La Salle County IL Biographies
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(Not Linked to Individual Bios)

 

AA-AB 
John Aaron
Dr. Constant Abbot
Isaac Abrams
Nathaniel J. Abrams
WILLIAM H. ABRAMS

AC-AD
William Ackermann
Augustus Adams
Charles H. Adams
Charles Henry Adams
Edward B. Adams
James Adams
John Quincy Adams
Oliver R. Adams
Wright Adams
Anfin Anfinson

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Joseph Alcorn
Charles A. Aldrich
Lorenzo D. Aldrich
Henry Taylor Alexander
John E. Alexander
Della (Wershinski) Allen
Edwin C. Allen
Erastus Allen
Hugh Allen
Michael F. Allen
Joel Alvord

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Albert F. Ames
John C. Ames
Z. F. Ames
Charles Amey

AN-AP

Andrew B. Anderson
Andrew N. Anderson
Andrew Anderson
John Anderson
Andrew Anderson
Ener Anderson
Jacob Anderson
James Anderson
John Hunter Anderson
Nelson Anderson
Oscar N. Anderson
Owen Anderson
William Anderson
Abram Andress
Dorsey C. Andress
Anfin Anfinson
Henry Angell
Peter C. Angevine
William V. S. Annin

Burton Z. Aplington
William J. Aplington


AR-AT

Daniel Arentsen
David Arentsen
Helia Arentsen
Thorbjorn Arentsen
Mr. Argubright
Abraham T. Armstrong
Mrs. Elsa (Strawn) Armstrong
George W. Armstrong
Joel W. Armstrong
John Armstrong
Joseph Armstrong
Joseph L. Armstrong
Marshall N. Armstrong
William E. Armstrong
William S. Armstrong
Stephen Arnold
Fridthjof G. Arntzen
Edward Atkinson
Elisha R. Atwood

AU-AY

Daniel Austin
Freeman Austin Sr.
Freeman E. Austin
George L. Austin
Phineas Austin
Seneca S. Austin
Silas Austin
William Austin
Joseph Avery

Burton Ayres

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John Aaron

Peru, Page 372

John Aaron came from New Orleans: grocer (Peru township); died in 1875.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Dr. Constant Abbot

South Ottawa, Page 261

Dr. Constant Abbot, from New York, in 1836 ; a physician (South Ottawa township); went to Cincinnati.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Nathaniel J. Abrams

Peru, Page 364

Nathaniel J. Abrams, brother of Isaac, and wife, Eliza A. Evans, came from the same place at the same time; was five years with his brother, merchandising ; since which, he has followed farming on Sec. 7, T. 33, R. 1 (Peru township). His children are: Mary E., married Lavega G. Kinnie ; Charles H., George W., and Eugene, are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Pg 868-869 Peru City

Nathaniel Jones Abrams, one of the early settlers of LaSalle county, was born Aug. 21, 1817, in Delaware County, Pa. He came West in the spring of 1838 and settled in Peru, where he was engaged for several years in general merchandising. Subsequently he disposed of his interest in the business and formed a life partnership with Eliza A. Evans, a native of Chester County, Pa., who, at the time of their marriage and for some time prior to that event, was a resident of Philadelphia. After a brief period the parties removed to their present farm residence, two miles northwest of the city. Their family consists of four children, one daughter and three sons – the former is married to L. G. Kinne an attorney of Toledo, Tama Co., Iowa; the latter are all single and living at home.

[History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886. ]


Isaac Abrams

Peru, Page 363-364

Isaac Abrams, and wife, Ellen Rittenhouse Evans, grand niece of David B. Rittenhouse, the astronomer, came from near Philadelphia in 1838. In company with his brother, Nath'l J., was engaged in selling goods for five years, and for the next five years followed the same business alone, and since has been agent for the sale of real estate. One of the substantial business men of Peru, and closely identified with all its history and growth. His children are: William H., Land Commissioner of the Texas & Pacific Railroad-resides at Marshall, Texas-he married Anna Harris, daughter of Hon. William A. Harris, of Virginia, M. C., and Minister to the Argentine Republic; Louisa, at home; Edwin Evans, a clerk, in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Pg 868-869 Peru City

Isaac Abrams and wife, Ellen Rittenhouse Evans, grand niece of David Rittenhouse, the astronomer, came from near Philadelphia, Pa., in the year 1838. He was engaged the first ten years of his residence in Peru, as a merchant and the next thirty years gave his attention to the land business, having in charge a large amount of lands for the Biddles and the Chaunceys of Philadelphia. Their children are three in number – William H. is Land Commissioner of the Texas & Pacific Railroad, a position he has held for over ten years; office at Dallas, Texas. He married Ella M. Harris, daughter of Hon. William A. Harris of Virginia, a Member of Congress and Minister of the Argentine Republic. Louise C. is at home with her parents. Edwin Evans of Chicago married Linnie, daughter of the late Dr. James T. Bullock, of Vermilliionville, LaSalle Co., Ill.

[History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886. - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



WILLIAM H. ABRAMS, Land and Tax Commissioner of the Texas & Pacific Railway, was born in Peru, LaSalle county, Illinois, January 10, 1843. His parents are Isaac and Ellen (Rittenhouse) Abrams: the latter is a niece of David Rittenhouse, the noted astronomer. Both parents are still living. The father has been a successful business man, - a merchant, land and real estate agent. He is now eighty-four years of age, but his wife is eight years younger, being only seventy-six. They both are members of the Congregational Church. Our subject is the oldest of the family of three children born to his parents, namely: Louise, still of the home circle; and Edwin, the youngest, engaged in the real-estate and insurance business in Chicago: the latters wife was Linnie Bullock, and they have one daughter, Louise.
Mr. Abrams has been in the railway service since October 20, 1866. From the time of entering railway work until September 16, 1873, he was connected with the land department of the Kansas Pacific, now part of of the Union Pacific, but at that date he connected himself with the Texas & Pacific Railway, and has remained with it ever since, as Land Commissioner, since 1875. He had been Assistant Land Commissioner under ex-Governor Throckmorton, who, having been elected to Congress, resigned in the last named year, and Mr. Abrams succeeded him. He, our subject, resided in Marshall, Texas, from 1873 to 1883, but in November of the latter year moved to Dallas,- where he has since resided, and is now regarded as one of the enterprising and prominent citizens of the city. He is a man well fitted for his position, and has given a high degree of satisfaction to all concerned. Since 1884 he has represented the Land and Tax interests in Texas of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway, and auxiliary lines also. Mr. Abrams was married, June 16, 1869, to Miss Ella M. Harris, daughter of Hon. W. A. Harris, of Page county, Virginia, now deceased, as is also his wife, Fanny (Murray) Harris, natives of Fauquier county, Virginia, but for a long time of Page county, Virginia, then of Pike county, Missouri, where they died, he in 1864 and his wife in 1889. He was a very prominent member of Congress, representing the Shenandoah valley for eight years. He also was United States Minister to Buenos Ayres under President Pierce, and was for some time the publisher of the Washington Union, which was regarded as the administration organ during President Buchanan's term of office. Mr. Harris and wife had six children, of whom W. A. Harris, of Linwood, Kansas, a large land owner and stock man and a prominent man, is the oldest, and his wife is Mary Lionberger; Murray Harris, the second son, born in Buenos Ayres, is Chief Engineer of the construction of the Pecos Valley Company's system of irrigation canals in Western Texas and New Mexico; Charles H., farmer and stock man near Bowling Green, Missouri; May, single and living in St. Louis, Missouri; Lelia, wife of Elijah Robinson, of Kansas City, Missouri, an ex-judge, and now a very prominent attorney of said city.
Mrs. Abrams was educated at the Convent of the Visitation, at St. Louis, while her husband is a graduate of Monmouth College, class of 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Abrams have the following children: Lucien, born June 10, 1870, graduated at Princeton College, New Jersey, class of 1892, and expects to study architecture and art for several years; Clarence Albright, born December 27, 1873, educated, first at Dallas schools, then at Beloit College, Wisconsin, for one year, and at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, New York; Harold Jefferys, born February 4, 1885, in Dallas, is the youngest of this bright and promising family. Both parents attend the Episcopal Church. ["Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas:..."; Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1892 - KT, Sub by FoFG]


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William Ackermann

One of the progressive and broad-minded journalists of LaSalle county is William Ackermann of Streator. He is one of the native sons of this county, his birth having occurred in Ottawa, March 14, 1857. His parent, Christian W. and Cordula (Kempter) Ackermann were natives of Wurttemberg, Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1848. They first located in Cincinnati, Ohio, thence went to Davenport, Iowa and ultimately became well known residents of Ottawa, Illinois the father departed this life in 1894 and the mother is still living, her home being in Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois.

After he had completed his elementary education in the common schools, our subject attended the Logansport (Indiana) high school for some time and being an intelligent, ambitious youth, found little difficulty in obtaining employment in the office of the Logansport Journal and other local papers when he sought to learn the printing business. In 1880 he engaged in the publication of the Deutsche Zeitung in Leadville, Colorado and four years later he came to Streator and established the well and widely known Volksblatt, which has attained an extensive circulation among the German citizens of this section of the county.

