Marshall County IL Biographies
C

 Mrs. R. M. Cahoon

James Cain

Mrs. Ann C. Calder

Joseph J. Calder

Nancy (Messick) Camery

Christopher Camery


Abner Camp

John Carver

Peter Cary

Patrick Cartney

Jason R. Chapman

James Charles

Edward Clifford

Samuel D. Clifford


Nancy H. (Brassfield) Louden Coan

A. Cohn

August Coleson

John A. Coleson

Patrick Collins

Warner Combs

Washington E. COOK

Edward Corcoran

John Coutlett

Sarah E. (Dever) Coutlett


William Cowen

Mrs. Gilley Cowen

Adam Crawford

Henry L. Crane

Euphemia (Beckwith) Croft


Hutchison Croft

H. V. Crossland

Jessie F. Culton

John Currie

Charles Cusac

 Mrs. R. M. Cahoon

Dress and Cloak-maker, Wenona.
Mrs. Cahoon was born in Barnstable County, Mass., in 1828. She married Mr. L, Cahoon in 1847. He was born in New York State. Moved west in 1860, and located in Osage Township, LaSalle County, Il1, They came to Wenona in 1871. They have three children living-Sarah J., George W. and Charles. She has been engaged in the dressmaking business since 1846, and lived in Wenona since 1862. She keeps on hand a full stock of all kinds of fancy trimmings, and is an accomplished and competent dressmaker.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 725 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 James Cain
Mr. Cain is one of the oldest living residents in this section, having settled here in 1835. He was born in Green County . Pa., in 1808. He moved with his parents to Ohio County, West Va., the same year and lived there many years. In 1832 he married Mary Burns and emigrated to Illinois, then scarcely freed from the Indians. He opened a large farm, planted an orchard, and in course of time has grown rich, but remains upon the old homestead and looks after Mb affairs. They have one child, Mrs. Amelia Sharer. Mr. Cain owns 400 acres of land.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 743 Richland Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Mrs. Ann C. Calder
Mrs. Calder was born in Green County, New York, in 1818. She married James Calder in October, 1842, also a native of New York State, who died in 1853, leaving three children - Marion C., L. G. and Clarence, Mrs. Calder is a member of the M. E. Church. She purchased her present farm of 160 acres in 1853, when she first came to this country, her husband having died in the fall of that year. She has devoted her life to the interest of her children, of whom she has handsomely provided for. She has very fine improvements noon her well cultivated farm, and is surrounded with every comfort of this life Mrs. C. has been successful beyond most men or women under like circumstances. Deprived of her husband when her children were small, and his help and counsel most needed, she has reared, educated and aided them, and seen them comfortably started in life.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 748-749 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Joseph J. Calder
Mr. Calder was born in Albany County, New York, in 1806. He came to Illinois in 1851, and located on the farm where he has ever since resided. He married Sarah Deddrick in 1830. She was born in Queen's County, New York. They have nine children living-Marion W., Alexander, Isaac D., James, Naoma, Anna Amelia (Powell), Marshall J., Hellen C. (Stowell) and two deceased. Are members of the M, E Church. He has held several of the local offices of his district. He owns 120 acres in Marshall County, Ill., also a tract of land in Iowa. Few families are better known or so generally respected as that of Mr. C. He has been a prominent temperance advocate all his life, and taken deep interest in Sabbath schools.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 745 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Nancy (Messick) Camery and Christopher Camery
Mrs. Camery was born in Rockingham County, Va., in 1801. She married Mr. Christopher Camery in 1821. He was born in Winchester County, Va., in 1791, and died March 11, 1875, leaving nine children - John, James, Christopher. David, Isaac, Elijah, Samuel, Mary and Armand J. Her maiden name was Nancy Messick. Mr. Camery was a soldier in the war of 1812, and served with distinction, and Mrs. C. claims a pension on his account. She owns 160 acres of land with good improvements.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 757 Saratoga Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Abner Camp

Propr. City Hotel.
Mr. Camp was born in Madison County, New York, in 1813 and came to Potter County, Pa., in 1837. In 1842 he removed to Stark County, and in 1846 came to Marshall. He was by trade a carpenter. In 1848 he married Eliza A. Ham, born in Dover, Mass., and to them were born two children-Isabella and Charles A. Has been in the hotel business since 1865. He keeps a first class house, which is popular with the traveling public, and runs a carriage to the depot and steamboats, Mr. Camp is an old citizen, and greatly respected by all.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 702 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Patrick Cartney

Margaret Colgan Bankie writes: "I have recently come in possession of a large hardbound volume of "Biographical History Illustrated of Bureau, Marshall, Putnam and Stark counties. It was published in 1897 in Chicago by S.J. Clark publishing company.  In it I found a biography of my great grandparents who resided in LaPrarie Township, Marshall county.  Here are some exerpts from that:

Patrick Cartney, one of the self made men of LaPrairie Twsp, whose early home was on the other side of the Atlantic, commenced life without capitol other than his strong hands and resolute will, has attained a fine position, socially and financially among his fellow citizens. Mr Cartney was born in County Louth, Ireland in 1824.  In1860 he emigrated to Peoria Ill where he worked on farms for about five years . he had saved $1500 and purchased 72 acres of land in LaPrairie Twsp, Marshall co,He later added 400 acres and built a fine home. In1865 he married Mary Mackin who was also born in County Louth Ireland,

To them were born five children Kate, John, Thomas, Jane, who maried Wm Green and Margaret (my grandmother) who married Frank Colgan. The family attended church at Camp Grove. Mr Cartney held the position of school director, discharging his duties faithfully and well.


 John Carver
Mr. Carver was born in County Limerick, Ireland, in 1828, and came to the United States in 1853. He first located in Connecticut, came west in 1856, and settled in Bureau until 1859 and then located in this County, He married Mary Sullivan in 1857. She was born in County Kerry. Ireland. They have had two children, both deceased. Are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Carver owns 80 acres of land, and is a thrifty, industrious, liberal citizen, taking an active part in all matters of general interest in his neighborhood. He might be classed as an Americanised Irishman.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 758 Saratoga Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Peter Cary
Mr. Cary is a farmer, living on section 83. Post office, Sparland. He was born in Albany County, New York, in 1830, and located in this County in 1854, where he has followed farming ever since. He married Miss Henrietta Halsted in 1869. She was born in Albany County, New York. They have one son. Charles D. Mrs. Cary is a member of the M. E. Church. Mr. C. is justice of the peace at the present time, and has been for the last seven years, and has also been school trustee. He owns 160 acres of land, all in good cultivation.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 757 Saratoga Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jason R. Chapman


Mr. Chapman was born in Hartford County Conn. in 1829 and came with his parents to Lacon when 15 years old. He went into the employ of J. A C. Fisher at an early day, and when the firm changed to William Fisher & Co., remained with them. He was a great favorite of Jabez Fisher, and his promotion was rapid. He was a good penman, and soon became thoroughly master of book-keeping and had entire charge of the correspondence and finances of the concern, conducting the business to the entire satisfaction of his employers. He left their employ to organize the firm of Chapman A. Patrick, afterward changed to Fisher & Chapman, which continued until 1868. Afterward he became a member of the firm of Bensley, Chapman & Shinn, in Chicago, and went into the produce and commission business. In 1871 he returned to Lacon and became connected with the house of John Hutchins, and in 1880 established the extensive dry goods house over which he presides at present. In 1862 he was elected County clerk for five years, served two years as treasurer, and has filled other offices of trust. He has been twice married, and has three children.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 692 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 James Charles
Mr. Charles was born in Monmouthshire, England, in 1817, and came to the United States in 1851, stopping a while at Danville, Pa., and coming to this County in 1858. He married Mary Lloyd in 1834. She was born in the same place. She died in 1875 leaving six children-Mary, John, Susan, Sarah A., William and Elizabeth, He owns 80 acres of land in a good state of cultivation. He has one son, a deaf mute, whom he has given a liberal education. The young man is attached to the occupation of farming and is successfully engaged in that business.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 751 Steuben Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Edward Clifford

Mr. Clifford was born in Brook County, Virginia, in 1806. He moved to Harrison County, Ohio, with his parents in 1811, and married Miss Rebecca Dunlap in 1831. She was born in Harrison County, Ohio, in 1807. They have six children living-Sarah (Mrs. Phillip), Nancy, Samuel D., Martha J (Mrs. Dunlap), Margaret and Susan (Mrs. Hamilton). Are members of the U. P. church. He was road commissioner six years. He owns 336 acres in his homestead, all improved. Mr. Clifford was an early settler in the township, and by his own exertions has grown to wealth and the possessorship of one of the finest firms in the Township.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 719 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel D. Clifford

Mr. Clifford is a farmer by occupation, and resides on section 11. He was born in Harrison County, Ohio. Dec. 21st, 1834, and located in Marshall County in 1853. October 29th. 1863, he married Sarah E. Hoyt, who was born in this County, They have four children-Laslie, Anita, Hoyt and James S. Mr. Clifford is school director. He owns 80 acres of land in a good state of cultivation, and has comfortable improvements. He is a pleasant and sociable gentleman.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 717 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Nancy H. (Brassfield) Louden Coan

Mrs. Coan was born in Indiana in 1833, her maiden name being Brassfield. Her parents came to Peoria when she was a child, and she married William D. Louden, born in Pennsylvania in 1858, He died in 1872 leaving three children-DeWitt, Rebecca and Henry. She married Mr. T. P. Coan in 1875. He is agent for the Hanna wagon in Nebraska. Mrs. C. owns a fine farm in Whitefield, also her residence in Henry. She is a member of the Congregational church.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 705 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

