to find the minutes for 1880.

In 1881 there were 38 churches listed: Arrington Prairie, Antioch (Burnt Prairie) constituted in 1872, Big Mound Prairie, Belle City constituted in 1866, Bethel (Burnt Prairie) constituted in 1855, Blooming Grove constituted in 1850, Barnhill (Wayne County) constituted in 1880, Burnt Hill (Dahlgren) constituted in 1880, Broughton constituted in 1880, Dahlgren constituted in 1850, Ellis Mound constituted in 1865, Ham’s Grove constituted in 1867, Hickory Hill constituted in 1861, Hopewell constituted in 1852, Knight’s Prairie constituted in 1847, Long Prairie constituted in 1852, Liberty Branch (Wayne County) constituted in 1878, Mt. Olivet constituted in 1874, Middle Creek constituted in 1859, Mt. Zion constituted in 1869, Macedonia (Sacramento) constituted in 1878, Mt. Horeb, New Prospect constituted in 1864, New Zion (Omaha), New Hope (Thackery) constituted in 1852, Olive Branch (Wayne County) constituted in 1873, Parker’s Prairie (Hoodville), Pleasant Grove (Fairfield) constituted in 1853, Providence (Fairfield), Pleasant Valley (Broughton) constituted in 1879, Roland constituted in 1879, Salem (Burnt Prairie) constituted in 1858, Six Mile (Wayne City), Sugar Camp constituted in 1842, Thackery constituted in 1841, Tennessee Bend constituted in 1880, Walnut Grove constituted in 1853, Zion (Carmi) constituted in 1855. There were 262 baptisms, 41 added by letter, 18 by experience, 59 were lost by letter, 58 were excluded, and 37 deaths.

In 1882 there were 39 churches listed. Pleasant Hill (Dahlgren) was constituted in 1881 and Carmi came into the Association. Several churches petitioned for dismissal to form a new Association. We have no record of what this new Association was but it is believed that it was Mt. Erie. There were 222 added by baptism and experience, 55 by letter, 13 by restoration, 116 were lost by letter, 54 by exclusion, and 31 deaths.

In 1883 there were 31 churches listed. There were 162 added by baptism and experience, 37 by letter, 13 by restoration, 57 dismissed by letter, 61 lost by exclusion, 7 erased, and 27 deaths.

In 1884 there were 30 churches listed. There were 304 baptisms, 42 added by letter, 23 by experience and restoration, 74 were lost by letter, 68 by exclusion and dropped, and 34 deaths.

In 1885 there were 30 churches listed with 210 baptisms, 29 added by letter, 30 by experience, 93 were lost by letter, 66 by exclusion and dropped, and 31 deaths.

In 1886 there were 32 churches listed. Griffin, IN was constituted in 1886. First and Second (New) Liberty (Hamilton County) was constituted in 1886. Cypress (Gallatin County) came into the Association. Liberty Branch (Wayne County) was granted permission to unite with Mt. Erie Association. There were 288 added by baptism, 69 by letter, 26 by experience and restoration, 95 were lost by letter, 127 excluded and 44 deaths.

In 1887 there were 35 churches listed. Texas Grove was constituted and admitted to the Association in 1887. Fairfield church presented their letter from Mt. Erie Association and was accepted. It appears that they went to Mt. Erie Association in 1882 and now came back to Fairfield Association. There were 219 additions by baptism, 69 by letter, 26 by experience, 170 were dismissed by letter, 63 excluded and 24 deaths. There was just one Liberty listed.

In 1888 there were 36 churches listed. There were 100 baptisms, 65 added by letter, 5 restorations, 61 lost by letter, 59 excluded, and 24 deaths. McLeansboro First Baptist came into the Association.

In 1889 there were 36 churches. There were 114 received by baptism, 35 by letter, 7 by relation, 11 by restoration, 48 were lost by exclusion, 7 dropped and 23 deaths.

In 1890 there were 36 churches listed. There were 145 baptisms, 48 added by letter, 13 added by relation and restoration, 69 were lost by letter, 2 were dropped, 51 were excluded and 47 deaths.

In 1891 there were 34 churches listed. First Baptist, Hoodville came into the Association. Griffin, IN, Parker’s Prairie, and Roland were not listed. There were 213 baptisms, 67 added by letter, 4 by relation, 19 by restoration, 3 were dropped, 36 excluded, and 22 deaths.

In 1892 there were 38 churches listed. First Baptist, Ridgeway, Pleasant Valley, Beaver Creek, Saline Creek, Junction City, and New Haven came into the Association. Antioch (Burnt Prairie) and Cypress were not listed. There were 158 baptisms, 90 additions by letter, 11 by restoration, 1 by relation, 118 were lost by letter, 45 by exclusion, and 53 deaths.

In 1893 there were 38 churches listed. There were 160 baptisms, 70 added by letter, 8 added by restoration, 6 by relation, 76 were lost by letter, 86 excluded, and 41 deaths.

In 1894 there were 38 churches listed. Ditney Ridge was constituted and came into the Association. First Baptist, Hoodville and Junction City were not listed. There were 252 baptisms, 73 additions by letter, 19 restorations, 7 by relation; 86 were lost by letter, 65 by exclusion, and 48 deaths.

In 1895 there were 40 churches listed. Dale was organized sometime in the 1880s and came into the Association along with Equality, coming from Big Saline Association. Bethel Church changed their name to Blue Mound. There were 294 baptisms, 106 added by letter, 17 restorations, 16 by relation, 81 were lost by letter, 70 by exclusion, and 43 deaths.

In 1896 there were 42 churches listed. Union Grove and Norris City were constituted in 1896 and were accepted into the Association. There were 267 baptisms, 96 added by letter, 10 by relation, 12 by restoration, 123 were lost by letter, 76 by exclusion, and 42 deaths.

In 1897 there were 42 churches listed. Tennessee Bend had 2 sets of messengers, each with its own letter. Both sets were refused a seat. There were 138 baptisms, 67 added by letter, 11 by restoration, 3 by relation, 64 were lost by letter, 36 were excluded, and 42 deaths.