It is a five-column quarto with a six-column supplement and is issued weekly on Friday morning. Until September 1894, the politics of the paper were distinctly Democratic, but at the time mentioned, the tariff issue assuming such grave importance to the people of the commonwealth, it was deemed advisable to follow a different course of tactics and to advocate protection of the products of American industry. This course has been maintained since and though some subscribers demurred, and, “like the laws of the Medes and Persians, changed not,’ the majority have conceded the wisdom of the editor and loyally praise him as a man possessing the courage of his convictions. The paper is of and for the people, working always for what it believes to be the good of the majority and for this immediate section of the county. It presents in a clear, concise form, the important news of the day and matters of local interest.

Upon the 10th of August, 1884, Mr. Ackerman married Miss Adolphine Hoebel, a native of Germany, but who, for a number of years had resided in Colorado. This worthy couple have numerous friends and well-wishers in Streator, among both the German and English citizens.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 57-58 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Augustus Adams

The parents of John Q. were the Hon. Augustus and Lydia (Phelps) Adams, the latter a daughter of Joseph Phelps, of the Empire state. The father was born in Genoa, New York, May 10, 1806 and grew to manhood in his native state. In 1840 he removed with his family to Elgin, Illinois, where he speedily became a power in social, business and political circles. He occupied numerous responsible positions, was a member of the constitutional convention of the state in 1848 and served with honor in the house and senate. He was a warm personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, Jude David Davis and General John M. Palmer and many other famous and representative men. In 1857 he removed from Elgin to Sandwich, Illinois where he organized the Sandwich Manufacturing Company of which he was the president for many years. He possessed great mechanical ability and was the inventor of the celebrated Adams corn-sheller and other agricultural implements. In 1870 he became of president of the Marseilles Manufacturing Company, which was established here by his sons and for twenty-two years he was connected with this enterprise, or until his death in 1892. His wife, Lydia, born in Homer, Cortland County, New York, died at her home in Sandwich in 1867, when in her fifty-third year. She was the mother of eight children, seven of whom were sons, and all but one of the number survive.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 268-270 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Charles H. Adams

Charles H. Adams, junior member of the Marseilles Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of all sizes of Marseilles Adams Corn-shellers (self-feeding and horse-powers), feed-grinders, pumps, Adams Spring Corn Cultivators, windmills, etc., is a son of Augustus and Lydia Adams. He was born Feb. 17, 1855, in Elgin, Ill. He received his primary education in the public schools of Sandwich, Ill., and when about fifteen years of age he attended college at Beloit, Wis. He afterward began the study of medicine and graduated from Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago in 1875. After practicing his profession five years, he came to Marseilles and became connected with the Marseilles Manufacturing Company as Assistant Secretary which position he still holds, his father being president of the company. In December, 1875, he was married to Mary A., daughter of Judge S. B. Stinson, of Sandwich, Ill. They have one daughter, Agnes W., aged six years. The Doctor is one of the energetic and rising young men of Marseilles and is a successful business man.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 814 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Charles Henry Adams

Charles Henry Adams is president and Edward B. Adams is secretary-treasurer of the Smith-Adams Co., wholesale grocers at La Salle. They have been prominent business men of La Salle County and Seattle, Washington for over twenty years. This is a business that was founded nearly twenty-five years ago and is one of the most successful wholesale and jobbing grocery houses in Central Illinois, with a trade extending all over this section of the state. In 1917 Edward B. Adams, H. H. Smith and Charles H. Adams incorporated the business under the title of Smith-Adams Co.

Charles Henry Adams was born at Admah, Nebraska, son of Robert L. and Sarah (Smith) Adams, their father a native of Charleston, Illinois and their mother of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Charles Henry Adams was educated in the University of Omaha, in Lake Forest Universtiy at Chicago and in 1901 graduated from the University of Nebraska, where he was a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

He is a Knight Templar Mason, a member of the La Salle Chamber of Commerce and is an independent in politics. June 25, 1917, he married Gertrude E. Jamieson, a native of Lanark, Ontario, Canada and a graduate of the University of Minnesota.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Page 300-301]


Edward B. Adams

Charles Henry Adams is president and Edward B. Adams is secretary-treasurer of the Smith-Adams Co., wholesale grocers at La Salle. They have been prominent business men of La Salle County and Seattle, Washington for over twenty years. This is a business that was founded nearly twenty-five years ago and is one of the most successful wholesale and jobbing grocery houses in Central Illinois, with a trade extending all over this section of the state.

Edward B. Adams was educated in the University of Nebraska, where he was a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. For about twelve years he has been manager of the wholesale grocery business at La Salle. In 1817 Edward B. Adams, H. H. Smith and Charles H. Adams incorporated the business under the title of Smith-Adams Co.

Edward B. Adams was born at Tekamah, Nebraska, son of Robert L. and Sarah (Smith) Adams, their father a native of Charleston, Illinois and their mother of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

E. B. Adams is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Illinois Valley Manufacturers' Club and of the Rotary Club. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Page 300-301]


James Adams

James Adams was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April 2, 1826. His father, James Adams, was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother Hannah Adams was born in Virginia. Dec. 18, 1851, Mr. Adams was united in marriage with Miss Thompson in Ross County, Ohio, where Mrs. Adams was born Nov. 29, 1835. Her father, John Thompson, was born in Virginia and her mother, Eliza Thompson, was a native of Ross County where they both died. Our subject went to Ross County when twenty-two years of age and after living there eighteen years made his home on section 1, Troy Grove Township. Their first purchase was eighty-four acres, but he improved and added to his farm until at his death, which occurred Aug. 30, 1880, his farm contained 244 acres with a fine residence and other buildings. Since his death, which caused universal regret, his widow occupied the old homestead to which she has added eighty-three and one-half acres. Her son John F., born Feb. 18, 1858, has charge of the property and is the main reliance of his mother and the younger children. The farm is well-improved and shows good management. Of the ten children born to Mr. and Mrs. Adams eight are living - Eliza H., wife of J. L. Houser, resided in Ross County Ohio; C. Alexander is a resident of Marion County, Kan.; Olin, a commercial traveler, resided in Kansas City, Mo.; Sarah J., John F., Guy, Mary Ella and Hattie B. are all living at home. James died at the age of twenty-two in St. Louis County, Mo., and Thompson died in infancy. In politics Mr. Adams cast his vote for the Republican party. In religion he was of the Swedenborgian or New Church faith being in life, a practical churchman. The family are also all of the Swedenborgian faith.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Quincy Adams

For nearly three-score years the Adams family, now represented in Marseilles, LaSalle county, by the subject of this article and his brothers, have been prominently connected with the manufacturing interests of northern Illinois and have a reputation which is word-wide, as the products of their business plant have gone to all parts of the earth.

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Samuel Adams, a native of Cayuga county, New York. The parents of John Q. were the Hon. Augustus and Lydia (Phelps) Adams, the latter a daughter of Joseph Phelps, of the Empire state.

The birth of J. Q. Adams occurred in Greenwood, Steuben County, New York, July 23, 1839 and his youth was spent in Elgin, Illinois, where he was educated in the public schools and academy.

He then learned the machinist’s trade in his father’s shop, and had just fairly started upon his mechanical career when the great civil war came on. He took a very active part in the Lincoln campaign of 1860, being a member of the celebrated Wide Awake Club.

In September 1861, Mr. Adams enlisted in Company G, Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Colonel Wilson. After being encamped at Geneva, Illinois and at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri, the regiment was placed on guard duty along the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, and later stationed in Kentucky at Smithland, where Colonel T. W. Sweeney took command of the regiment. Arriving at Fort Donelson just after the surrender, the regiment was sent north to Camp Douglas, Chicago with prisoners. Afterward, joining General Grant’s army, the regiment took part in the battle of Shiloh and there met with heavy loss as one hundred and seventy men were killed or wounded of the four hundred and fifty participating in the engagement. Mr. Adams fought in the thickest of the fray both days of the dreadful conflict and later was engaged in the siege of Corinth under General Halleck and on October 3 and 4, 1863, in the second battle of Corinth under Rosecrans, in which battle the division with which he was connected lost one thousand and four out of less than three thousand men. General Hackelman, commanding the First Brigade was killed and General Oglesby, commanding the Second Brigade was badly wounded.

In January, 1864, Mr. Adams veteranized. In April of the same year the regiment joined Sherman’s army and took part in nearly all the most important battles of the Atlanta campaign, after which they went with Sherman on his famous march to the sea, and later on his other great campaigns through the Carolinas, which included the burning of Columbia and the battle of Bentonville, ending with the capture of Raleigh and the march to Washington, where they took part in the grand review of the troops. He served with the rank of first Lieutenant and regimental quartermaster during the last months of the war and was discharged as such in July, 1865, when his services were no longer required.

Returning to the peaceful vocations of life, Mr. Adams joined his father and brothers, H. R. and O. R. Adams in the Marseilles Manufacturing Company and gradually advanced until he became president of the concern, as he is today. In this finely equipped factory all kinds of corn-shellers, horse-power pumps, plows, windmills and various implements required in modern farming are manufactured in immense quantities and sold and shipped to all parts of this and foreign countries. The brothers have persevered through many long years in their ambitious endeavor to build up an extensive and remunerative trade and have succeeded beyond their most sanguine expectations. A large force of men are afforded employment and in numerous ways the community reaps benefit from this thriving industry.