A. Cohn
Mr. Cohn was born in Germany, and came to the United States in 1853, locating in New York City. He moved to Chicago in 1857, and to Peoria in 1859, where he established a restaurant. He moved to Lacon in 1861 and went into the manufacture of cigars, and in 1862 moved to LaSalle. where he carried on the cigar business for two years, and the turning business-which is his trade-for four years, and in 1867 located in Wenona in a saloon, which he sold out in 1869 and started a grocery. In '71 he moved to Troy Grove, where he carried on a grocery and dry goods business one year, then went to Chicago, and back to LaSalle, returning to Wenona in 1874, when he started in the Saloon again, which he discontinued in 1878, and opened a restaurant. He married Mary E. Gerlach in 1869. She was born Germany. They have five children-Amelia, Rosetta. Hermena, Jennetta and Betta. He is a member of the I. O. O. F.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 713-714 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 August Coleson
Mr. Coleson is a farmer in Hopewell Township, who was born in Sweden in 1855. He came to the United States in 1869, and located In Marshall County. He married Anna Lindgen in 1877, born in Germany. They are members of the United Lutheran Church. He rents 160 acres of land which he cultivates, and is a hard working farmer.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 730 Hopewell Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 John A. Coleson
Mr. Coleson was born in Woodford County, Ill., in 1857 and is a son of Caleb Coleson, now a resident of Eureka, Ill. In 1878 he married Amelia Clark, likewise born in Woodford County, They have one child, Frank Oscar, and are members of the Christian Church. He rents 160 acres of land from his father, which he cultivates. He is a promising young farmer, with an unusual amount of perseverance, and with good health is sure to succeed.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 717 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Patrick Collins
Mr. Collins was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, in 1829. He came to the United States in 1847, when only 18 years old, and at once assumed his position in the world as a man prepared to battle for his share of God's gifts, clothed with integrity and armed with the strong bow of determination and perseverance. He first worked at daily labor at $6.00 per month, but his aim was upward. He soon discovered that under the bright rays of the western sun - under the glorious constitution of this free republic the young shoots of honest labor would bloom for all men alike, the foreigner as well as the native born. He has successfully demonstrated by his grand success, that the narrow-minded prejudice of the few can in no way impede the progress of the many who come to this country to enrich it by their labor.

He first located in Cheater County, Pa., and in 1851 in Marshall County, Ill. he married Miss Margaret Monier in 1868. She is a native of the Isle of Man. They have eight children-Sarah J , Thomas, Charles, Annie, James. Charlotta, John and Edward. Mr. Collins owns 240 acres of land, all in cultivation. He has just completed undoubtedly the finest residence in the Township, furnished in the most elegant and substantial manner from cellar to garret, including all available modern improvements. The location is a very desirable one, commanding a view of the entire country in every direction. He has sold off most of his other property, as he believes that a farm of 240 acres, well managed, is better than a section neglected.

He was one of the first in this part of the country to introduce the great improvement of tile draining, and has reaped a large interest from the investment and lastly we can say that Mr. Collins is not carried away above his fellow men by his success, like too many. He is the same plain, unassuming, kind-hearted, hospitable man he always was. He truly retains in a practical manner the characteristics of his native land. His latch hangs outside the door.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 757-758 Saratoga Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Warner Combs
Mr. Combs was born in Hampshire County, Va., in 1825, and was a son of Jacob Combs and Sarah Edwards, of Virginia, from which marriage was born nine children, six of whom are now living - Harriet married George Eyestone and resides in Wyandotte County, Ohio. Mary Jane married Benj. W. Pitegell and resides in Kewanee, Henry County, Ill. John resides in McDonough County, Thomas in Whitefield, and Isaac in the Indian Territory. Mr. Combs married Elizabeth Wood, daughter of Frances Wood, of Wyandotte County, Ohio, by whom he had five children - Sarepta, Horace, Emma, Electa, and Sherman. Mrs. Combs died in 1866. He entered the marriage state a second time in May, 1868, marrying Hannah Johnson, daughter of Henry Johnson and Mary Davidson, of Kentucky. Of this union are two children-Charles Harrington and Edna Viola. Mr. Combs came to Illinois in the spring of 1852 and located where he resides at the present time, on a farm of 160 acres, also owns a stock farm of 800 acres in the town of Steuben. The grand parents of Mr. Combs on the paternal side were John, born in Frankfort, Germany, and Ellen Snell. On the maternal side, Thomas Edwards and Martha Cesner.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 760 Whitefield Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Washington E. COOK

The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896. - Marshall county Biographical extractions pages 100-199

Transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass

Washington E. COOK, deceased, was for sixteen years county clerk of Marshall county, and, in due deference to all others, he may be said to have been the democratic leader in the county. Personally known by nearly every person having business at the county seat, he exercised an influence that was felt and acknowledged by all. He traced his ancestry back to one Elijah COOK, who came with the Pilgrim fathers and afterward located in Connecticut. One of the descendants of Elijah COOK, Ebenezer, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and in a very early day settled in Oneida county, New York, and there reared a family of eleven sons and two daughters. The neighborhood was known as "Cook's corners." One of his sons, also named Ebenezer, married Leonora COMBS, and to them, on the 29th of December, 1809, was born the subject of this sketch. Ebenezer COOK, Sr., was a soldier in the war of 1812, and until her death his widow received a pension from the general government.