In 1898 there were 42 churches listed. There were 151 baptisms, 61 added by letter, 6 by restoration, 8 by relation, 90 were lost by letter, 35 by exclusion, and 44 deaths.

In 1899 Mill Shoals was constituted and accepted into the Association. The page listing churches, additions, and losses is missing for this year.

In 1900 there were 40 churches listed. Equality church asked to be dismissed to join Saline County Association. Dale and Norris City were dropped because they no longer existed as churches. Enfield was constituted in 1900. There were 221 baptisms, 66 added by letter, 13 by restoration, 3 by relation, 34 were excluded, 83 were lost by letter and 42 deaths.

In 1901 there were 41 churches listed. Enfield and Norris City were accepted into the Association. Norris City was constituted in 1901. There were 166 baptisms, 57 added by letter, 6 by relation, 87 were lost by letter, 52 excluded, 16 by erasure, and 33 deaths.

Until 1901, after Sunday school, those attending the Association retired to the grove for the preaching service.

In 1902 there were 42 churches listed. There were 248 baptisms, 115 added by letter, 29 by restoration and relation, 125 were lost by letter, 70 by exclusion and erasure, and 47 deaths.

In 1903 there were 41 churches listed. Burnt Hill was not listed. There were 174 baptisms, 66 added by letter, 18 by experience and restoration, 93 were lost by letter, 63 by exclusion and erasure, and 47 deaths.

In 1904 there were 42 churches listed. North Fork was constituted in 1902 and accepted into the association in 1904. There were 190 baptisms, 73 added by letter, 13 by experience and restoration, 61 were lost by letter, 22 by exclusion and erasure, and 37 deaths.

In 1905 there were 42 churches listed. Texas Grove moved their meeting house to Delafield and changed the name to Delafield. There were 222 baptisms, 72 added by letter, 13 by experience and restoration, 20 were dismissed by exclusion and erasure, 66 by letter, and 45 deaths.

In 1906 there were 42 churches listed. There were 239 baptisms, 53 added by letter, 15 by experience and restoration, 111 were lost by letter, 28 by exclusion and erasure, and 53 deaths.

In 1907 there were 42 churches listed. There were 279 baptisms, 96 added by letter, 16 by experience and restoration, 32 were excluded and erased, 88 were lost by letter, and 40 deaths.

In 1908 there were 39 churches listed. New Haven was dropped because it had gone out of existence. There were 446 baptisms, 102 added by letter, 26 by experience and restoration, 56 were excluded and erased, 107 lost by letter, and 31 deaths.

In 1909 there were 39 churches listed. It was decided to cooperate with the Southern Baptist Convention. There were 431 baptisms, 128 additions by letter, 99 by experience and restoration, 93 were excluded and erased, 162 were lost by letter, and 24 deaths.

In 1910 Grayville presented their letter from Mt. Erie Association. Shawneetown joined Fairfield Association. Enfield was dropped because it went out of existence. There are no records of churches, additions, and losses for this year.

In 1911 there were 39 churches listed. There were 133 baptisms, 58 added by letter, 6 by restoration, 78 were lost by letter, 25 by exclusion, and 34 deaths.

In 1912 there were 39 churches listed. There were 126 baptisms, 44 added by letter, 5 by restoration, 64 were lost by letter, 22 by exclusion, and 44 deaths.

In 1913 there were 40 churches listed. Liberty Church (Burnt Prairie) was constituted and accepted into the association. There were 155 baptisms, 44 added by letter, 10 by restoration, 76 were lost by letter, 23 by exclusion, and 37 deaths. No record was found of Sunday morning services for this year. Article XI states that the annual meeting will begin on Thursday instead of Friday.

In 1914 there were 40 churches listed. There were 215 baptisms, 82 added by letter, 16 by restoration, 90 were lost by letter, 120 exclusions, and 36 deaths.

In 1915 there were 39 churches listed. There were 212 baptisms, 74 added by letter, 14 by restoration, 52 were lost by letter, 17 by exclusion, and 36 deaths.

In 1916 there were 35 churches listed. There were 160 baptisms, 62 added by letter, 11 by restoration, 76 were lost by letter, 67 by exclusion, and 68 deaths.

In 1917 there were 35 churches listed. North Fork, Shawneetown, Saline Creek, and Zion weren’t listed. There were 161 baptisms, 25 added by letter, 49 were lost by letter, 34 by exclusion, and 22 deaths.

In 1918 there were 36 churches listed. Zion was listed again. There were 72 baptisms, 21 added by letter, and 1 by restoration, 46 were lost by letter, 15 by exclusion, and 29 deaths. Motion was made and carried to strike from the record the matter relative to the proposed name change of the association.

In 1919 there were 36 churches. There were 36 baptisms, 33 added by letter, 3 by restoration, 58 were lost by letter, 10 by exclusion, and 44 deaths.

In 1920 there were 36 churches listed. There were 185 baptisms, 53 added by letter, 12 by restoration, 37 were lost by letter, 163 by exclusion, and 43 deaths. A proposal was made to change the name to Carmi Baptist Association. This was to be voted on but no record of a vote could be found.

In 1921 there were 37 churches listed. There were 332 baptisms, 114 added by letter, 24 by restoration, 94 were lost by letter, 161 by exclusion, and 34 deaths. Macedonia had been dropped because it hadn’t reported for 3 years. Calvary Baptist and Rosedale Baptist of Evansville, IN came into the Association.

In 1923 there were 34 churches listed. There were 181 baptisms, 60 added by letter, 15 by restoration, 41 were lost by letter, 60 were excluded, and 32 deaths. It was recommended that Fairfield Association be retained.

In 1924 there were 34 churches listed. There were 193 baptisms, 37 added by letter, 10 restorations, 20 were lost by letter, 54 by exclusion, and 40 deaths. Immanuel and Germany Township united with this association. They were Evansville, IN churches.

