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Jersey County: World War 1 Military Obituaries

Of their sacrifice, and humanity everywhere as a result of their deeds has been able to cast aside the cross of unjust oppression. The generations of the future will pay their memory a constant.

FRED AND HAROLD WORTHY
The first Jersey County man to make the supreme sacrifice in battle was Sergeant Fred Worthy. In company with his cousin Corporal Harold Worthy, he went to St. Louis on the 9th of April, 1917, and enlisted in what was then the First Missouri Infantry, later consolidated with other forces and known as the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Infantry. The story of Fred and Harold Worthy is one. The boys enlisted together and were in training together. They went to France as members of the same company, and from the time of their enlistment vowed to stay together. They received their training in this county at Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, Okla., and made the trip overseas early in May of 1918. In the fighting in France their company, which was K Company of the 138th Infantry, was cited for special courage and daring during the fighting in the Vosges Front in August. On the 26th of September, Sergeant Fred Worthy was killed in action and his cousin fatally wounded. The latter passed away five days later in a hospital.
Fred Worthy was the son of Mr. And Mrs. Frank Worthy, who reside west of Jerseyville, and Harold Worthy was the son of Armell Worthy. The later and his son had made their home since the death of Mrs. Armell Worthy, at the Frank Worthy home.
The citation of their company, of which they were leaders for bravery by a foreign power, tells of the stern mettle of which the boys were made. They were among the first of our men to grasp the situation and volunteer. They fought with determination, for they realized for what they were battling. They gave their all and the world today is better because of the price they paid and the willingness with which they made the sacrifice.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

SERGEANT MARJOR MARION H. LYNN
Sergeant Major Marion H. Lynn, son of Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Lynn of Otterville, was the first Jersey County boy to make the supreme sacrifice in the great World War. He enlisted in the United States Army at Omaha, Neb., June 22, 1917, and sent at once to Camp Logan, Colo. About July 15th he was transferred to fort Douglas, Salt Lake City, Utah, and assigned to Company F, 43 Infantry. Here he was made first class private and later Sergeant Major, September 16th. Sergeant Major Lynn was a young man of unusual promise, high ideals, and uncompromising integrity. He hated war and loved peace. But that the oppressed of the world might have the liberty that is the birthright of every American, he gave up a promising career and all that life meant on the altar of service. Too sensitive to the pressure of a great crisis, he collapsed from overwork and died at Camp Grant, Ill, October 28, 1917 at the age of twenty-four years. The remains were laid to rest in Noble Cemetery at Otterville. It was written at the time of his death, "The life of Marion Lynn is a sermon in itself. Jersey County is proud of Marion Lynn."
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE RALPH E. GIERS
Private Ralph E. Giers died at Columbus, Ohio, Friday October 18th 1918, at 4:40 P.M. at the age of 25 years, 9 months, and 27 days. His death was the result of an attack of Spanish Influenza. He went to an eastern training camp from Jersey County the lst of August, 1918, with the contingent of limited service men. After a short period of preliminary training, he was assigned to duty at Columbus, Ohio. During his short period of service in that city he made many friends by his manly deportment. Prior to his induction into service with the limited service men, Ralph has tried to enlist in practically every branch of the service, but was refused because of a bad condition of one arm, resulting from a break in childhood. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Giers of Jerseyville. The body was brought to Jerseyville and taken to the home of his parents on West Exchange Street. Funeral services were held, Tuesday, October 22nd, from the family residence at 2:00 P.M., Rev. F.O. Wilson of the Methodist Church, officiating. The interment took place in Oak Grove Cemetery. The members of Jerseyville Lodge NO 954, B.P.O.E. attended the funeral in a body.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]


