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Daniels, John Andrew, now deceased, was at one time of the leading agriculturists of Jersey County. He was born in Sangamon Country, Ill., April 4, 1862, and died on his farm in Jersey County, August 23, 1908. He was a son of John A. and Phebe (Moffit) Daniels, the former of whom was born in Chester Country, Pa., and the latter in New Jersey. After their marriage they located in Jersey County, but later moved to Sangamon County. Still later, they returned to Jersey County where they lived for many years, and then moved to Kansas. There the father died, and the mother, returning to Jersey County, here passed away.

ohn Andrew Daniels attended the public schools of Jersey Country, and lived at home until 1885, when he moved to the farm of his wife's parents, four miles northeast of Jerseyville. This was a farm of over 200 acres, and he not only operated it, but many additional acres, and was a stockraiser upon an extensive scale.
In October, 1885, John Andrew Daniels was married to Laura E. Milton, born in Jersey County, a daughter of Charles and Frances Milton. By his first marriage, Mr. Daniels had three children, namely: Lewis W. and Lilly F., both of whom live at St. Louis, Mo.; and Ray W. The first Mrs. Daniels died April 20, 1896. On May 26, 1898, Mr. Daniels was married (second) to Margaret McReynolds, born in Jersey County, a daughter of Anderson and Alnora (Van Horn) McReynolds, he born in Sumner County, Tenn., and she in Delaware County, N.Y. Mr. and Mrs. Daniels had the following children: George Anderson, John Andrew, Charles Herbert, and Frank Eugene.

After the death of Mr. Daniels, Mrs. Daniels lived on the farm for eighteen months. On November 1, 1909, she bought lots in Woodlawn on the north edge of Jerseyville, on which she had a modern residence erected, and here she has since made her home, renting her portion of the farm. She attended the public and high schools and was graduated from the latter in 1892, and for two years taught in the Hickory Log district, and in the Victory district for three years. She belongs to the Domestic Science Associated on Jerseyville. Her father came to Jersey County as a boy, with his parents, Mr. And Mrs. Joseph McReyonds, in 1835.

Mr. Daniels was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church in his younger days, but after his second marriage, he united with the Presbyterian Church. A Republican, her served as a member of the school board for a number of years. He was a great reader, and kept very well posted on current events.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard]

Daniels, Harry S., president of the Jersey Mercantile Company at Jerseyville, is one of the vigorous and enterprising business men of Jersey County and is identified with numerous organizations which have the best interests of the community, state and nation at heart. Mr. Daniels was born at Jerseyville, Ill., April 14, 1866, and is a son of James S. and Emily (Jackson) Daniels, the former of whom was born in Chester County, Pa., and the later in Jersey County. The maternal grandparents were George H. and Elizabeth (Brown) Jackson the latter of whom was born in Missouri.
James S. Daniels came to Jerseyville before the Civil War, in which he took part in serving in an Illinois volunteer regiment. In 1872 he embarked in a hardware business under the name of J. S. Daniels, continuing alone until 1889, when he admitted his son Harry S. to a partnership, under the firm name of J. S. Daniels & Son, which style continued until 1892. He was a man of sterling character and fine business faculty and was so highly esteemed by his fellow citizens that he was elected to the highest municipal office in their gift, being mayor at the time of death, on July 12, 1892
Harry S. Daniels was reared by careful parents and enjoyed liberal educational advantages. Early displaying business aptitude, when his education was completed, he became his father's partner and has been identified with his same business ever since although in 1914 the concern became a stock company, incorporated for $65,000. Mr. Daniels is president of the same, F.W. Giers is vice president, and F. F. Loellk is secretary and general manager, with Fred Decker as assistant manager. The business is now operated as the Jersey Mercantile Company and is known all over the state, its activities covering a general department store which does a business of $250,000 per year.

