Marshall County Illinois Biographies
E

 Charles S. Edwards

Robert B. Edwards

Emanuel Brown EMERICK

George Washington EMERICK

Robert S. Erwin

Albert Evans

Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Evans

Jarvice G. Evans

Joshua Evans

William Evans

A. G. Everley


 Charles S. Edwards

Mr. Edwards was born in Maryland, and when five years old his parents moved to Kentucky.  He came to Illinois in 1831, spending one season in Putnam County, and teaching the first school ever taught on Clear Creek.  He came to Shaw's Point in the spring of 1832, and lived there 36 years.  He opened a large farm, was successful in business, and retired with a competence.  He sold out to Reuben Broaddus.  In 1826 he married Mary B. Edwards and ten children were born to them.  Two died in infancy, three afterwards, and five are now living. William D. was a very promising lawyer who studied in Henderson, Ky., and began practice in Lacon where he died.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880,, Bennington Township, Page 740-741]



Charles S. Edwards
Superintendent of schools of Marshall County.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 695 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Robert B. Edwards

Mr. Edwards was born in Roberts Township Marshall County, September 10, 1844, and was a son of Chas. T. Edwards, one of the first settlers of the Township. He was educated at Clark's Seminary. Aurora, and graduated from the N. W. University. Evanston in 1872. Having chosen the profession of law, he became a student with Bangs & Shaw, and after an unusual close application to study and thorough mastery of principles he was admitted to the bar September 11,1874 and began practice in Lacon. In December, 1875, he married Almira J, Johnson, born in this County. In 1864 he shouldered a musket and went south to aid in putting down the rebellion, enlisting in Co. 1.141st Reg. Ill. Vol., and was appointed first duty sergeant. In 1874 he became a partner in the firm of Bangs, Shaw & Edwards, one of the leading law firms of the district, in which he still remains. He is industrious and painstaking, and possesses the ability and the push to take him to the top round of the forensic ladder.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 690-691 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]







Robert S. Erwin
Mr. Erwin was born in Butler County, Pa., in 1829, and was a son of John Erwin and Mary Batts, of Hagerstown, Md. They bad seven children, of whom six are living. Mr. E. came west in 1855, and has lived in Whitefield ever since. When the 86th Reg. Ill. Vols., was formed he enlisted, and was severely wounded at the battle of Peach Tree Creek, and confined in the hospital until the close of the war. His brother Charles also enlisted, and served some time in the artillery service. Both were honorably discharged when the war was over. Mr. John Erwin, father of the above, was a soldier in the war of 1812 and obtained a land bounty for his services. One of Mr. Erwin's sister's married Henry Kirk, the descendant of a British soldier of the Revolution, who deserted from his command and settled in this country.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 762 Whitefield Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]




Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Evans
Mrs. Evans was born in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1810. Removed to Illinois in 1843 and to this County in l846. She married Mr. Justus Jones in that year, who died in 1849, leaving one child, Augusta. She married Mr. Joshua Evans in 1852, who died in January, 1868 leaving her with one child, Frances. She has been a member of the M. E Church for over 52 years. Mrs. Evans is now 69 years of age, yet is smart and active, and in the possession of all her faculties. A lengthy biography of her husband is given elsewhere.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 724 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Joshua Evans

Mr. Evans was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, Jan. 5th, 1793. When he was about eight years old, his father Thomas Evans, died, leaving his mother, Rhoda, a widow with eight children, six sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom was not over sixteen years old. A tract of land was owned by the family, but very little had been done in the way of clearing off the heavy timber that covered it, and when cleared the soil was sterile. In 1803 the widow abandoned the Virginia home, not having been able to effect any sale, and removed with her family to Licking county, Ohio. At the age of 19, Joshua enlisted in the army and served in the war of 1812–13. He belonged to the regiment commanded by Lewis Cass and during the latter part of the war served in the war as quartermaster. He was among the unfortunate victims of General Hull’s treacherous and cowardly surrender [of Detroit], and could never refer to that incident of the war without expressing his indignation.

In 1816 he was married to Elizabeth Radcliff, by whom he had three sons and six daughters. His three sons, William, Albert, and Rev. J.G., are still living, and now reside in Evans township. Three of the daughters grew to womanhood and are still living. The eldest, Mrs. Alexander, resides in Magnolia, Putnam county, one in Nebraska, and the third in Michigan. In 1824 Mr. Evans joined the M.E. church of which he remained a member until his death, and most of the time held some official relation in the church. In 1830 he removed to Illinois and settled at Cherry Point, then in LaSalle county. His undoubted and unquestionable veracity won the confidence of his neighbors among whom he always maintained a high standing. He had no advantages for an education, his entire school privileges extended through only a part of one winter. He was, however, a man of very sound judgment and was very accurate in his business. His memory was unusually good, and he read men so readily that he was not often deceived. He was industrious and economical, and was among the best of the early farmers in Evans township.