When our subject was but eleven years of age his father died, and soon after he commenced to learn the hatter's trade, but abandoned this and secured a position as clerk in a general store, where he remained some years, going from thence to New York city, where he served one year as clerk in a hotel. Hen then went to Honesdale, Pennsylvania, where, on the 16th of May, 1832, he was united in marriage with Miss Eunice KELLOGG. Here purchasing a hotel, he continued in its management for four years, when he removed to Dunkirk, New York, and assisted in surveying the Buffalo & Erie railroad. In June, 1838, he removed to Birmingham, Ohio, where for nine years he was engaged in merchandising. He now determined to go still farther west, and came to Marshall county, locating three miles west of Henry, where he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land for four dollars per acre, and commenced a farmer's life. This farm has since been known as the Harney farm, Mr. COOK disposing of it after three years' ownership.

Mr. COOK was not long a resident of the county before his abilities were known and recognized by his fellow citizens. In the fall of 1849 he was nominated and elected to the office of county clerk, and removed with his family to Lacon, December 1, of that year. In that city he continued to reside until his death. He was re-elected county clerk three times, serving in all sixteen years. He also served ten years as township supervisor, and in whatever position he was called upon to fill he discharged its duties with fidelity and to the satisfaction of his constituents.

In 1860 Mr. COOK was sent as a delegate to the Charleston convention and voted continuously for Stephen A. Douglas. With the remainder of the Illinois delegation he withdrew from the convention when it was clearly shown that their rights were not to be respected. In 1868 he was a delegate to the national democratic convention, which met that year at Philadelphia. His faith in the principles of the democratic party as enunciated by Jefferson and Jackson never wavered, and he died as he lived, a democrat.

Fraternally, Mr. COOK was a Mason and had attained the thirty-second degree of that order. For some years he was a member of Apollo commandery, Chicago, and was a charter member of Peoria commandery. On his death, which occurred January 7, 1879, the Masons took charge of his funeral, attending in large numbers from Peoria and elsewhere. The circuit court, which was then in session, adjourned out of respect to his memory.

Mr. COOK was a self-educated man, having little opportunity to attend either public or private schools. His father dying when he was so young necessitated his shifting for himself in a great degree, but he was a great reader and kept himself thoroughly informed on all the questions of the day, as well as in general literature. Few men had a greater knowledge of American history, especially its political aspect. Physically he was large and strong, able to endure almost any hardship. In Chicago, the great metropolis of the west, he had unlimited faith, and there invested nearly all his spare means. Some of the real estate which he there purchased yet remains in the hands of his son, George.

Notwithstanding she was almost a life-long invalid, Mrs. COOK survived her husband some sixteen years, dying March 25, 1895. Although her sufferings at times were very great, she remained cheerful and bore it all with Christian fortitude. For very many years she was a member of the Congregational church, and used her every talent for the advancement of the Master's cause, dying in the full assurance of faith.

Of the family of Mr. and Mrs. COOK, Helen J. married D. W. WARNER, and now resides in Boulder, Montana; Belle V. is now the widow of S. M. GARRETT, of Lacon, while George W. E. still resides in Lacon, enjoying the respect and esteem of all its citizens. He resides on the old homestead in the north part of Lacon, which has been in possession of the family since 1855, the brick part of the house having been erected in 1837. To such men as Washington E. COOK much is due, and the lesson of their lives must be an inspiration to all.

George W. E. COOK is a native of Bethany, Pennsylvania, born June 23, 1834. Like his father before him, he has been quite active as a democratic politician and has served in various official positions to the satisfaction of every one. He has been an alderman and mayor of Lacon, a member of the school board for twelve years, seven of which he acted as president of the board. In county and state conventions he has represented his party as a delegate, and for some years was president of the democratic club of Lacon. He has been a delegate from his club to the national democratic club conventions, and in every way has shown a knowledge of men and measures, entitling him to deserved recognition.