MATTHEW FRANCIS COLEMAN

Matthew Francis Coleman gave his life for the great cause of world freedom on the battle-torn field of France. He left Jersey County with a contingent of drafted men for Camp Gordon, Ga., on the 17th of May 1918. Just one week before his departure he was married to Miss Laura Griffith of Jerseyville, daughter of Mr., and Mrs. John Griffith. Before entering service Coleman had been employed in the Western Cartridge Works at Alton, turning out munitions for the Government. He was a member of the famous 18th infantry and belonged to Company M. The word that he was missing in action since 23rd of November was received by local relatives on the 1st of October. A later message received announced he died of wounds sustained in battle on the 7th of October. Coleman was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Coleman, who reside northeast of Jerseyville. At the time of his death, Coleman was 28 years of age. He leaves besides his wife and parents, five brothers, William, Thomas, and Richard of Jersey County. James of Alton, and Eugene, who was also in the military service at the time this article was written.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

E.LESLIE SPRIGGS
E. Leslie Spriggs left Jersey County the 4th of September, 1917, with the first draft contingent from Jersey County. There were six men in the contingent ad they went to Camp Taylor, Ky. The Jersey County men were the first draft men to enter the Kentucky cantonment. In the early summer of 1918 Spriggs went overseas. His death occurred during the month of October in a hospital. He was attended during his last illness by Lester Monk, with whom he went to camp in September, 1917. Spriggs was a willing worker I n the service and his death has added another golden star to the list of Jersey County's service flag, a list that time will never efface.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

ARCH F. KEEHNER
Arch Keehner left Jersey County with a contingent of special service men in July 1918. He went to Bradley Polytechnic Institute, where he received special training as an electrician. From there he went to Camp Sherman and was assigned to Head-quarter's Company of the 84th Division. He went overseas early in September. His death occurred in a hospital in France from pneumonia the 15th of October. During his illness he was attended by Lester Mondl another Jersey County boy attached to the 334th Ambulance Company. Keehner was a faithful and efficient soldier and made the supreme sacrifice for his country with a willingness that betokens the true soldier.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE JAMES D. COLEMAN
Private James D. Coleman went to Camp Taylor, KY., with the contingent of draft men the 26th of February, 1918. After receiving his preliminary training at the Kentucky camp, he went overseas early in the summer attached to the Head-quarter's Company of the 128th Infantry; during one of the great drives by the American troops he was severely wounded. He died the 22 of November, 1918, in the hospital as the result of his injuries. His cousin, Matthew Coleman, of Company M of the18th Infantry, was killed about the same time that James was wounded, and a brother-in-law of the latter, Charles Kruse, also lost his life in this battle. James Coleman was the son of William and Kate Coleman of the Fidelity vicinity. He gave his life amid the awful din o battle, the like of which the world never before had seen. His life blood is written with that of countless others of the brave into the stripes of the Old Flag.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