He settled at Cherry Point because he thought the prairies around the grove would not be settled for many generations and his descendants could have ample range for their stock, but he lived to see every quarter section for many miles from his residence occupied. He was very accommodating to those who he thought deserved help, and determined that question wholly by the answer to two inquiries. Is he honest? Will he work? If he thought a man to be lazy or dishonest he would give him neither sympathy nor assistance in any way, but if he believed him honest and industrious he was always ready to accommodate. He was for many years before his death the oldest settler in the township and was honored as such by his neighbors.

In 1850 when the township organization in Marshall county was effected, the people at a public meeting, chose the name of Evans for the town as a compliment to him. In politics he was an ardent Whig and usually took an active interest in the political campaigns. He was one of the delegates from Marshall county to the senatorial convention at which Robert Boal was nominated for the state senate. When the Whig party was abandon he became a Republican and voted that ticket until his death. He was widely and favorably known among the early settlers of this and surrounding counties. In 1853 Mr. Evans married Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, by whom he had one child, now Mrs. Brown, a resident of this township. He died January 15th, 1869.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 719-720 Evans Township - Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta]


William Evans

Mr. Evans was born in Licking county, Ohio, December 31st, 1817, and came to  this county with his parents in the fall of 1830. In 18498 he married Martha Springer, who was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, and four children have been given to them. viz.: Elizabeth, Douglas, John F. and Lucy. Mrs. Evans died in 1866. Are members of the M.E. church. He was justice of the peace some seven years, served as school trustee some 25 years, and filled other local offices. He owns 320 acres of land, all improved, with good buildings. He is the oldest settler in the township of Evans.

From  "The  Record of Olden Times or Fifty Year on the Prairie"
embracing sketches of the discovery, exploration and settlement of the country.
by Spencer Elsworth,   Lacon, IL Home Journal Steam Printing Establishment
Copyright Date MDCCCLXXX (1880)

(Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta)

William Evans was born in Licking county, Ohio, in December 31, 1817; died April 28, 1888, aged 70 years, 3 months, and 28 days. He came to Illinois with his father in 1830. He was converted and joined the M.E. church at camp meeting held at Cedar Point, under the ministry of Rev. Cundiff. He was married in September, 1842, to Jane Alexander, who died with smallpox the following July. He was married to Martha E. Springer, April 5, 1850. She died January 19, 1866, leaving three sons and two daughters—two daughters having preceded her to their heavenly rest. August 12, [1876], one of the sons, DeWitt, followed his mother to the rest of the faithful, leaving two sons and two daughters, all now married, to mourn the departure of their beloved father.

William Evans has been a member of the M.E. church over 50 years. He has been a resident of Evans township longer than any person living in it. He has never been demonstrative in his religious life, but always a true friend to the church. He held the office of trustee constantly from the organization of the board in 1853, until his death and was for many years a steward in the church. During his last sickness his suffering was great, but is patience never gave way. He gave testimony that the future was bright and that he was ready to go at the call of the Master. In business matters he was a man of unswerving integrity, having the entire confidence of the whole community.

Taken from The Wenona Index Newspaper
Wenona, Illinois, May 3, 1888.

(Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta)


Albert Evans

Mr. Evans was born in Licking county, Ohio, December 21, 1827, and came to Putnam county in the fall of 1830 with his parents. The township was named after his father. He married Miss Harriet Springer in 1855. She was born in Putnam county. They have six children living—Winslow, Ella, Lincoln P., Charles E., Charlotte Bell and Ada. They are members of the M.E. church. He was justice of the peace ten years, assessor seven years, and has been township treasurer twenty-six years. He owns 223 acres of land, all improved. He was in the lumber business for awhile in Wenona.

