LaSalle County Illinois Biographies, Sketches and Obituaries

Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Nancy Piper unless stated otherwise

C


Sheldon Cadwell

Cornelius Cahill

John W. Calkins

William Callagan

Campbell

Charles Campbell

James B. Campbell

Oliver Canuteson

Elias Carey

John T. Carr

Robert Carr

Alonzo Carter

Benjamin Carter

Ferdinand Carter

Joel Carter

Levi Carter

Samuel Carter

Sylvester Carter

Urial Carter

Abel Cartwright

John Dean Caton

Thomas Dean Catlin

Alfred W. Cavarly

Lyman D. Cavarly

Christopher Champlin

Solomon Channel

C. H. Charles

William Chumasero

Jerry and Frank Church

Amos Clark

Beebe Clark

David Clark

Dolphus Clark

Eldridge Gerry Clark

James Clark

Jesse A. Clark

John Clark

Justus M. Clark

William A. Clark

William Clayton

Charles Clifford

Joseph Cloud

John Cochran

John Cody

Samuel L. Cody

Churchill Coffing

Cornelius Cokeley

Timothy Cokeby

John Coleman

Charles Colton

David W. Conard

Peter Consols

Burton C. Cook

Edward Cook

John T. Cook

Jonathan Cooley

Simon Cooley

Matthew R. Coon

Timothy Corbit

FRANKLIN CORWIN

William Cottew

Thomas R. Covell

Benjamin Craig

Henry Cramer

David Crawford

Sylvanus Crook

Amzi Crosiar

James and William Crosiar

Simon Crosiar

Jeremiah Crotty

Bradish Cummings

John Currier

Henry Curtis

William H. W. Cushman

Sheldon Cadwell

Sheldon Cadwell, from Middletown, Ct., and wife, Aphia Van Valkenburgh, from Green County, N.Y., settled at Vermillionville, in 1836 ; he was a tinner by trade ; he moved on to S. 29, T. 33, R. 2, in 1839, and followed farming until his death, in 1853, aged 60. His widow died in 1876, aged 81, leaving six living children : Cushman, married Maria Greenfield, and removed to Kansas ; Charlotte, married Dr. Thomas W. Hennesey, of La Salle, now living in Dimmick ; Alexander, married Harriet Wiswall, they are living in California; Sheldon, is a Baptist clergyman, married Martha Adams, and lives in Deer Park ; Jacob, married Adeline Wiswall, they are in California ; Lyman, married Cordelia Brown, now in Iroquois County; George,married Mary Elizabeth King, and occupies the old homestead.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 337-338 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Cornelius Cahill

Cornelius Cahill came from Pennsylvania in the fall of 1838 ; a merchant, and Justice of the Peace; now living in Corpus Christi, Texas.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 368 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John W. Calkins

John W. Calkins, and wife, Miss Page, came from Salisbury, Ct., in 1838, and settled on Sec. 19. Mrs. Calkins died in 1838. He married Miss Beardsley, of Connecticut, who died soon after. He then married Cynthia Bishop, of Connecticut. Mr. Calkins removed to Deer Park in 1842, and subsequently to Ottawa, where he died leaving four children: James, who married, was engaged in the lumber trade in Ottawa, subsequently in Chicago, and is now manufacturing lumber at Manistee. Mich.; Helen, married Edgar Baldwin, from Connecticut and lives near Vermillionville; Mary, married Henry M. Baldwin, from Connecticut, and settled in Deer Park-Mr. Baldwin died, and Mary is now the wife of Henry Page, in California; William W., married Louise Hossack, and lives in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 388 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Callagan

Page 22

William Callagan, section 24, Adams Township, was born in County Donnegal, Ireland, Sept. 12, 1818, a son of James Callagan, also a native of Ireland, now deceased. Our subject came to America in April, 1843, and lived one year in Philadelphia, Pa. He came to La Salle County, Ill., in the spring of 1846, and has since lived in Adams Township. He is the owner of a fine farm of 140 acres of land, and is engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married in Ireland April 19, 1939, to Jane Flaming, daughter of Nathaniel Flaming, and of the six children born to this union three are living - Mary, married George Hupp, of Northville Township, and has five children - Clara, Harley, Retta, Frederick and Arthur; Annie, married Henry Madison, and has three children - Frank, Emery and Edward; William is a farmer and stock-raiser, and has 130 acres of land. He married Eva Reed and is living with our subject. He has one child - Ralph J. Mr. Calagan is a member of the Wesleyan Methodist church.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Campbell

Campbell settled on S. 31, Ealge Twp in 1835 ; he sold to Myers, and left.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 444 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Charles Campbell

Charles Campbell, from New York, about the year 1835. His children are : C. C. Campbell, of Ottawa ; George C., for some time a member of the law firm of Glover, Cook & Campbell, married Julia, daughter of J. O. Glover, and is now a prominent lawyer in Chicago; Elizabeth is the wife of Dr. H. B. Fellows, of Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 250-251 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James B. Campbell

James B. Campbell came from West Tennessee to the south part of Illinois in the fall of 1829; was State Agent for sale of canal lands, and one of the first County Commissioners; went to Galena in 1836.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 230 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Oliver Canuteson