In 1925 there were 34 churches listed. There were 277 baptisms, 68 added by letter, 6 by statement, 15 by restoration, 105 were lost by letter, 42 by exclusion, and 35 deaths. This is the last year that exclusions, restorations, and loss by letter were recorded. It is not specified how many of these are actually exchanges of members from one church to another in the Association. Also, one might wonder how many of the exclusions and restorations were repeated offenses by the same people.

In 1926 there were 38 churches listed. There were 137 baptisms and 77 other additions. There were 35 deaths.

In 1927 there were 40 churches listed. There were 283 baptisms and 159 other additions. There were 37 deaths. This year, the annual meeting was on Wednesday afternoon instead of Thursday morning.

In 1928 there were 39 churches listed. There were 244 baptisms and 56 additions by letter. There were 19 deaths.

In 1929 there were 39 churches listed. No record of baptisms and other additions was found for this year. There were 33 deaths.

In 1930 there were 38 churches listed. There were 189 baptisms and 91 other additions. There were 34 deaths. Walnut Street asked for dismissal to unite with Ohio Valley Association of Kentucky. Grace Baptist asked for dismissal to unite with Davis-McLean Association of Kentucky.

In 1931 there were 25 churches listed. There were 120 baptisms and 46 deaths.

In 1932 there were 33 churches listed. There were 272 baptisms and 37 deaths. Victory church came into our association from Ohio Valley Association of Kentucky.

In 1933 there were 33 churches listed but 6 didn’t report. There were 179 baptisms and 23 deaths.

In 1934 there were 33 churches listed but 7 didn’t report. There were 90 baptisms. There was no record of deaths for this year.

There are no records for 1935. The 1936 minutes state that minutes were not printed for the previous year due to insufficient funds.

In 1936 there were 32 churches listed. There were 100 baptisms and 37 deaths.

The minutes for the 1937 meeting were not found.

In 1938 there were 32 churches listed with 142 baptisms and 39 deaths.

In 1939 there were 33 churches listed with 159 baptisms and 44 deaths. Antioch came into Fairfield Association from Franklin Association.

In 1940 there were 32 churches listed with 156 baptisms and 44 deaths.

In 1941 there were 31 churches listed. There were 39 deaths, but no record of baptisms was found.

In 1942 there were 31 churches listed with 79 baptisms and 57 deaths. Antioch was granted a letter of dismissal to return to Franklin Association. Crossville church was organized in 1941 and was accepted into the Fairfield Association in 1942.

In 1943 there were 27 churches listed with 194 baptisms and 27 deaths.

In 1944 there were 31 churches listed with 205 baptisms and 48 deaths.

In 1945 there were 31 churches listed with 155 baptisms, 111 by letter, 2 by statement, and 4 by restoration. There were 43 deaths and 1 exclusion.

In 1946 there were 31 churches listed with 240 baptisms, 146 added by letter, 7 other additions. There were 104 lost by letter, 36 deaths, and 9 other losses. It was proposed to change the association name to Hamilton-White. This did not pass.

In 1947 there were 31 churches listed with 226 baptisms, 129 by letter, and 3 other additions. 131 were lost by letter; there were 36 deaths, and 13 other losses.

In 1948 there were 26 churches listed with 128 baptisms and 62 by letter. There were 38 deaths. Carmi united with the newly formed Wabash Valley Association. There was no response from Crossville, Grayville, and Liberty. They probably joined the new association as well.

In 1949 there were 27 churches listed with 167 baptisms and 64 additions by letter and other additions. There were 37 deaths.

In 1950 there were 27 churches listed with 93 baptisms and 46 added by letter and other additions. There were 32 deaths.

In 1951 there were 26 churches listed with 96 baptisms and 28 by letter. There were 32 deaths. It was adopted to have a memorial sermon each year.

In 1952 there were 28 churches listed. Enfield was organized in 1951 and came into the Association in 1952. There were 98 baptisms, 48 added by letter and other additions. There were 46 deaths.

In 1953 there were 28 churches listed with 52 baptisms, 44 added by letter and other additions. There were 44 deaths.

In 1954 there were 28 churches listed with 133 baptisms and 87 other additions. There were 35 deaths.

In 1955 there were 28 churches listed with 98 baptisms and 64 other additions. There were 49 deaths.

In 1956 there were 29 churches listed with 71 baptisms and 77 other additions. There were 48 deaths. McLeansboro Second Baptist was organized and was accepted into the Association in 1956. New Hope didn’t report.

In 1957 there were 29 churches listed with 98 baptisms and 78 other additions. There were 36 deaths. Beaver Creek church was destroyed by a tornado December 18. The members united with other churches. Knight’s Prairie presented a letter, but after considerable discussion, it was ruled that a petitionary letter as of an entirely new church would be required. The letter was written and the church was accepted.

In 1958 there were 28 churches listed with 97 baptisms and 83 other additions. There were 37 deaths.

In 1959 there were 28 churches listed with 81 baptisms and 80 other additions. There were 39 deaths.

In 1960 there were 29 churches listed with 55 baptisms and 73 other additions. There were 40 deaths. Union petitioned to come from the Franklin Association and was received. Motion was made, seconded, and passed to file an application to The Baptist Hour for a position on their radio program.

In 1961 there were 29 churches listed with 69 baptisms and 68 other additions. There were 41 deaths. Knight’s Prairie didn’t report.

In 1962 there were 27 churches listed with 91 baptisms and 81 other additions. There were 55 deaths. Casey Avenue (Mt. Vernon) applied for membership in this Association. The committee appointed to consider this application brought back the recommendation that they not be received.

In 1963 there were 27 churches listed with 50 baptisms and 62 other additions. There were 51 deaths. Knight’s Prairie and New Hope were dropped because they had become inactive. The New Hope church burned in the 1990s. A committee was named to check about buying a home for the Director of Missions. A home on South Washington Street was purchased. Richard Hubble was the first occupant.

In 1964 church camp began. It was a vital part of youth work in the association. There were 27 churches listed with 45 baptisms, 73 other additions, and 44 deaths.

In 1965 there were 27 churches listed with 73 baptisms and 44 other additions. There were 37 deaths.

In 1966 there were 27 churches listed with 90 baptisms, 70 other additions, and 48 deaths.