From  "The  Record of Olden Times or Fifty Year on the Prairie"
embracing sketches of the discovery, exploration and settlement of the country.
by Spencer Elsworth,   Lacon, IL Home Journal Steam Printing Establishment
Copyright Date MDCCCLXXX (1880)

(Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta)

Albert Evans was born in Licking County, Ohio, December 21, 1827, and died in Nevada, Missouri, July 19, 1894, aged 66 years, 6 months, 28 days. In August, 1830 his parents Joshua and Elizabeth Evans, removed from Ohio to Illinois, and settled on Sandy Creek, then in LaSalle county, but now in Marshall County. Here on what has ben known as the Joshua Evans farm, now owned by Dell Kemp, Albert grew to manhood. During his boyhood and youth-time he was recongnized by all who knew him as one of the best boys in the community. He was industrious, thoughtful and quiet. He enjoyed innocent recreation, but never participated in any malicious mischief, nor indulged in any sport that could possibly injure others. His principals along these lines were so well-known that the boys of the neighborhood passed him by when proposing any questionable conduct. On the 4th of April 1855, he was united in marriage with Miss Harriet Springer, and they made their home on what was then known as the Beatty farm and now owned by S. J. White, which Mr. Evans had purchased about a year before. In October 1865, they left the farm and moved to Wenona, where they remained until November 1879, when they returned to their farm.

In March 1884, they removed to Nevada, Missouri, where they remained until his death. Albert Evans was converted in February 1861 under the ministry of Rev. A. A. Cowen, and joined the M.E. church, of which he was a consistent and active member to the close of life. His church relation was not nominal. He filled nearly every official position in the church and always to the entire satisfaction of his brotheren. He served as school treasurer for Evans Township for 32 years, and as Justice of the Peace for 11 years. He was an honest, faithful and conscientious man. He had the confidence of all who knew him, and never betrayed their confidence. He was cheerful in his disposition, and had such control of his temper that he was always quiet and severe even in the midst of provocations. He was a kind father and an affectionate husband. His widow, 3 sons and 3 daughters are left to mourn his loss. The remains were brought to Wenona last Saturday, and after funeral services conducted by Rev. Riason, in the C.P. church where the M.E. people have been holding services the past few weeks on account of repairs and painting being done on their own house of worship, interment took place at the Cherry Point cemetery on Sandy.

Mrs. Evans, the widow, accompanied the remains to Wenona, as did also Mr. and Mrs. Winslow Evans, of Peoria, Mr. Evans being a son of the deceased, and other relatives from a distance were also present, among them, J. G. Evans, a brother, of Abingdon; Mrs. Iliff, of Galesburg, and Mrs. John Axline of Lacon, both sisters of Mrs. Evans; Alex Brown and wife, of Henry, Mrs. Brown being a half sister of the deceased; Ed Kemp and wife of Lostant. Mrs. Frank Wright, of Wenona is a daughter of the deceased.

Taken from The Wenona Index Newspaper
“Brought to Wenona for Burial,”
Wenona, Illinois, July 26, 1894.
(Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta)


Jarvice G. Evans

Mr. J. G. Evans, pastor of the M. E. church at Wenona, was born in Evans township, Marshall County, December 19, 1833. The sons and daughters of Joshua Evans were all reared in toil. Joshua Evans allowed no idlers about his home. So, at the age of 16, J.G. was given his time and allowed to do for himself, that he could secure a greatly coveted education. His father could have helped him, but he did not think it best to do so, any farther than to give him his time, believing that it would be better for the boy to work his own way, which he did, first by farming and afterward by teaching to get money to pay expenses while going to school. J.G. received his education at the Peoria Wesleyan Seminary, Judson College, Mt. Palatine, and at the Ohio Wesleyan University.

Influenced by what he has always regarded as bad advice, he left college before graduating to enter the ministry, going to the Rock River Conference in 1854. He commenced preaching in 1854. Still pursuing his studies, Quincy College conferred upon him the A.M. in 1870, and at a still later date the Doctor of Divinity. He received a degree of LL.D. from the Chicago College of Science.

J. G. continued in the pastorate until 1872, and was then elected president of Hedding College at Abingdon, Illinois between 1872 and 1878, and again elected in 1889. In 1878 was elected president of Chaddock College, Quincy. He resigned during the year and returned to the pastorate.

He served the Central Illinois Conference as secretary for six years, and was, in 1876, a delegate to the General Conference, Baltimore. He then was honored with the chairmanship of the committee on Temperance and Prohibition at the General Conference in Omaha. He was also president of the Central Illinois Conference Temperance Society from its organization. He published a number of lectures and sermons in pamphlet form, including "Pulpit and Politics," "Tobacco," "Thanksgiving Discourse," "Funeral Sermon of Lincoln," and several others.

He married Nettie Gardner June 14 1857, born in Delaware County, Ohio. They had one daughter Ida, and one son deceased. Ida Eva Evans was a graduate of Hedding College, and a teacher of Latin in the Streator high school.

