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Hancock County, Illinois

 Biographies of Appanoose Township

AMOS DAVIS
Amos Davis, deceased, was born Dec 20, 1814, in Vermont, where he grew to manhood; was educated in one of the universities of his native State; emigrated to this county in 1841, settling first in Nauvoo; was one of the leading merchants of that city at the time. He followed that business until 1857, when he moved upon his farm in Appanoose tp. When he first came to the county he had only $1.50 in money, but by industry and economy he accummulated considerable property, owning at the time of his death 1,300 acres of very fine land, mostly in this tp. He knew well the achievements of self-education and experience. He despired not the day of small things, and by and by great things were added to his successful efforts. He was joined in marriage April 12, 1866, to Mary J. Isenberger, and they had 4 children: viz., Amos, Jacob W., Mary J. and Guy. Mr. Davis' death occurred March 22, 1872, and in that event the community lost one of its most enterprising farmers and worthy citizens.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

SAMUEL T. EGAN
Samuel T. Egan, one of the leading farmers of Appanoose tp., was born in Franklin county, Ind., Dec. 14, 1819. His parents, James and Nancy, were both natives of Pennsylvania. His father dying when he was but a small boy, and his mother when he was 16 years old, he was early thrown upon his own resources for a training for the vicissitudes of life. The seeds of pure morality, however, having been sown in his youthful heart, he persevered through life, and has won a success far beyond that of many who have had better early advantages. He has now a fine farm of 285 acres, on sec. 34, a good residence, etc. all acquired by his own management and industry. Nov. 19, 1846, he married Cordelia M. Maynard, and they have had 8 children, 7 of whom are living-4 sons and 3 daughters. His wife died Feb. 24, 1869, a member of the Methodist Church.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

AMUEL V. ELLIOTT
Farmer and school-teacher, Nauvoo, was born in Tioga county, Pa., May 12, 1845; was brought to this county by his parents in 1850, where he grew to manhood and enjoyed more entended advantages than many others at the day, especially farmer boys; he received his education at the Fort Madison Academy; he now follows farming in the summer and teaching school in the winter. March 27, 1873, he married Alice Cwerden. His father died in 1875, aged 65 years; and his grandfather, John Reynolds, was a soldier in the war of 1812.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JAMES E. GREEN
Farmer, sec 34; P.O., Appanoose; was born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 8, 1820, and is a son of Samuel and Jane Green, who also were natives of the Keystone State. James E. emigrated from his native place to St. Louis, in 1853, and the same year came to this county, where he has since resided, following farming. Dec. 28, 1858, her married Anna Bolton, a native of England; she died in 1860, and he again married in 1865, this time Eliza J. Reed, and they have had one child.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JOHN HAIGH
Farmer, sec 13; P.O., Appanoose; was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 26, 1821, and is a son of John and Mary Haigh, natives of England; he was reared in his native city, but was deprived of the advantages of an early education; at a very early age he was placed in the Tecoma cotton mills, which were built by his father. It was among the first in the city. The subject of this sketch worked in that establishment for seven years, that is, until 1838, when he went to work at Gambol's morocco works, of Philadelphia, and learned the art of dressing morocco; he continued in this business until 1853, when he came to this county, where he settled and has since resided, engaged in farming. He owns a fine farm of 210 acres in this tp. In 1842 he married Sarah Falcrod; she died soon afterward, and in 1846 he married Sarah E. Sheward.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JAMES HAMMOND
Farmer, sec. 13; P.O.; Fruitland; was born in England Dec. 17, 1842, and was brought to this country by his parents, Thomas and Mary A. Hammond, in 1843, first settling in Nauvoo, where they lived until 1844, and then they moved to their farm in this tp., where our subject has since resided, except a few years. Feb. 4, 1862, he enlisted in Co. B, 17th Iowa Inf., in which he served till 1863, shortly after the surrender of Vicksburg, when he was transferred to the Signal Corps,a division of the regular army, where he served until April, 1865, when, on the expiration of his term, he was discharged. He then returned home and has ever since followed farming. In the fall of 1867 he married Mary S. Boyle, and they have had 6 children, 2 sons and 4 daughters.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JOHN HOBBS
Deceased, was born Dec. 4, 1801, in Pennsylvania; he went to Knox county, O., in 1823, and came to this county in 1856. Dec. 27, 1825, he married Anna Shipley, who died May 1, 1853; March 27, 1856, Mr. H. again married, Rebecca S. Zeigler, and they have had one child, Alice May, deceased. Mr. Hobbs lived near Nauvoo from the time he first settled in this county until his death, Jan. 5, 1871. He was a man highly respected by all who knew him, for his generosity and good manners. His funeral was very largely attended.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

L.A. HOBBS
Was born Oct. 26, 1835, in Washington county, Pa., and is a son of John (deceased) and Nancy Hobbs; he was taken to Knox county, O., by his parents, when quite young, where they remained until 1850, and then they removed to Delaware, O., where he received a college education. He came West the first time with his father in 1854, remaining here about six months, when he returned to Ohio; during the following winter (1855) he attended and graduated at the Cleveland Commercial College; in March 1855, he came to Nauvoo, where he engaged as book-keeper in the store of John B. Icking. In May, 1856, he married Miss Julia A. Henry, and they have had 5 sons and 3 daughters. Mr. H's father died in March, 1871, aged 70 years.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

