LaSalle County Illinois Biographies, Sketches and Obituaries

G

(Index Not all linked)


Isaac Gage

James Galloway

Reeder Galloway

Samuel Galloway

William Gentleman

John Gibson

Ruby I. Gilbert

Gideon Gillett

George W. Gilson

George Gleim

James Glover

Joseph O. Glover

Riverius Goddard

William H. Goddard

Jacob Goff

Roswell Goodell

Henry Gorbett

Madison Goslin

Nahum Gould

Samuel Graff

Dr. Frederick Graham

Thomas Gransden

Horace Graves

William H. Graves

William Gray

Charles H. Green

Henry Green

John Green

Hugh M. Gregg

Ezra Gregg

Henry W. Gridley

Ralph W. Gridley

Samuel B. Gridley

George W. Greiner

David Griffith

RICHARD E. GRIFFITH

Enos Griggs

Aaron Grinnell

William Groom

Mrs. Barbary Grove

David Grove

Joseph Grove

Samuel Grove
Norton Gum

Aaron Gunn

Jason Gurley

Isaac Gage

Isaac Gage, from New Hampshire, came in 1837, and settled on Section 8. He married Lucy Little, daughter of James Little, of Eden. Mr. Gage is a wealthy farmer. He has four children : Louisa, married S. T. Osgood, and lives at Marseilles; Harriet E., Ida A., and Benjamin Frank, are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 449-450 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James Galloway

The first settler in the limits of the present town was James Galloway ; he came from Pennsylvania to Ohio, near Sandusky, and remained there three years ; he visited the Illinois river in the fall of 1824. and is said to have spent some months in hunting, trapping, and exploring the country; moved his family to Chicago in 1825, and wintered there; in 1826 he bought a claim on S. 24, T. 3, R. 4, which was first made by a man by the name of Rawson, who sold to Ephraim Sprague, and Sprague sold to Galloway, where he made a home and spent his days. His first wife died in 1830; her children are: George, claimed to be the first white male child born in the county, now living near the old farm: John, died in Missouri; Susan, married Joel Ellis, lives in Chicago; Jane, married Mr. Halloway ; Mary, married Mr. Clyburne, and lives in Chicago. Mr. Galloway's second wife was Matilda Stipes; her children are: Archibald, married Mary Dickerman, and lives near the old farm ; Marshall, who is a conductor on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad ; Samuel, lives in Michigan ; Sarah, married Mr. Pearson, and is living on the old farm; James, is living in the vicinity. Mr. Galloway died in 1863, aged 73 years. His widow died in 1864.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 390-391 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Reeder Galloway

Reeder Galloway, brother of James, married Rachel Stipes; died long ago, leaving one son, John R., of Marseilles.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 392 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Galloway

Samuel Galloway, and wife, Catharine McClure, of Scotch descent, from near Londonderry, in the north of Ireland ; emigrated to America, and settled in Lexington, Green County, New York, about 1806-his wife died in 1815 : his second wife was Lydia Moore, who died 1833. He removed to La Salle County, Illinois, June, 1837, with all his children; he first located near where Tonica now is, and in 1840 moved on to S. 6, T. 31, R. 3-known as the Galloway farm, and the location of the Galloway post office. He died July 24, 1840. His children by his first wife were : Catharine, who married Joseph T. Bullock, and lives near Tonica; Samuel C., died single, August 24, 1840 ; Francis, married Elizabeth J. A. Galloway, and settled on S. 1, T. 31, R. 2-he died July 24, 1869 ; Mary, married John Briley, and lived on S. 1, T.. 31, R. 2. She died Dec. 25, 1876. The children of the second wife are: Elijah M., who married Elizabeth Halcott, daughter of Colonel Thomas Halcott, from Green County, New York. Elijah was Postmaster and Justice of the Peace for several years ; he now lives near Monroe City, Missouri; Lydia M., married Henry Slater; her second husband was W. Holly, who died in California. She is now living with her third husband, Jefferson Smith, in Mich.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 443-444 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Gentleman