Not only as a politician has Mr. COOK been active and influential, but as a horticulturist he has taken high rank, having given much attention and study to that subject. About three acres of the home place he has set aside for use in experimenting in horticultural products, especially the strawberry. He is a member of the National Pomological society, and is its vice-president for Illinois. He has also been a member of several farmer clubs, in which he has taken an active part. In educational matters, also, he has given much time and attention, and has ever been a true friend of the public school contributing to educational journals and being consulted by legislators on legislation pertaining to the public schools. For some years he was a regular contributor to the Prairie Farmer, and has contributed more or less to various horticultural journals in the country. As has been stated, his mother was almost a life long invalid, and to her he gave the love and affection of a dutiful son, ministering unto her wants and doing all in his power to alleviate her misery. To do this work he remained under the parental roof until the mother was called to the upper and better world.



Washington E. Cook
The ancestor of the Cook family was Elijah Cook, who came over with the Pilgrims and settled in Connecticut. Among his descendants was Ebenezer, a soldier of the Revolution, who at its close removed to Oneida County New York, in the town of Augusta, and with eleven stalwart sons and two daughters made a large farm that was for long years after known as "Cook's Corners". One of these sons was Ebenezer, and he married Sonara Combs, to whom in the year of grace 1808 on the 29th day of December was born the subject of this sketch. His father too was a soldier, and served on the northern frontier in the war of 1812, for which long after death his widow drew a pension. By occupation he was a cattle drover and likewise ran a hotel long and favorably known to travelers of that day. During her husband's long Journeys his wife attended to the house, and here young Cook lived until eleven years old, when his father died and he was sent to learn the hatter's trade; but it did not suit his active temperament, and after a year or so he left and took a situation in a store, following the business several years. Next he went to New York and obtained a place in a hotel. Stayed a year and went to Honesdale, Pa., where he not only found a situation but a wife in the person of pretty Eunice A. Kellogg, whom he married May 16, 1832. He purchased a hotel here which he run four years, sold out and moved to Dunkirk, where he turned surveyor and helped lay out the Buffalo and Erie railway. In June, 1838, he went to Birmingham, Ohio, and embarked in merchandising, following it with varying success for nine years, when he sold out and with his family came to Senachwine, Illinois, where his sister (Mrs. Morgan) and four brothers had already settled. Here he bought of Col. Snyder 320 acres of land for $1,280, most of it under improvement. The place has since been known as the Harney farm. He cultivated it for three years and sold it for $4,000, reserving the crop. That fall he removed to Henry to "lay on his oars" until fall, when he was elected County clerk and moved to Lacon in 1847. He bought a house of Silas Ramsey, opposite the court house, where he lived until it burned down in October, 1862, and he moved to the place where he ever after lived. He served three terms of four years each as supervisor, making twenty-two years of service in the County board. He was one of the best officials the County ever had. His records are clear and the writing good. Was several times a candidate for the legislature, held various offices of trust, was personally very popular, and though defeated at times, invariably ran ahead of his ticket. In 1860 he was a delegate to the Charleston convention where the great split in the Democratic party occurred that made possible the election of President Lincoln. He was also a delegate to the Philadelphia National convention of 1868. He was an active member of the Masonic order and a Knight Templar, was punctual and regular in his attendance at the lodge, and took deep interest in its workings. Previous to his death he took an active interest in the construction of a new line of railroad through Lacon. He had two sons and two daughters born to him, Geo. W. E., living at home, Nellie E. (Mrs. Warner) living in Montana, Isabel B. (Mrs. Garratt), and Martin K., deceased. The latter was a very persevering young man, who at the commencement of the war enlisted in the 4th Ill. Cavalry, was promoted lieutenant and served on Gen. Hurlburt's and Canby's staffs. He was three years in the service, and after his return was killed by the premature discharge of his gun while hunting. Mrs. Cook lives at home with her eldest son and looks after the large property left her by her husband. She is kind to the poor, and beloved by all her friends.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 692-693 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Taken From the Henry Republican
January 16, 1879

The Republican, in its last issue, gave the announcement of the death of Hon. Washington E. Cook, which took place suddenly at the Matteson House, Chicago, on Tuesday of last week, and this unwelcome news was as sudden to the people of this county as it was unexpected and sudden to the family of which he was the honored head.

Mr. Cook was a New Yorker by birth, his native town being Cook's Corners, Oneida county. He was a holiday gift to the family, the little stranger appearing December 19, 1808. As he grew in statue he become a boy, and in time was apprenticed to a hatter at Clinton, N.Y. He completed his time at the hat business, but his inclinations and opportunities led him to abandon this calling, and about the year 1830 he went to New York City, where he was a clerk for some time, remaining in the city about a year. He then left New York, and at Honesdale, Pa., made the acquaintance of Miss Eunice A. Kellogg of Bethany, Pa., a lady of culture and refinement, whom he married. She was the daughter of Eliphalet Kellogg, a man of prominence in his time, and one highly esteemed in the community.