In December, 1865, John Q. Adams and Miss Helen A. Beardsley of Carlton, Orleans county, New York were united in marriage at Sandwich, DeKalb county, Illinois. They have a very handsome home, situated upon the bluffs overlooking the town and surrounding country. Mr. Adams, it is needless to say, is now, as he has always been, a firm friend to the principles of the Republican party. He has not been desirous of holding public office, but has served as a member of the town board of trustees. Ever since 1856 he has been a member of the Congregational denomination and for the past thirty years has been treasurer of the Marseilles church. His life has been conspicuous for integrity, honor and nobility of word and deed; he has been faithful in the discharge of his duty toward his country, his family and to society in general.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 268-270 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Oliver R. Adams

Oliver R. Adams, Secretary and Treasurer of the Marseilles Manufacturing Company was born in Elgin, Kane Co., Ill., Sept 10, 1845, the sixth son of Augustus and Lydia (Phelps) Adams. His parents were natives of New York State. They settled in Illinois in 1839 at Elgin. His mother died at Sandwich, Ill., in 1867. Our subject removed from his native city to Sandwich, Ill., when about twelve years of age. He was educated at the public schools, the Elgin Academy and at the Fulton Military School. He began to work in his father's factory at Sandwich, working one year as a Molder. In 1867 he removed to Marseilles, starting in business as a member of the firm of Adams, Tilson & co. Later the said firm was succeeded by the firm if A. Adams & Sons, of which firm our subject was also a member. In 1870 the firm of A. Adams & Sons reorganized as an incorporated company under the general laws of the State, as the Marseilles Manufacturing Co., of which company Mr. Adams in 1872, became Assistant Secretary and in 1873 he was elected Secretary and Treasurer of the same company, which position he still holds. He served as Trustee of Marseilles one term. He was married in 1865 to Hattie J. Armstrong, a daughter of David H. Armstrong of Sandwich, Ill. She is a native of Washington, N.Y. To Mr. and Mrs. Adams have been born three daughters, of whom the youngest, Bessie D., is the only one living. Amy and Mary E. are deceased. Mr. Adams is a active member of the Congregational church and is a worker in the Sabbath-school, having been Superintendent about nine years. In politics he is a staunch Republican. He is a strong advocate of prohibition.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 814-815 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Wright Adams

Hon. Wright Adams, section 34, Mission Township, was born in Kendall County, Ill., Nov. 21, 1842, a son of Earl and Deborah (Gifford) Adams. His parents settled in Kendall County in 1833, his father building the first house on the present site of Yorkville. Their family consisted of nine children, seven of whom are living - Anna, Lois, John V., Diantha, Caroline, Wright and Charles E. Wright Adams was reared on a farm and received a good education, completing it at Fowler Institute, Newark and subsequently taught two terms. He enlisted in the war of the Rebellion as a private, in Company E, Ninety-first Illinois Infantry and was mustered out as First Sergeant and brevetted Second Lieutenant. He participated in many important battles, prominent among them being the Red River campaign and Mobile. He came to La Salle County in 1868 and located where he now lives, on a farm belonging to his father-in-law, which contains 350 acres of choice land. He owns a fine farm of 160 acres adjoining the one he lives upon. Mr. Adams was elected to the State Legislature in 1882, and while there introduced four important bills for the consideration of the body. He was a member of the committees on canals and rivers (of which he was Chairman), commerce, corporations, federal relations and mines and mining. He has been Supervisor of Mission Township four years. He was married Jan. 2, 1868, to Cornelia H., daughter of William and Sarah (Rood) Smith. Mrs. Adams died Dec. 13, 1876, and March 14, 1878, Mr. Adams married Emily J. Smith, a sister of his first wife. They have one child - Harry H. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the Republic.

Page 437

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


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Joseph Alcorn

Joseph Alcorn was born in Armstrong County (now Clarion County) Pa., July 31, 1824. He is of Scotch descent and son of John R. and Elizabeth (Pierce) Alcorn. There were eight children in his father's family, five of whom are still living, namely: Mrs. Eliza White, a resident of Kansas; Joseph; Thomas, of Armstrong County, Pa., Alexander W., of Portage County, Ohio; David K., of Earlville. Mr. Joseph Alcorn was united in marriage to Jane Marshall in Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Archibald Marshall, who died near Lawrence Kas., and her mother died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alcorn, while on her way to Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Alcorn have four children, namely: Mrs. Elizabeth Simirson, a resident of Ottawa County, Kas.; Alexander of Earl Township; Carrie J. and Archibald at home. Joseph Alcorn enlisted Feb. 8, 1865, in Company C, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry. He participated in the Atlanta campaign and in Sherman's march to the sea. The farm of Mr. Alcorn contains 173 acres, situated on sections 9, 10 and a part of 14, also twenty acres of timber-land on section 20, Earl Township, his residence being on section 9. He came to La Salle County in 1854 and settled in Earl Township in 1863. He has served two terms as Justice of the Peace.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 171-172 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Charles A. Aldrich

Charles A. Aldrich was born in Barnstable, Mass., Nov. 9, 1816. When he was two years old his parents, Gideon and Sophia (Coates) Aldrich, moved to Londonderry, Vt., where they lived until 1833, moving from there to Genesee County, N.Y. Later they settled in Cattaraugus County, where the father died many years ago. Our subject was brought up a farmer, his father following that avocation. In 1842 he was married in Leon, Cattaraugus County, to Isabell Presler, by whom he has seven children - Mrs. Hannah J. Farrell, of Hamilton County, Iowa; Lewis G., of York County, Neb.; Mrs. Lucinda Parker, Mrs. Mary Waterbury and Mrs. Amelia Swensen, all of Kendall County, this State; William M., residing in this township and George L., the youngest, living at home and working the father's farm. He had been previously married to Polly M. Nichols, who died, leaving one daughter, now Mrs. Polly M. Kilburn, of Sandwich, Ill. In 1846, Mr. Aldrich moved from Cattaraugus County to Kendall County, this State, where he worked rented land until 1868. He then came to Meriden Township and in 1874 bought his present home of 100 acres on section 16. Mr. Aldrich is a Greenbacker.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 398-399 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Lorenzo D. Aldrich

Lorenzo D. Aldrich, a retired farmer, living in the village of Meriden, was born in Harland, Windsor Co., Vt., March 4, 1817. His parents, Noah and Lydia Aldrich, were natives of that State, living all their married life on the old homestead, where they are now buried. Of their nine children two died in childhood. Lorenzo, the subject of this sketch, was their fourth child and was reared to a farm life, having the opportunities for education common to the New England farmer boys. Jan. 22, 1840, he was united in marriage with Laura Strank, born in Avon, Livingston Co., N.Y., Aug. 5, 1816 and daughter of Peter and Louisa (Cartwright) Strank. They lived in Hartland, following farming until 1851, when they came to La Salle County, locating on eighty acres on section 12, Mendota Township. He now owns a farm of 375acres on section 12 of Mendota and section 7 of Meriden townships, the original eighty-acre homestead making a part of this property. Of the nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich six are now living - Harrison H., a resident of Nebraska; Henry D., residing near the old homestead; Herbert C., living near Sioux Falls, Dak.; Clarence M., a resident of Kansas City; Abbie L., wife of Charles Strong, living in the village of Meriden, near her parents; Eugene L., at the old home. Two children, Louisa, the third and Martha the sixth child, died young in Vermont. Emma, their eighth child, died in Mendota Township. In April, 1882, Mr. Aldrich left the farm in charge of his youngest son, Eugene, and moved to Meriden Village. In politics Mr. Aldrich affiliates with the Republican party, casting his vote for General Harrison in 1840. He has been active in developing the county, and is and has been with all its best interests. For the past thirty years of more of his active life he made stock breeding and raising a speciality.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 399 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Taylor Alexander

Henry Taylor Alexander (deceased) was born in Mifflin County, Pa., in September, 1824. His father, Robert Alexander, died when our subject was eight years old in Mifflin County. After the death of his father, he went to Centre County, Pa., where he was reared by a maternal aunt. At the age of twenty-one years he went to Clarion County in his native State, having previously learned the trade of a millwright. He remained in Clarion, engaged in mechanical work until 1850, when he came to La Salle County and entered 300 acres of land, 200 of which is on section 4, Earl Township and 120 acres adjoining on the north, in DeKalb County. This was all prairie land and wholly unimproved.

Mr. Alexander returned to Clarion County, Pa., in the spring of 1851, and was married to Martha J. Sharp, a daughter of William and Martha Sharp. Mrs. Alexander's parents came to Earl in October, 1866, making their home with their daughter until their decease. Her father died April 22, 1873, aged eighty-two years and her mother died April 5, 1874, at the age of eighty-five years. After his marriage, Mr. Alexander made a homestead of the land he had entered and here he resided with his family till his death, which occurred Feb. 16, 1882. His family still occupy the homestead. Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Alexander six are now living - William R., born at the homestead April 30, 1854; Maggie W., Robert B., Emma B., Henry T. and Sarah B. The eldest Rhoda A., died August, 1877, in her twenty-fifth year. Miss Maggie Alexander is an artist of much taste and natural ability. She has received instructions from artists of celebrity and has produced a number of fine paintings.

Mr. Alexander never worked at his trade to any extent after coming to Illinois, devoting his attention almost entirely to agricultural pursuits. He was a man of much force of character and energy. Politically he was a Democrat. He took a great interest in educational matters, being School Director for a number of years. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, which he and his wife joined at Earl a few years after coming to Illinois. He was Elder of the church at the time of his death and for many years previous.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 172-173 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Taylor Alexander was another of the self-reliant and progressive men who played a constructive part in the development of LaSalle County farm industry, and he was one of the substantial and honored pioneer citizens of Earl Township at the time of his death, February 16, 1882, his wife having survived him by a number of years.