Miller Twp

Oliver Canuteson, one of the first company from Norway to New York, in 1825. Came to Illinois in 1834-died in 1850. He left two sons and one daughter. One son died in the army in 1863.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 459 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Elias Carey

Elias Carey, and wife, Margaret Collins, from Ohio, on to the Wabash, in 1829, or 1830, and to Troy Grove, in 1831. Settled on 8. 24, T. 35, R. 1. He left during the Black Hawk war, but returned at its close, and made a farm in Ophir. He died in Mendota, in 1868. His children are: Nancy, now dead; Sally, married William Thompson, now in Iowa: Minerva married W. Pollins, in Mendota; Abijah and John, went to Oregon; Calvin, to California; Washington, is now here; Absalom, in Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 411 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John T. Carr

John T. Carr, from Onondaga County, New York, came in the fall of 1836, and settled on Section 36, Northville Twp. He was thrown from a wagon in crossing Fox River, and broke his neck. Children: Charles settled on Sec. 36: is now in Somonauk. Barney S. married Susan Williams; lives in Somonauk. R. D. Carr removed to California. Lindsey Carr, was a soldier in the Mexican war-Capt. Co. H., 10th Regiment Illinois Volunteers for three months ; also of the same for three years. He was killed on the picket line near New Madrid.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 422 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Robert Carr

Robert Carr, and wife, from Connecticut, in 1837. settled on S. 29. Mrs. Carr died in 1875. Mr. Carr is still living, at the full age of 80 years. His son, Daniel, married Bridget Gardner, and lives on S. 29. He, with Mrs. Scranton, are his only children.[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 414 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

The Joel Carter Family

Joel Carter, father of the foregoing seven sons, came from the bank of the St. Lawrence river in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., in 1836 to Earl Township; died in 1853. aged 75.

Samuel O. Carter, from St.Lawrence County,N.Y.. in 1835 ; stopped near Chicago three months in December ; settled on S. 17. Wife, Lurania Thornton; has three sons: Adolphus married widow Doane; Heman H. married Malvina Philips ; Joel at home.

Alonzo Carter, from St. Lawrence County, N. Y., in 183(5; now a Methodist preacher in Ohio.

Levi Carter, from same place in 1836; married widow Jewett ; now in Sandoval, Marion County, Illinois.

Ferdinand Carter, from the same place in 1836: he died 1854. His widow, Deborah Breese. died 1867.

Benjamin Carter, from same place in 1836; went to Green County 1860 ; now there.

Sylvester Carter came in 1836 ; he died of cholera in 1849; first wife. Miss Christy ; second, Mary Breese, widow ; third, Lucy Pine. Of his children, James Carter is in Livingston County ; Joseph is teaching in Normal; Lucien in Livingston County.

Urial Carter, married Eliza Rogerson ; now in Arkansas ; has seven or eight children ; left here in 1855.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 432 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Abel Cartwright

Page 682

Abel Cartwright came to this county with bis wife and seven children in 1865 and for a short time lived in Ottawa, He then moved one and a half miles west of where he now resides, buying 160 acres on section 4. He afterward sold this land and bought the farm on section 3 in 1877 where he has since made his home. He is the owner of 180 acres of fine land, eighty acres being on section 10, and eighty acres on section 3. He was born Nov. 9, 1814, in Hinesburgh, Chittenden Co., Vt., a son of Silas and Sally (Heath) Cartwright, natives of Vermont and Connecticut respectively, both dying many years ago. Abel Cartwright was a year and a half old when his parents moved to Franklin County, Vt., where he lived till thirty years of age, and there received a limited education in the common schools. He then went to Plattsburgh, N. Y., where he was married March 20, 1848, to Adeline M. Hilliard, a daughter of Anson and Amity (Smith) Hilliard. They have eight children, seven born in Plattsburgh, N. Y.-L. N., born June 23, 1849; Hettie A., born Jan. 29, 1851; Truman, Feb. 10, 1853; Mary E., June 1,1857; Albert H., July 20, 1859; John H., Nov. 20, 1861, and Abel, April 11, 1864. Sherman A. was born in Utica Township, La Salle County, June 24, 1868. In politics Mr. Cartwright affiliates with the Republican party. Mrs. Cartwright's father was born in Plattsburgh, N. Y., and was a militia man in the war of 1812, and his father was a Revolutionary soldier. He died Dec. 31, 1857, aged about sixty years. His wife died in 1848 and was about forty-four years old at the time of her death.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.- Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Dean Caton

John Dean Caton, from Monroe, Orange County, New York, came to Chicago in 1833 and to LaSalle County in 1842. His wife was Laura Adelaide Sherrell, of Utica, New York. They have three children: Carrie, now Mrs. Norman Williams, of Chicago; Arthur; and Laura.