William Gentleman, from Vermont, settled in the town on Section 18, in 1834, and is still on the old farm ; has buried two wives, and has four children : Eliza ; William, has recently graduated at Cornell University ; James; and one younger daughter.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 393 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Gibson

John Gibson, from Ohio, came here in 1840. He was a Lieutenant in the war of 1812, from Pennsylvania; he died in 1869; his wife died in 1860. Left six children: Martha married C. McKinley; Maria, married Jas. N. Frenary, of Rutland; Capt. Wm. L., married Eliza Trumbo, of Rutland ; Geo. W., married Cynthia Robinson, of Rutland; John P., married Mary J. Anderson, of Rutland; Capt. Theodore C., married Susan S. Sample, of Ottawa,

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 284 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ruby I. Gilbert

GILBERT, Miss Ruby I., business woman, born in Junius, N. Y., 1st December, 1851. She has been for many years recording secretary of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Illinois and book-keeper of the Woman's Temperance Publication Association, and is a most interesting and fit survival in the growing group of business women which this modern time has developed. Miss Gilbert handles from two to three hundred thousand dollars a year, and has completely gained the confidence of all associated with her. She has the remarkable combination of a delicately poised conscience and a perfectly level head. Many persons might intend to be accurate as she is, but their intellectual make-up would render it impossible. Mathematical and ethical qualities must balance each other to produce such a result Miss Gilbert was engaged in clerical work in Freeport, Ill., when Miss Willard lectured there early in the crusade movement, and then first became especially interested in temperance work. The education of Miss Gilbert has been wholly in the public-schools, and in various relations that she has sustained she has received a diversified and thorough business training. In 1882 she came into association with Mrs. Mary B. Willard, who was at that time editor of the "Union Signal." She has since then sustained an intimate relation with Mrs. Willard, serving also as her legal business representative in this country after the American School for Girls was established in Berlin, Germany, in 1885. Miss Gilbert went to Illinois with her parents in 1855, and was reared in the town of Mendota, her father having been an itinerant minister in the pioneer days of the Baptist Church.

(Source: American Women by Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Vol. 1, 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

Gideon Gillett

Gideon Gillett, and wife, Ruth Goddard, from Granby, Connecticut, came in September, 1833. He died in 1F66. His children were: Emeline. died single; Almon, died-his widow married Levi Carter ; Luna, married Pliny Dewey ; Rxith, married Simon Cooley; Dennis T., married Man' Smith, in Iowa; Daniel S., married Susan Worsley. in Iowa ; Samuel N., married J. Weisman : Simeon B., married Eliza Baker.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 412 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George W. Gilson

George W. Gilson, of Connecticut, graduated at the Norwich University in 1837, came to Peru in spring of 1838; was an engineer on the original Central Railroad, built under State authority, under T. B. Ransom, resident engineer; he married Miss E. C. Greenfield, of Middletown, Ct., a sister of Mrs. Ransom; he removed to Lost Grove, but returned to Peru, and was elected Mayor in 1855. He removed to Chicago, and became a member of the real estate firm of A. J. Galloway & Co.; he died Sept. 29, 1856, leaving four children: George T., lives in Chicago-he married the daughter of Prof. D. J. Pinckney, of Ogle County; the widow and Prances are living with Emma, the wife of Judge M. R. M. Wallace, in Chicago; Ella, is the wife of Wm. J. Russell, of New York City.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 371 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George Gleim

George Gleim, and wife, Katharine Weitzel, came from Germany to Baltimore, in 1834, and settled on S. 36, T. 32, R. 3, in 1840. His wife died in 1858, leaving two children: Frederick, who occupies the homestead, and is a successful farmer; Anna is now living in Texas. Mr. Gleim married a second wife, by whom he had six children, all living in the town of Bruce.