Mr. Alexander was born in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, in September, 1824 and was eight years old at the time of the death of his father, Robert Alexander. Thereafter he was reared in the home of a maternal aunt, in Centre County, Pennsylvania. As a youth he learned the trade of millwright and he continued in the work of his trade in Clarion County, Pennsylvania until 1850, when he came to LaSalle County and obtained 300 acres of land - the most of this being in section 4, Earl Township and the remainder over the line in DeKalb County. This was wild prairie land at the time and with the passing years Mr. Alexander here developed a well improved and finely productive farm estate.

In 1851 Mr. Alexander married Miss Martha J. Sharp, who likewise was born and reared in the old Keystone State and whose parents, William and Martha Sharp, passed the closing years of their lives in her home in LaSalle County, each having died when more than eighty years of age. Of the seven children of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander all but one survived the honored father - William R., Maggie W., Robert B., Emma B., Henry T., and Sarah B.

Mr. Alexander was a man of resourceful energy and his character was the positive expression of a strong and noble nature. He was aligned loyally in the ranks of the democratic party, was influential in community affairs of public order and he served a number of years as a director of his school district. Both he and his wife were earnest members of the Presbyterian Church.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol. III Page 602-603]



John E. Alexander

John E. Alexander, present manager for the Mendota district, has been in charge for three years. His jurisdiction extends over the plant and business of the company (Illinois Northern Utilities Company) from Plano to Sublett. Mr. Alexander was born in Chicago, in 1893, and technical study and practical experience have brought him an unusual range of knowledge of gas and electrical manufacture and distribution. His work in LaSalle County has yielded pleasant results and the properties have made rapid advancement. Mr. Alexander is president of the Mendota Chapter of the Izaak Walton League of America. This local chapter was organized in  April, 1823.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol II, Page 273]



Della (Wershinski) Allen

Mrs. Della W. Allen is proprietor of the Della Allen Shop at Mendota, one of the most distinctive and exclusive mercantile establishments in La Salle County. Its success is primarily due to the knowledge, taste and executive ability of Mrs. Allen, whose career is indicative of the success that can be won by women in the commercial field.

It has had ten years of prosperity, so that its success belies the superstition connected with its opening day, Friday, the 13th of September, 1913. From the first it has been a shop handling the latest styles of ready-to-wear garments for women and girls, and it has come nearer to representing the latest designs than perhaps any other store in this section of Illinois. The shop has had an increasing business that shows its steadily continued popularity. Mrs. Allen has a resident New York buyer to supply her shop with the latest Parisian styles. When she engaged in business there was only one stock house in Chicago that carried the latest designs of New York garments, the same as carried in the New York stock rooms, though now there are a dozen or more such establishments. The shop gets new purchases of stock very week. Mrs. Allen has four assistants, all experts in their lines.

She started the business at a time when her husband was ill. Later, when he recovered his health, he became a partner in the business. Mr. Allen is an expert advertiser and has handled that side of the business so successfully that customers come to Mendota from many miles distant. The shop has a mailing list of 3,500.

Mrs. Allen was born in Mendota, daughter of Fred Wershinski. Her father, now living retired at the age of eighty-seven, started in businss as a dry goods merchant at Mendota soon after the Civil war and continued active nearly fifty years, until he retired in 1913. His business is now the J. H. Walker Store.

Mrs. Allen as a girl spent much of her time in her father's store and thus learned the technique of merchandising. Her husband, Robert Allen, was for some years a clothing merchant at Polo, until his health failed. He is now a full partner in the business, being active in every department of buying and selling, in addition to having exclusive charge of the advertising. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have one son, Robert Jr. Mrs. Allen is not only a successful business woman, but very popular and is rich in those qualities that made for expert salesmanship. Mr. Allen shares her popularity and is equally proficient.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol II Page 288-289


Edwin C. Allen

Edwin C. Allen, banker and Mayor of the city of Ottawa, is a son of Asa and Lucy (Cutler) Allen and was born in the city of Rochester, N.Y., in November 1820. His grandfather, Philip Allen a Revolutionary soldier, was a native of Vermont. The Cutlers were a Massachusetts family. Edwin C. received a high school and academic education in his native city and after leaving school came West as far as Ypsilanti, Mich., where he was employed as a clerk in a bank. From Michigan he went to Wisconsin and embarked in mercantile life at Allen's Grove, Walworth County (named for his father and uncles) till 1852. From there he came to La Salle County, Ill., and was Cashier of a bank in Peru three or four years. In 1856 he located in Ottawa and commended the baking business, the firm being Eames, Allen & Co. In 1865 the National City Bank of Ottawa was organized and he is the President and principal manager of that sound institution. Mr. Allen was City Treasurer several years, and now (1885) is at the head of the municipal government, making a public-spirited and efficient chief magistrate. He is a Republican and a man of considerable influence in his party. Many years ago he was an active Odd Fellow, but has rarely attended a meeting of the order since living in Ottawa. His wife was Mary C. Champion, a native of Providence, R.I., to whom he was married July 20, 1845. They have four children - Kate, Edith C., Emma and Edwin Co. The family attend the Congregational church and are liberal supporters of its material needs.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 505 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


The year 1852 recorded the arrival of the late Edwin C. Allen in LaSalle County and he became one of the influential citizens and business men of Ottawa, the county seat, where he was for many years president of the National City Bank. He commanded unqualified popular confidence and esteem, was liberal and progressive as a citizen and served at one time as mayor of the City of Ottawa.

Mr. Allen was born at Rochester, New York, in November, 1820, a son of Asa and Lucy (Cutler) Allen and a grandson of Philip Allen, who was born in Vermont and who was a patriot soldier in the War of the Revolution. In his native city Mr. Allen obtained a liberal academic education and as a young man he found employment in a bank at Ypsilanti, Michigan. Later he was engaged in mercantile enterprise at Allen's Grove, Wisconsin, a place named in honor of his father and uncles and there he remained until 1852, when he came to La Salle County and took a position in a bank at Peru. In 1856 he removed to Ottawa and became a member of the banking firm of Eames, Allen & Company. In 1865 he became one of the organizers and incorporators of the National City Bank and as its president he did much to further the up-building of this substantial and important financial institution.

Mr. Allen was a stalwart in the ranks of the republican party, served several years as city treasurer of Ottawa and in 1885 was elected mayor, in which office he gave a most able and satisfactory administration. He attended and gave liberal support to the Congregational Church.

In 1845 Mr. Allen wedded Miss Mary C. Champion, who was born at Providence, Rhode Island and they became the parents of four children: Kate, Edith C., Emma and Edwin C. Mr. Allen was one of the venerable and honored citizens of LaSalle County at the time of his death.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol. III Page 552-553]


Ethan Z. Allen

Freedom, Page 397

Ethan Z. Allen, and wife, Lydia Marsh, came from Tinmouth, Rutland County, Vt., in 1834; he settled on Section 13 (Freedom Township). He held the office of Justice of the Peace for thirty-five years, when he resigned in 1875. He has six children: Eliza Ann married Edward C. Hall, she died in 1867; George married Martha Larkin, in Towa; Milo, at home; Minerva, married Richard Martin, of Freedom; Lucetta, married Newton Davis, in.Harding.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Erastus Allen

South Ottawa, Page 263

Erastus Allen, from Plattsburg, New York, came in 1834 (to South Ottawa Twp); sold goods with Crook; went to Galena.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Hugh Allen

Northville, Page 427

Hugh Allen came to Northville in 1837 ; moved to Dayton 1845.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Michael F. Allen

Michael F. Allen proprietor of Allen's livery stable, is the eldest son of John and Ann (McDearmet) Allen. He was born in La Salle County, Ill., in 1857 where he was reared and educated. When about fourteen years of age he learned the trade of a bricklayer at which he worked seven years. In 1883 Mr. Allen bought the livery stock of Thomas Gillan. His stable is well filled with good horses and rigs of all kinds to supply the wants of his many customers. He commenced his livery on a small scale, but by his industry and close application to business he has established a good trade. His stable is centrally located on Wright street, between Second and Third streets. Mr. Allen was married in May, 1885, to Dora Sullivan, the youngest daughter of Philip and Mary Sullivan of La Salle.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 763 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Joel Alvord

Vermillion, Page 295-296

Joel Alvord, Edward Alvord, Nelson Alvord, (sons of Joel), Jacob Barr, William Groom, and Madison Goslin, left Albany County, New York, in wagons, the 15th day of May, 1833, for the West In Chicago, they met Judge Isaac Dimmick, then returning from a tour of exploration, who directed them to this locality. They arrived here July 18th. A journey by land for hundreds of miles at that day through a country, most of it unsettled, without roads or bridges, can hardly be appreciated now. They were compelled to adopt camp life; stopping at night on the bank of some stream, where wood and water could be procured, and sleeping in their wagons, or on the ground, and in some instances were compelled to build bridges to cross the streams. Joel Alvord, and wife, in 1833, bought a claim of Jacob Moon, on S. 18,  (Vermillion Township) where he spent the remainder of his life a substantial farmer, and good citizen. He died, March, 1856, aged 76, leaving five children: Betsey married Reuben Moffat; Edward, married Elizabeth Cleveland; Alison; Nelson, a Baptist clergyman, married Sarah Bailey, and lives in Kansas; Joel, married Lydia Hall, died of a wound.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


