Marshall County IL Biographies

G

Carrie C. Gage  

F. C. Gale

James Gallup

Edwin Gants

Nathaniel Gants


C. C. Gapen

William Gapen  

Amasa Garratt

James Garrett

Austin C. Garvin


James F. Gates

Richard Gell

Frederick Geude

William H. GERMAN

John GERMAN

Samuel Gibb

Mrs. Lucy (Gaylord) Gibson

S. M. Glenn

C. Gould

Edward S. Gould

H. G. Grawburg

G. W. Gray

William H. Gray

Edward Green

Enoch George Green

Nathanial P. Green

Mark Gregory

John Grieves  

H. R. Griffin

S. C. Griffin

Melchi Grove

W. C. Guyer

Carrie C. Gage

Mrs. Gage was born in North Wolfeboro, N.H., and is a daughter of Aaron and Mary (Bickford) Roberts. The family came originally from England, and in the days of the colonies settled at Dover and became farmers. Mr. Roberts, senior, was born and labored on a farm when a boy, afterward removing to this place, where he died after a long a busy life. He followed merchandising here, amassing a large property, which was equitably divided among his descendants. Here his children were born and grown up, the sons assisting in the store and gaining a thorough knowledge of the business. Five sons and daughters were born to them, viz., Susan Abigail (Mrs. Blake), Alonzo and Porter D., living in Chicago, Mary B.G. (deceased), and Carrie C., the subject of this sketch. She married in 1854, Fred. Gage, and moved immedieately to Kenosha, Wis., where they lived two years, and went to Manitowoc, where he engaged in business. Here he made the acquaintance of Phineas Stevens, and in 1860, along with him and A. and P. D. Roberts, removed to Lacon, and under the firm of Stevens, Gage, Roberts & Co., embarked in merchandising, the lumber and grain trade. They did a very extensive business for a number of years and were quite successful. Mr. Gage retired from the firm about 1870, and purchasing a large farm west of Lacon, turned his attention to improving it. He also opened an exchange and loan office in Sparland. He had a first class aptitude for business, his investments were always safe, and he accumulated a large property. His married life was happy, and to them two children were born - a son that died in infancy, and a daughter - Maria Theress, born March 6, 1873. -

Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 682 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper

F. C. Gale

F. C. Gale, Physician and Surgeon

Dr. Gale was born in Windham county, Vermont in 1840 and comes from an old family that has given many eminent men to the country. His father was a farm and gave him a good education, after which he studied medicine and after receiving his diploma entered the United States navy as assistant surgeon in 1861, serving on board the U.S. steamer Potowaka, engaged in the blockade of southern ports and the pursuit of rebel cruisers, also in which capacity he visited the different West India Islands, the Caribbean Sea, crossed the Atlantic and entered the Mediterranean Sea, visiting most of the consular states on the way. He was in the expedition of Com. Goldsboro that captured Hilton Had and the Carolina coast, also in Burnside’s expedition and in a great storm off Hatteras. Saw several vessels with all on board go down. The service was exciting and laborious, now chasing rebel armed cruisers, now capturing peaceful traders, and again having sharp encounters with rebel batteries and iron clads. Occasionally they would chase a noted rebel cruiser like the Florida, the Sumpter, the Nashville, and four times he was wounded but never seriously. At the close of the war he was mustered out and returned home. In 1865 he married Fannie Taft, daughter of the Hon. Geo. W. Taft, of Vermont. She died in 1870, leaving two children – George Taft and Orpha M. His present wife was Jennie Handwork, whom he married at Morris, Ill., February, 1874. He came to Lacon in 1875 and has built up a large and lucrative practice.

Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 683 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper

C. C. Gapen

Mr. Gapen was born in Geneva, Fayette County. Pa , July 17,1808, and came west to Scioto County, Ohio, in 1830. He was married in 1832 to Sarah Fort, a native of Scioto County, Ohio, and to them four children were born - William T., Washington F., Mary A. and Timothy E. In 1834 Mr. Gapen came to Crow Creek, and was employed in Owen's Mill. The County was then new and sparsely populated and the people for fifty miles around were dependent upon this mill for their flour; and while nearly all the settlers suffered from the effects of ague, the locality abounded in frame and fish, and was literally a "land flowing with milk, honey and venison." In 1834 Mr. G. moved to Stevenson County. Ill., at that time the third family in the County, remaining there eight year s and then returned to Lacon, where he has since resided. He carried on the blacksmithing business here for several years and early in the late war was appointed superintendent of the blacksmith shops at Jackson and Memphis, Tenn., returning in 1863. He was in Washington at the time Lincoln was assassinated, and remained in that city until the close of the war, witnessing the grand review of the victorious army of the North. Mr. G. was appointed postmaster in Lacon in 1870.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 686-687 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 James Gallup
Mr. Gallup was born in Windham County, Conn., in 1825, and moved to this state in 1840, locating in Peoria County and in Marshall County in 1852, where he purchased a farm in La Prairie Township, and put up a house and moved into it that year. He had occasion to return to Peoria for part of his goods, and left Mrs. Gallup alone in their new house on the prairie three days and three nights. The first night a pack of wolves invaded the premises, making the night hideous with their terrific cries. It was new music for the ears of Mrs. Gallup, who had but recently left the refined civilization of Rhode Island, where she was born and brought up. But she came out all right. He lived in La Prairie about 11 years. Engaged in the meantime in the grain business at Sparland, and in 1870 he associated with him Mr. Noon, and added the lumber trade to his business. He married Miss Patience C. Stone in 1849. She was born in Rhode Island Aug. 31,1826. They have five children - George H., Benjamin, William, Juliette and Charles F.; and three deceased. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and has been through all the chairs and encampments. He left home at the age of 15, was superintendent of the large woolen manufactory of Fox, Rice & Co., Worcester, Mass., at 20, and was the first to produce fancy cassimeres in the United States of home manufacture. The king of England had a pair of pants made from the first piece produced in England of a fancy pattern. Mr. Fox had a portion of the same piece sent him, which he submitted to Mr. Gallup, with the question if he could make it, which he set about and successfully produced. This gave him great prominence in the manufactory. He owns 160 acres of land in La Prairie Township and some seventeen lots in Sparland. Having made his "pile," he takes the world easily, and hunts, fishes or travels as fancy dictates. Last year he ascended to the headwaters of the Missouri and floated down in a canoe to its mouth.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 753-754 Steuben Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Nathaniel Gants and Edwin Gants
Edwin Gants is a son of Nathaniel and Nancy Gants, The latter is a sister of the well-known Judd Bros., of Evans Township. Nathaniel Gants was born in Pennsylvania Jan. 17th, 1820, came to Illinois in 1844, and was married (to Nancy Judd) Dec. 31st, 1847. They have four children- Thomas, born May 19, 1849, Edwin, born Nov. 19,1852, Emma, born March 19,1854, and Preston, born July 29, 1866. Edwin lives in Evans Township, and in April, 1879, married May Disosway, born in Virginia. They have one child. Mark Edwin. Mr. Gants is a member of the Masonic order, and owns 100 acres of land.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 720 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Gapen

Mr. Gapen is a resident of Lacon engaged in the manufacture of saddles and harness. He was born in Scioto county, Ohio, in 1833, but was raised in Lacon, his parents moving here when he was but one year old. In 1857 he married Elizabeth Boyles, a native of Adams county, Ohio. They have six children - Charles, Mollie, Sallie, William, Emma Dell and Frank. He is a member of the I.O.O.F.; has been in business for himself since April, 1866. -

Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 682 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper

Amasa Garratt
Mr. Garratt was born in Washington County, Ohio, in 1817, and came to Putnam (Bureau) county, along with his father, in 1836, and to this County in 1850, and located on section 9 in Steuben Township where he remained twelve years, then moved to section 17, where he now lives He married Sarah A. Orr in 1851. She was born in Maryland. They have five children living-James O , Josephine, Augustus, Clara and Alison. He served as supervisor of his Township, and has served as justice of the peace some fifteen years. Has filled other local offices, attended closely to business, accumulated a handsome property, and owns nearly 900 acres of land.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 752 Steuben Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

James Garrett
Mr. Garrett was born in Steuben Township in 1850, and comes from a family whose ancestors fought in the Revolution, and one of whom fell at the massacre of Wyoming. He married Miss Charity Newingham in 1878, born in Brown County, Ill. They have one child, named Emmett, born Aug. 26, 1879. He is a member of the Masonic order, and owns 150 acres of land. Is principally engaged in raising sheep and hogs. He has about 200 sheep at present, and will increase his herd. Mr. Garrett is a good farmer and citizen.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 753 Steuben Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

Austin C. Garvin
Mr. Garvin was born in Monroe County, Indiana, October 4,1815, and moved to Putnam County in 1849, with his mother. He married Eliza Simmons in 1868, born in Maryland. They have three children-Clara E., Bertha and Austin C. He is school director, and owns 117 acres of land which he cultivates in good style. Mr. Garvin is a gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet. He is kind, hospitable and courteous.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 721 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

James F. Gates
Mr. Gates was born in Peoria, Ill., in 1848, of good old Yankee stock, his parents coming from Worcester, Mass., in 1823. His mother survives, living at Dunlap station, and is 75 years old. When ten years old he went into a store in Peoria, serving several years as a clerk in different concerns. At twenty he enlisted and served his time in the war for the suppression of the rebellion, and then took a course of study in Cole's business college. He clerked a year at the Peoria House, then went to Quincy and assumed charge of a hotel, which he ran for a year, went to Dunlap and bought a store, which he run for two years, and then came to Henry and entered into the grocery and provision trade. He does a thriving business and keeps a large stock. In 1870 he married Effie B. Fordner, born in Cincinnati and to them three children have been born - Mabel Inez, Jesse Freeman and Perrie Fordner. He has a large trade which he personally oversees, and is making money.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 700-701 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Richard Gell

Page 681-682 Lacon Township

This gentleman, member of the firm of Stire & Gell, merchants and clothiers of Lacon, is a native of England, born in Huntingdon in 1818. Before coming to this country he received the business training of a ten years experience in the grocery business in the city of London. In 1851 he came to the United States, and located in Lacon, remaining here about seven years. He then moved on a farm in Steuben township, where he remained one year, lived in La Prairie five years, and then returned to Lacon, being connected with Fisher's flouring mill about four years. At the expiration of this connection he formed a partnership with Felix Kahn in the clothing business in Sparland which lasted seven years, when he again returned to Lacon and formed his present business partnership with Mr. Store. October 18, 1846 he married in London England, Mary A. Wood, a native of that city. They have one child living, Maria Nancy (now Mrs. Martin, residing in Tazewell county), and have lost one child by death. They are member of the Baptist church. A few years ago Mr. Gell visited his old home in the city of London, and has consequently three times crossed the broad Atlantic. He is an estimable citizen, a man of sturdy integrity, honest, upright and straightforward in all his dealings, and enjoys in a high degree the confidence and esteem of his fellows. . -

Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 681-682 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper

William H. GERMAN

The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896. - Marshall county Biographical extractions pages 100-199
Transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass

William H. GERMAN, residing on a fine farm of two hundred acres on section 15, Hopewell township, and who is also the owner of another farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 14, of the same township, while making no pretension of great ability in any particular manner, is yet a man who has drawn around him many friends who admire his honesty of heart and such qualities that go to make up the trustful man. His father, John GERMAN, was a native of Zanesville, Ohio, born in 1797, and was a son of Moses and Caroline GERMAN, natives of Pennsylvania, but of German descent.