On June 8, 1896, Mr. Daniels was united in marriage with Miss Castelle Derry, who was born at Springfield, Ill., and is a daughter of James H. and Emma (Allyn) Derry. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Daniels was Rev. Norman Allyn, who was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and one of the early circuit riders of Jersey County. Mrs. Daniels died September 12, 1916, and is survived by two children: Stewart D. and Elizabeth Emily.

In politics Mr. Daniels is an independent Democrat but politics plays a small part in his public-spirited work for he has the real good of the city at heart and works unceasingly for betterment along every line. He is a zealous member of the Red Cross and was very helpful in the late effort to raise the Y. M. C. A. quota fund of his district for army relief. A graduate of the city high school, he has always been interested in educational progress and for five terms has been a member of the school board and it's president two terms. He has also served as city treasurer, has been a member of the city council a period of fifteen years and served one term as mayor He is a member of the Baptist Church, of which he is a trustee. He is a liberal contributor and hearty on the line of giving encouragement to new business enterprises and served very efficiently on the committee that raised money for the shoe factory. Mr. Daniels is a member of the Community Club. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and is a Thirty-second degree Mason and has been master of the Jerseyville lodge two terms.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard]

Day, Ira E., agent for many of the leading automobile concerns of the country, and proprietor of a garage and repair shop at Jerseyville, is one of the enterprising young men of Jersey County. He was born in Fidelity Township, June 13, 1889, a son of William A. and Elizabeth Day, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work.
After attending the Pleasant Hill district school, Ira E. Day resided on the home farm until he was fifteen years old, when he began working in the shoe factory at Jerseyville. Six months later he went to St. Louis, Mo., and was employed for a few months by Swift & Co., in their packing house. Returning to Jersey County, he rented his father's farm and conducted it for eighteen months in partnership with his father, and then operated it along for six years. Leaving the farm, he came to Jerseyville and worked for Patrick Fleming for six months, going then to Mr. Fleming's farm in Jersey Township where he spent a year. Once more he returned to Jerseyville and was engaged in mixing cement for all the city pavements, and following that was engaged in excavating work at Whitehall, Ill., where he installed nine miles of sewer. For the subsequent five years he was employed in an auto garage owned by Charles Wedding at Jerseyville, and in 1915 embarked in the garage business for himself on the site of Mr. Wedding's establishment, the latter having moved. Mr. Day handles the Grant 6, the Dort & Mitchell 6 and Dodge Bros. cars, and has been agent for Jersey and portions of Macoupin and Greene counties for the Waterloo Boy tractor, having sold eleven in eight months; and also has sold four Austins Road graders, six P. & O. Tractor plows, two Grand 6 cars, four Dodge cars, six Maxwell cars, three Dort cars, three Saxon 6's, and eighteen second-hand Ford cars, and many other second hand makers in the last eight months; also two John Lawsons and one 30-60 Altman Taylor tractors. He also carries on a general garage and repair business, and has been encouragingly successful.

On January 29, 1908, Mr. Day was married to Bertha M. Coyle, born at St. Louis, Mo., September 30, 1892, a daughter of Rufus and Fannie Coyle. Mr. and Mrs. Day have one son, William A., who was born November 17, 1909. In politics Mr. Day is a Republican. Mr. Day drove the first automobile that went through Calhoun County.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard]

Day, William A., a retired farmer of Jerseyville, was formerly on of the progressive farmers of the county, and has always been a man of high standing. He was born in Jersey Township, January 25, 1847, a son of Ira E. and Mary (Hudson) Day, he born in Vermont, and she in Greene County, Ill. In an early day, Ira E. Day came to Jersey County, and entered a tract of land one and one-fourth miles west of Jerseyville. David Hudson, the maternal grandfather, a native of Kentucky, was one of the earliest settlers in what is now Greene County, Ill. After their marriage, Ira E. Day and his wife located on a farm five miles east of Jerseyville in Fidelity Township, where he owned and improved 240 acres of land, clearing off the original timber. Here he died in 1868, his wife surviving him until 1878. Their children were as follows: Stephan, Jane, Ann, all of whom are deceased; William A.; Thomas, David and John, all three of whom are deceased; Bell, who is Mrs. Isaac Rhodes of Freeman, Mo., and her twin sister, Eliza, who is deceased.