AM

Albert F. Ames

Albert F. Ames was born in Plattsburg, Clinton Co., N.Y., Dec. 4, 1823, a son of David A. and Louise (Gordon) Ames. When fourteen years of age he went to Essex and learned the nailmaker's trade, at which he worked in different towns of New York till 1857, when, April 4, he came to La Salle County and bought 160 acres of land in Waltham Township, and the following year moved his family to Illinois. His land was entirely unimproved, but he went to work and the first year prepared seventy acres for cultivation, and built a story and a half house, boarded up and down. In 1874 he sold his farm and moved to Ottawa, but a year later bought the farm on section 33, where he now lives, known as the Valentine farm. Mr. Ames was married May 7, 1851, to Rebecca A. Edmonston, a native of Troy, N.Y., born Sept. 26, 1835, daughter of Samuel and Jane (Bennett) Edmonston. They have an adopted daughter - Gladys A. Du Shane. In politics Mr. Ames is a Republican. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Page 751

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John C. Ames

John C. Ames, Mayor of Streator is a native of La Salle County, Ill., and was born in Freedom Township, July 17, 1852, a son of Isaac and Arilla (Mooar) Ames, natives of Maine and early settlers of La Salle County, coming here in 1848. He received his primary education in the district schools and afterwards attended the Illinois State Normal, at Normal, two years. On leaving school in 1872 he became associated with John Dickerman in the drug business, under the firm name of Dickerman & Ames. He sold his interest and in 1873 he engaged in the hardware business with the father, the firm name being I. Ames & Son. This firm was burned out in 1875 and he resumed the business alone, continuing it till July, 1885, when he sold out and has since been engaged in the lumber trade, which he began in 1878 in connection with his hardware business.

March 2, 1875, he was married to Minnie Ross, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hunter) Ross of Lacon, Ill. They have two children living - Isaac Carlos and Walter Cope. Arilla Elizabeth died while on a visit at Prairie Cetner, aged fourteen months.

In 1880 Mr. Arms helped to incorporate the Streator Glass Works and has been one of its directors since its organization. He was one of the incorporators of the Plumb Hotel Stock Company of which he was one of its Directors. He is also a Director and Vice-President of the Streator Loan and Building Association, which was organized in 1874. In April, 1884, he was elected Alderman for a term of two years, but on being elected Mayor the following April, he resigned his position of Alderman. In 1885 he became a stockholder of the Streator National Bank and the same year was elected one of its directors. He has been a successful business man and although starting out with no capital except that borrowed from his father he has accumulated considerable real estate, both in Streator and in Chicago.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Streator, Page 592 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John C. Ames, collector of customs for Chicago, ex-United States marshal for the northern district of Illinois and an active and prominent Republican leader of the state, is a native of Freedom township, LaSalle county, Illinois, born on the 17th of July, 1852. His paternal ancestors were early New Englanders and his father, who was a native of Maine, was for many years a leading business man of Streator, Illinois, where he also became prominent in public affairs and whence he was sent as a representative to the state legislature.

When John C. was about two years of age the family moved to Livingston county. After working on the home farm and attending district school until he was fourteen years of age, John C. Ames commenced a broader life by entering the State University at Normal, where he remained for two years. In the meantime his father had removed from Livingston county to Streator and upon leaving school the young man joined the family there. Just before reaching his majority John C. entered the drug business, but after two years joined his father in the hardware trade by purchasing the interest of the latter's partner. Two years later, when their entire stock was destroyed by fire, he became the sole owner of the concern. Notwithstanding this temporary setback, Mr. Ames continued to profitably conduct the business for ten years. In 1880, while thus engaged, he organized the J. C. Ames Lumber Company of which he is still president and in 1891 founded the City National Bank of Streator, of which he also remained the head until in January 1898, when he was appointed by President McKinley to the office of United States marshal for the northern district of Illinois

In the meantime Mr. Ames had been attaining prominence by gradual and most creditable stages. From 1885 to 1889 (two terms) he served as mayor of Streator and declined a nomination for a third term. During four years, under Governor Fifer, he also held the office of president of the board of canal commissioners. His appointment to the United States marshalship was therefore considered but a deserved advancement. Mr. Ames continued to discharge the duties of that office with zeal, honesty and ability, until he was honored with the appointment of collector of the customs for the port of Chicago, on July 12, 1906.

On March 2, 1876, Mr. Ames was united in marriage with Miss Minerva Ross, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hunter) Ross, of Lacon, Illinois. Of their three children one only survives - Isaac Carlos Ames, born in 1880. In 1899 he enlisted for the war in the Volunteer Infantry. He served as corporal with his regiment in that service and resigned in 1901. He is now associated with his father in the lumber business at Streator, Illinois, being a director in the company. John C. Ames is popular socially, belonging to the Chicago Union League and Hamilton clubs of this city and the Streator Club of Streator, having served as the first president of the organization last named.

[Source: Waterman, Arba N.. Historical review of Chicago and Cook County and selected biography. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1908. Page 841-842 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John C. Ames was the second mayor of the city of Streator, was founder and active head for many years of the Ames Lumber Company and eventually became a notable figure in the public life of Illinois.

The late Mr. Ames was born in Freedom Township, LaSalle County, July 17, 1852. His father, Isaac Ames, settled in La Salle County in 1848m was a farmer and was also identified with the early affairs of Streator as a merchant and banker, being one of the original stockholders of the Union National Bank.

John C. Ames grew up on a farm, was educated in the country schools and spent two years at the State Normal. When he moved to Streator in 1872 he was a member of the drug firm of Dickerman & Ames and subsequently became associated with his father in the I. Ames & Son's hardware store. This business was burned out in 1874, but John C. Ames continued to sell hardware until 1885. In 1879 he became a lumber dealer and in 1891 incorporated the J. C. Ames Lumber Company. In later years his son Carlos took the active management of the business, while John C. Ames was named president and principal owner. He was at one time president of the Old City Bank.

In 1885 Mr. Ames was elected mayor of Streator to succeed Col. Ralph Plumb, the first mayor. He has previously served as a member of the city council and during his two terms of mayor, being reelected in 1887, a substantial progress was made in the material improvement of the community. His administrations settled the waterworks question, stared the sewer system and planned the physical growth of the city.

The late Mr. Ames was for many years one of the ablest leaders of the republican party in the state. He was a man of engaging personality, diplomatic and practical and had a host of friends not only in his home city but all over North Central Illinois. Governor Fifter appointed him president of the Illinois and Michigan Canal Commission. President McKinley appointed him United States marshal for the Northern Illinois district and he was reappointed by President Roosevelt. Later President Roosevelt appointed him collector of the Port of Chicago and he was reappointed by President Taft and served until 1915 in President Wilson's administration. This was an office of great responsibility, many millions of dollars being collected through the office. He was also for several years custodian of the Federal Building at Chicago. Mr. Ames retired from office and sold his lumber business at Streator in 1915. He enjoyed the personal friendship of many prominent Americans and Illinoisans, including President McKinley, President Taft, President Roosevelt, Governor Fifer, Congressman Reeves and Judge Humphrey. For several years after his retirement he spent his winters in Florida, and was one of the men identified with the development of the Lake Wales community in that state. Mr. Ames died at Lake Wales, March 21, 1922, but was brought back and laid to rest in Streator.

On March 2, 1875, he married Miss Minerva Ross, who survives him and has recently returned to Streator to make it her permanent home. She was born in Marshall County, Illinois, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hunter) Ross, being the twelfth of the thirteen children of her parents. Her father and mother were both natives of Pennsylvania, her father of Cumberland County and her mother if Indiana County. Her father was a pioneer farmer of Marshall County, Illinois. Mrs. Ames is of Revolutionary ancestry through both her parents and for many years has been prominent in the Daughters of the American Revolution, serving as state regent two years, as vice president general one year and was annually elected delegate to the national convention by the Streator chapter. She became a charter member of the first literary club in Streator and was also prominent in the Kings Daughters' Society.

Mr. and Mrs. Ames had three children, but the only survivor is Carlos Ames, who was born July 21, 1880 and who for a number of years was the active manager of the J. C. Ames Lumber Company at Streator, but is now a resident of Chicago. He was a soldier with the rank of sergeant in the Spanish-American war and during the World war served with the rank of major. Maj. Carlos Ames married Beulah VanHeyde and they have one daughter, Elizabeth Virginia, born June 28, 1913.

[Source: O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924. Vol. 3, Pg 629-632]



Dixon Evening Telegraph (Dixon, Illinois), July 11, 1953

Lumberman Dies

St. Petersburg, Fla (A) - Carlos Ames, 73, retired president of the Ames Lumber Co., Chicago, and once prominent in Illinois politics, died Friday at his home here.


Z. F. Ames

Z. F. Ames was born July10, 1824, in York County, Me., and is one of nine children of Marston and Mary (Manning) Ames. He was married March 1, 1858 to Julia Fogg, who was born July 8, 1833, in Ossippee, N.H. He came to Bennington, Marshall Co. Ill., in 1857 and bought railroad land at $20 per acre which he still owns; and in 1858 he built a small house where he and his young wife began life. He engaged in family in Bennington till 1867 when he built his large and commodious residence in Rutland, and has since lived in comparative retirement, although he still takes much interest in managing his 240 acre farm, and the raising of thoroughbred English shire horses. Mr. Ames has been prosperous in his farming pursuits especially at grain-raising during the late war. Mr. Ames is a Republican in politics and has ever been an active temperance worker. He and his wife were among the original members of the Advent church at Rutland. They have had a family of seven children, three now living - Mary A., born in Bennington Township, now the wife of E. D. Whipple, a merchant at Lostant and Frank Z. and John M., natives of Rutland, where they still reside. Four children died in early childhood.