Judge Caton was nearly the first lawyer in Chicago. He was Judge of the Circuit Court for the circuit embracing La Salle County, and subsequently one of the Supreme Judges and Chief Justice of the State. He has been largely connected with the telegraph interests, and has accumulated a large fortune.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 254 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Thomas Dean Catlin

It has been practically within the latter part of the nineteenth century that the northern portion of Illinois has been opened to the advance of civilization and the cities of this division are the product of the latter-day enterprise and progress. Ottawa, belonging to this class is mentioned in the Gazetteer as “the seat of varied and useful activities;” and among the prominent men who have helped to make it such stands the gentleman whose name heads this review. He has been identified with this region for more than forty-one years and is today the representative of some of its leading industries.

Thomas Dean Catlin is a native of Clinton, Oneida County, New York, born March 12, 1838. His parents were Marcus and Philena (Dean) Catlin. His father was a professor of mathematics in Hamilton College at Clinton. He was of English descent and his death occurred in 1849. On the maternal side, Mr. Catlin descends from an old historic family of the Empire state.

His mother comes of a family that founded Deansville, New York. In 1795, on the site of that town, lived the Brotherton Indians and in that year, John Dean, a Quaker, went to the place as a missionary to labor with and for the red men. For a year he lived in a log house, and then erected what is now the wing of the residence owned by Charles Hovey. There he faithfully continued his work until life’s labors were ended and he passed peacefully away in 1820 at the advanced age of eighty-eight years.

He had a son, Thomas Dean, who likewise wad devoted to missionary work among the Indians. He had been his father’s assistant and when the latter died he continued to labor toward civilizing the red men. He was a man of herculean proportions and of great ability and sound judgment. He was not only the Indian agent but was also a counselor, spiritual guide and general law-giver and was largely instrumental in transferring the Brotherton Indians to a reservation at Green Bay, Wisconsin. He secured the appropriation of sixty-four thousand acres from the government and also secured the passage of a law through the New York legislature which enabled the Indians to sell their lands at full value.

From 1830 to 1840 his time was entirely taken up with locating his dusky friends in their new home and in adjusting business matters for them and, wearied by his great toil, death came to end his arduous service in June 1842, when he had reached the age of sixty-three years. He was scrupulously honest, and his career, both public and private was above reproach in every particular. He had the love and reverence of the Indians and the confidence and highest regard of all with whom he came in contact. At the time when a petition was circulated for the establishment of a post-office at another place in the vicinity, he went to Washington and secured the office for Deansville instead. He became its first postmaster and the office and the village were named in his honor. He had five children, and among this number was Mrs. Philena Catlin.

Her son, Thomas Dean Catlin, acquired his education in Hamilton College at Clinton, New York, being graduated at that institution in the class of 1857 at the early age of nineteen years. He still belongs to the college society known as Sigma Phi. Upon the broad fields of the west, with its unlimited opportunities, he entered upon his business career. In 1858 he came to Ottawa, Illinois to meet by appointment his uncle, A. H. Redfield, of Detroit, who was acting as an Indian agent and was stationed at the head-waters of the Missouri river. It was his intention to go to that region, but, his uncle having been detained for a time, he meanwhile sought and obtained a position in the employ of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company, first as a freight clerk, receiving a salary of only four hundred dollars a year; but he soon afterward won promotion and for five years served as agent, finally receiving sixty dollars a month – the highest salary he ever received from that corporation.

His connection with the establishment of telegraphic communication in the west certainly makes him worthy of a place in this history. It is said that rapid transit and rapid communication are the most important factors in civilization. Mr. Catlin is a pioneer in this enterprise. In 1863 he became the secretary of the Illinois & Mississippi Telegraph Company, which had been established in 1849, one of the first in the west. This company owned telegraph patents for several of the western states, controlling the business section of the county. It built various lines throughout the west and in 1867 leased its lines to the Western Union Telegraph Company, thus forming the connecting link between the Atlantic and Pacific.

Many and varied have been the business interests with which he had been connected. He is a man of broad capabilities and resources and his keen discrimination, sound judgment and business sagacity enable him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He is an able financier, his ambition being tempered with a safe conservatism and he is now at the head of one of the leading financial institutions of the state. In April, 1884, he was elected vice-president of the National City Bank, of Ottawa, and in June 1890, after the death of E. C. Allen, its president, he was elected to the superior office, and has ever since acceptably and creditably filled that position. This bank is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars and it now has a surplus of one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars and undivided profits of fifty thousand dollars, making a working capital of about three hundred thousand dollars. He is also president of the State Bank of Seneca, Illinois.

In 1867 Mr. Catlin organized the Ottawa Glass Company and they established one of the pioneer industries of its kind west of Pittsburg, of which he was the secretary and treasurer. Business was carried on under that name until 1880, when the company sold its plant to the United Glass Company of New York, a corporation capitalized for one million two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and owning factories in various places. Of this company Mr. Catlin was the president and treasurer for six years after its organization.

In 1866 Mr. Catlin was married to Miss Helen C. Plant, a resident of Utica, New York and a member of one of the old and honored families of the Empire state and connected with the Daughters of the Revolution. Their only child is James Plant Catlin.