In 1967 there were 27 churches listed with 32 baptisms, 60 other additions, and 40 deaths.

In 1968 there were 27 churches listed with 82 baptisms and 47 other additions. There were 54 deaths.

In 1969 there were 25 churches listed with 89 baptisms, 55 other additions, and 51 deaths.

In 1970 there were 26 churches listed with 67 baptisms, 43 other additions, and 36 deaths.

In 1971 there were 25 churches listed with 56 baptisms and 84 other additions. There was no record of deaths. Pleasant Hill did not report.

In 1972 there were 25 churches listed with 127 baptisms and 83 other additions. There were 31 deaths.

In 1973 there were 25 churches listed with 108 baptisms, 83 other additions, and 49 deaths. Antioch petitioned to come into the association and was accepted.

In 1974 there were 26 churches listed with 61 baptisms, 52 other additions, and 47 deaths. Ten Mile submitted a letter asking for admission to the Fairfield Association from Franklin Association and was accepted.

In 1975 there were 26 churches listed with 132 baptisms, 81 other additions, and 39 deaths.

In 1976 there were 26 churches listed with 124 baptisms, 79 other additions, and 47 deaths. Blue Mound reorganized but didn’t continue. Their messengers were absent.

In 1977 there were 27 churches listed with 72 baptisms, 100 other additions, and 45 deaths.

In 1978 there were 26 churches listed with 61 baptisms, 63 other additions, and 32 deaths.

In 1979 there were 26 churches listed with 63 baptisms and 57 other additions. There were 39 deaths.

In 1980 there were 26 churches listed in the Association. There were 56 baptisms, 76 additions, and 43 deaths.

In 1981 there were 26 churches listed with 67 baptisms, 68 other additions, and 43 deaths.

In 1982 there were 26 churches listed with 92 baptisms, 52 other additions, and 35 deaths. Zion was listed as Kingdom.

In 1983 there were 26 churches listed with 85 baptisms and 88 other additions. There were 42 deaths.

In 1984 there were 26 churches listed with 74 baptisms, 60 other additions, and 44 deaths.

In 1985 there were 26 churches listed with 73 baptisms, 60 other additions, and 43 deaths.

In 1986 there were 26 churches listed with 65 baptisms, 54 other additions, and 44 deaths.

In 1987 there were 26 churches listed with 57 baptisms, 52 other additions, and 33 deaths.

In 1988 there were 26 churches listed with 79 baptisms, 57 other additions, and 42 deaths.

In 1989 there were 26 churches listed with 57 baptisms, 52 other additions, and 45 deaths.

In 1990 there were 25 churches listed with 54 baptisms, 64 other additions, and 37 deaths. Dale wasn’t listed (closed).

In 1991 there were 25 churches listed with 42 baptisms, 67 other additions, and 44 deaths.

In 1992 there were 24 churches listed with 80 baptisms, 55 other additions, and 33 deaths. Tennessee Bend didn’t report.

In 1993 there were 24 churches listed with 51 baptisms and 26 other additions. There were 32 deaths.

In 1994 there were 24 churches listed with 60 baptisms, 34 other additions, and 37 deaths. Pleasant Hill church building and contents were sold.

In 1995 there were 24 churches listed with 69 baptisms, 51 other additions, and 42 deaths. The Director of Missions home was sold to Lester and Freda Dean.

In 1996 there were 24 churches listed with 53 baptisms, 36 other additions, and 33 deaths.

In 1997 there were 24 churches listed with 45 baptisms, 28 other additions, and 38 deaths. Middle Creek church burned at Christmas of 1996 and a new building was dedicated in November of 1997. A motion was made to change the name of the association to Goshen Trail. The motion carried.

In 1998 there were 24 churches listed with 77 baptisms. There were 29 deaths.

In 1999 there were 24 churches listed with 87 baptisms, 40 other additions, and 45 deaths.

In 2000 there were 24 churches listed with 68 baptisms, 47 other additions, and 37 deaths.

In 2001 there were 24 churches listed with 100 baptisms and 61 other additions. There were 31 deaths.

In 2002 there were 24 churches listed with 91 baptisms, 65 other additions, and 29 deaths. McLeansboro Second didn’t report. The church closed the building and contents were sold.

In 2003 there were 23 churches listed with 81 baptisms, 64 other additions, and 30 deaths. Smith Chapel closed and the building and contents were sold.

In 2004 there were 22 churches listed with 52 baptisms, 47 other additions, and 39 deaths. Ellis Mound united with Greater Wabash Association just a few weeks after the 2004 yearly meeting.

In 2005 there were 21 churches listed with 49 baptisms and 72 other additions. There were 39 deaths.


The following is an excerpt from a book written by W. P. Throgmorton, Editor of the Baptist Banner, 1880:

The Fairfield Baptist Association was organized, and the first meeting held with Bethel church, White County, Illinois, September 18th and 19th, 1857. The churches entering the organization were as follows; Bethel, Enon, Mt. Pleasant, and Ellis Mound. The aggregate membership of these churches was one hundred and seven. At the same meeting however the following churches came in: Pleasant Grove, McLeansboro, Blooming Grove, Ephesus, Little Prairie, New Hope, Parker’s Prairie, and Zion. The membership of these as reported summed up five hundred and sixty-one, making a total of six hundred and sixty-eight. Elder C. J. Kelly was the first moderator, and M. V. Hunsinger the first clerk with D. R. Felix assistant clerk. The ministers as reported at this meeting were as follows: F. Stacy, J. B. Smith, E. W. Overstreet, S. A. Martin, C. R. Pitman, J. B. Sneed, and Thomas Stokes. From that time until now Fairfield has enjoyed a steady growth. Her total membership as reported in 1878 was two thousand five hundred and eighty-one. She has many strong churches in her membership and many noble, self-sacrificing men among her ministers. Still she does not do half the work that ought to be done. While she is not avowedly anti-missionary, she is somewhat “ommissionary”. This is shown by the many thriving towns within her limits that have no Baptist churches or Baptist preaching. Carmi, Enfield, Norris City, and other places we might name have no Baptist preaching. This ought not to be so. Our Fairfield brethren are strong enough to have the gospel regularly preached at every important point in their territory. The territory of this association comprises all of White county, and part of Gallatin, Hamilton, Jefferson, and Wayne.