Page 305

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Charles Amey

Page 367, Manlius Twp

Charles Amey, son of Charles and Mary Amey, was born May 23, 1825, in Huntingtonshire, England. At the age of nine years he lost his father, and when he was sixteen years old his mother died. He obtained but a limited education, he being obliged to do for himself from an early age. When seventeen years of age he with four brothers immigrated for America, and for four years after his arrival he worked as a farm hand in Oneida County, N. Y. In 1846 he came to Illinois and lived in Kendall County almost seven years. He subsequently located in Grundy County and for about six years was employed by A. Holderman. He was married April 24, 1864, to Charlotte Holderman, daughter of Henry Holderman, formerly of Missouri, now deceased. Seven children have been born to them - Mary E., Matilda J., Nellie E., Lottie E., Mattie M., William A. and Evert. Mr. Amey settled on his present farm in Manlius Township about 1859. To his original purchase of 160 acres he has since added till his farm now contains 280 acres. He is one of the prosperous and energetic farmers of this township, and is a highly respected citizen. He has held the office of School Director. In politics he casts his suffrage with the Republican party.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


AN

Andrew Anderson

Page 20

Andrew Anderson, deceased, was born near Stavanger, Norway, May 14, 1802. He immigrated to the United States in 1836, and the first year lived at Ottawa, La Salle Co., Ill. In 1837 he came to Adams Township and settled on section 34, where he engaged in farming. He was first married to Melinda Anderson, and of the six children born to them only one is living, a son named Christopher. Mrs. Anderson died in 1863, and Mr. Anderson was again married in 1866 to Anna Anderson, by whom he had four children, Andrew, Annie, Oscar and Adolph. Mr. Anderson was a successful and enterprising farmer, and at his death, which occurred Sept. 11, 1883, he left a farm of 420 acres, which is still owned and occupied by his family.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Andrew Anderson

In the pioneer period of its history La Salle County gained a fine element of Scandinavian citizenship and time has conclusively proved that from this source the county had much to gain and nothing to lose. Prominent among the sterling pioneers representative of this class of valued citizens was the late Andrew Anderson, who became a resident of LaSalle County in the year 1836 and who here passed the remainder of his sturdy, industrious and useful life, secure in the high regard of all who knew him.

Mr. Anderson was born near the historic old city of Stavanger, Norway, on the 14th of May, 1802, and in that district of the far Norse land he was reared to adult age. In 1836 he immigrated to the United States and the same year witnessed his arrival in Ottawa, Illinois. In 1837 he settled on a tract of land in Adams Township and he made the passing years count in successful achievement. He developed one of the fine farm properties of that township, was loyal and liberal as a citizen and was the owner of a valuable farm of 420 acres at the time of this death, which occurred September 11, 1883. The maiden name of his first wife was Melinda Anderson and they became the parents of six children, of whom only one, Christopher, survived the father. The death of Mrs. Anderson occurred in 1863, and in 1866, Mr. Anderson married Anna Anderson, four children having been born of this marriage, namely: Andrew Jr., Annie, Oscar and Adolph.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol. III Page 595]

Adams, Page 456-457

Andrew Anderson, Ole T. Oleson, Halvar Nelson, and some others, emigrated from Norway in the spring of 1836, and came to La Salle County in the summer of the same year, and settled in the town of Adams in the spring of 1837, on Secs. 21 and 22. Mr. Anderson is quite wealthy.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Andrew Anderson

Miller, Page 460

Andrew Anderson, from Norway to New York in 1836, and came to Illinois in 1838, with his wife, Olena Nelson; he died of cholera in 1849. His widow died in 1875. The children were two sons and two daughters.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Andrew B. Anderson

Andrew B. Anderson resides in the northeast quarter of section 26, his farm containing 120 acres of land. Brainard Anderson, the father of Andrew B., was born in Norway, Aug. 29, 1792. He was married in his native land to Isabella Anderson and they came directly to LaSalle County from Norway in 1844, his family consisting at that time of two sons and six daughters.

Brainard Anderson obtained his land from the Government, improved the farm and lived upon it until his death, which occurred Oct. 18, 1868. His wife died July 20, 1854. At the present time there are six daughters and one son, Andrew B., he being the only male representative of the family living.

He was born in Norway, Feb. 18, 1840. He was united in marriage to Melinda Molond, also a native of Norway, born in 1839. Her parents were among the early settlers of Adams Township and are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have five children living, namely, George B., Nettie I., Clara May, Seward F. and Alfred M. Four children are deceased. Their eldest daughter, Mrs. Peterson, died, leaving one child, Elmer, who now resides with his grandparents. Politically Mr. Anderson is a Republican. He has held several local offices and is now serving his third term as Commissioner of Highways. He is also one of the Directors of the Mutual Insurance Company, of Earlville. The family are members of the Lutheran church.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 172-173 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Andrew N. Anderson

The gentleman whom we here select as deserving special mention in a collection of biographical sketches of citizens of LaSalle County, is a banker at Leland. He was born in Adams Township, this county, March 17, 1855, a son of Nelson and Ann (Quam) Anderson.

Mr. Anderson of this sketch was reared to farm duties and educated at Leland; and he continued in agricultural pursuits in Adams Township until he was thirty-two years of age. In the autumn of 1883 he and Thomas F. Thompson formed a partnership, he buying out Mr. Thompson’s former partner, Mr. Buland, in the grain business, ever since which time the firm name has been Thompson and Anderson, bankers and grain merchants. They established the Leland Bank in 1896 and are doing a safe and profitable business.

Mr. Anderson has been a resident of Leland ever since 1883. He has served as supervisor, is a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1884 he married Anna Vold, who died in 1897, leaving three children – Vira A., Nelson C. and Nieda J.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 589-590 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Ener Anderson

Miller, Page 460-461

Ener Anderson came with hisfather (Andrew Anderson); he married Margaret Gunnison, and settled on S. 16, T. 34, R. 5; has had eleven children; eight are still living. Andrew, Jr., also came with his father; has several children now living in Ottawa; Susan, married John Hill; Elizabeth, married Henry Doggett.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 460-461 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jacob Anderson

Rutland, Page 282

Jacob Anderson, from Norway, to New York, 1825; here, 1834; settled on S. W.1/4S. 13, T. 34, R. 4; went to California and died there, one of the first colony.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James Anderson

James Anderson was born in Perth, Scotland, Jan. 3, 1822, and reared a farmer. His parents and the family of ten children came to Canada in 1857. In 1860 the subject of this sketch, leaving the family in Canada, came to La Salle County, and the following year his family joined him. James bought the old "Cooley farm" of 160 acres on section 35, Ophir Township, where he lived until 1881, when he bought his present home in the same section, now owning the west half of section 35. James Anderson and Annie Bailey were married Oct. 17. 1862. She is a native of Vermont. Her father died when she was a mere child. Her mother, now Mrs. Marvin, resides with her. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have five children and all at home - William, James, Christine, David and Agnes. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are worthy members of the Presbyterian Church and the family all attendants. Mr. A. has always been a Republican. Mr. Anderson's father died in 1881. His mother is still living aged eighty-seven. He has also two brothers, David and William and one sister, Mrs. Agnes Wilson, residing in Waltham Township. Two sisters, Mrs. Christine McKenzie and Mrs. Margaret McCagne, live in Canada.

Page 495-496

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Anderson

Grand Rapids, Page 453

John Anderson, a native of Ireland, came from Clinton County, N. Y., here in 1837; settled, with a family, on S. 6. In 1849 he mysteriously disappeared, and was never heard from afterward.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hunter Anderson

No one can hear the story of John Hunter Anderson’s life and fail to be impressed with the pluck and fortitude which he has manifested. Nor con one refrain from deeply admiring and respecting this worthy citizen of Streator and at the same time must learn many lessons from his brave struggles with adversity and obstacles which would have daunted the spirit of most men.

A native of Airdrie, Scotland, born July 8, 1859, our subject is a son of William and Mary (Hunter) Anderson and a grandson of John Anderson and John Hunter. The parents, who are likewise natives of the land of heather, are still living, their home being in Streator. They emigrated to the United States when their son, John H., was an infant but nine months old and for a number of years Mr. Anderson was inspector of coal mines at Braidwood and Streator, Illinois, later acting in the same capacity at Virden.

The boyhood of our subject was spent in Braidwood, Will county, Illinois, chiefly, his educational advantages being limited, as he commenced working in the coal mines at the early age of ten years. Eight long, tedious years the lad was thus employed, at the end of which time he met with the great calamity of his life. A large portion of the roof of the mine in which he and his brother were working collapsed and when he was extricated it was found that his spine was seriously injured. Paralysis of the lower limbs results and for a long time he was practically helpless. When he had partially recovered the brave youth set about the task of mastering the science of telegraphy and is entirely self-taught. At length he was employed by the Western Union Telegraph Company at Streator and remained with that concern for twelve years. In 1892 he became the manager of the Postal Telegraph Cable Company’s office at Streator and still occupies this responsible position. He has proved himself faithful and efficient and enjoys the confidence and sincere respect of all who know him. In early life he formed careful, frugal habits and partly owing to his and partly to the fact that he has made judicious investments of his savings, he is now the possessor of a competence. He owns three good residences in Streator, and rents two of them, while the third is his own home, and besides he has money invested in the wholesale and retail tobacco business.