Mr. Catlin is connected with many of the public interests of Ottawa which are calculated to promote the moral, educational and material welfare of the community. He is a member of the First Congregational church, and is serving as one of its deacons. He was a member of the first board of trustees of the Ryburn Memorial Hospital, and is also a member of the board of trustees of Hamilton College at Clinton, New York. Charitable and benevolent, he gives freely of his means to those in need of assistance, but gives always in a quiet, unostentatious way, seeking not the laudations of men. In his political views he is a stalwart supporter of the Republican party and has served his city as alderman and a member of the board of education.

The record of Mr. Catlin is that of a man who by his own unaided efforts has worked his way upward to a position of affluence. His life has been one of industry and perseverance and the systematic and honorable business methods which he has followed have won him the support and confidence of many. Without the aid of influence or wealth, he has risen to a position among the most prominent men of the state and his native genius and acquired ability are the stepping-stones on which he mounted.

[Source: Biographical and genealogical record of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1900. Page 14-16, Biography of Thomas Dean Catlin - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Alfred W. Cavarly

Alfred W. Cavarly, a native of East Lyme, Connecticut, came to Illinois in 1822, first settled in Edwardsville, and subsequently at Carrollton, Green County; was a member of both branches of the Legislature several terms, and County Judge one term, also one of the Commissioners to revise the statutes in 1845; in 1853 he moved to Ottawa, and practiced law for several years. He died in 1876, aged 83. Only one lawyer in practice when he came to the State survives him.

Judge Cavarly had two sons, Alfred and Henry, beside his daughter, Mrs. Wm. Cavarly. Alfred died young.

His widow, Sarah Ann Whitcraft, of Annapolis, Maryland, is still living in Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 252 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Lyman D. Cavarly

Lyman D. Cavarly, from New York, lived in Ottawa twenty years, and returned to Connecticut. His son William married Julianna, a daughter of Judge A. W. Cavarly. He died several years since. Mrs. Cavarly died in 1874, leaving one daughter, Fanny, now living with the widow of Judge Cavarly.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 251-252 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Christopher Champlin

Christopher Champlin, a native of Connecticut, moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, in 1820; came to Ottawa in 1835; moved his wife, Betsey Lee, and family, in 1836. He was a deacon of the Baptist Church, a radical abolitionist, and most worthy man. He died in 1862; his widow died in 1875. Their children were: John C, who married Miss Kennedy, practiced law in Ottawa, was County Judge, and was killed by the cars when crossing the track in 1873; Elizabeth, married Isaiah Strawn, and lives in Ottawa; Caroline, married Howard Chester,-second, Chester Morton, third, R. W. Griswold ; Sarah, married Thomas Bassnett; Cordelia, married Joel W. Armstrong, of Deer Park; Mary C, married Cyrus B. Lewis, of Marseilles; Bertha A., married William Glover; Fanny, married Alvin Ford, of Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 238 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Solomon Channel

Solomon Channel, and wife, Betsey Wamsley, from Ohio in 1832, settled on N. W.1/4S. 12, T.33, R. 4; sold to A. D. Butterfield, and returned to Ohio, came back to Illinois in 1840, and died 1875; his wife died before him. He has had seven children. Joseph, now in Iowa; Mary, married a Mr. Bell in Adams; Malvina; Alva, is dead; Sarah, John, and Jackson, are single.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 283 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

C. H. Charles

C. H. Charles, and wife, Juliet Mann, came from Tioga County, Pa., in 1837; was a merchant in partnership with John Hoffman; died in 1840. His daughter, Susan, married Wm. Gilman, of Mendota; Phebe, married Hon. Washington Bushnell, of Ottawa; one son, C. C. Charles, married, and lives in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 368 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Chumasero

William Chumasero, from New York, in 1838; a lawyer of good ability; married Elizabeth Brown: and removed to Helena, Montana, about ten years since.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 364 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jerry and Frank Church

Jerry and Frank Church, brothers, came from New York about 1831 or'32; they made a claim near Ottawa, and after a brief absence finding it floated, they left in disgust. Jerry was an eccentric genius, and published an autobiography.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 246 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Amos Clark

Amos Clark, brother to Beebe, came from Connecticut in 1837; purchased a farm on Sections 20 and 29, and in 1839 sold to Myron B. Bennett, and returned to Connecticut.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 388 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Beebe Clark

Beebe Clark settled on his farm as soon as purchased. In 1837 he married Susan Bishop, of Connecticut, and cultivated his farm till 1869. when he sold, and moved to Joliet, to live with his daughter Henrietta, an only child, the wife of the Rev. Chas. A. Gilbert; he died Feb., 1870, and his widow died two years after.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 384 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David Clark

David Clark, and his wife, Debby Ann Gorbet, came from Clermont County, Ohio, in 1836, and settled at Vermillion, where he worked at his trade for several years, then removed to Utica, and is now living in Waltham; a good blacksmith, and an honest man.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 331 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Dolphus Clark