SKIT FOR 150TH ANNUAL MEETING
2006

September 29-30

Goshen Trail Baptist Association

One Hundred-Fiftieth Celebration

Introduction

Read by: Steve or Jeanie Hamson

Two thousand and six! This is an historical time as we celebrate our 150th year as an association of Baptists. A time of remembrance; a time to reflect; a time to look forward. To help us do this, let’s take at look at some of the happenings in our nation, around the world and in our association. There is so much to tell about and so little time. To make it easier to comprehend, the one hundred and fifty years have been divided into time periods--each giving us a glimpse of, first, our national history, secondly, our associational history, thirdly, excerpts quoted from some of the minutes, and finally a song from that time frame.

(Song: “Remind Me, Dear Lord” Sung by: Sara Brake)

(Music playing in the background--”What a Friend We Have in Jesus”)

Read by: Marshall Cross

1856 - 1880

The year is 1856--only 80 years after the Declaration of Independence. Armed with gun and ax, plow and Bible, Americans transformed a wilderness into one of the world’s greatest nations. The United States had added territories that completed the lower 48 state area and went from 31 to 38 states during this period.

The debate on slavery was heating up as President James Buchanan took office. President Abraham Lincoln found himself trying to preserve the union but Civil War soon broke out. For four bloody years slavery divided the nation, leaving it with an assassinated president and large scale political, social and physical issues to resolve. Under the leadership of Presidents Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Rutherford B. Hayes the land began the long process of healing. Before long the first transcontinental railroad was completed. The telephone and electric light bulb were invented; the westward expansion was continuing.

Read by: Shirley Rister

The Fairfield Baptist Association was organized in 1856. Not much is known about the first years as there are no known records until 1872. Those records tell us there were 31 churches in the Association; those still active today are: Belle City or Belle Prairie, Blooming Grove, Hickory Hill, Hopewell, Middle Creek, New Prospect, Sugar Camp, Walnut Grove, and Zion or Kingdom. By 1880, Nine more churches had joined the association and 4 had dropped leaving a total of 36 churches. Total baptisms for this time period were 1,240. It is interesting to note that many members were “excluded” and others were “restored”. The subjects of Sabbath schools, literature, and education were all of great concern. The earliest records report as follows:

Read by: Sara Brake

Quote:

Minutes of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the Fairfield Association of Baptist held at Salem Meeting-House, White County, Illinois on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday August 15, 16 and 17 1872--

Officers and Post offices:

U. Allen, Moderator, McLeansboro, Illinois

Wm. H. Stokes, Clerk, Norris City, Illinois

“On Periodicals and Publications:

Your committee on Periodicals and Publications feel greatly discouraged in attempting to make a report or offer recommendations on this subject.

Our people are too slow to take hold of this power for good: Although we believe it second only to the pulpit. May we hope that in once more presenting the importance of laying hold of the Press as a power for good that the churches will adopt the recommendation of their first meeting after the Minutes come to hand, and that the members of the churches feel that they are individually called upon to do all they can to sustain and give increased importance to the circulation of our denominational literature, by whomsoever published, whether in Books, Tracts, Periodicals or Papers. Brethren do you not see that the world is fully alive to the importance of the Press as a power? Shall the children of the world always be wiser in their generation than the children of light? Let a universal NO be the response, while every Baptist and friend of Baptist, rise up for earnest and efficient labor…

Respectfully submitted, C. J. Kelley, Chairman”

(Song: “It is Well with My Soul” Sung by: Sara Brake)

Read by : Troy Mayberry

1880-1900

President James Garfield was assassinated almost as soon as he was elected and President Chester Arthur came into office. The rise of big business and the Labor Movement began to gain strength. The railroads opened up the west and seven more states joined the union.

“The gay (18)’90s” has been looked upon as one of the happiest periods in American history. Education, the arts, literature, magazines and newspapers all seemed to flourish. People seemed content with the present and optimistic about the future. Presidents Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, and William McKinley led the U. S. to become one of the greatest economic powers in the world. It’s population stood at more than 75 million. The public school system expanded swiftly as the U.S. sought to become the first nation to educate all its people. Colleges and universities doubled in number between the Civil War and 1900. Women were encouraged to get a higher education.


Read by: Cindy Phillips

New churches to the Fairfield Baptist Association during this time were Burnt Hill, Cypress in Gallatin Co., Dale, Equality, Fairfield, First Liberty, Griffin in Indiana, Hoodville First, Junction City, Mill Shoals, New Haven, Pleasant Hill of Dahlgren, Ridgway First, Saline Creek, New or Second Liberty, Tennessee Bend, Thackery, Union Grove, Broughton, Dahlgren, Ditney Ridge, Norris City, Texas Grove or Delafield, McLeansboro First, Carmi, Pleasant Valley, Beaver Creek, and Bethel or Blue Mound. There were 3,545 baptisms; 1,044 added by letter; and 325 by experience/relation/restoration. Losses by letter were 1,499; by exclusions/erased/dropped 1,068; and by death 593 for a net gain of 1,754 members. The people of the Fairfield Baptist Association in keeping with the times, apparently agreed on the need for higher education, especially for ministers, as was recorded in the minutes of 1890:

Read by: Jamie Burzynski

Quote:

“Report of committee on higher ministerial education called for and read by Eld. D. Manley, and on motion was adopted.

Higher education is complying in part with the purposes of God. God having created us to know His glory, the heavens declare the Glory of God and the firmament showeth His handy-work. The author of this text must have, in some degree, attained a knowledge of what we call higher education. God has endowed us with a faculty to acquire a knowledge high as the heavens, deep as the earth and as broad as the universe. So to oppose or stand in the way of our aspiring youths gaining a knowledge which fits and prepares them to fill any or all of the higher positions in life, deadens the aspirations of usefulness and happiness of our noble young men and women whom God has chosen for the work of preaching the glorious Gospel of the blessed God to a perishing world. It is our duty to aid them, for so doing we are conforming to the educational policy of the times universally recognized as wise. Does it pay to give those who are hungering and longing, and standing saying, “Lord her am I, send me.”