He afterwards "run a hotel" at Bethany, with success; engaged in the mercantile business at Birmingham, Ohio, for 10 years, when in 1846 or 7 he removed with his family to Marshall county, Illinois and opened the place three miles west of this city, now owned and occupied by Mr. Daniel Harney. Here he resided for some three years, and while farming on a considerable scale, with James Andrews and Samuel J. McFadden, then young men, as assistants, he found he had the faculty, by being in town more than on the farm, that there was an easier way of securing a livelihood than by plowing the soil. It led him to dislike agriculture. So he sold the place to B. & S. Eldridge, and moved to Henry.

This change was the making of W. E. Cook Being a man of excellent business qualifications, foresight, judgment and tact, he became a prominent man, and a popular one, as his genial manners and high social proclivities made him friends everywhere. He was a staunch democrat and a rising man. The county was democratic at that time, and his ambition secured the nomination and election to the office of county clerk. This office was a lucrative one to him, and he held it three successive terms, and from it he became one of the leading politician of his party in the state, and the most prominent one in his district. He favored all important enterprises, and gave his influence for general improvement of the state, in constructing railroads, etc., and held some stock therein. He was farseeing and successful in whatever he undertook, and his "financial rod" blossomed as the rose. His estate at the time of his death was estimated at about $75,000.

For several terms he allowed his name to be used as a candidate for congress and also for state senator, but the changed political complexion of the district and county, gave the honors to his opponent.

His illness and death is told by the Lacon Democrat as follows: "When he died Mr. Cook was 70 years and 10 days old; the last day he spent with his family being his 70th birthday. His disease was something in the nature of quick consumption. He had always been troubled some with his lungs, and had at times suffered severe prostration. A year ago he was quite ill, but in the past few months seemed to be fully recovered; his friends remarking on his unusual spirit and buoyancy. In transacting his business in Chicago, during the late severe weather, he contracted a cold and age and past infirmities rendered its impossible for the system to resist the attack. He died calmly and peacefully and was consigned to his tomb looking as natural as when last month he moved amongst us."

Mr. Cook was a leading Mason and Odd Fellow, and highly revered by members of the two orders. He was well schooled in Masonic lore, and was a member of Peoria commandery at the time of his death.

The funeral was held at the Congregational church in Lacon on Friday last, where assembled a large congregation of weeping friends to pay their last sad rite over the demise of their revered friend. The solemn service was conducted by Rev. W. Tracy, assisted by Revs. Norris and Price. My Tracy's sermon was brief, practical and appropriate, while the singing, conducted by Mr. Stire, was of a high order. At the close of the sermon, the Peoria commandery took charge of the body of its deceased brother. The burial service was then read at the church, and concluded at the grave. Some 100 Masons were in line as the procession proceeded to the cemetery.

The bereft embrace Mrs. Cook, the son George, Mrs. S. M. Garratt of Pontiac and Mrs. D. G. Warner of Dakota territory. All present at the obsequies except the latter. Mrs. Clara Morgan, postmistress of Snachwine, is a sister of the deceased.

Mr. Cook has closed a long, somewhat eventful and useful life. In many respects he was a remarkable man. He had a strong constitution, was a good liver, and enjoyed life with the rest of his fellows. He made money rapidly and spent it generously. His business capacity was above the average and his operations were large. His church connection was Congregational, and the church in which the obsequies were held was of his founding. He was of a very social disposition, very indulgent as husband and father, and a very agreeable man in his family. He surrenders to the summons of death, and a conspicuous life is thus ended. Peace to his ashes.


Edward Corcoran


Mr. Corcoran was born in County Waterford, Ireland, in 1830, and emigrated to Wilbraham, Mass., in 1851 and from there to Illinois. He came to Lacon in 1855 and engaged to work for Jabez Fisher. His aptitude to learn and willingness to make himself useful specially commended him to his employer, who placed him in charge of the ferry, which position he filled for seventeen years, retiring from it to take the position of city watchman, which he has since filled. In 1860 he married Catherine Carney, born in Ireland. They have six children living - Willie J., Eddie, Patrick, Henry, Maggie (deceased), Thomas and Mary. Mr. Corcoran has become thoroughly Americanized, and is a man of more than usual intelligence.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 685 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 Sarah E. (Dever) Coutlett and John Coutlett


Mrs. Coutlett was born in Scioto County, Ohio, March 21 1822. She came to this County with her parents in 1830. Her father, James Dever, was born in Virginia near Wheeling, July 20.1791. He moved to Scioto County, Ohio, with his parents when a young man, and married Mary Barnes, March 6, 1817. She was born in Maryland, Oct. 13 1799. They had seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third, the two oldest having died in infancy. Her father died Dec, 26, 1834 and her mother is still living and enjoys fair health, although in her 81st: year; her mind is as clear and bright as many not half her age. Mrs. C, married John D. Coutlett April 16, 1839, in Marshall County. They had seven children, four of whom died while her husband lived. The other three children are still living - Robert B., Claannah L. and William H. Mr. Coutlett died Oct. 15, 1878. He was born in Lancaster Pa., Dec. 25. 1812 and moved to this state about 1833.