Dolphus Clark, and wife, Sally Loring, from Ontario County, N. Y., in the fall of 1836 settled on S. 5, T. 33, R. 5 ; first a farmer ; present residence in Marseilles. Children: Carlos, married Clarissa Dyke, live in Nebraska; Adaline, married Samuel Parr, now a widow in Marseilles; Mercy, married Sylvester Kenfrew, live in Nebraska ; Sally Ann, married D. A. Nicholson in Marseilles; Caroline, married H. W. Morey, died from the bite of a rattlesnake ; John, married Mary Jane Kerns, lives in Iroquois County ; Mary, married Ebenezer Barbour in Marseilles ; Richard, married Mary Parr in Nebraska; Clara M., married F. E. Titus in Morris, Grundy County.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 317 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Eldridge Gerry Clark

Eldridge Gerry Clark came with the Jennings family from N. Y. ; died here soon after.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 448 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James Clark

James Clark, and wife, Charlotte Sargent, came from England, to Ohio, and from there here in 1833, and settled on S. 17. He was a contractor on the Illinois and Michigan Canal, and was the first to develop and manufacture hydraulic lime for the market from the Silurian strata of that neighborhood, conferring a great benefit upon the locality and the whole Northwest, and enriching himself. Mr. Clark has been Town Supervisor and member of the Legislature, and is now General Agent of the Consolidated Cement or Hydraulic Lime manufacture of the West.

His children are: John, who married Julia, daughter of Truman Hardy ; is living in Utica and is partner with his father, doing a large business ; Charlotte, who married James B. Peckham, and lives in Utica.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 357-358 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jesse A. Clark

Jesse A. Clark, from Fort Covington, New York, in 1832 ; kept tavern at the foot of the bluff, made the Clark claim, then went to Madison, Wisconsin, and died there.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 265 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Clark

John Clark, and wife, Sarah Cook, from Grafton, N. H., came in 1839, and settled on S. 10, T. 32, R. 2. Mrs. Clark died in 1845; he died in September, 1872, leaving five children: Charles, married Olive Slater, and lives in Missouri; Moody, died single; John, married Rachel Merritt, and lives in Bureau County; Lydia, married William Ellsworth, and lives on the old farm; Sarah, married John Elliott, and lives in Vermillion.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 336 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Justus M. Clark

Justus M. Clark, son of Jesse A., took the farm occupied by his father in 1835. He married Martha Dunn; he had kept school in Kentucky; he was a Presbyterian minister, and died on his farm, February 13th, 1867, leaving children. One daughter married Walter Good, now of Marseilles; one married Henry Howland ; Julius Clark is a lawyer, now in Kansas.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 265 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William A. Clark

The first settler in Rutland was Wm. A. Clark, from South Carolina; he settled on the N. E. ¼ S. 22, T. 34, R. 4, in the spring of 1829 ; sold to John Green, and moved to near Naperville.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 277 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Clayton

William Clayton, and his wife, Elizabeth Puntney, came from near Wellsburg, Virginia, and settled on S. 28, T. 33, B. 2, in 1834. He bought the claim of Esdell, who bought of Vroman. Vroman bought his claim of Reynolds, and sold to Esdell, who got badly frozen on the prairie, and died at Martin Reynolds'. His administrator, Josiah Seybold, sold the claim to William Clayton. Mr. Clayton has held the office of Justice of the Peace, and Town Supervisor, but has little taste for office, preferring the quiet of his farming operations, in which he has been very successful, accumulating a handsome property. His wife died in 1875.

His children are: James, who married Sarah Clayton, and settled on S. 21-removed to Colorado, and was murdered when out prospecting; Caroline, married James C. Reynolds; Sarah, married David Dick, who lives on S. 22 ; William married Miss Ostrander, and lives on S. 32; John, married Julia Suydam, and lives adjoining William-both are successful and prosperous farmers; George, went to Colorado, and while taking a drove of cattle and horses from New Mexico to Colorado was murdered, probably by his Mexican assistants-his body was found unburied with the fatal bullet-holes in his head; Manning, served in the volunteer service in the war of the Rebellion, and died soon after his return from the army; Ellen, is unmarried, and lives with her father.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 334-335 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Charles Clifford

Charles Clifford, from Ireland to Michigan, in 1834, and settled on S. 13, T. 31, R. 2, in 1837; now living in Ottawa. Has children.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 443 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph Cloud

Joseph Cloud came from Kentucky in the fall of 1832; married Jane N., daughter of Dr. David Walker ; in 1834 was appointed County Clerk; held the offices of County and Circuit Clerk, Justice of the Peace, Postmaster, and Probate Judge. He died in 1841. An excellent and very popular clerk and magistrate.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 230 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Cochran

John Cochran, from Adams County, Ohio, entered land on Section 3 in 1851, and has occupied it since 1856.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 477 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Cody

John Cody, from Ireland, came to La Salle in June, 1837; he married Miss Turney; he is still living; his wife died in 1870. Has three children: James, married Mary Whalen, is now a grocer in La Salle; Bridget, married James Duncan, the present Mayor of La Salle ; Ellen, is unmarried.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 381 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel L. Cody

Samuel L. Cody, from Vernon, N. Y., settled on Section 13 in 1835, and married Miss Baxter, second wife widow Kenyon, sister of his first. Children: Harriet, married George Frisbin Busnell; Louisa, married Walter Colton ; Ford C. ; Joy, died in the army ; Frederick, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 402 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Churchill Coffing

