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Livingston County, Illinois
Genealogy and History


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1880 U.S. Federal Census
Supplemental Schedules for the
Defective, Dependent and Delinquent Classes

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Schedule for Deaf-Mutes

(Transcribed by: Teri Moncelle Colglazier)

As with all transcriptions please verify information with original source


Supplemental Schedules for the Defective, Dependent, and Delinquent Classes.

Inhabitants in ...(see below)..., in the County of ...Livingston..., State of ...Illinois...

enumerated June, 1880


Deaf-Mutes

"The object of this Supplemental Schedule is to furnish material not only for a complete enumeration of deaf-mutes, but for an account of their condition. It is important that every inquiry respecting each case be answered as fully as possible. Enumerators will, therefore, after making the proper entries upon the population schedule (No. 1), transfer the name (with Schedule page and number) of every deaf-mute found to Schedule No. 1 to this Special Schedule and proceed to ask the additional questions indicated in the headings of the several columns. Care must be taken not to enumerate persons who are deaf only (hard of hearing) or dumb only (tongue-tied) as deaf-mutes. A deaf-mute is one who cannot speak, because he cannot hear sufficiently well to learn to speak. Enumerators may obtain valuable hints as to the number of deaf-mutes, and their residence, from physicians who practice medicine in their respective districts, also from school-teachers. Great assistance may be derived from questions addressed to deaf-mutes themselves: Do you know any deaf-mutes in this neighborhood? The class feeling of the deaf and dumb, arising from their isolated state is so great that they seek each other out for the sake of companionship and ordinarily know every deaf-mute for miles around."

   

Name

Residence
when at
home

(Note A)

Is he
self-
supporting,
or partly so

(Note B)

Age at
which
deafness
occurred

(Note C)

Supposed
cause of
deafness,
if known

Is this person
semi- mute/
semi-deaf

(Note D)

Has this person
ever been an
inmate of an
institution for
deaf-mutes

Is this
person
also
insane,
idiotic or blind

Amity

               

18

23

Carrall, Emerson J

 

yes

2

cerebro spinal fever

 

no

 

27

23

Evansin, Regina

 

yes

B

   

Jacksonville
for 18 m

 

Broughton

               

3

16

Johnson, Jonathan

(no further information provided)

       

13

37

Lyans, Thomas

(no further information provided)

       

Fayette

               

2

47

Fields, Caroline

(no further information provided)

       

Indian Grove

               

14

39

Gellters, Dunat

(no further information provided)

       

13

5

Moore, Jonathon

(no further information provided)

       

5

24

Hughes, Mary

(no further information provided)

       

Waldo

               

5

1

Zehr, Andrew

(no further information provided)

       

Union

               

16

16

Eggenberger, John

(no further information provided)

       

Rooks Creek

               

13

2

Edenfield, John

(no further information provided)

       

Pontiac

               

41

3

McDowell, Julia W

 

no

1

Cerebro Spinal Menegitis

semi
semi

Jacksonville for 3yrs

 

Long Point

               

8

8

Swift, Robert

(no further information provided)

       

Notes:

Note A: A deaf-mute may be found either at his own home or away from it in some educational institution, asylum or poor-house. In the latter case, his residence when at home must be stated, in order that he may be accredited to the State or county to which he properly belongs so that the county in which the institution is situated may not be charged with more than its due proportion of deaf-mutes.

Note B: If self-supporting, say "yes" if partly self-supporting, say "partly: if not, say "no". Indicate all inmates of institutions who are maintained or treated at their personal expense (not at the expense of any town, county or State, nor of the institution) by the word "Pay"

Note C: If a deaf-mute from birth, say "b"; if not, state the age at which deafness occurred. Special pains should be taken to indicate all deaf-mutes from birth.

Note D: The word "semi-mute" has a technical meaning, and denotes a deaf-mute who lost his or her hearing after having acquired at least a partial knowledge of spoken language. Some semi-mutes retain the ability to speak imperfectly, others lose it entirely. If a deaf-mute has ever learned to speak, he is a semi-mute (unless he was artificially taught to speak in an institution for deaf-mutes) By a semi-deaf person is meant one who cannot hear sufficiently well to comprehend what is said to him, but who hears very loud sounds, such as thunder, &c



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