Mr. Coutlett came to Lacon about 1836, and brought with him considerable means, which he loaned, and lost part of. The balance he invested in real estate which improved. Mr. Dever was a Jackson Democrat, and Mr. Coutlett was a Whig and Republican. Mrs. C. lives at her pleasant home surrounded by old friends and neighbors and sees without a regret the years go by and the time approach when the Master shall call her.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 687 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 William Cowen and Mrs. Gilley Cowen
Mrs. Cowen is widow of William Cowen, who was born near Hagerstown, Md., in 1798, and emigrated to Ohio at an early day. He died in 1863. She was born in Monongahela County, Va., in 1805, moved with her parents to Ohio in 1808 and married in 1824. She has had seven children - Hermil, Cynthia (Mrs. Letts), Minerva (deceased), Lucinda (Mrs. Morse), Robert A., Isabella (deceased), Theresa and Zilpha, Malvina (Mrs. Stevenson), William, Delbert and John (deceased). They are members of the M. E Church. Mrs. Cowen comes from the Dents and is a cousin of John O. Dent. They moved to Putnam County in 1811. During the Black Hawk war Mr. Cowen was a soldier under Colonel Strawn.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 722 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry L. Crane


Mr. Crane was born in Crimtown, now Montclair, N.J., march 5, 1813, and moved at an early day to Ohio. He learned the trade of a brick mason and followed it for many years. Here he joined the M. E. Church, of which he was for 51 years an upright, consistent member. He was three times married, first to Elizabeth Martin, of New York City in 1834 to whom eight children were born as follows: Sarah, now Mr. (Mrs.?) W.W. Dean; Josiah Wesley, Henry, J., Mary and William, all dead. Charles is married and living in Lacon, and Margaretta, now Mrs. A. Pichereau. Mrs. Crane died in 1851. In 1836 Mr. Crane joined several of his neighbors and came to Lacon, then Columbia, a not very promising town of five cabins and two frame houses. He was largely instrumental in organizing the M. E. Society, the first Church formed in the place, and of the thirteen original members he was the last survivor but one. After the death of his wife he married Mrs. Eliza D. Ransley in New Jersey, in 1852 and by her had five children, viz. George M., a printer; Greenberry F., Kate Celia, Henry L. and Nelly, at present living at home. Mrs. (Ransley) Crane died in 1866, and in 1868 he wedded Mrs. Julia (Wolcott) Wilson, who survives him, born in Columbia County, New York. Mr. Crane died Feb. 17, 1880, after a long and well spent life. For thirty years he was a local preacher of the M. E. Church, and always an active influential member. In 1848 he was elected sheriff, filling the office as principal or deputy four terms; was U. S. storekeeper nine years, and served as supervisor, collector, assessor, etc., for many years. Few men's lives were so long and so free from blemish, and he died regretted by all.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 683-684 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 Adam Crawford
Mr. Crawford was born in Ayrshire, Parish of Kirkmichael, Scotland, in 1806, and came to the United States in 1854, selecting and purchasing his present farm. He married Agnes Shearer in 1834, born in Wictonshire, Scotland. Eight children have been born to them-Margaret, .lames, Adam, John William. Agnes. Matthew A. and David R. Are members of the Congregational Church, Matthew is a clergyman of much promise. Adam was a soldier for three years, and now holds a responsible position with an agricultural firm in Omaha. Mr. Crawford owns one of the best farms in the Township and has been very successful in his business.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 747 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Euphemia (Beckwith) Croft
Mrs. Croft, widow of H. Croft, whose biography is given elsewhere, was born in Durbin County, Indiana, in 1832, and moved to Marshall County when a child, with her parents in 1833, and located on the farm she is now occupying. She married Hutchison Croft in 1850. He died in March, 1878, leaving four children- Samuel M., Emma (Mrs. Kirkpatrick), Julia A, and James. Are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The estate contains about 1200 acres of land, all improved. Her fine residence was burnt down in April, 1880.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 725 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hutchison Croft
Mr. Croft was of English parentsge on his father's side, and was born in Bucks County, Pa. Sept. 7th. 1828. When about seven years old, his father moved to Clinton County, Ohio, and lived there until 1844. Hutchison showed when a small boy a strong inclination to deal in and handle stock, and for a boy his judgment was remarkably good, the faculty seeming inborn.

In 1844 his father and family moved to the east end of Marshall County, Young Croft was then about 16 years old. They first lived in Evans Township, but afterward located in Roberts. The family was poor, and when he arrived at the age of manhood he had nothing to begin life with, and a poor education; but good judgment and an indomitable will enabled him to contend successfully with the disadvantages of poverty.