In 1868 William A. Day was married to Bell Fink, who was born in Ruyle Township, Jersey County, a daughter of John and Caroline (Lumpkins) Fink. For four years, or until the death of Mrs. Day, Mr. Day lived on his father's homestead, and during that period two children were born to him, namely: Herman, who lives in Jerseyville; and Delia, who is Mrs. George Johnson of Medora, Ill. On March 3, 1879, Mr. Day was married (second) to Elizabeth Sandidge, born in Jersey County, and daughter of Miles and Mary (Terry) Sandidge, both of whom were born in Jersey County. The grandparents were Henry and Mary (Waggoner) Sandidge, born in Greene County, Ill., and Absolom and Mary Terry, born in Texas. For a time following his second marriage, Mr. Day continued to reside on the family homestead, and then he bought 120 acres of land where he resided until 1907, in that year renting his farm and moving to Jerseyville where he had bought a residence on the East Side, and this has continued his home ever since. By his second marriage, Mr. Day has three children, namely: Maude, who is Mrs. John Ready of Alton, Ill.,; Jessie, who is Mrs. J. H. Cadwalader of McClusky, Ill.,; and Ira E., who lives at Jerseyville. Mr. Day is a member of the Baptist Church. In politics he is a Democrat and has served as a school director, and in several township offices, being a man of ability and public spirit.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard]

Decker, Fred W., bookkeeper, treasurer and auditor of the Jerseyville Mercantile Company, is a man well versed in business methods, and to his ability and foresightedness is due much of the present prosperity of this company. He was born October 8, 1883, a son of Philip and Emeline (Cope) Decker.

Philip Decker was born in Holland, but came with his family to the United States in childhood and was reared to manhood in New Jersey, where he learned the tailoring trade. Later he became interested in the lumber industry, which took him to Missouri, Arkansas and other states. Still later, he engaged in farming in Jersey County, Ill., where he remained until 1905, when he moved to Canada, and he is there very extensively engaged in farming. The mother of Fred W. Decker was born in Jersey County, Ill., in 1844, and her parents were American born. Philip Decker and his wife had three children: Mrs. Richard Powers, who resides in Jersey County; Mrs. William Schultz, who lives in Jersey County; and Fred W.. Philip Decker is a Mason and while living in the United States was a Republican. In 1917 he paid a visit to his children, and while much interested in the progress made by Jersey County since he had left it, declared that he intended to continue to make his home in Canada. Mrs. Decker's grandmother, Lucinda Cope, lived over a century.

Fred W. Decker attended the local schools of the Franklin district and the Jerseyville High School, from which he was graduated in 1902, and he then took a business course. For some time thereafter he alternated teaching school during the winter and attending the State Normal School in the summer, continuing in the educational field for eleven years, during that time being connected with the schools of Otterville, Fieldon, Buena Vista and Franklin, at one time teaching in one of the oldest schoolhouses now standing in the state. He has studied law and is specializing in higher accounting. Mr. Decker was for three years assistant cashier of the Fieldon Bank, a state institution, and after that came to Jerseyville to assume the duties of his present connection.

In 1913 Mr. Decker was married to Eleanor J. Wheaton, born in Jersey County, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Antone J. Wheaton, well-known residents of the West Side, Jerseyville. Mr. and Mrs. Decker have the following children: L. A, who was born April 26, 1914, and Cornelia J., who was born March 20, 1915. Mr. Decker is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for William J. Bryan. The Catholic Church holds his membership.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard]

Decker, William, owns and operates 200 acres of magnificent farm land in English Township, where he is regarded as one of Jersey County's most desirable citizens. He was born in Plainfield, N. J., in June 1861, a son of Cornelius and Ellen (Vanderway) Decker, natives of Holland who came to New Jersey in 1840, and lived there until 1867, when the migrated to Jersey County, Ill., settling in English Township, where they became landowners, and there they died. Children as follows were born to them: Fred, Richard, and Hattie, all of whom are deceased: Philip, who lives in Canada; Hiram, who lives in Oklahoma; Agnes, a twin of Hiram, died in childhood; William; and John, who lives in Canada.