GUNNERY SERGEANT CHARLES EWIN
Word was received the 12th of October that Gunnery Sergeant Charles Ewin had died in a hospital in England. In December, 1917, Ewin enlisted in the Marine Corps and was sent to Paris Island for preliminary training. At that place he displayed such unusual ability as a marksman that he was selected for special training at a New York school. He was assigned as a gunner on a battle plane and was on his way to the scene of the conflict when he became ill. He died in a Liverpool hospital and the remains were sent to his home in this country. He was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery at Jerseyville, after services held in the Methodist Church. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. F.D. Hopkins, of Oak Park, Chicago, a personal friend of the deceased.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE ROBERT L. LAHEY
Private Robert L. Lahey died at Camp Taylor, Ky., Saturday, October 12th at 3:20 a.m., aged 19 years, 4 months and 23 days. Funeral services were held from St Francis Xavier's Church, Tuesday, October 15th at 9:00 a.m. Requiem High Mass was celebrated; Rev. J. J. Clancy, celebrant; Rev. E. Eckhard, deacon and Rev. Francis Shield, sub-deacon. Private Lahey went to the Kentucky training camp with a contingent of drafted menthe 4th of July 1918. He was a willing and interested soldier and performed his duties as such with a credit to the community that sent him. His body was interred in the St. Francis Cemetery.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE CHARLES G. HAGEN
Private Charles G. Hagen died at Camp Custer, Mich., Saturday, October 12, 1918, at the age of 25 years, 4 months, and 26 days. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Hagen, who reside in Fieldon vicinity. The body was brought to the home of his parents and the funeral services were conducted at the Evangelical Church in Fieldon, Rev. Paul Strange, of the Jerseyville and Fieldon pastorate, officiating. The interment took place in the Fieldon Cemetery. Hagen went to Camp Cuter with a contingent of ninety-two general service men the morning of September 5th. Early in the year of 1918 he was married to Miss Katie Groppel, who survives him. Hagen was a splendid soldier who met death as courageously and with as much devotion to his country as if he had died on the battlefield.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE LAVERNE CHAPPELL
Private LaVerne Chappell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Chappel, was born at McClusky, Ill., the 19th of February, 1890, and died at the Letterman General Hospital, Presidio, San Francisco, Cal. The 8th of November, 1918 following an attack of the influenza-pneumonia. Chappell enlisted in the medical unit of the Letterman Hospital in April, 1918, and was one of the best liked men in the organization. His whole-hearted willingness, coupled with his athletic ability, made him a general favorite. Chappell gained great notoriety before the war by his ability as a ball player. He was a member if teams in the American Association and was purchased by the Chicago White Sox from Milwaukee for the large sum of $18,000.00 and other considerations, which at that time was a record price for a ball club to pay for any player. The remains were shipped to Jerseyville for interment and arrived here the 15th of November. Funeral services were held from the home of his parents Wednesday, November 17th, at 2:30 P.M. Rev. F. O Wilson officiating and the burial were in Oak Grove Cemetery. Chappell was a member of Jerseyville Lodge NO. 954, B.P.O.E.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

CORPORAL THOMAS WHALEN
Corporal Thomas Whalen of Grafton was the fourth man from Jersey County to meet his death in action. A message received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Whalen of Grafton, from the War Department stated that he met his death the 16th of October. Before entering service Whalen was employed by the Illinois Powder Company and was entitled to exemption by reason of his occupation. He waived his exemption rights and met the death of a hero on the shell torn fields of France. He leaves his parents, two sisters, Miss Mary Whalen of Grafton and Mrs. George Parker of Alton; three brothers, Edward, who was in service at the time this column was compiled; William of Quincy and John of Covington Ky. Corporal Whalen was a natural leader, as was shown by his promotion from the ranks. He was 27 years of age at the time of his death.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE WALTER MAXEINER
Walter Maxeiner of the Brighton vicinity was another Jersey County boy to give his life in the great cause. He went to Camp Custer with a contingent of Jersey County draft men the 5th day of September, 1918. At the camp he became ill of influenza-pneumonia and died the Camp Hospital the 14th of October. The body was shipped to the home near Brighton, arriving there the evening of the 15th. The funeral services were conducted at the Brighton Cemetery. No other services were permissible because of the influenza epidemic at Brighton at the time. I.O.O.F., of which Private Maxeiner was a member attended in a body. Walter Maxeiner at the time of his death was 24 years of age.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE HERSCHEL GILL
Private Herschel Gill went to Camp Custer with a contingent of Jersey County draft men the 5th of September, 1918. During the epidemic of influenza that raged in the camp he contracted the disease which in his case proved fatal. His death occurred the 17th of October and the body was sent to the home of his mother, Mrs. Sarah Gill, at Elsah. Funeral services were conducted at the home Saturday, October 19th and the remains were taken to Newbern for interment. Though Private Gill did not meet death before the cannon or in the awful storm of battle, yet he died as willingly for the country of his birth as those who charged across the bullet-swept spaces of No Man's land.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