From  "The  Record of Olden Times or Fifty Year on the Prairie"
embracing sketches of the discovery, exploration and settlement of the country.
by Spencer Elsworth,   Lacon, IL Home Journal Steam Printing Establishment
Copyright Date MDCCCLXXX (1880)

(Courtesy of Peggy Brock Cacciamatta)


Emanuel Brown EMERICK

Emanuel Brown EMERICK, deceased, was one of the leading and enterprising agriculturists of Marshall county, where he died of consumption on the 8th of September, 1880, after one year's illness. He was widely known and honored, and in his death the community, with whose interests he was closely identified, has lost a valuable citizen. His integrity of character, unbounded benevolence, and never-failing courtesy, made him beloved by all who had the honor of his acquaintance.

Mr. EMERICK was born near Wheeling, West Virginia, July 26, 1850, and was the son of George W. and Cassie (BROWN) EMERICK. His boyhood days were passed upon his father's farm in Marshall county, and in the district schools of the neighborhood he acquired a fair education, being particularly good in mathematics. He remained under the parental roof until his marriage, which important event in his life occurred October 20, 1877, Miss Anna J. MOODEY becoming his wife. She was born in Covington, Miami county, OHIO, and is the daughter of J. C. and Rachel S. (ORR) MOODEY. They began their domestic life upon a part of the old homestead of his father, which he continued to operate until his last illness. He was an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and supported the democratic party, but took no active part in political affairs. When called from this life his remains were interred in the family cemetery at Henry, where they now rest.

One daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. EMERICK - Anna May, who goes by the name of Bonnie. She is one of the three heirs, besides the widow, of her grandfather, George W. EMERICK, who left her a handsome property. A young lady of seventeen years, attractive and agreeable in manner, she is now attending high school, and is a great favorite of all who know her. Since her husband's death, Mrs. EMERICK has made her home with her father, J. C. MOODEY, in Henry, and as the guardian of her daughter, devotes most of her time and attention to the education and improvement of that young lady. She is a lady of taste and refinement and throughout the county has a host of warm friends.

[Source: The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896., Marshall county biographical extractions through page 100, transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass.]

Emanuel B. Emerick.
Mr. Emerick is a farmer, born in Washington County, Va., in 1861 and is a son of G. W. Emerick, a large land holder of this Township. He came to Marshall County along with his parents when a child, and married Jennie Moody, born in Miami County, Ohio, in 1877. They have one child, Anna May, born Jan. 24th, 1879.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 705 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George Washington EMERICK

G. W. Emerick

Mr. Emerick was born in Washington County. Pa., in 1823, and located in Henry in 1853. Up to September, 1879, he was farming on an extensive scale and was very successful, owning five farms which he rents out. He is now in the grocery and provision trade, and does a very extensive business. In 1849 he married Miss C. Brown, who died in 1877, leaving three children - Minerva A., Emanuel B. and William G. In 1879 he was married again to Miss Emma Morrison. Mr. Emerick has taken a leading part in public concerns, is a man of ability and influence, and a good citizen.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 701 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George Washington EMERICK, deceased, was probably better known for a time than any other person in the northern part of Marshall county. He was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Washington county, July 12, 1820. His parents both lived to an advanced age, and both died on the old homestead where George was born many yeas ago. An only daughter, Ellen, yet resides on the place, which is near the village of Moundsville, Pennsylvania. On that farm the boyhood and youth of George were passed and he was given excellent educational advantages, which wee improved, so much so, that while yet in his teens he was enabled to teach the district schools, and it is said that his first work, aside from that on his father's farm, was as a teacher in the public schools.

Before leaving his native state, Mr. EMERICK was united in marriage with Miss Cassie BROWN, in August, 1847. By this union six children were born: Minerva A., Emanuel B., Mary E., Margaret M., Frances Luella, George W., all of whom are now deceased. Minerva A. married Holmes MORRISON, and dying left one daughter, Mary MORRISON, who is a most estimable young lady, yet residing in Henry. Emanuel B. married Miss Anna Jennie MOODEY, a daughter of J. C. MOODEY. He died, leaving one daughter, Anna May, better known as Bonnie EMERICK, who also resides in Henry, and is a graduate of the Henry high school class of 1896. None of the other children ever married. In 1855 Mr. EMERICK determined on leaving his old home, believing the west a better field for the industrious and energetic man to succeed. Coming to Marshall county, he purchased forty acres of land on section 18, Henry township, which was the basis of his vast accumulations in after years. To the original forty he added other tracts, and selling none, had at the time of his death over one thousand acres, divided into six farms, all of which he leased to other parties. Much of the success attending him was due to his wife, who was a careful, painstaking and economical woman. She died in 1877.