William Decker attended the Franklin district school, and when he was eleven years old went to live with Ezekial Chance, on a farm, 120 acres of which later became his by purchase. Still later, he bought eighty acres additional, and he is ow the possessor of one of the finest farms in the township. In 1882 Mr. Decker was married to Ellen Chance, born in English Township, a daughter of Henry and Emeline (Cope) Chance, both born in English Township. Mr. and Mrs. Decker have two children, namely: Stella, who is Mrs. George Kessler of English Township; and Lilly Pearl, who is Mrs. William Felter of English Township. The Presbyterian Church holds Mr. Decker's membership. He is a Republican and has been a school director, highway commissioner and supervisor. Fraternally he is a Mason and Elk, and in every way he measures up to the best standards of American citizenship.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Dobbs, Joshua Elias, a retired farmer and justice of the peace, is one of the representative men of Grafton. He was born at Grafton, March 15, 1841, a son of Jesse and Matilda (Marsh) Dobbs. Jesse Dobbs was born in Barren County, Ky., December 22, 1818, and he was a farmer and carpenter who came to Jersey County when he was eighteen years old, locating first in South Otter Creek. There his parents died and he then came to Grafton, where he was married, his wife being a native of the village. Their children were as follows: Mary J Houston; Joshua Elias; Amanda McDaniel, who is deceased; Henry C., who lives in Coffeyville, Kas.; Sarah E. Chappie, who is deceased; Charles W., who is deceased; Edward; and George W., who is deceased.
As he was the eldest son, Joshua Elias Dobbs was forced to early lend a hand at supporting the family, and so was only sent to school for three months. When his country had need of him during the Civil War, he enlisted in Company A, Thirteenth United States Infantry, and saw service at Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Steelesville, Haynes' Bluff, Champion's Hill, Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, Siege of Jackson, (Miss.), Collinsville, Tenn., battle of Chickamauga, Siege of Nashville, and was wounded at Vicksburg, May 19, 1863. He would have been killed had it not been that he had secured a towel from one of the old colored women and had placed it, folded four thicknesses, in his breast pocket over his heart. The bullet struck this towel, the impact being so strong as to fell him, but the towel saved his life. On July 21, 1865, Mr. Dobbs was mustered out of the service at St. Louis, Mo., and returned to Jersey County, where he engaged in farming.

On March 24, 1865, Mr. Dobbs was married to Elizabeth Worthy, who was born in Tennessee, and they became the parents of the following children: Sarah E., who is deceased; Jason E., who is deceased; Rosa E. Wedding; Louis E., who is deceased; Emma; Bertram; Pearl Spencer; A. J.; and Cora Spangle. In politics Mr. Dobbs is a Republican, and he has served as road commissioner and school trustee and is now a justice of the peace. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Jerseyville. Jerseyville Post, G. A. R. holds his membership, and he enjoys meeting his old comrades by whom he is held in high esteem as he is by all who know him.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Dodge, William K. (Kendall), one of the leading men of Fidelity, who is closely identified with the banking and commercial interests of Jersey County, was born in Fidelity Township, April 16, 1868, a son of Edson A and Margaret (Miner) Dodge, natives of Vermont. Luther Dodge, the paternal grandfather, came to Jersey County at an early day, and the maternal grandfather, William K. Miner, located on the present site of Fidelity, acquiring many acres of land which he entered from the government. Both these grandfathers became leading men of this part of the state.
After marriage, the parents of William K. Dodge, settled at Fidelity, where the father operated a grist mill, and he was also interested in mercantile pursuits, but during his later years he was a farmer. After retiring he moved to Jerseyville, and served as secretary of the Jersey County Fair Association for some years, and he was also secretary of the Trotting Association for a long period. A man of consequence, he held township and county offices, and died in 1894, respected by all who knew him. The mother survives, and makes her home at Jerseyville.