LESLIE CRAY
Leslie Cray, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Cray of Jerseyville, enlisted in the service the 17th of April, 1917. He was among the first volunteers to go from Jersey County. He was attached to the Second Balloon Squadron of the army and received his preliminary training at San Antonio, Texas, and at Fort Omaha, Neb. On the trip overseas Cray became ill of rheumatic fever and obliged to remain in the hospital at Liverpool, England. His parents received a letter from him written in the hospital, in which he stated that he expected soon to rejoin his squadron in France. Pneumonia developed and Cray passed away the 29th of January. He was the first Jersey County man to die overseas for the great cause of humanity. That he realized sooner than many the great significance of the war was demonstrated by his early enlistment for action. His body is buried in England.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE JOHN OSCAR
John Oscar went to Camp Lewis, Washington, the 24th of May 1918, with a contingent of drafted men from Casselton, N.D. He received his preliminary training at Washington Camp and was then transferred to Camp Learned, Cal. He landed in France the 8th of September, 1918 and was killed in action the4thof October. He was the son of Theodore Oscar of Jersey County and, until his removal to North Dakota, resided the greater part of his life in this county. Oscar was an efficient soldier, as he had been an efficient business man. He had worked himself up by his ability while in the lumber business in North Dakota and was slated for an important advancement when he was called into the army. Like so many others, he made the supreme sacrifice for his country, which marks the true patriot and which has written his name on the honor roll of the world.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE JOHN F. FEHRENBACH
Private John F. Fehrenbach was born in Richwood Township, Jersey County on the 6th day of January, 1897. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Fehrenbach, who resided west of Jerseyville. Private Fehrenbach went to Camp Forrest, Ga., on the 6th of September, 1918. He was placed with the Engineers Replacement Troops. At Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., he contracted pneumonia, following an attack of the Spanish Influenza and died in the hospital there at the age of twenty-four years, nine months and six days. The body was brought to Jerseyville and taken to the home of his parents near Fieldon. Funeral services were conducted at 9:30 o'clock the morning of October 19th at St, Mary's church, Rev. E. J. Eckhard officiating. The deceased was a member of the Jerseyville Knights of Columbus Council and that organization attended the funeral in body. Private Fehrenbach was one of the youngest in Jersey County to give his life in the great war, yet his short span of years he gave more to the world and the common cause of humanity than many who live to extreme old age.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE CARL J. GIERS
Private Carl J. Giers was born in St. Louis, MO., on the 18th day of March 1894. He was the eldest son of Dr. and Mrs. L.J. Giers. In November, 1907, he removed with his parents to Jerseyville. At the outbreak of the war, Carl attempted to enlist in the navy, but was unable to meet the very stringent physical qualifications demanded by the navy at that time. The 14th of June, 1918, he was sent to the Rahe Army Auto and Truck school at Kansas City, Mo. Giers was gifted as a mechanic and made good from the start. He was sent to Cap Holabird, Md., and on the 14th of August he entered Company D of the Water Tank Train 302. He was transferred to Camp Upton, L.I.N.Y. on the 24th of September. He suffered an attack of the Spanish Influenza and died the 28th of September at the Base Hospital at Camp Upton, at the age of 24 years, 6 months and 10 days. The body was sent to Jerseyville under the escort of Sergeant Lemle of the Camp Upton Base Hospital. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday, October 2nd, at2:30 P.M., from the Methodist Episcopal church, Rev, Paul Strange officiating, assisted by Rev. Joseph Jenkins and Rev. W.S. Neely. Gier's record in service was excellent. He was a tireless worker and his great ambition from the outbreak of the war was to get into his country's service and get overseas into action. His body was interred in the Oak Grove Mausoleum.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE JOHN N. POWERS
Private John N. Powers died at Camp Custer, Mich., Sunday, October 13, 1918 at the age of twenty-three years, ten months, and nine days. Funeral services were held from the home of his sister, Mrs. Loren Erwin, in Jerseyville, Wednesday, October 16th, at 3:00 P.M., Rev. F. O. Wilson officiating. The burial was in Grimes cemetery. Powers went to Camp Custer the 5th of September with the big contingent of draft men from Jersey County. He is survived by his sister, Mrs. Loren Erwin, three brothers, James, Andrew, and Lewis. He was the son of James D. Powers. His death, like that of so many other men from the county, was a result of an attack of the Spanish Influenza. His record as a soldier in the brief time he was in camp was first class.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