Does it pay, we ask for the state to educate its children, educate its officers for its army and navy? We answer--yes! So it pays the churches to educate men for the Gospel ministry. We therefore recommend Ewing College, Ewing, Ills., as a place where such knowledge and preparations can be attained. We also, with grateful hearts acknowledge the munificent gift of Mr. Rockefeller of one million six hundred thousand dollars to the University of Chicago for the purposes named in the report submitted.

D. Manley--- E. Hunsinger -- J. C. Elliott Com.”


(Song: “How Great Thou Art” Sung by: Jamie Burzynski)

Read by: Chuck McCormick

1900-1925

A new century began with President William McKinley being assassinated in 1901. Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him and before long the first successful airplane flight occurred and the first Model T is produced. Oklahoma, Arizona and New Mexico join the U.S. The Progressive Movement begins with the aim of protesting social welfare and the harsh conditions of industrialization and to promote moral improvement mainly by banning alcoholic beverages. Before long we were embroiled in World War I. Even though President Woodrow Wilson originally tried to keep America neutral, when German subs sank five American ships and was plotting to sabotage American industries, the U. S. declared war.

When the war ended in victory, Americans felt lighthearted. During the 1920’s, the United States set off on a joy ride in an “era of wonderful nonsense.” The era became known as the “Roaring 20’s“. The passage of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution ushered in Prohibition.

Read by: Dorothy Lane

These years were busy years for Illinois Baptists and the Fairfield Baptist Association. The number of churches during this time ranged from 42-34 with churches as far away as Evansville, IN, Shawneetown, and Ridgway. Texas Grove moved their meeting house to Delafield and thus changed their name to “Delafield”. The Illinois State Baptist Association was organized Nov. 7, 1907; Illinois WMU was organized in 1908 but the first reference to WMU our minutes was in 1919 (Ladies Aid Society was listed for many years before and after until1924 when only WMU was listed). This association joined the Southern Baptist Convention in 1909. An attempt to change the name to Carmi Baptist Association in 1920 never came to a vote.

Excerpts from the Fairfield Associational Minutes reflect the issues of the day:

Read by: Alisha Black

Quote:

“Report on Resolutions” (1917)

Resolved, that we favor the new orphanage to be located in White county, the land for which has already been donated to the Illinois Baptist State Association, by the Baptists of that county…

Resolved, that we deplore the prevalence of Sunday desecration, and that we urge our people to maintain a determined stand against Sunday work for profit, Sunday games and Sunday amusements in general.

Resolved, that we favor the cause of nation-wide and world-wide prohibition of the liquor traffic for beverage purposes, and that as Christians and as citizens we will do what we can in every proper way to bring it to pass.

Resolved, that while we deplore the blood and carnage of was, we indorse the course our government has taken in entering into the great conflict, and that we pledge ourselves to all the duties and self-sacrifices which true patriotism requires.

Resolved, that while we pray for peace, we pray first that victory may be won for the cause of right, and that we will pray daily for the physical, moral and spiritual welfare of our soldier boys and their safe return to home and loved ones after the conflict is over.

Resolved, that we urge all our churches and all our people to give full support to our Associational missionary with their sympathies, their contributions and their prayers…

Resolved, that this body elect a superintendent of woman’s work of this association.” …

“The Sunbeam Band movement, begun in 1886, was not altogether to do things for children but that children might do things for others and for Jesus.”

The first mention of Sunbeams (now known as Mission Friends) is noted in the Minutes of 1919 as follows:

Sunbeam Band

Church-- (Leader)-- Number of Members

Carmi --Mutrice Pyle-- 37

and in the Minutes of 1920:

“Carmi Sunbeams paid $30.00 on the 75 million drive.”

(Song “Jesus Wants Me for a Sunbeam” Sung by Children‘s Choir led by Alisha Black)

Read by: Seth Schlag

1926-1945

Calvin Coolidge is President. Charles A. Lindberg’s solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927 roused the nation and did much to stimulate the new aviation industry. The future looked bright when Herbert Hoover became President; however, the Hoover administration had hardly begun when the country suffered the worst business crash in its history on October 29, 1929. Millions of Americans were out of work, thousands of banks failed and businesses went bankrupt. President Franklin D. Roosevelt faced the challenge of the Great Depression. His New Deal worked to end the depression and restore the economy as war clouds were gathering in Europe. Although trying to remain neutral, America was drifting steadily into war. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941, the U. S. declared war. Four long years later on September 2, 1945 the final surrender was made after the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

Read by: Nancy Colbert

The minutes of the Fairfield Baptist Association give little clues as to world affairs at this time except for the listing of “2 U. S. Service men” in the 1944 obituaries and “3” in 1945. However in 1935, “No minutes were printed because of insufficient funds.” In 1943, the orphanage report states, “Under the war rationing program we urge all churches and friends to continue the sending of fruits and vegetables as the above cannot even be bought at the wholesale house at present.”

There were an average of 33 churches in the association during this time period. Antioch came into the association from Franklin Association in 1939 only to leave again in 1942 and then return at a later time.

According the minutes of 1926, there was much concern about the status of Sunday Schools:

Read by: Bryan Cowling

Quote:

“Report on Sunday School read:

We, your committee on Sunday Schools, report as follows:

After careful investigation of the records we find the following:

The enrollment of our Association Sunday Schools to be 2,013, with an average attendance of only 1,226 in 1925. We found we had 234 teachers and offices in our thirty-four or more Sunday Schools, and that the 1925 records report 170 conversions from the Sunday School…The figures given reveal a field white unto harvest…We make the following recommendations:

-- That the Bible be made the chief text book in every Sunday School, and that the Sunday School literature be a supplement to the study of the Bible, and that we encourage and train the boys and girls in real Bible reading.