James Glover

Judge James Glover, father of J. O. Glover, came from Oswego, N. Y., in 1833, and settled in South Ottawa ; he had held the position of County Judge in New York for a considerable time. He died about 1849.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 260 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph O. Glover

Joseph O. Glover, from Oswego, New York, in 1835 ; held the office of Justice of the Peace and was admitted to the bar in 1840, and with B. C. Cook, under the firm name of Glover & Cook, constituted one of the leading law firms of the county for twenty-five years ; in 1869 he was appointed U. S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois and removed to Chicago, where he now resides. He married Janette Hart, and has three children: Julia, wife of George C. Campbell; Henry S. and Otis B. at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 245 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Riverius Goddard

Riverius Goddard, and wife, Miss Buttles, from New York, in 1837 ; a blacksmith by trade ; moved to Michigan. The widow Arsenith Bellamy, (who came in 1837 and died in 1848), Mrs Root, Gillett, and Holcomb, were all sisters.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 406 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William H. Goddard

William H. Goddard came from Boston in 1836 : disgusted with farming after four years' trial, went to Louisville, Ky., and pursued his profession of a dentist. His wife was a sister of the somewhat noted writer, James Ross Brown.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 448 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jacob Goff

Jacob Goff, and wife, from Pennsylvania to Tazewell County, in fall of 1835, and soon after settled on S. 17. Mr. Goff died in 1840. His children, Alif, Samuel, Janet, and William, all moved to Kansas about 1856.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 442-443 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Roswell Goodell

Roswell Goodell, from Connecticut, in 1834, settled near Buffalo Rock, and died there in 1837. His daughter, Emma, married Alson Woodruff. Eaton was Deputy Sheriff, under Woodruff, and Sheriff from 1851 to 1853. He married a daughter of Gov. Matteson, removed to Joliet, then to Springfield, and is now in Chicago. Edward, Andrew, Adaline, Henry, and Maria, all died single. Althea married Col. Irwin.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 236 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry Gorbett

Henry Gorbett, from Clermont County, Ohio, in 1837, with his wife, Sally Robinson, settled on S. 31, T. 33, R. 3. His second wife was the widow Holland; he had fifteen children: Mary, married Calvin Pembroke; John, is in Texas; Debby Ann, married David Clark; Francis Asbury; Mary Ann, married John Quimby; George, is dead; Margaret, married James Wilson; Peter, is in Pontiac; Sarah, married a Mr. Fisk; Joseph, is in Pontiac; Angeline, married Edward Smith; Henry and Samuel are at Rooks Creek.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 260-261 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Madison Goslin

Joel Alvord, Edward Alvord, Nelson Alvord, (sops of Joel), Jacob Barr, William Groom, and Madison Goslin, left Albany County, New York, in wagons, the 15th day of May, 1833, for the West In Chicago, they met Judge Isaac Dimmick, then returning from a tour of exploration, who directed them to this locality. They arrived here July 18th. A journey by land for hundreds of miles at that day through a country, most of it unsettled, without roads or bridges, can hardly be appreciated now. They were compelled to adopt camp life; stopping at night on the bank of some stream, where wood and water could be procured, and sleeping in their wagons, or on the ground, and in some instances were compelled to build bridges to cross the streams. Madison Goslin died in the fall of 1833.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 295-296 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Nahum Gould

Nahum Gould was born in Warwick, Franklin County, Mass., in 1798; crippled by an accident and unable to labor, he attended an academy at New Salem, and taught school alternately, till he entered Amherst College and graduated in 1828. He studied theology with Dr. John Woodbridge, of Hadley. He married Rebecca B. Leonard. Was ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church, and appointed a missionary in the State of New York.

May 5th, 1834, with his wife, three children and his sister, Semira (who afterward married Thomas Hartsell, of Hennepin), started for Illinois in a light wagon; they generally found accommodations for the night at the houses along the route, but were sometimes compelled to sleep in their wagon. He arrived at his wife's brother's, Dea. John Leonard, at Bailey's Grove, on June 12th. He was first settled at Union Grove, and preached occasionally at Hennepin and Vermillionville. He organized or assisted in organizing a Presbyterian Church at Hennepin, Dec. 29th, 1834; one at Union Grove, Dec. 3rd, 1834; at Vermillionville or Lowell, August, 1834 ; one at Plainfield ; one at Rockwell, January, 1837. That year he built a house and settled at Rockwell.