CORPORAL MARCUS G. WOOD
Corporal Marcus G. Wood died at the Panama Canal Zone Tuesday, October 8th 1918 at 6:15 a.m. aged eighteen years and twenty days. He was the youngest of four brothers to enter the service of the United States and was the son of Mrs. Jennie Wood and the late George Wood of this city. Corporal Wood was the second boy of the family to enter the service, and did so in April 1917. He was sixteen years of age at the time and discontinued his studies in the Jersey Township High School to enlist. He was accepted as a musician, his age being a bar to his being employed in regular service. About six weeks following his enlistment he was sent to the Panama Canal Zone. He was in his regiment's band there for some time, but later secured a transfer to line of duty with the Coast Artillery Corps. He was a member of the First Company, Coast Artillery Corps, Fort Sherman, and Canal Zone. Prior to his death he had been engaged in learning special observation work. The remains were shipped from the Canal Zone and arrived in Jerseyville the thirty-first of October. The funeral was held from the home of his mother, 713 Harrison street, Friday, November 1st at2:30 p.m., Rev. F.O. Wilson officiating. And the interment was in the Oak Grove Cemetery. Corporal Wood was probably the youngest man in service from Jersey County to give his life for his country.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE FRANCIS V. ROBB
Private Francis V. Robb was born in Jerseyville, Ill., August 27, 1891. He was the son of George and Catherine Robb. His education was obtained in the Holy Ghost School. At the time of his enlistment, Robb was an employee of the Shephard Garage and was a splendid mechanic. Like so many of our other young men, he felt the call to a greater service and enlisted at Jefferson Barracks, MO., the 15th of December, 1917.He went to Camp Hancock, Ga., the 15th of January, 1918, and remained there until the time of his death, which occurred the 18th of January 1919. Robb was liked by all who knew him. His jovial disposition and constant optimism under all circumstances endeared him to all who were fortunate enough to be his friends. His body was brought to Jerseyville for burial. The funeral services were conducted from St. Francis Xavier's Church Friday, January 24th at 9:30 a.m., Rev. J. J. Clancy officiating. The interment was in the St. Francis Cemetery.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE JACOB F. DUNSING
Private Jacob F. Dunsing left Jersey County the 27th day of May, 1918, for Camp Gordon, Georgia. After a period of preliminary training he was sent overseas where he participated in the great battles being fought at the time. He was reported missing in action on the fourth of October, and two weeks later announcement was made by the War Department that he had been killed in action on the day in question. His brother, Chas. Dunsing, was overseas at the time of Jacob's death, but was ill in a hospital. Private Dunsing was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dunsing, of Rosedale Township. He died the death that every soldier desires should be his lot to be called that of facing the enemy. Jacob Dunsing gave his life for others and "greater love hath no man"
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

CHAS. F. KRUSE
Chas. F. Kruse was a member if a contingent of forty-five men to leave Jersey County the twenty-seventh of May, 1918. The contingent went to Camp Gordon, Ga., where the men received their preliminary training. Kruse and practically all the men in the contingent remained together until across the ocean where as members of Replacement Company they became separated. Kruse went into the fighting shortly after his arrival overseas and was reported missing in action since early October, 1918. In May, 1919, the wife, Mrs. Etta Coleman Kruse, received notice from the War Department that Charles F. Kruse was killed in action between October 4 and 12, 1918. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Kruse of Fidelity township.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