Churchill Coffing, and wife, Asenath Brewster, from Salisbury, Ct, came in 1839; a thoroughly educated and able lawyer, but lacked energy of character, and was not successful in business; he died in Chicago in 1872, leaving one son, John, now living with his mother in Chicago; one daughter, Catharine, married Mr. Colliday, now in Philadelphia.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 364 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Cornelius Cokeley

Cornelius Cokeley came from Pennsylvania, with H. S. Kinney, in 1835; died in Peru, about 1850; widow lives in Peru. Had one son John and five daughters: Mary married Mr. Miller; Maggie married Wm. O'Neil; Theresa married Nellie.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 368-369 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Timothy Cokeby

Timothy Cokeby came from Pennsylvania in 1837; now on a farm.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 369 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Coleman

John Coleman, came from Richland Co., Ohio, in the fall of 1831 ; he settled on S. 22, lived there till 1847, and went to Missouri for two years, and then returned to the old farm ; he is now living in Streator. His wives were : 1st, Anna Cramer ; 2d, Roxena Cowgill; 3d, Hester Kelley ; 4th, Lutitia Griffith. All dead. Of his children : Julia Ann, married Mr. Ploger, of Ottawa ; Hester Ann, married Joaiah Roberts, of Streator ; James, William, Lilla, are single.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 441 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Charles Colton

Charles Colton came from New Hampshire, and settled on Section 15 ; moved West.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 420 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David W. Conard

David W. Conard settled on Section 30. His first wife was Miss Debolt; second wife, Miss Grove.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 461 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Peter Consols

Peter Consols and John Wilcox settled on S. 30, T. 33, R. 5, in 1834.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 450 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Burton C. Cook

Burton C. Cook, from Monroe County, New York, arrived in Ottawa, July 21, 1835; was absent one year completing his education, and came back in 1837; was admitted to the bar in 1840. There was a class of four admitted at that time: B. C Cook, Joseph O. Glover, Joseph True who died soon after, and John M. Carothers, afterward a partner of T. L. Dickey and for many years Clerk of the Circuit Court of Kendall County ; he died about 1860. Mr. Cook was elected States' Attorney for the 9th Judicial Circuit in 1846; the circuit embraced the counties of La Salle, Grundy, Kendall, Kane, De Kalb, Ogle, Bureau, Putnam, Stark, Peoria, and Marshall; after two years' service he was again elected for four years; in 1852, he was elected to the State Senate and re-elected in 1856 ; he was a member of the peace conference in 1861, and was elected to Congress in 186-1-66-68 and 1870, and resigned in 1871, since which time he has been Solicitor for the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, and has resided in Chicago. Mr. Cook married Elizabeth Hart, daughter of Hon. Onis Hart, of Oswego, N. Y.; he has one daughter, Nellie, who married C. H. Lawrence.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 245-246 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Edward Cook

Edward Cook came in 1835 ; died in California, 20 years ago : left a widow and son. All have left.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 434 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John T. Cook

John T. Cook, brother-in-law to Sutphen, came in 1834 ; went to Galena, then to Chicago in the lumber trade ; his wife died in Chicago of cholera.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 432 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jonathan Cooley

Jonathan Cooley, came in 1835. Had one daughter who married Ephraim Scott.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 425 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Simon Cooley

Simon Cooley, from New York, came in 1836; married Ruth Gillett. He was a carpenter by trade; went to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 414 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Matthew R. Coon

Matthew R. Coon, and wife, Emily Wiswall, from Pennsylvania, in the fall of 1834, with William Wiswall, came by the rivers, and settled on S. 12, T. 32, R. 2; moved to Iowa about 1845, and from there to California, where he died, leaving four children.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 329 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Timothy Corbit

Timothy Corbit, from Pennsylvania, in 1837, settled adjoining J. D. Butterfield.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 284 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

CORWIN, Franklin, (1818 - 1879)

(source: Library of Congress - Contributed by Sara Hemp)

CORWIN, Franklin, (nephew of Moses Bledso Corwin and Thomas Corwin), a Representative from Illinois; born in Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, January 12, 1818; attended private schools; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1839 and practiced in Wilmington, Ohio; member of the Ohio house of representatives in 1846 and 1847; served in the State senate 1847-1849; moved to Peru, La Salle County, Ill., in 1857; member of the Illinois house of representatives and served as speaker; elected as a Republican to the Forty-third Congress (March 4, 1873-March 3, 1875); was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1874 to the Forty-fourth Congress; resumed the practice of his profession in Peru, Ill., until his death there on June 15, 1879.

Daniel Cosgrove

Daniel Cosgrove came from Ireland in 1837; was Justice of the Peace for several years ; died in 1872. His wife was Miss Garrity. His children were: Annie, Daniel, Terrance, Cronise, and Luke.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 381 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Cottew

Page 22

William Cottew, farmer and stock-raiser, section 36, Adams Township, is a native of Kent, England, born Oct. 28, 1818, a son of Peter Cottew, deceased. He came to the United States in 1845 and settled in Adams Township, La Salle Co., Ill., where he has since made his home. He was married in July, 1853, to Sara Lett, widow of Harvey Springstead. To this union were born six children, of whom three are living - Alfred, Ida and Charles William. Alfred married Therza Boomer and has one child, named Ray Lett. He is a resident of this township. Mrs. Cottew had one child by her former husband, who is now deceased. Mr. Cottew is the owner of 192 acres of choice land in this township and his wife owns 109 acres.