William K. Dodge resided with his parents until 1892, and then located the McCollister farm, and worked it on shares. In 1901 Mrs. Dodge inherited eighty acres of land, and in 1909 Mr. Dodge bought the remaining eighty acres of their present farm, on which he raises Shorthorn cattle, Poland-China hogs and draft horses. In 1908 he moved to Cabado, Tx. (actually Ganado, TX), where he conducted a rice elevator and managed two stores, dealing in feed, and he remained there for two years, and then returned to his old home. On November 24, 1913, Mr. Dodge organized the Bank of Fidelity, with a capital stock of $11,000, of which John Ewin is president; C. E. Lewis is vice president; and William K. Dodge, John Ewin, C. E. Lewis, William Birkenmayer, A. D. Ewin, James Ryan and J. T. Darnille are directors.

On February 24, 1892, Mr. Dodge was married to Miss Ida S. McCollister, of Fidelity Township, a daughter of Isaac and Sylvia N. (North) McCollister, natives of New York and Illinois respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Dodge have the following children: Syliva N., Marcus F. and Harold, all of whom are at home. Mr. Dodge is a republican, and has served terms as assessor and collector of his township. Since 1895, he has been a member of Fidelity Camp, M. W. A., and Mrs. Dodge belongs to the Royal Neighbors and the Ladies Aid Society. A man of unusual ability, Mr. Dodge has known how to make his work count for something, and his influence is a strong one in his community, and it is always exerted in the right direction.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Dougherty, James, now deceased, during his life was one of the prosperous farmers of Jersey County, and his widow, Mrs. Mary Dougherty, is one of the highly esteemed residents of Grafton. James Dougherty was born in Ireland, March 8, 1833, a son of James Dougherty, also a native of Ireland. The elder James Dougherty brought his family to the United States in 1843, locating at St. Louis, Mo., and there his wife died during the great cholera epidemic in that city.

James Dougherty, the younger, attended the schools of St. Louis, and after completing his educational training, went to Calhoun County, Ill., where he commenced farming, continuing in this line of endeavor after he moved to Jersey County. He conducted the 100-acre farm he bought in Jersey Township, until his death, when his widow assumed the management of it, but later she rented it. Mr. Dougherty was a member of the Catholic Church. Politically he was a Democrat.

After moving to Calhoun County, James Dougherty was married to Mary Angeline Lamarsh, born at St. Charles, Mo., coming of French decent. Mr. and Mrs. Dougherty had the following children born to them: Mrs. Catherine Frieman, Mrs. Julia Dempsey, Mrs. Rose McClintock, Mrs., who are living, and four who are deceased. Mrs. Dougherty is also a member of the Catholic Church, and takes an interest in its charitable and patriotic work. She is very well know at Grafton and in the surrounding country, where she has many warm friends.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Down, William R., a general farmer and stockraiser residing on section 21, Piasa Township, is one of the substantial men of Jersey County, and one of the substantial men of Jersey County, and one widely known an generally respected. He was born in Piasa Township, in April, 1851, a son of Bartholomew and Isabella (Pringle) Down, he born in Devonshire, England, and she in Scotland. They came to the United States in their youth, he in 1835 and she in 1836, and he bought forty acres of land in Piasa Township, Jersey County, from the government. Later he went to Bunker Hill, Ill., and was married in 1846. Returning to Piasa Township, he was engaged in farming until his death. At one time he owned 2,000 acres of land in Jersey County. He and his wife had the following children: Isabella, who is the widow of Christian Bauer, lives in Piasa Township; William R.; Ann, who lives on the homestead; and Mary, Alice and John who are deceased; and Michael, who is also living on the homestead.