EMANUEL LEROY CLINE
Emmanuel LeRoy Cline was born at Fidelity, Ill., June 20th 1888. He went to Camp Custer, Mich., as a member of the draft contingent which left Jerseyville the 5thof September, 1918. He became ill of the Spanish Influenza and was sent to the Base Hospital the 2nd of October. He developed pneumonia and died the 12th of October. The body was taken to the home of his parents nears Fidelity and the funeral was held from the Fidelity Methodist Church, Wednesday, the sixteenth. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Cline, one brother, Irl, and one sister, Mrs. Ray Searles. Cline was a model soldier, quiet and unassuming, yet ever ready to respond to the call of duty, even though it led "Through the Valley of the Shadow".
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

JOHN EDWARD FITZGIBBONS
John Edward Fitzgibbons entered the service of his country with a draft contingent from Jersey County in October 1917. In February, 1918, he was invalided home on account of poor health. He departed for Fort Staton, N.M. the twenty-sixth of September for treatment in a government sanitarium and died there of influenza. The remains were brought to Jersey County and taken to the home of his mother, Mrs. Bridget Fitzgibbon at Delhi, the tenth of October. The funeral was held October 13th, from the home and the Catholic Church at Brighton, Rev. Father Marion officiating. The deceased was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Fitzgibbons.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

HERBERT LEE ROSS
Herbert Lee Ross, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Ross, was a member of a draft contingent that went to Camp Taylor the twenty-sixth of February, 1918. He became ill of measles upon his arrival in the Kentucky camp and was taken at once to the base hospital. He developed pneumonia following the attack of measles and died Saturday, March 30th, at the age of 23 years, 1 month and 20 days. His father and mother were with him at the time of his death, having been notified several days before of his critical condition. The remains were brought to Jerseyville and the funeral services were held from the Baptist church, April 2nd, Rev. Joseph Jenkins, the pastor of the church, officiating. The interment was in Oak Ridge Cemetery. Ross was the third man from the county to make the supreme sacrifice for his county.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE WALTER JOKERS
Walter Jokers left Jersey County the 28th day of June 1918, for Camp Taylor, Ky. After a period of preliminary training he was sent overseas, where he saw service as a member of an artillery contingent. The fourth of October he was killed in action, being the eighth man from Jersey County to give his life overseas for the cause of his country in the great World War. He fell just six days before the signing of the armistice. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Martha Jokers, of Dow, one sister, Mrs. J. L. Foster, and five brothers, Jacob, Louis, Herbert, Charles and Harry Jokers. Walter Jokes at the time of his death was twenty-nine years of age. His body rests on the battle field of France like that of so many other brave men whose graves shall ever be a shrine where liberated humanity of future ages will pay it homage.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

PRIVATE LESTER CORY
Private Lester Cory was a member of the draft contingent that left Jersey County on the twenty-seventh of ay, 1918. He went to Camp Gordon, Ga., and after brief training went overseas as a member of a Replacement Company. It is thought that he met death during the great conflict in the Forest of Argonne, where so many brave American boys met similar fates. For more than six months there was no word from Lester following a report from the War Department that he was wounded. Early in May, 1919, his mother received work officially from the War Department that Lester Cory had been killed in action. Today he sleeps with the fallen brave upon a foreign soil, but the sacrifice he made is not forgotten in the hearts of his countrymen.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

ISAAC McCOLLISTER
Isaac McCollister was the only man from Jersey County enlisted in the naval forces of the country, to die in the service. He enlisted in July, 1918 at the age of twenty-two years. He left school in the third year of his course in mechanical engineering at the University of Illinois to serve his country. He was first sent to Great Lakes Naval Training Station, where he received his preliminary training. After the training at Great Lakes Station, he was sent to Norfolk, Va., where he served for a time. The next duty that fell to his lot was a trip to South America on the U.S.S. St. Francis, returning to the states after a three months' period of service on the vessel in question, He was then ordered to go overseas on the Leviathan which was engaged in bringing troops back to this country. On the return trip he was stricken with appendicitis and was operated on while on board ship. When the Leviathan docked at the New York, McColister was sent to the Naval hospital at Brooklyn, N.Y., where he was getting along very well. a relapse set in and the first information that the relatives received that his condition was not normal , was the message stating his serious condition which was received at the same time as the death message. McCollister was the son of the late Sherman McCollister and Mrs. Fannie B. McCollister, who, with two daughters, Misses Elizabeth and Edith McCollister, survive. Isaac McCollister was a sterling m young man and at the time of the signing of the armistice had successfully passed the examination for transfer to the naval aviation section of the service.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