Some two years after the death of his first wife, Mr. EMERICK married Miss Emma MORRISON, and leasing his farm, removed to Henry, where he embarked in the grocery trade, in which line of business he was likewise quite successful. By this union there was one child, Norman Clyde, now at home. Their married life was of comparatively short duration, Mrs. EMERICK dying in 1884. Two years later, in 1886, he married Miss Laura V. WOOD, who survives him.

In early life Mr. EMERICK was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal church, with which he was identified until his death, and in which he took a great interest. For many years he was class leader of the class at Snyder's school house, which was located near his farm, and for a time was superintendent of the Sunday school meeting at the same place. On his removal to Henry he became an active worker in the Methodist church of that place, and was interested in the building of the house of worship, which was erected under the pastorate of Rev. J. H. SCOTT. He greatly rejoiced in the completion of the building, having contributed largely in time and money to that end. He was a member of the building committee and watched the erection of the building with an interest that never flagged, and when finally turned over to the congregation and duly dedicated to the service of Almighty God, he was indeed happy. For twenty years he served on the board of trustees, and for a still longer period was a class leader in the church. Over forty years he had a name in the house of God and a fellowship among his brethren, and his interest in the cause was strengthened as the years went by. He was loyal to the faith as he saw it, and his trust in the Heavenly Father was as a little child. The Sunday school was ever dear to him, and he was faithful in attendance as long as he was able regularly to attend church.

The cause of temperance also found in him a strong friend and a most earnest advocate. In fact, he was keenly alive to all the moral and reform movements of the day. His intellectual force was considerably above the average and he thought and read much upon religion and temperance, and was always ready to give a reason for the faith that was in him. A man of strong will and determination, when once he decided upon a course of action he held tenaciously to his opinions and defended them against all who took issue with him. He was, however, not a blind sectarian, but was broad in his estimate of the good in others wherever they brought forth fruit. He intensely desired to see the triumph of the cause of temperance and believed that constitutional prohibition, both state and national, was the most direct way of securing that end. For this reason he identified himself with the prohibition party, and always voted as he prayed.

George W. EMERICK was an unpretentious man, of a quiet and retiring disposition, but when aroused was full of force and energy, and none were at a loss where to find him. Possessed of foresight and good calculation, and withal a close manager, he succeeded in all his business undertakings and at his death left a good property to his heirs. In 1890 he became a sufferer from the grip, from which he never fully recovered. Death came to his relief on the 16th of July, 1893, and the funeral services were held in the Methodist Episcopal church in Henry, and were very largely attended by sympathizing friends, many coming from a considerable distance. The services were conducted by Rev. William Woolley, the pastor of the church, assisted by Rev. J. H. SCOTT and Rev. E. E. WASMUTH. Rev. SCOTT offered the prayer, Rev. WASMUTH read the ninetieth Psalm as a Scripture lesson, and Rev. WOOLLEY preached a brief sermon from the text, "For me to live is Christ, to die is gain." Following the discourse Mr. SCOTT paid a just tribute to the memory of the deceased, whose connection with the church as a Christian for forty years he emphasized, as also in his official character while he was pastor. His remains were then laid to rest in the Henry cemetery, there to wait the great judgment day, when the dead in Christ shall be raised to meet their Lord in the air and reign with Him throughout all eternity. His monument stands at the head of the north avenue in the cemetery. It is seventeen feet high and weighs twenty tons. The design was selected by Mrs. EMERICK from designs exhibited at the world's fair, but was erected by a Henry firm, at a cost of two thousand one hundred dollars.

In early life Mr. EMERICK was a democrat and voted with that party until he saw that, if in the providence of God any reform was to be obtained it must come through some other source. For years he was an auxiliary member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Young Woman's Christian Temperance Union. He was a lover of music, and in early life was a good vocalist and played the violin, but in later years lost his interest in such matters. His home was always open to the preachers.

Mrs. Laura V. EMERICK, who survives her husband, is a woman of taste and refinement, a Christian who delights in doing good, and by thus doing serves her Master.

[portrait of Geo W Emerick available on page 87]

[Source: The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896., Marshall county biographical extractions through page 100, transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass.]



A. G. Everley
Mr. Everley was born in Monongahela County, Va., in 1837. Came west in 1868, and located in Wenona. He enlisted in the 3d West Virginia cavalry in August. 1862, and served until 1865, when he was mustered out at Wheeling. West Virginia. Married Miss Carrie Dilliner in 1861). She was born in Queen County, Pa. They have four children,- Wordan D., Mary F. , Reason A. and Sarah Ann. He is a member of the M. E. Church. He cultivates 160 acres of land.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 723 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

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