After growing up on the farm and attending the schools of this district, William R. Down was married in April, 1866, to Mary Harris, born in Piasa Township, a daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Taley) Harris, born in Tennessee. Mr. Harris came to this vicinity in 1830, and she in 1831, and after their marriage, they located in Piasa Township. Until March 1900, Mr. and Mrs. Down continued to live with his father, and then he bought eighty acres of land in Piasa Township, to which he later added forty acres. Subsequently he bought another eighty-acre farm, and on it all he carries on general farming and stockraising and has been very successful. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Down are as follows: Harry, who lives in Galveston, Tex.; Nellie, who is Mrs. Silas Williams, of Piasa Township; Lela, who is at home; Myrtle, who is Mrs. John Jones of Piasa Township; and Elmer and Lydia who are at home. Mr. Down is a Presbyterian. In politics he is a Democrat, but has never had the time or inclination to enter public life.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Doyle, John, agent for the Pierce Oil Company at Grafton, is one of the men held high esteem all over Jersey County. He was born in Grafton, Ill., June 7, 1877, a son of Philip and Rose (Donohue) Doyle. Philip Doyle was born in Ireland and came to the United States in boyhood, locating at St. Louis, Mo., where he was employed by a moving-van company. Coming to Grafton, Ill., he was engaged in stone quarrying, and he died in 1915. His widow survives. Their children were as follows: Mary, Lizzie, Allie, Rose, Tess, Nellie, John, Philip, Frank, Willie.

John Doyle attended the Grafton schools until he was sixteen years old. He then went to Springfield, and learned the boiler-making trade, at which he worked for ten years, at both St. Louis and Danville. He then came to Grafton and operated a transfer line until 1915, when he engaged with his present company, which has connections all over this and surrounding counties.

Mr. Doyle was married (first) to Miss May Serry, born in St. Louis, Mo., who at her death left one child, Rose, who lives in Grafton. Mr. Doyle was married (second) to Catherine Bowman, a school teacher and a former chum of the first Mrs Doyle and was her bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. Doyle have a son, Russell, who is at home. In politics he is a Republican. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias. The Catholic Church holds his membership. With each change, Mr. Doyle has bettered his condition, and his ability and uprightness have always commended him to his employers, and those with whom he is brought into contract.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]

Dunham, Stephen A. Douglas, one of the prosperous general farmers of Jersey County, owns and operates a fine property of eighty acres in Jersey Township. He was born in Richwoods Township, June 11, 1858, a son of Benjamin and Anna Elize (Reddish) Dunham, natives of Ohio and Jersey County, respectively. In company with others, Benjamin Dunham drove cattle over the prairies, through to Montgomery County, Ill., traveling in a covered wagon. In this company were some who came with him to Richwoods Township, Jersey County. The paternal grandparents were Stephen and Charlotte Reddish, who were born in New Jersey, but came to Jersey County, Ill., at a very early day. After their marriage, Benjamin Dunham and his wife located a farm in Richwoods Township, where they died, having had a family of three daughters and ten sons.

Stephen A. Douglas Dunham was reared in his native township, and attended the district schools. In August, 1898, he was married to Rachel Proffer, born in Stafford County, Mo., a daughter of James and Missouri (Harris) Proffer, natives of Missouri. After marrying Mr. Dunham bought a farm in Richwoods Township, but in 1911 he sold it and bought his present eighty-acre farm, where he has since carried on general farming and is meeting with a gratifying success. He and his wife have the following children: Bertha Ann Eliza, Gertrude C., Lottie Bell, Myrtle May and Elmer Stephen. In religious faith Mr. Dunham is a Baptist. He is a Democrat, and has served as a school director. Thrifty and hard-working, he has made all his efforts count for something, and stands very high in his community.

[Source: "History of Jersey County, Illinois" Edited by Oscar Brown Hamilton, President Jersey County Historical Society Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, Chicago, 1919
Biographies (for the letter D), pages 537-546:
Transcribed by Nicole Dodge Gard ]