JOSEPH RIVARD
Joseph Rivard went from Jersey County to Camp Taylor, Ky., the twenty-eighth day of June 1918, with a contingent of fifty-three selective service men. After a period of training there he was transferred to Camp McClelland. He died at the last mentioned place and his body was taken to Calhoun County for burial.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

Another family to contribute three sons to the cause was that of the Luther Legate. From his family the following sons entered the field against the Kaiser: Wesley, Earl and Mason.

Three Lanham Brothers were in the service during the World War. The brothers, sons of Mr. and Mrs. James Edward Lanham, both deceased are James, Harry, Fred E. and Thomas E. Lanham.

Another patriotic family was that of Philip Menegham. Three sons enlisted in the service from this home. The boys who entered service are James F., George and Leo.

Three sons of William Dunlope of the Grafton vicinity were in the service. The boys serving are Harry, James H. and F.O. Dunlope.

Newell Worthy left Jersey County the 28th day of June, 1918 for Camp Taylor, Ky. He was sent immediately overseas with the 22 Regiment of Engineers. After his arrival overseas he was transferred to Company D, 18th Infantry, as a sharp shooter and was in the thickest of the Argonne Drive. Once during the fight while shooting from a tree he was discovered by the enemy and shot seventeen times with a machine gun. Worthy returned home wearing two gold service stripes, a sharpshooter's badge and two wound stripes.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]

IN MEMORY OF FORMER RESIDENTS
The list of men following is one of former Jersey County residents who have given their lives in the service. They will be remembered by many Jersey County people who knew them while they were residents of this community.

Paul Dee
Paul Dee, son of Rev. J.G. Dee of Lebanon, Ill., and formerly pastor of Jerseyville Methodist Church died at Camp Taylor, Ky., the 15th of October 1918. He was to have received his commission as a first lieutenant in the artillery service at the time of his death. He is survived by a wife and infant son, who was two weeks old at the time of his father's death.

PRIVATE HERSCHEL DAWSON
Private Herschel Dawson enlisted the 27th of May, 1918. He formerly resided in Jersey County and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dawson of this city. He enlisted at Galesburg, Ill., where he was employed as a lineman. His death occurred in a hospital in France. Besides his parents he leaves a wife and three sisters.

SERGEANT DOUGLAS GRAY
A man claiming Jersey County as his home gave his life in the Argonne fight. The man was Sergeant Douglas Gray, who married Miss Ruth Bligh of this city in 1917. Gary enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war with a Missouri regiment, during the Argonne fight a call was issued for a sergeant to lead eight men into a particularly hot part of the fight to rescue the wounded. Sergeant Gray volunteered and let the little contingent of eight men into the dangerous place. Three of the contingent returned and among the missing was Sergeant Gray.

ROBERT EARL FITZGIBBONS
Robert Earl Fitzgibbons, of St. Louis, met death in France as a result of an accident the 29th of January, 1919. He was born in Jerseyville, Ill., the 16th of May 1892, and was a graduate of the local high school. At the time of his enlistment, in August 1917, he was employed as a private secretary of Armour and Company of East St. Louis. He enlisted in the Illinois National Guard, 6th Infantry, which later became the 123rd Field Artillery. He trained for overseas service at Camp Logan, Texas and went to France early in 1918. A brother Louis , was with the 123 Field Artillery in France. Robert Fitzgibbons was united in marriage October 2nd, 1916 to Miss Lorena Adams of this city, who, with their infant daughter, Robert Jane, survives him.