On the 5th of May, 1893, the marriage of John H. Anderson and Miss Emily Anderson was celebrated in Streator. Mrs. Anderson, who is of Swedish parentage and was not even in the remotest degree related to our subject, is a lady of good education and refinement and, like her husband, has numerous friends in this city.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 178-179 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Nelson Anderson

Page 20-21

Nelson Anderson, deceased, was born near Christiana, Norway. He came to America in 1845 and settled in De Kalb County, Ill., and in 1850 moved to Adams Township, La Salle County, where he resided till his death in 1864. He was married to Ann Quam, who was born May 10, 1832, near Stavanger, Norway. She came to the United States in 1843 with her parents, settling in Mission Township, La Salle Co., Ill, where her father died, and her mother has since resided with her son in Iowa, and is now in her eighty-seventh year. Our subject's father came to America in 1846 and resided with him for many years. He died in Iowa several years ago. To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were born six children, of whom five are living - Sophia, wife of Alex. Halverson, of Adams Township; Linnie, married Edwin Johnson of Leland, Ill., and lives in Iowa; Andrew, married Anna Void; John and Nelsie, at Home. Andrew is a member of the firm of Thompson and Anderson, grain merchants of Leland. He was Township Collector one year, and is the present Supervisor of Adams Township. Our subject Nelson Anderson, served his township as Assessor, and also as Collector. He was an honest, upright citizen and was highly respected by all who knew him.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Nelson Anderson and wife, Ann Quam  were both natives of Norway. He came to this country about 1845 and his wife in 1842 and were married in De Kalb county, Illinois, in which county they continues to reside for a short time, and then moved to Adams township, LaSalle county.

Nelson Anderson was a farmer by vocation and died in 1864, at the age of forty-four years: and his wife is still living, now aged sixty-eight years and living on the old homestead in Adams township. Their six children were Sophia B., Mattie S., Lorinda S., Andrew N., John N. and Nelsey M. All these are now deceased excepting our subject and John N., who is a farmer on the old homestead.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 589-590 – Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Owen Anderson

Owen Anderson, who now holds the office of public administrator, to which he was appointed by Governor Small on the 2d of February, 1922, is one of the representative members of the bar of La Salle County and has been engaged in the practice of his profession in the City of Ottawa for more than a quarter of a century. He is a native of La Salle County, and here the greater part of his life thus far has been passed.

Mr. Anderson was born on the home farm of his parents in Serena Township, this county, July 20, 1865 and is a son of Ole and Anna (Helgeland) Anderson, both natives of Norway, where each was born in the year 1840, the former in the district of Saetersdal and the latter in Stavanger. The death of the father occurred September 13, 1872 and that of the widowed mother on the 17th of September, 1897, their marriage having been solemnized at Nettle Creek, Grundy County, Illinois and three of their five children being now deceased. Ole Anderson was reared under the sturdy discipline of a farm in his native land and was about twenty years of age when he came to the United States and established his home in Grundy County, Illinois in 1860. Within a few years he came to La Salle County and engaged in farm enterprise in Serena Township, but about six years later he removed to Ford County where he purchased the farm on which he passed the remainder of his life. He was a man of strong mentality and well fortified convictions, was a republican in politics and both he and his wife were zealous communicants of the Lutheran Church. He had no desire for public office, but gave about two years of characteristically loyal service as school director of his district.

After the death of the father the Anderson family returned to La Salle County, and here Owen Anderson duly profited by the advantages of the public schools, the while his own early experience gave to him an enduring appreciation of the dignity of honest toil and endeavor. He advanced his education by taking a course of study in Luther College at Decorah, Iowa, an excellent institution maintained under the auspices of the Lutheran Church and thereafter he gave several years of effective service as a teacher in the public schools. He read law under the effective preceptorship of Hon. H. W. Johnson of Ottawa and was admitted to the bar in 1895. He thereafter continued his service as a teacher until 1897, since which year he has been engaged in the practice of law at Ottawa, with a record of substantial and worthy achievement both as a trial lawyer and well fortified counselor. He has given yeoman service in behalf of the cause of the republican party, and it was as a representative thereof that he was appointed to his present office, that of public administrator in February, 1922. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran Church.

On the 5th of July, 1892 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Anderson and Miss Belle Nelson, who was born at Nettle Creek, Grundy County, this state, and of the six children of this union one died in infancy, the names of the five surviving children being here entered in the respective order of birth: Oscar Elmer, Ella Anna, Olive Irene, SeDell Theresa and Truman Chester.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol. III Page 413-415]



Oscar N. Anderson, real estate operator; abstractor; secy. And manager The Sheridan County Abstract Book Co.; loan and insurance broker; (Prog.); b. Feb. 1, 1876, Sheridan, Ills.; s. of Erasmus and Ellen (Peterson) Anderson; educ. Pub. And grad. H. S., Aurora, Neb., 1895; student State Univ. of Nebraska, 1898-1902; located in Sheridan, Wyoming, 1902, and was employed in the office of the superintendent fo the C.B. & Q. R. R., 1902-6; engaged in the real estate and insurance business and sec.-ma. Of the Sheridan County Abstract Book Co., since 1909; trustee of The Sheridan Building and Loan Assn., 1913-15; makes a specialty of selling irrigated ranches and placing Eastern loans; deputy county clerk, Sheridan county, Wyo., 1906-9; member Masons, Chapter and Blue Lodge; O. E. S.; I. O. O. F.; Kappa Sigma fraternity. Address: Sheridan, Wyoming.

[Source: Men of Wyoming, By C. S. Peterson, Publ 1915, Transcribed by Richard Ramos]


William Anderson

Rutland, Page 283

Wm. Anderson, from Ohio, 1834, on S. E.1/4S. 3, T. 34, R. 4.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Abram Andress

Abram Andress was born at Bethlehem, Pa., in 1801. When a youth Abram Andress was employed as a clerk in the city of Philadelphia and later returned to his native village and married Sarah Horsfield, a native of Nantucket. He was engaged in the distilling and rectifying business in Bethlehem. In 1850 he came to La Salle county, Ill., and settled in Mendota Township and purchased 520 acres of land, and when the city of Mendota was laid out sold 320 acres at quite an advance on the purchase price. In politics he was a Republican and in religious faith a Moravian. His first wife died in Pennsylvania, leaving three sons - Montford S., of Chicago; Dorsey C., and Charles A. The latter was a member of the Eleventh and later of the Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry, and served his country till the close of the war. He was regularly promoted to Lieutenant- Colonel and he command of the regiment on Sherman's march to the sea. He died in Mendota just one week after the death of his father. Mr. A. Andrews married for his second wife Elizabeth Yohe, and to them were born three children - Edgar H., of New Jersey; William C. and George H. of Decatur, Ill.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 638 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Dorsey C. Andress

Dorsey C. Andress, Postmaster at Mendota, Ill., is a son of Abram Andress, Dorsey C. Andress was born in Bethlehem, Pa., Dec. 3, 1837. He learned the trade of a blacksmith but at the time of the breaking out of the Rebellion was engaged in under-draining. He enlisted Aug. 26, 1861, in Company I, Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry and at the organization of the company was appointed Corporal. He was promoted to Orderly Sergeant in 1862 and held that position two years. He re-enlisted as a veteran in 1864 and was appointed Commissary Sergeant of the regiment. He was commissioned First Lieutenant and was mustered out Aug. 26, 1865, just four years from the date of his enlistment. He participated in thirty-one battles, beginning with Shiloh and ending with Bentonville, N.C. He was in active service during his whole term of enlistment and was wounded slightly twice, once at Shiloh and once at Vicksburg. Soon after the war he located in Bloomington, Ill., and a year later returned to Mendota and engaged in the mercantile business till the death of his father, when he went to the farm and remained four years. He then came again to Mendota and engaged in the coal business and in 1883 was appointed Postmaster. Politically Mr. Andress is a Republican. While living on the homestead he was Collector of Mendota Township four years and gave one-half of his commissions which built the plank walk from the city to the cemetery. He was married Aug. 25, 1861, the day before he left for the war to Sarah E. Swearingen, daughter of John and Nancy Swearingen. They have seven children - Belle May, Charles A., John C., Carrie E., Grace A., Kate G. and Fred L. Feb. 18, 1877, Mr. and Mrs. Andress united on profession of faith with the First Baptist Church, Mendota and he has since been an active worker in the church and Sunday school. He is Vice President of the First La Salle County Union Sunday-school Association. In 1882 Belle May and in 1883, Charles A., united with the same church.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 683-684 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Anfin Anfinson

Anfin Anfinson, section 34, Mission Township, was born near Stavanger, Norway, in December, 1818, a son of Anfin Anfinson. His educational advantages were limited as his parents were poor and he was obliged to work after his tenth year. In 1844 he came to the United States and located where he now lives, working for some time as a common laborer. He has by hard work and good management accumulated a large property. He owns 450 acres of fine land under cultivation and twenty-seven acres of timber, together with a large capital of money at interest. He was married in 1846 to Caroline Olson. They have had fourteen children, of whom the eldest four, Engerline, Daniel, Anfin and Richard are deceased. The living are - Bertha Ole, Cornelius, Josephine, Sarah A., Osmon, Josiah, Edward, Ephraim and Charlotte. Anfin was employed in teaching school at the time of his death, having taught five years. Ole has taughter school for the same length of time. Cornelius has contributed a large correspondence to the press. Osmon and Josiah are students at the Jennings Seminary of Aurora, Ill. Mr. Anfinson has served his township as Highway Commissioner one term, and as School Director several years. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church.