John GERMAN grew to manhood on his father's farm near Zanesville, Ohio, and there married Cassandra SMITH, a native of Ohio. In 1831 they moved to Putnam county, Illinois, and settled near Magnolia. After a year he went back to Ohio, but returning to Putnam county for a time, rented farms in Magnolia township. They were the parents of eight children: Samuel, who left home many years ago, and was never afterward heard from; Moses, who lives in Iowa; Rachel, wife of Calvin SHIELDS, of Putnam county, Illinois; Susan, who first married Henry HANNUM, and on his death married Thomas JOHNSON, now lives in Henry, Illinois; Elizabeth, now the wife of Y. A. GLENN, of Putnam county; Gilla, who married Daniel HARNEY, both of whom are now deceased; William H., our subject, and Maria, who died at the age of sixteen years. The mother of these children dying, the father married Elizabeth MORRIS, who is now deceased, and by this marriage were three children - Joseph, now living in Iowa; Eleanor, now the wife of T. W. STONER, of Hopewell township, and Melissa, now the wife of William FETTER, residing in Iowa. John GERMAN was for many years a class leader in the Methodist Episcopal church, and died in the faith. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk war.

The subject of this sketch was born March 12, 1840, on Ox Bow Prairie, near Magnolia, Putnam county, Illinois, and there grew to manhood. His father being in limited circumstances, was unable to give him the education he desired and therefore his school days were but few in number and he may be said to be a self-educated man. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, seventy-seventh Illinois volunteer infantry, and went with his regiment to the front. After a short term of service he was taken sick with the measles at Covington, Kentucky, and lost his voice for a period of three months, for which cause he was honorably discharged.

Returning home, Mr. GERMAN resumed his occupation of farming, and November 12, 1863, married Miss Ada E. STEWART, a native of Hennepin, Illinois, and a daughter of John E. and Sophia H. (CHAPLIN) STEWART, the former a native of Ohio, born in 1814, and the latter of North Carolina, born in 1817. John E. STEWART was a son of John I. STEWART, who came from Scotland. His father was a well educated man, a surveyor by profession, and served as a soldier in the war of 1812. The father of Mrs. GERMAN came to Hennepin in 1832, and there engaged in his trade of tailoring, in which line he continued until 1845, then removed to a farm. Mr. and Mrs. STEWART were the parents of eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity - Mary Jane, now the wife of I. A. GLENN, of Putnam county; Nancy W., now the wife of E. S. FOSTER, living in La Salle county, Illinois; Mrs. GERMAN; Lucinda W., now the wife of John McCLOSKEY, living in Roberts township, Marshall county; Kelp S., who married Rosa Belle GRAVES, now deceased, lives in Washington county, Kansas; Elizabeth Frances, who is now deceased and Ellen, now the wife of W. A. STONER, of Englewood, Illinois. Mrs. STEWART, who was a member of the Baptist church, died April 8, 1892. Mr. STEWART resided in La Salle county, Illinois, up to the date of his death, which occurred January 30, 1896.

To Mrs. And Mrs. GERMAN eight children have been born, three of whom are now living - Charles Stewart, Moses Samuel and Edwin Schon. Immediately after marriage, Mr. and Mrs. GERMAN commenced their domestic life upon a farm in Putnam county, and there rented land until 1866. He then purchased a small farm on Clear creek, in Hennepin township, Putnam county, which was then unimproved timber land. He at once commenced its improvement and after remaining there until 1881 sold out and removed to his present location in Hopewell township, Marshall county, where he has a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres, all of which is well improved. Mr. GERMAN is engaged in general farming, confining himself to no particular branch, and has been quite successful during the fifteen years of his residence in Marshall county. He has lately remodeled his large barn and built a fine dwelling, in which the family now reside.