Russel Brock
Russel Brock a former Jersey County boy, gave his life in battle on the fields of France the 6th of October, 1918. Brock went into service from St. Luis. He was the son of Justice Brook of Elsah and leaves a wife, who before marriage was Miss Carrie Schaaf of the Grafton vicinity.

Mark C. Campbell
Mark C. Campbell, of Bremond, Texas, a former Jersey County boy was killed in action in France the 4th of November, 1918. He left his home in that state for Camp Travis, San Antonio, Texas April 26th, 1918, where he received his preliminary training. He sailed from New York with 360th Infantry of the 90th Division. He was 32 years of age and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Campbell of Bremond.

PRIVATE JAMES AUGUSTUS BRAY
Private James Augustus Bray died at the General Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, October 12th, 1918 at 3:00 a.m., age 24 years, 2 months and 25 days. The remains were brought to Jerseyville and were accompanied here by his father, Frank Bray. The body was taken to the home of his aunt, Mrs. Albert Long. Funeral services were conducted at the Methodist Church in Jerseyville, Wednesday, October 16th, at 1:00 P.M., Rev. F. O. Wilson officiating. The interment was I n Oak Grove Cemetery.

Lieutenant A. S. Hunt
Lieutenant A. S. Hunt enlisted in the Medical Corps in June 1918. He was sent for preliminary training to Fort Benjamin Harrison; here he remained for three months. From there he was transferred to Camp Pike, Ark., remaining there for a period of six months. From that place he was sent to Camp Stuart, Va., where he remained for eight days before going overseas. He arrived at Brest, France, July 21st, 1918 and was with the Base Hospital No. 31 until January 14th the following year, when he was transferred to the Base Hospital at Bazoilles, the number of the hospital being 60. At the time of the compiling of this book, Lieutenant Hunt was still in service in Bazoilles.

MISS KATHRYN I. SLATEN
Miss Kathryn I Slaten graduated as a nurse from St. John's Hospital in St. Louis in 1915. She left for overseas in October 1917, with the Washington University Detachment of Base Hospital No 21. This unit had charge of British Hospital No 12 at Rouen, France. The hospital had the capacity of 1,500 to 1,600 and was crowded at times, patients being placed in the race court. The patients were all British except a few Americans from the 27th and 30 Divisions. The unit returned to St. Louis in May 1919. Miss Slaten is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Slaten of Grafton.

ELLIS V. DAY
Ellis V. Day was the only man from Jersey County to win a commission as an aviator in the Aero Service. Day enlisted in January, 1918 and was sent to Fort Wayne, near Detroit, where he received preliminary training. Other places where he trained are Champaign, Camp Dick, Wright Field, Chanute Field and Love Field.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL RICH
When war was declared, Dr. Henry W. Rich offered his services in the United States Army and was appointed First Lieutenant in the Dental Section of the Officers Reserve Corps, August 15th, 1917. On September 10 he was ordered to Camp Pike, Little Rock Ark., and attached to the 336th Field Artillery, 87th Division. On March 9th, 1918 he was promoted to the rank of Major and was shortly afterwards transferred to Fort Oglethorpe Ga., where he received military training at the Officers Training Camp at Camp Greenleaf. In May, 1918, Major Rich was recalled to Camp Pike and n June15th received the appointment of Division Dental Surgeon of the 87th Division. With this division he was transferred from Camp Pike to Camp Dix, N.J., in June and sailed for France August 27th, 1918 on the Mauretania. His division was located at Pons, France until early in November, being en route to the front when the armistice was signed. December 27th Major Rich was put in charge of a dental infirmary at Embarkation Camp No 2, St. Nazaire, where he served but a short while being transferred to Angers District. This area was closed March15th 1919 and Major Rich was again transferred, going to Camp Montoir, St. Nazaire, where he had supervision of a large dental infirmary. On May 19th he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
[Source: Jersey County in the World War,1917-1919 (August 1919) - Transcribed by: Kristie Dunlap]