When about 21 years old, he married Miss Euphemia Beckwith Dec 22, 1849. They went to housekeeping in the old log cabin on the Beckwith farm, where his wife had been raised from infancy. He first took a lease on the widow's dower in the farm, and after accumulating some property he bought the heirs out, and finally acquired full possession of the farm. This place seemed to be headquarters for all his trading operations. After he had been in business a few years, farming and raising stock, he went in partnership with John A. McCall and David Adams in buying and shipping stock to Chicago.

Mr. Croft perhaps bought and shipped more stock to Chicago than any other man in this part of the state, as the firm always relied on his superior judgment. In after years, when business accumulated to such an extent that it was necessary to establish a bank, the firm established the old bank of J. A. McCall & Co., which did a safe business as long as Mr. Croft remained one of the firm. He accumulated wealth and bought farm after farm until at his death he had the Dent, Beepelle, Lloyd, Phillip, and the McCall farms, near Magnolia, in all 1,200 or 1,400 acres of valuable land.

Of his children, Samuel, the oldest son, married a daughter of Peter Forbes, and lives on the Beepelle farm; Mary Lovina died Sept. 1st, 1861, and was buried in Cumberland cemetery; Emma married John Kirkpatrick and is still living on the farm; Julia lately married Clark Sinclair and is also living on the farm; James, the youngest son lives with Samuel.

After Mr. Croft had accumulated a handsome property and in the prime of life, he was taken down with the spinal disease which rendered him helpless and a great sufferer. He was first taken down in June, 1874 and became paralyzed below his vital parts. He had a stretcher constructed, covered with an air bed and mounted on a wagon, and with a driver he traveled in this conveyance about the country, buying stock and doing considerable trading.

After he became an invalid he sold out all interest in the back and dissolved his long-existing partnership with Messrs. McCall and Adams. His friendship grew stronger for his neighbors, and under the ministrations of Rev. Robert Taylor, a Cumberland Presbyterian minister, he attached himself to that Church, receiving the rites at his own home. He attended services in his invalid wagon, which he would have hauled up to the Church window, where he could see and hear the preacher.

A short time before he died he sent for his old friend Thomas Judd and had him draw up his last will and testament dividing his property between his wife and children to the satisfaction of all. He died March 7th, 1878. His remains were enclosed in a metallic case and buried in Cumberland cemetery, on Sandy, where a splendid monument stands to mark the last resting place of a good man.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 715-716 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

 H. V. Crossland
Mr. Crossland is a farmer and school teacher residing on section 16. He is a native of Marshall County, born April 29,1848. April 6, 1876, he married Cynthia L. Broaddus, who was born in this Township. May 6, 1847. They have one child, George M., born July 11, 1878. Mr. Crossland owns 320 acres of land, and has filled various local offices with credit to himself and to the entire satisfaction of the community.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 734 Roberts Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jessie F. Culton

CULTON, Miss Jessie F., journalist, born in Henry, Ill., 14th February, 1860. Her grandfather on her father’s side was a native of Tennessee. On her mother’s side she is descended from the Blanchards of Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Culton moved to Chicago when Jessie was but a few months old, and there she grew up. She removed to Richmond, Ind., in 1883, and took a position on the editorial staff of the “Register,” in which capacity she served nearly a year, in the meantime doing reportorial work on the “Palladium” and "Item," daily papers of Richmond. In 1884 she went to California with her father, as Mr. Culton's health demanded a change of climate. They traveled extensively throughout the State, and settled in San Diego, where they built a pleasant home. She also has a home on a ranch in Garden Grove. Her duties as housekeeper prevent, to some extent, her journalistic work, but she contributes articles to St. Louis, Chicago and other eastern papers.

(American Women, by Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Volume 1, Publ. 1897, Transcribed by Marla Snow.)


John Currie
Mr. Currie was born in Northumberland, England, in 1812, and came to the United States in 1851 locating in Marshall County. He married Mary Thompson in 1831, born in the same place. They have four children living - Robert, Hannah, Mary (Mrs. Fleming), and James. He owns a farm in Ford County. Mrs. Currie died in 1877. His son Robert lives in Ford County. Although classically educated and possessing the ability to succeed in any of the professions, he prefers the quiet content of a farmer to the turmoil of political life.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 744 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

 Charles Cusac
Mr. Cusac was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1838, and came to Illinois in 1858, finding a home in this County, and lived three years, and then returned to Ohio. He time back to Marshall County in 1865, returned to Ohio in again in 1866, and once more came to Illinois in 1871. He married Miss L. J. Smith in 1861-born in Ohio, same County, He has seven children.-William H., Charles A., Louis S., U. S. Grant, James J., Minnie E. and Estella. He cultivates 160 acres of land. In 1863 made a trip to California, returning the following year.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 723 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 

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