-- We find only one Sunday School graded in our Association, and we your Committee recommend that as far as possible that we grade our Sunday Schools as we believe that it will help us solve the non-attendance of our Sunday Schools.

-- We want to call your attention to the membership or the Fairfield Association which is 2,881. If the Sunday School is the evangelistic field of the church in light of these figures and the average attendance of the thirty-four Sunday Schools in our Association, which is 1,226. We need to be alarmed and every Baptist parent should be urged to help solve non-attendance of our Sunday Schools in the whole Association. We recommend that the pastors and Sunday School superintendents and our missionary co-operate in correcting this condition at once.

-- As this is the day of much controversy concerning the Bible and many are the schemes for promoting the study of the Bible, but in face of all that we can do to promote Bible study the enemies have forced it out of the public school, we recommend that we do all that we can to place the Bible on every teacher’s desk in our fair State, not to teach some kind of religion, but to teach our youth sacred history.

W.R. Evans, G. W. Rohrer, J. V. Hall, Committee.

(Song: “His Eye Is On The Sparrow” Sung by Bryan Cowling)

Read by: David Allen

1946-1960

Also known as the era of the Cold War against Communism.

The Presidents were Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Alaska and Hawaii made it 50 United States. We saw the development of the first transistor which spurred the growth of computers and electronics. This in turn led to the first U. S. satellite and the establishment of NASA. The Korean Conflict was fought; the Civil Rights movement heated up; and the Interstate Highway System was funded. In the medical field, the development of the polio vaccine promised an end to this crippling and deadly disease.

Read by: Mary Widick

Meanwhile, at the Fairfield Baptist Association in 1946 a proposed change to the Constitution was given “to substitute the name ‘Hamilton/White’ for the name ‘Fairfield’ in Article I. This failed to receive the necessary two-thirds majority vote.” A motion at the 1947 Annual meeting to change the name to “Bethel” was tabled until the next year. The matter was brought up again in 1948 and the only member of the retained committee who was present, moved that we retain the name Fairfield Baptist Association. The motion carried unanimously. Carmi Baptist went to the newly formed Wabash Valley Association in 1948 as apparently did Grayville, and Liberty of Burnt Prairie. During the 100th Annual Meeting held in 1956 McLeansboro Second, petitioned to be accepted. Beaver Creek was destroyed by a tornado Dec.18. 1957 and was disbanded as members joined other churches; Zion church became Kingdom and is still often referred to by either name; and in 1960 Union joined from Franklin Association and continues in the association to the present.

In 1951 memorial services were started to honor the memory of deceased members of the past year:

Read by: Leland Widick

(Music playing in the background--“Face to Face”

“Obituaries Report:

We, your committee on Obituaries, report that 32 of our dearly beloved brothers and sisters in Christ have been called from our midst to the Great Beyond during the past year. We therefore recommend that out of respect to them one stanza of “Face to Face” be played softly and followed by prayer.

Respectfully submitted,

A. B. Aud, Marshall Cross,Martin Vaupel, Committee

Bro. Ola Allen is called to stand by Moderator to make a 10 minute talk out of respect for our departed ones. This he very fittingly did.

It is now moved, seconded, and adopted to have a memorial sermon preached each year.

The congregation now stands to sing one stanza of “Face to Face” which was followed by prayer.”

Song led by: Leland Widick

(Congregational song: “Face to Face”)

Read by: Kay Mayberry

1960-1975

The nation faced continuing crises with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War years of President Lyndon B. Johnson, and the Watergate Scandal of President Richard M. Nixon. Additional headlines told of: Segregation, Desegregation, The Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War Protests, Hippies, Women’s Movements, Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile Crisis, John Glenn orbits the earth, astronauts walk on the moon, the Berlin Wall, the Beatles, Kent State, assassinations, Watergate. The nation and world could only be described as ones of great social and political turmoil.

Read by: John Smith

During this time period there was an average of 26 churches in Fairfield Baptist Association. In 1960, the association filed with the WEBQ radio station for a position on the “Baptist Hour”. A tent revival was held at Dahlgren in 1962 with 5 professions of faith. Knight’s Prairie and New Hope churches were dropped in 1963 for inactivity. In 1963, a home on South Washington Street in McLeansboro was purchased for the use of the Director of Missions. Church camp was begun in 1964 for a period of time. WMCL Radio Baptist Hour began in 1968 and continues to the present. Pleasant Hill of Dahlgren closed in 1971 and the building and contents were sold in 1994. In 1973, Antioch Church once again rejoined Fairfield Association. In 1974, Ten Mile Baptist Church was received into Fairfield Association having been affiliated with Franklin Baptist Association. Organized in 1820, Ten Mile is one the oldest Baptist churches in the state.

The Cooperative Program was started in 1925 by the Southern Baptist Convention. The 1961 minutes of the One Hundredth and Fifth Annual Meeting recommend a stronger support of this program:

Read by: Gerald Mayberry

Quote:

“Cooperative Program Report:

The Cooperative Program is World Missions--preaching and ministering in the name of Christ around the world. The Cooperative Program is Southern Baptists way of carrying out the “Great Commission.” Records show that for the past year churches in our Association gave a total of $6,158.25 through the Cooperative Program as compared with $6,071.16 for the previous year. This is an increase of $87.09. Eight of our churches did not contribute to the Cooperative Program last year. Records reveal that last year churches in our Association used 91c of each dollar for local expenses and 9c out of each dollar to all mission and benevolences, including the Cooperative Program, Associational Missions, and the Baptist Children’s Home.

In support of the Cooperative, we recommend:

First, that every church in the Association give to the cooperative Program with a Christ-honoring amount.

Second, that every church place the world missions outreach of the Cooperative Program first in its finance as it asks every member to place his tithe first in his finance.

Third that every church “as the Lord prospers” increase the percentage of support to the Cooperative Program by at least 2 percent per year of its total receipts through 1964.