In 1838 his wife, Rebecca Blake Leonard, died leaving four daughters. The sickness of 1838 swept away more than half of the church. He preached at Troy Grove, and organized a church there. In 1838, being, in common with the majority of the population, taken sick, he turned his horse on the prairie to care for himself, and was taken to his sister, Mrs. Hartsell at Hennepin, where his children were. Mr. Hartsell was also sick, and his only child died. Thos. Hartsell died at Waukegan about twelve years since, and his wife, Semira Gould, died at Hennepin, thirty years since, or in 1846. Mr. Hartsell's only surviving child and son lives at Aurora.

Mr. Gould returned to Rockwell late in the fall, and in the spring of 1839 married Sarah Dewey, daughter of Roswell Dewey. He left for his health and lived at Princeton one year, then settled at Troy Grove ; preached and taught the district school and kept a station on the Underground Railroad, and claimed that the passengers went safely through. While at Homer he was a sort of an itinerant on a missionary circuit to Indian Creek, where he organized a church in 1843; one in Paw Paw in 1844; preached in Harding and Serena ; suffered many hardships and encountered many dangers and narrow escapes in fording streams and other new country experiences.

In 1846 he removed to Gouldtown, in the town of Freedom, where he resided four years, then to Northville, and to Somonauk in 1859.

In November, 1850, his wife, Sarah Dewey, died, and in 1858 he married Lois Jane, widow of Rev. Francis Leonard, of Galesburg. His family lived with or near him till 1871, when one daughter went to Nebraska, one died, one went to Iowa, and one to Minnesota.

In October, 1871, he removed to Nebraska, and settled at Kearney Junction. He secured the organization of a church at Kearney, aided efficiently in organizing the presbytery of Kearney and synod of Nebraska, and presided at the first meeting of each.

He died at his home in 1872, aged 74, and his grave overlooks the city which had but one house when he went there. But few men have had more varied experiences-seen more of new country life, or labored more zealously in their chosen field, or accomplished more for which his church should be grateful.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 377-379 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Graff

Samuel Graff came from Germany in 1834 : tailor by trade ; settled on Section 8; moved to Section 5 ; died in 1874.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 428 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Dr. Frederick Graham

Dr. Frederick Graham, from Westchester County, N. Y., first to Ottawa, and then settled on Section 8, in 1836; a practicing physician for many years. He and his wife are both dead.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 445 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Thomas Gransden

Thomas Gransden, from England to Ulster Co., New York, in 1834, and settled on S. 30, T. 36, R. 5, in 1837. He married Eliza Powell, and has two sons, Thomas, and Albert, and three daughters, Anna. Alice and Martha ; all at home, except Martha, who married Edward Armstrong, of Northville

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 427 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Horace Graves, and William H. Graves

Horace Graves, and William H. Graves, came to Putnam County in 1829 and 1830, and were early settlers in Hope.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Hope, 481 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Gray

William Gray came from Rhode Island, in 1837; a carpenter by trade ; married Mary Brown, and settled and still lives on S. 2, T. 33, R. 2. They have two children: Arthur, who married Belle Bane; his present wife is Candace Fuller-he lives in Streator; Fanny married James Chase, now at her father's.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 336 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Charles H. Green

Charles H. Green, son of Henry Green, of Ottawa, came to Illinois with his father, and settled on Section 3; he married Jane Loyd, and has three daughters. Mr. Green cultivates a large farm and has a fine herd of short-horn stock.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 388 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry Green

Henry Green and wife, from Cheshire County, New Hampshire, 1833 ; first to South Ottawa, then to East Ottawa in the spring of 1834. The first settler in East Ottawa, and built the first house on the east side of Fox river. He patented a mowing machine, the first in this locality. He was County Commissioner in 1839-40 ; died in June, 1860. His children are : Charles Henry, who married Jane Loyd, and settled on S. 3 in Farm Ridge; William, now in Kansas; Mary P.; Martha E. and her mother are in Kansas.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 238 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Green