HUGH JACKSON
Was born Sept. 23, 1837, in Fulton county, N.Y., and is a son of James and Mary Jackson, farmers by occupation and distinguished for intelligence and piety; they were in comfortable circumstances and gave their children a good education; they were natives of Scotland and came to America in 1832; at the age of 18 Hugh left the paternal roof in Albany county, N.Y., whither they had removed from Fulton county, and came to Illinois, settling in Hancock county with but little of this world's goods; he had but $5.25, but by industry and integrity, having during three years saved some little money, he joined a party of friends and went to Pike's Peak, thence to New Mexico and thence to New Orleans, where he spent the winter; he then returned to Illinois for a short time; after traveling some months in Missouri and this State, he returned in the spring of 1861 to this county, where he has since remained. In 1865 he married Mary H. Hammond, a native of England. Mr. J. is a Presbyterian.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

ROBERT JACKSON
Was born in Albany county, N.Y., a brother of the preceeding; he grew to manhood in his native State, where he received a common-school education, and after he came here he attended school at the Fort Madison Academy. April 13, 1865, he enlisted in Co. E, 118th Ill. Vol. Inf.; was discharged at the close of the war, having served about six months.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

WILLIAM JACKSON
Was born in Scotland June 27, 1808, and is a son of James and Isabella Jackson, natives also of Scotland; he emigrated to the United States in 1834, and lived in New York until the fall of 1838, when he came and settled in this tp., where he has since resided. During the Morman troubles he took no part on either side. He was here at the first immigration of the Mormons, and heard Joe Smith make his first speech in Illinois, and saw the corner-stone of the temple laid. An anecdote of Joe Smith Mr. J. relates as follows: At that time live-stock was running at large everywhere, and application was made to the city council to adopt a law prohibiting this; they applied to Joe Smith, Mayor, to make a proclamation to that effect; Smith refused to do so, but said he would come out and make a speech; he did so, and said that if any person had any more dogs than he could keep at home and feed, he was one of the dog breed himself; and made a similar remark concerning the people allowing hogs to run at large. In the fall of 1844 Mr. J married Allisa Winning. Mr. J. has for fourteen years been township Treasurer, and has also been Supervisor and Assessor for awhile. He owns a farm of 120 acres on sec. 29.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JOHN KENNEDY
Deceased, was born in 1815, in Ireland, and came to this country in 1830, first settling in Delaware county, Pa., in 1850, while there, he married Eliza Scanlin; in 1853 they came to this county, locating in this tp., where they lived until his death, Feb. 15, 1880. He was a very estimable citizen.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JAMES LINDSAY, JR.
Was born Aug. 27, 1853, in this county, and is a son of James and Anna Lindsay; was reared on a farm, receiving a common-school education; April 24, 1879, he married Ella Ikerd, of this county. His grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, serving also 18 months in the war of 1812.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JAMES A. OLLIS
Farmer, P.O., Appanoose; was born Sept. 8, 1828, in Montgomery county, Ind., and is a son of Matthias and Catharine Ollis, father a native of England and mother of Ohio. James A. was reared on a farm and received a common-school education. March 2, 1854, he married Martha Brown, and they had 5 children, 4 of whom are living; James A., Mary C., Sarah C. and Elizabeth A. Mrs. Ollis died March 28, 1880, a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, which she had been for 18 years. Mr. O. is also a member of the same Church.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

CHAUNCY ROBISON
Was born March 27, 1805, in Oneida county, N.Y.; came to this county with his parents, Charles and Jerusha Robison, in 1829; here he spent his early life, while the county was first setting up. He had one brother, John K., who was a soldier in the Blawk Hawk war. Chauncy entered as register in the land-office in Quincy, in which position he remained until 1837, when he went to Carthage, and there engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, which he followed till August, 1839, when he was elected County Recorder, in which office he served eight years; he then went to Louisiana, where he spent the winters of 1847-'8, for the benefit of his wife's health; in the spring of 1847 he came to Nauvoo, where he lived until 1850; he then purchased a farm in Appanoose tp., where he has since resided. In 1841 he amrried Hannah D. Hughes, of Carthage, and they have had 4 children, only one of whom is now living, Ella M., now Mrs. Deusenburg. Mrs. R. died March 27, 1861. Mr. R's grandfather on his mother's side was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, under Gen. Washington.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

LEWIS SLEIGHT
Deceased, was born March 2, 1819, in New Jersey; when sixteen years of age he emigrated to St. Louis, when he resided sixteen years, then came to Nauvoo, and was Captain of the ferry-boat that ran from that place to Montrose, Iowa, from that time, 1851, until his death, June 2, 1872. He was married in 1842 to Sarah Frisby, and they had 3 children; Emma L., now Mrs. Violett; Lulu L. and Ada. Several of Mrs. Sleight's ancestors were valiant soldiers in both the Revolutionary was the the war of 1812.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JAMES B. WEBB
Son of Wm. and Harriet Webb, who came to this county in 1841 with a company of Mormons, who reared here and educated in the common school. December 21, 1869, he married Mary E. Tyner, and they have had one child, Hattie U. Mr. W. owns 80 acres of land on sec. 27.

Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.

JOHN ZINGREE
Physican and surgeon, Appanoose, was born in Switzerland September 14, 1830, was educated at the Military Academy at Berne, was 1st Lieutenant of the 3d Division of the Swiss army under Gen. Doriass, one of Napoleon's old generals. The Doctor came to the is country in 1851, and the next year commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Branton, an eminent physician of Cleveland, Ohio. In the spring of 1854 he graduated at the Western Missouri Medical College, and soon after came to Nauvoo, where he commenced the practice of medicine. He remained in Nauvoo till 1856 when he purchased a farm oppostie Fort Madison and moved upon it, where he has since resided, engaged in farming and practicing medicine. He married his last wife, Hattie Knapp, in April 1877. Dr. Z. own about 2,000 acres of land in Illinois and Iowa.
Source: History of Hancock County, Illinois, by Th. Gregg, 1880, Transcribed by J.S.




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