Thomas R. Covell

Thomas R. Covell came from Alton, in 1824. He settled on Covell creek, giving his name to that stream. He traded with the Indians, and built a mill near where the creek emerges from the bluff on to the Illinois bottom. He moved to Salt Creek, Cook County, about 1833, and died there. The camp-ground of the 4th Cavalry was Covell's cornfield.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 227 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Benjamin Craig

Benjamin Craig, from Ohio, settled on S.16,.in1837. Sold to Pickens.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Otter Creek, Page 462 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry Cramer

Henry Cramer, came from Richland Co., Ohio, in 1831 ; he died in 1832. His daughters married John Coleman, James McKernan, Geo. McKee, and Daniel Barrackman.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 441-442 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David Crawford

David Crawford from Ireland in 1833; came here in 1838 with William Sly; removed to Iowa in 1861.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 423 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Sylvanus Crook

Sylvanus Crook, from Clinton County, New York, in 1832, a merchant and farmer; he was a Justice of the Peace for several years, and died July 9, 1871. He married Elizabeth Farnsworth, who survives him. Lucy married Albert Pool, now in Iowa; Minnie and Charles are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 263-264 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Amzi Crosiar

Amzi Crosiar, brother to Simon, came from Pittsburgh, and settled on Sec. 36, near Shippingport, in 1826; came to Utica in 1833, and settled at the foot of the bluff on the south side of the river. He was killed by a runaway team in 1848.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 357 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James and William Crosiar

James and William Crosiar, brothers of Simon Crosiar, from Pittsburg, Pa., settled on Section 36, near Shippingport, in 1831; they both left in 1833.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 381 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Simon Crosiar

Simon Crosiar was born near Pittsburgh, Pa.; his wife, Sarah Owen, was from Clermont County, Ohio. He left Pennsylvania in 1815, and went to Ohio, and was married in 1817; removed to Illinois and settled at Cap au Gray, in 1819, and removed to Calhoun County, where he remained until 1S24. then to Peoria, and to Ottawa in 1826, where he put up a log cabin on the ravine near where S. W. Cheever now lives; resided there one year and then removed to the south side near the Bass rocks, where he remained about two years; removed to Shippingport in the fall of 1829; built a mill on Cedar creek, and removed there in 1831. He was Postmaster, and carried the mail to and from Peoria once a month. Sold the mill to Mr. Myers; built a saw-mill and carding machine on the Percomsoggin ; started the saw-mill in the spring of 1833 and the carding machine in the fall after. Removed to Old Utica, on the north bank of the Illinois in 1834, kept a store and warehouse for storage and commission business, and for a time was Captain of a steamboat on the river. He died in November, 1846; his widow died in 1871.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Crosiar were bold, hardy and resolute, and well calculated for frontier life. Mrs. Crosiar told the writer many incidents of her pioneer life; she said she was not afraid of the Indians even when alone, unless they were drunk, but they were like white men when intoxicated, unreasonable and dangerous. On one occasion, during her husband's absence, they came and wanted whisky; she had covered up the whisky barrel and told them she had no whisky; they told her she had, and went to uncover the cask; she then seized a hatchet and told them they should not have it if she had ; they told her she was a brave squaw, but raised their tomahawks, and she was compelled to yield to numbers; they got the whisky and had a big drunk, but did not molest her.

Mr. Crosiar was an active participant in the Black Hawk war, and was one of the party that buried the victims of the Indian Creek massacre.

In his numerous removals he followed the rivers, transferring his family and effects in a keel boat, and frequently served as a pilot on the river. The latch string of the Crosiar cabin was always out, and many an early emigrant gratefully remembers their kindness and hospitality.

They had a large family of children, but they have all left except one. Amzi Croziar, the only child remaining here, married Miss Brown, and is an extensive farmer and prominent citizen of Utica.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 355-357 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jeremiah Crotty

The early settlement of Seneca is so connected with the Crotty family that a history of the village would be incomplete without a sketch of its founder.

JEREMIAH CROTTY was born in Cork, Ireland, and came to this country in 1827. After becoming disgusted with a Micawber-like life about New York City waiting for "something to turn up," he concluded to go out in the country and turn it up himself. With a bundle upon his back, supported on his shoulder by a short stick, he started West and trudged along all one day until he became convinced that his "grip-sack" was a big load and getting heavier, and on inspecting it found it filled with a dozen pairs of long stockings, a couple of pairs of corduroys and a fustian vest or two, besides several large old-style "hankerchers." Concluding that they were not the style, and preferring to go lighter, he selected one or two articles and left the rest by the wayside.