John Green, and wife, Barbara Grove, came from Licking County, Ohio, in the fall of 1829. He brought the irons for a saw and grist mill by team overland, and millwrights to put them up. Mr. Green lived on the claim bought of Clark, in Rutland, until 1832, when he removed to Dayton. He built a saw mill and put in a run of stone in 1830, and a flouring mill in 1832. He was County Commissioner, and occupied a prominent place in the business and early history of the county. He died December 17th, 1874, aged 84; his widow is still living, 85 years of age. He had nine children; Eliza, married William L. Dunnavan, and lives in Rutland; Jesse, married Isabella Trumbo; he served three terms as Justice of the Peace and was three years Town Supervisor; in 1849 he led a company of forty-nine men to the then El Dorado, California. David, married Mary Stadden; served as Town Supervisor several terms in company with his brother Jesse he has run the large woolen factory at Dayton - the first one run by water in the State. It was built in 1840 and enlarged in 1864. Joseph, died in 1855. Catharine, married George M. Dunnavan, of Dayton; Isaac, born in Illinois, married Rebecca J. Trumbo, and lives on the old farm; Rachel, married George Gibson; Rebecca, married Oliver W. Trumbo.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Dayton, Page 270-271 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hugh M. Gregg

Hugh M. Gregg, from New York; settled on S. 3 ; died, 1838.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 401 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ezra Gregg

Ezra Gregg, son of Hugh ; studied law, and went to Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 401 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George W. Greiner

One of the young, energetic business men of Tonica, LaSalle County, is George W. Greiner, who is well along on the highway leading to fortune. A truly wide-awake, enterprising citizen, he is heart and soul alive to the progress and advancement of this place, and for that reason, if for no other, he would be highly esteemed by the residents of this thriving village

Mr. Greiner is proud of the fact that he is one of the native born sons of Illinois, and that in him two nationalities are united, as his father, Charles Greiner, was born under the French flag, while his mother, Sophia (Ehmler) Greiner, was a native of Prussia. His paternal grandfather lived and died in France, and reared twelve children. The maternal grandfather of our subject emigrated to the United States many years ago, settling in Putnam county, Illinois, where he lived until his death, at the age of about threescore and ten years. Charles Greiner came to America to seek his fortune when he was a young man, and locating in Hennepin, engaged in the bakery and grocery business during most of his active life. He died in that section of the state in 1889, when in his seventieth year, and is survived by his widow, who is a resident of Hennepin. Of their eight children six are living, and all dwell in Putnam County save George W. They are named as follows: Anna, Charles, Jennie, Ida and Charlotte. Anna is the wife of W. E. Eddy; Jennie of John Markley; Ida of W. C. Patterson; and Charlotte of H. B. Zenor.

The birth of George W. Greiner took place in Putnam county, July 18, 1869. The benefits of an excellent public school education were his, and after completing his studies he began clerking in a store. Thus occupied for several years, he gained a practical idea of business methods, and at the same time carefully accumulated a snug little capital, with which to embark in an enterprise of his own when the proper time came. In 1895 he came to Tonica and purchased the general store owned by the Miller estate, adding a meat market. He keeps a high grade of goods and transacts his business in a thoroughly enterprising manner, his store being neat and attractive.

Fraternally Mr. Greiner is a highly esteemed member of Tonica Lodge, No. 364, F. & A. M., at the present time enjoying the honor of being master of the lodge. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he is independent, preferring to use his franchise for the nominees and principles which he deems worthy of support, regardless of party lines. His fellow citizens, respecting his financial ability and excellent judgment, honored him with the position which he still holds, that of village treasurer.