Page 438

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Angell

Vermillion, Page 294-295

Henry Angell, from Rhode Island; left there in the fall of 1835. While on the way was frozen in on the Erie Canal, and wintered in Utica, New York; arrived here in the spring of 1836, and settled at Vermillionville, where his wife died. He married Miss Washburn, and settled on S. 35; he died about 1850; his widow died in 1874. His children by his first wife are: Abbey, who married John Fry, her second husband is John M. Trout, now in Kansas; Henry, is in Nebraska; Mary Jane ; Lydia, married Granville Clark. His children by his second wife are: Washburn and Albert, twin brothers-Albert is dead, Washburn married Miss Stillwell; Everett, is married, and lives on the old place; Ann, married George Enderton ; Hannah, married George Sharp.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Peter C. Angevine

Among the retired farmers of LaSalle county is the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch, Peter C. Angevine, of Sheridan. He is a native of the neighboring state of Indiana, born in Dearborn county, August I, 1830, a son of James and Susan (Montfort) Angevine, the former a native of New York city, born August i, 1777; the latter of Fishkill, Dutchess county, New York, born September 23, 1793. James Angevine was a son of John Angevine, also a native of New York city, and a son of Daniel Angevine, who was a native of Rochelle, France. Daniel Angevine had to leave France on account of his religious views and was among the Huguenots who sought refuge from persecution in America. He was a sea captain and ship-owner and also at one time was a wine merchant. It was about 1643 that he landed in the American colonies and made a settlement in New York city, where he passed the closing years of his life, working at the trade of shoemaker. John Angevine, the grandfather of Peter C., was born and reared in New York city, and was there married to Miss Sallie Coutant, who, as her name indicates, was of French origin. They were the parents of several children, James being their only son. For thirteen years during his early life he followed the ocean, as a sailor and cooper. He was married in New York in 1812, and in 1817, accompanied by his wife and three children and his father and mother, he came west to Indiana, which had only the year previous attained to the dignity of statehood, and, selecting a location in Dearborn county, made a permanent settlement. Their children in order of birth were as follows: James A., John H., Charles E., Alletta M., Eliza A., William, Gilbert, Jane S., Peter C., Sarah L. and Addie V.

Peter C. Angevine came to LaSalle county, Illinois, in the fall of 1869, landing on the present site of Sheridan, October 27. That was before the town of Sheridan came into existence. He has since been identified with this place. His father also came to LaSalle county, but lived here only a short time, when he died and was taken back to Dearborn county, Indiana, and laid to rest by the side of his wife. Peter C. carried on farming operations here during his early residence in the county, but for some time past has lived retired.

He came to LaSalle county in the fall previous to his permanent settlement here, and November 18 married Miss Jane E. Rowe, returning with his bride to Indiana and remaining there nearly a year. Mrs. Angevine was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, July 27, 1833, a daughter of Robert and Mary (McMath) Rowe. Mr. and Mrs. Angevine had an only child, Aline A., who died at the age of five years; and they have an adopted daughter, Fannie A.

In their religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Angevine are Universalists and are identified with the church of that denomination.

[Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 211-213 - Contributed by N. Piper]


William V. S. Annin.

A valued citizen of Marseilles is the gentleman of whom this sketch is penned, his residence here dating back almost a score of years. In tracing his lineage it is found that he comes from honored old New Jersey families, and that in him are united two quite distinct nationalities, the Scotch and the Holland-Dutch, both noted for integrity, industry and thrift, for a high sense of honor and for patriotism and many other of the noblest qualities which animate mankind.

John Annin, who was born in Scotland, was the founder of the Annin family in New Jersey. One of his descendants was Jonathan Annin, of Liberty Corner, Somerset county, New Jersey, and one of the latter's children was Joseph S.. the father of our subject. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. and was a merchant by occupation. He married Miss Ellen Schenck, a (laughter of Ferdinand Schenck, of Dutch ancestry. Mr. Schenck was a successful agriculturist in New Jersey for many years.

William V. S. Annin was born in Millstone, Somerset county, New Jersey, November 28, 1827, and in his boyhood received a liberal education. He remained under the parental roof until he reached his majority, and in 1849, during the great gold excitement on the Pacific coast, he sailed for California, going around Cape Horn. He was not very favorably impressed with the west nor the prospects of acquiring a fortune, and the following year he returned to New York city. At New Brunswick, New Jersey, he embarked in a mercantile business, which occupied his time and attention for twenty years. In 1870 he concluded to come to Illinois, and, locating in Marseilles, he soon found employment with the Marseilles Manufacturing Company, having charge of the store of supplies, bolts, screws, and similar fittings. He continued to act in this position year after year, winning the approbation and good will of all associated in business with him, and only his severe illness caused him to abandon his post of duty, recently.

The substantial brick residence of the Annin family is located on West Bluff street. The estimable lady who presides over the well-being of the household was formerly Miss Harriet M. Plummer, her marriage to Mr. Annin being solemnized in Brooklyn, New York, June 2, 1858. She was born and reared in that city, and is the only daughter of Roswell and Harriet (Chamberlain) Plummer, who were natives of Vermont, but who after their marriage lived in Brooklyn. Seven children blessed the union of our subject and wife, and of these Roswell P. is now a resident of Los Angeles, California; Harriet M. is the wife of Howard M. Weirick, of Phoenix, Arizona; Louise E. is the wife of E. R. Spencer, of Marseilles; William S. is living in Council Bluffs. Iowa; Mary T. is the wife of Walter Hobart of Marseilles; and Joseph S. and Nellie W. are at home. In all of the varied relations of life, whether in business, society or in the home, Mr. Annin has nobly performed his duties, and to his children he will leave a record of which they may justly be proud.

[Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 340-341 - Contributed by N. Piper]


Burton Z. Aplington

Burton Z. Aplington. M.D. is a native of Illinois, born in Ogle County, March 8, 1856, the youngest son of Zenus and Caroline (Nichols) Aplington, natives of New York. His father was a Colonel in the late war and was killed at the battle of Corinth, Miss. His mother is still living and is a resident of Ogle County. He was reared in the town of Polo, Ogle County and received his education in the schools of that place. At the age of twenty years he began the study of medicine, entering the Chicago Medical College from which he graduated in 1879. He then went to the University in New York City from which he also graduated, after which he came to La Salle and commenced the practice of his profession, where he has built a large and successful practice. Dr. Aplington is a member of the State Medical Society and also of the District Medical Society. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Odd Fellows order, and Ancient Order of United Workmen.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886, City of Ottawa, Page 763-764 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William J. Aplington

William J. Aplington is not only one of the successful and popular younger members of the bar of his native city and county, but he also honored both by his service as a soldier with the American Expeditionary Forces in France in the great World war.

Mr. Aplington was born in the City of La Salle, on the 28th of May, 1891, and he was still a mere child at the time of his parents' death, his mother having passed away in 1896 and his father having died in the following year. Mr. Aplington is the only child of Dr. Burton Z. and Katherine (Mullen) Aplington, for former of whom was born at Polo, Ogle County, Illinois, and the latter at LaSalle. Doctor Aplington was graduated from the Medical College of the University of the City of New York, and his fine character and exceptional ability gained to him secure place as one of the leading physicians and surgeons in the City of La Salle, where he continued in active general practice until his death. He was an honored and valued member of the La Salle County Medical Society, and was affiliated also with the Illinois State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He was still a young man, in the very prime of his strong and useful life, when death brought a close to his mortal activities.

William J. Aplington is indebted to the public schools of La Salle for his early education discipline, which included the curriculum of the high school and in the meanwhile his youthful ambition led him to formulate definite plans for his future career. In consonance with this ambition he finally entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and in the same he was graduated as a member of the class of 1915, his reception of the degree of Bachelor of Laws having been virtually simultaneous with his admission to the Michigan bar. In October of the same year he gained admission to the Illinois bar and he has since been established in the practice of his profession at La Salle, save for the period of his military service in the World war.

On the 15th of May, 1917, about one month after the nation became involved in the World war, Mr. Aplington entered the Officers' Training Camp at Fort Sheridan, the great military post enar Chicago and after due preliminary training he accompanied his command, Company I, Three Hundred and Forty-third United States Infantry, overseas in 1918. The regiment first landed in England and thence proceeded to France, where it continued in active service as a part of the American Expeditionary Forces until the signing of the historic armistice brought the war to a close. In June, 1919, Mr. Aplington returned with his regiment to the home land, and with the same he was mustered out at Camp Upton, Long Island, New York, on the 3d of the following month, he having received his honorable discharge with the rank of first lieutenant. He then returned to his native city and resumed the practice of his profession. Prior to his return, in April, 1919, LaSalle citizens had marked their appreciation of his personality, professional ability and patriotic service by electing him city attorney and of this office he has since continued the efficient and popular incumbent. Mr. Aplington holds the office of exalted ruler of La Salle Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and he is affiliated also with the Knights of Columbus and the American Legion.

On the 5th of July, 1918, shortly before departing for service overseas, Mr. Aplington wedded Miss Elizabeth Lavanway and the three children of this union are Betty Ann, James Burton and John Paul.

[O'Byrne, M. C.. History of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1924., Vol. II Page 72-74]


 

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