His clear head and willing hands soon found enough to do, and after one year's residence in New York, eight in Pennsylvania and three in Maryland, where he was married to Ellen Blake, he came West. He made his appearance at Lockport in 1838, at canal contract lettings. He had no recommendations such as the rules required, but he put in his bid and was made all sorts of fun of by the high-toned, ruffle-shirted gentlemen who came to carry off all the bids in triumph. He contented himself in his corduroy breeches and knit jacket, smoked a cob pipe and kept his mind to himself, and to the surprise of the aristocratic crowd won the contracts, laid out before their bewildered eyes $6,000 in gold as his backer or recommendation and went away, leaving them in a state of ludicrous bewilderment.

As an evidence of his solid sense, he took contracts that others had beggared themselves in and made money. He discovered that much of the canal way was through beds of soft, shaly slate or soapstone. Other contractors adopted the old slow drill and sledge hammer process to remove this material. He employed a gigantic plow of his own invention and with four yoke of oxen literally T lowed up the solid rock, running night and day with two sets of teams and men, "beating the frost" and doing ten times the work with the same outlay that others could.

He had contracts for different sections of the canal between Aux Sable and Ottawa, and most of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad between Minonk and Ottawa. The harder and more expensive jobs he managed himself, and the others he sub-let to others. He contracted on the canal until 1842, when work was suspended until 1844. He again went to work on the canal; was in Tennessee a short time and then went to Elgin, where he took contracts on the Northwestern Railroad.

He remained at Elgin until Dee. 15, 1850, when he removed to Manlius Township and settled on land now comprised in the village of Seneca. He had entered this land in 1848 and had a house built on it in 1849 . John Higgins and P. Burk did the carpenter work and R. Cosgrove the mason work. This was the first dwelling-house erected in what afterward became Seneca Village. In 1857 Mr. Crotty laid out a village on the bluff which took the name of its founder. Lots were sold for $1 each, and up to the year 1860 the village contained about fifteen dwelling-houses and two stores. The stores were kept by Crotty & Hickleing and Martin Seeley. The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad had been built in 1852,and a station house erected in 1854. Mr. Crotty's son was the first station agent and was also the first Postmaster. Letters at that time averaged about three a week and the rest of the mail was in proportion.

It was soon found that in the valley near the railroad would be a more convenient place for business houses, so in 1862 Mr. Crotty erected a store on the present site of the saloon owned by E. Waterman. Martin Seeley built and kept the second store, and the next one was built by J. Armour. It was occupied by Underhill & Vanghey. The first elevator was built by J. Crotty. The first death was that of Annastasia Crotty, who died in May, 1853. Henry Cuddigan was the first child born in the village and Thomas F. Wendle, Mr. Crotty's bookkeeper, was the first man to enter into matrimonial relations in the village. Such is a brief sketch of the early history of Seneca as related to the writer by J. J. Crotty, son of Jeremiah Crotty, who lived at Seneca, laid out and founded by him, about thirty years, and the post office was named "Crotty" by the Government.

He died leaving a widow and three sons - William, Matthew and John J., and three grandchildren, sons of his daughter, Mary McGorrisk, deceased, who were his heirs. His estate was valued at about $100,000. Although a man of much eccentricity of character, he was universally respected and died mourned by all who knew him. He died July 28, 1879, at his home at Seneca, in his eighty-first year. Old age and a general breaking down of the system for about nine months previous to his death had confined him to his house, and for the greater portion of the time to his bed, so that his demise was not unexpected.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : also a condensed History of Illinois, embodying accounts of prehistoric races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil and political history.. Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.Page 359-360 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Bradish Cummings

Bradish Cummings, and wife, Sophia Sergeant, from Ware, Massachusetts, in 1834, settled on S. 11, T. 32, R. 2. His wife died in April, 1835. He married Betsey Hatch, from Connecticut, in 1836. Sold his farm to Nathan Applebee, and moved to Brooklyn, Iowa. His children are : Sergeant, who married Mary Hays; Henry, married Mary Peck; William, married Susan Crusen ; and Charles-have all four settled in Iowa, Sophia, married Samuel J. Hayes, and lives in Farm Ridge; Frances, married Moreland Francis, and lives in Iowa; Almira and Maria, children of the second wife, went with their parents to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 328-329 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Currier

John Currier came from Vermont to Cincinnati, and here in 1838; wife, Eliza Wallace; ten children.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 433 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry Curtis

Henry Curtis, and wife, Mary E. McNett, from Connecticut, in 1836.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 428 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William H. W. Cushman

William H. W. Cushman, from Middleborough, Massachusetts, 1834; merchant, miller, banker, capitalist, and manufacturer. Wielding a large capital, he has filled a prominent place in the business of Ottawa and the county at large. He was twice elected a member of the Legislature. He raised the Fifty-third Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, and was commissioned its Colonel. His first wife was Athalia A. Leonard; she died in 1835. In 1837 he married Harriet Gridley, of Ottawa, daughter of Rev. Ralph Gridley; she died in 1841. In 1843 he married Anna C. Rodney, daughter of Caesar A. Rodney, of Delaware. His children are: Wm. H., who married Miss Douglass (they are now living in Colorado); George is in California; and several younger children at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 239 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


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