The marriage of Mr. Greiner and Miss Irma Boyle took place November 28, 1890. She is a daughter of Albert and Frances (Hartenbower) Boyle. Three children bless the home of our subject and wife, their names being, respectively, Earl, Frances and Veryne.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]

Henry W. Gridley

Dea. Henry W. Gridley, and wife, Lucy Dickinson, came from Deerfield, Mass., in June, 1835, and settled on S. 1, where he resided until 1848, when he sold to Thomas Dunnaway and removed to Ottawa, where he now resides. His children are : Caroline E., married Henry L. Brush ; Chas. H., is deceased ; Laura W., married Dr. D. Hopkins : Lucy S., at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 386 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ralph W. Gridley

Rev. Ralph W. Gridley, from Middleborough, Massachusetts, in, 1834 ; died February 2d, 1840; his wife died January 19th, 1841. His children were: Harriet, married W. H. W. Cushman ; Samuel B., of Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 239 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel B. Gridley

Samuel B. Gridley, son of the Rev. Ralph Gridley, was a merchant for many years, a partner of W. H. W. Cushman, and for the last few years of his life superintendent of the Ottawa Gas Works; he died in 1876. He married Miss Stone, daughter of Dr. Stone, from Vermont, and left one son, Ralph, now in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 239-240 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David Griffith

David Griffith came from Washington County,Pa., in 1857, and settled on Section 25-then three to four miles from neighbors ; he died Aug. 14, 1877.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 477 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

RICHARD E. GRIFFITH

Donated by Danni Monn Hopkins

RICHARD E. GRIFFITH, Postmaster of Lewistown, has long been closely connected with the business interests of the city and county and is numbered among the foremost citizens of the community. He is a native of this State, born in Peru January 28, 1853, and a son of Michael and Margaret (McClaren) Griffith. The father of our subject was a man of much learning and was a pioneer teacher in the public schools of Peru, where he died in 1853. The mother subsequently married Thomas Bowen, who established a wagon shop in Lewistown, this county, and carried on business as a wheelwright here until his death in 1872. The mother passed away in 1865.

He of whom we write received a substantial education in the city schools and when but a boy commenced to work with his step-father and learned of him the trade of a wagon-maker. After the latter's death he and his brother C. V. engaged in the business and carried it on until 1880 and then began to deal in agricultural implements, and also dealt in railroad ties, etc. Mr. Griffith continued in that business until his appointment as Postmaster in 1889, a position for which he is amply qualified in every respect and whose duties he is discharging very satisfactorily.

December 31, 1876, the marriage of our subject with Miss Calista E. Guernsey was duly solemnized. She was born in Illinois, in Lee Township, this county. They have here a very pleasant home and the gracious cordiality of the hostess and the courteous hospitality of the host often attract to it friends form a large circle of acquaintances.

In his career as a man of business and a civic official, our subject has displayed an excellent capacity for the management of affairs with tact, promptness and discretion, and the possession of these qualities pointed to him as a man well fitted for the responsibilities of the federal position he is so ably filling. He has always been a Republican and has given his party his most earnest support. He has served eight years as Deputy Sheriff and for two years was a member of the City Council. He was identified with that honorable body at the time the water-works were projected, and as a member of the water-works committee was very active in securing their establishment. He was also one of the committee of ways and means and of streets and alleys, and was chairman of the committee on police and fire. He has served as delegate to numerous county, Senatorial and Congressional conventions, and his wise counsels are valued by his party. He is a member of Lewistown Camp, No. 228, M. W. A.

-- PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL ALBUM OF FULTON COUNTY, ILLINOIS 1890  Pages 526-527

Names mentioned: BOWEN; GRIFFITH; GUERNSEY; McCLAREN

Enos Griggs

Enos Griggs, married Lovina Hall; killed by lightning.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 401 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Aaron Grinnell

Aaron Grinnell, bachelor, came from New York, in 1837, in the poor house, familiarly called "Old Chub."