Respectfully submitted,

John R. Lee -- Otto Catlin -- Wm. L. Auxier

(Song: “I Was There When It Happened” or “I Found the Answer” by Quartet)

Read by: Chris Marsh

1976-1990

The United States celebrated the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence; President Gerald R. Ford pardoned Nixon; a Washington outsider, Jimmy Carter, was elected president; Presidents Ronald W. Reagan, and George H. W. Bush started the Conservative Movement in politics. In 1979, inflation soared to 11.3% while unemployment reached a 40 year high in 1982. The Iran Hostage crisis, Camp David Accords, “Reaganomics,” Space Shuttle and Challenger Disaster, Affirmative Action, environmental concerns, the accident at Three Mile Island, the end of the Cold War and the Berlin Wall coming down, student killings at Tiananmen Square in China, AIDS, Abortion, and growing Drug Abuse--so many issues in such a short time.

Read by: Lora Marsh

During this time period, Fairfield Baptist Association had 25 churches. Blue Mound reorganized in 1976 but their messengers were absent and it did not continue. A very successful World Mission Conference was held in April of 1987. There were also many other programs started, reinstated or continued.

Associational track meets were held in conjunction with RA’s. Some boys competed and won at the state level. Radio broadcasts on WMCL continued strong. Monthly hymn sings and youth meetings were held with good attendance and programs. VBS clinics were held to assist churches with their Vacation Bible Schools. Both the 1977 and 1978 minutes, the Mission Board Annual Report approved motions to appoint an associational youth camp committee. That was done and camp was held for the first time in several years July 31-August 4, 1978 at Union Grove Camp Grounds.

Camp continued successfully as noted in the 1985 minutes:

Read by: Ernie Essary

Quote:

The 1985 youth Camp proved to be an outstanding experience for everyone present--the 96 campers and all the workers alike. There were 5 professions of faith and several rededications. A true revival atmosphere prevailed at the camp. The campers all appreciate the generosity of the individuals and churches who helped in any way.

The special programs presented…were of exceptional quality and extremely enjoyable.

We rented some films to show during camp and also to use in the mission study. These proved to be of great value.

Workers from (various churches) helped make the preparation and serving of the meals easier for our cooks. We are thankful for the food contributed.

Swimming was again enjoyed by the campers.

All of you, the churches and individuals of the association, make camp possible. Your investment in these young people will certainly pay great dividends. Keep up the “Good Work”!

Respectfully submitted,
Ernie Essary

Led by: Debbie Knight or Troy Mayberry

All who have attended camp in the past please stand and joining in singing “Bread on the Water” and/or “Bigger Than Any Mountain”

(Song: “Bread on the Water” and/or “Bigger Than Any Mountain” by any and all who have attend camp.)

Read by: Noah Schlag

1990-2006

These years began with George H. W. Bush as president. After the impeachment of President William J. Clinton, America prepares for the new millennium. George W. Bush was elected president amidst “hanging chads” recount in Florida. There seems to have been wars and rumors of war, shootings, bombings, and terrorism: Kuwait and Operation Desert Storm; Persian Gulf War; Oklahoma City bombing; Columbine School shootings; World Trade Center and the Pentagon on 9/11; the Iraqi War; the recent terrorist plot in London; Hezbollah and Israel. In addition, the dissolving of the Soviet Union into 15 republics, cloning, the Welfare Reform Act, the immigration debate, aviation security, homeland security, and Social Security have all kept the attention of Baby Boomers and the X-generation as we try to keep track of it all via the internet. What will the next 25 years bring?

Read by: Linda Reed

If there was a lot going on in the nation and world, Fairfield Baptist Association was also busy. Several churches were lost. Dale (1990),

Tennessee Bend (1992), Pleasant Hill (1994 building and contents sold), McLeansboro Second (2002 building and contents sold), Smith Chapel (2003 building and contents sold), Ellis Mound (2004 united with Greater Wabash Association shortly after annual meeting), Middle Creek building burned Dec. 25, 1996 but was quickly rebuilt and dedicated November 23, 1997). The Director of Missions home was sold to Bro. Lester and Sis. Freda Dean upon their retirement in 1995. On the bright side, a name change finally passed in 1998 as the association became Goshen Trail Baptist Association. In 1999, an associational office opened at 103 N. Washington Street, McLeansboro. Sponsorship of Cowboy Church began in 2005. A World Mission Conference was held in 1995 and an On Missions Celebration and Fair Nov.10-14, 2004. The association, churches, and individuals became more involved in local, state, national and foreign missions with involvement in World Changers, trips to New York, Michigan, Louisiana, Germany, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, and Ghana. Some of our own were sent out to serve on the international mission field in Romania.

Read by: Mark Hutson

Quote:

Mid-Year Meeting, February 17, 2004:

Special music for the evening was…“People Need the Lord” and “The Mission”.

Bro. Wendell Lang, Executive Director of the ISBA delivered the message for the evening preaching from Matthew 28:16-20.

The services ended with a special Commissioning Service for Chris, Sue, Haley and Jesse Hortin, who are leaving our association to go out in the foreign mission field. Bro. Dennis Reed led the Prayer of Dedication, followed with all present singing “Wherever He Leads, I’ll Go.”

The services were closed with prayer by our Director of Missions, Bro. Steve Hamson.

Respectively submitted,
Cindy Phillips, Clerk

(Song : “People Need the Lord” sung by Mark Hutson

Conclusion:

Read by: Steve or Jeannie Hamson

A total of 88 churches have been associated with Fairfield/Goshen Trail at one time or another in the past 150 years. There are 21 in the association today--some of those are struggling to survive; others are growing and prosperous. The churches are conducting strong Vacation Bible Schools, supporting a growing your camp, getting involved in World Changers, and providing special services for Seniors. The WMU has local, state, national and international involvement; hymn sings and youth activities continue to be enjoyed; and the Southern Baptist Missions Programs are all generously supported.

May we all pray that God will strengthen each individual in each church to more diligently serve Him in the future so that the cause of Jesus Christ and the salvation of lost souls will increase in the years to come--thanking Him that He has been with us through it all.

(Song: “Through It All” sung by Chris Marsh)

Leland Widick: Let’s all stand and praise his name.

(Closing Congregational Song: “Lord , I Lift Your Name on High” led by Leland Widick)




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