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 441 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Groom

William Groom, and wife, Miss Burhans, from Albany County, N.Y., came with Alvord's company in 1833; was a farmer, and Methodist preacher; he died in 1852. His children were : Delia, married a Mr. Wells; Betsey, married John Harkins ; Alida, married Austin B. Carleton, of Vermillion ; Peter, married Miss Martin, now in Nebraska ; Abram^ married L. T. Naramoor; Joseph, married Eunice Harrington, in California ; William, married Miss Thomas, in Tonica.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 351 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Mrs. Barbary Grove

Widow Barbary Grove, mother of Joseph, came in 1833. She died at the age of 78. Her son, Elias, came with her and died single in 1845 ; her daughter Elizabeth, was the first wife of N. Madison Letts.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 281 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David Grove

David Grove, and wife, Anna Howser, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1829; one of Green's party; aided John Green for a year or more, and then settled on S. 22, T. 34, R. 4; now living, aged 73. Children of first wife: Samuel, who married Mary Parr, lives at Utica, and is now Supervisor of that town; George, at home; John died. Mrs. Grove died in 1849 Second wife, Mary W. Robinson. Her children were: Katharine, at home; Anna, married a Mr. Hoag, now dead; Elizabeth, married David Connard, and lives in Miller ; Isabella, married Daniel Wickwire, and lives in Rutland; Eliza, married W. H. Chapman, and lives at Freedom.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 277 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph Grove

Joseph Grove, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1829; one of Green's Company. He married Elma Jackson, and settled on S. 22. He died in 1858. His widow died in 1872. Their children were: Semantha, who married a Mr. Wakefield; John, is in Iroquois County; Jeremiah, died in the army; Jesse, is at home; Lewis, married Melinda Pitzer, now of Miller; Elma, married George Pitzer, of Iroquois County ; David, is at Dayton ; Mary, and Clara, are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 278 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Grove

Samuel Grove, from Licking County, Ohio, was one of Green's party. He returned to Ohio, and came back to La Salle County in 1856.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 278 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Norton Gum

Norton Gum, from Rockingham County, Va., in 1834 ; died in the summer of 1835.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 345 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Aaron Gunn

Aaron Gunn, from Montague, Massachusetts, was one of a colony formed in 1830, in Northampton, Massachusetts. Agents sent out to find a location, fixed upon La Salle. The colony came out in 1831. Gunn, and seven other young men bought two perogues, or canoes, at Mottville, Michigan, and floated down the St. Joseph to South Bend, then hauled their canoes across the portage to the Kankakee (the same route taken by La Salle 150 years before), they then floated down the Kankakee and Illinois to Hennepin, in nine days. The season was wet, and the colony, dissatisfied with the location, scattered over the country, mostly going to Bureau County. Mr. Gunn went to where Lamoille now is, bought a claim of Mr. Hall, who was killed by Indians, at Indian Creek, the following summer.

The next summer he left on account of the war, and remained two years at Magnolia. In 1835, sold his claim and bought 400 acres north of and now adjoining the town of La Salle. In common with most of the settlers in 1836, he supposed his fortune made, being told that his 400 acres were worth 840,000, and that he need work no more, but not realizing that sum he went one year on the Ottawa mission as a Methodist exhorter, and in 1837 was married to Nancy Winters, of Mt. Palatine, and went to farming, finding his 400 acres worth what its production of farm crops would indicate. He is still living on a part of the $40,000 farm, at a ripe old age; probably as comfortable as he would have been had he realized his anticipated fortune. His experience and disappointment in that respect might be written as a part of the history of many of the emigrants who came in 1836-7. His children are : Lydia C., who died at the age of 18 ; Nettie Z., married George A. Elliott, of La Salle; Moses W., Pastor Baptist Church, Normal, Ill. ; Lucy G., married Herman B. Chapman, of La Salle ; Elizabeth S., married Frank L. Ay res, of Kansas ; Aaron E., a farmer, of La Salle ; Bella E., at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 374-375 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jason Gurley

Jason Gurley came from East Hartford, Ct., to Ottawa in 1834, and to Troy Grove in 1835. His children were: Jason, Jr., who came to Calumet in 1830, and to Troy Grove in 1835, and bought a claim of Welch; Julius, was killed at Ottawa by a fall from the bluff : Joel, died in 1848 ; John A., of Cincinnati, was a noted Universalist preacher, and editor-was appointed Governor of Montana, but died before assuming the office ; Delia, married Ralph Woodruff, of Ottawa ; Sarah, married Joseph Hall.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 407-408 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]