While engaged in hunting on the 23d of August, 1873, Mr. GERMAN accidentally shot himself in the left arm, necessitating its amputation above the elbow. Notwithstanding this unfortunate occurrence, he seems to get along as well as most men who have the use of both hands and arms. Fraternally he is a member of Lookout Mountain post, No. 94, G. A. R., and politically he is independent, voting for such men and measures as he thinks will best advance the interests of his town and country. He has been assessor of Hopewell township six years; road commissioner three years, and has also served as school director for a number of years.

Mrs. GERMAN, who was born January 15, 1844, was reared on the farm and received a good education in the district schools, preparing herself as a teacher, and for several terms taught in the public schools of Putnam county, Illinois. She is a kind-hearted, intelligent woman, and has a host of friends throughout Marshall and Putnam counties. The same can also be said of Mr. GERMAN.

Frederick Geude

Mr. Geude lives on section 2, of Lacon Township, and was born in Prussia, April 5.1824. He lived there until twenty-eight years old, and then emigrated to the United States and located in this County. Previous to leaving he married Dora Blum, born in Prussia, and to them three children have been given - Herman, Anna and Amil. Are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Geude owns 126 acres, entered by Jordan Sawyer, and subsequently purchased by John F. Shepherd. He is Township trustee, and has served as such five years, keeps his place under first class cultivation, and is a model farmer.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 693 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Gibb

The subject of this sketch was born in Cumberland County. Pa., in 1813, came to this County in 1830, and three years later married a Yankee school marm, Miss Mary Hall, of Baskingridge, N. J., where she was born August 31, 1812. She was liberally educated at home, and taught school several terms, refusing several eligible offers of marriage before she came west, wishing to see the world before making a choice. Soon after reaching here she met Samuel Gibb, a sturdy young mail carrier from Knoxville to Hennepin. It was a case of love at first sight. He was straight as an arrow, and made nothing of swimming a river, if necessary, in the absence of bridges. They were married in 1838, and began housekeeping at once. She was a good manager and he was industrious, and they made money lively. They own a pleasant home of 312 acres of land, and four sons and daughters - John W., Henry H., Sarah E. and Mary Catherine.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 694 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Mrs. Lucy (Gaylord) Gibson
Mrs. Gibson (Gaylord) was born in Bradford County, Pa., in 1803 and came to this Township, then a part of La Salle County, in 1831, removing to her present homestead in 1833 or 1834. She married George Martin in 1833, a native of Connecticut, who located in this neighborhood in 1830. He died in 1838 leaving two children-Aaron G. and Silvia A. (Kirkpatrick). She married her second husband, James Gibson, in 1842. He was born in Fifshire, Scotland. He died in 1855 leaving two children - Isabel and James. Mrs. Kirkpatrick's husband died in 1862 in the army, of disease contracted there. Mrs. Gibson has 200 acres of land, all under cultivation. She is believed to be the oldest settler in Evans Township. She remembers when the family were notified to pack up and get away from the Indiana during the Black Hawk war. Lemuel Gaylord, her father, was one of the Revolutionary soldiers, and was at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was retained in the service for a year after the close of the Revolution. He helped to haul away the cannon captured from the British army. He died at the age of 89 years and was buried in the Cumberland cemetery near the house of Mrs. Gibson in this Township.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 722-723 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

S. M. Glenn
Mr. Glenn belongs to a family that settled in early times in Putnam County, where his father died and several of his brothers still live. He was born in Crawford County, Indiana, May 22.1822, moved to McLean County in 1857, remained there two years, went to Schuyler County in 1848 (58?), and came to Marshall in 1859. He married Caroline Conrad in 1843, born in Indiana in 1829. They have four children-Mary Roberta, Julia Disosway, Charles W. and George J. Mr. Glenn has been supervisor three years, and assessor eight years. He is a good farmer, and the best bee-keeper in the County, He is generous to his friends, just to his enemies, and liked by all whose friendship is worth having.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 735 Roberts Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

C. Gould

Mr. Gould is an extensive dealer in hardware. He was born in Erie County. New York, in 1834, and when ten years old came to McHenry County, Ill., with his parents, whence he removed to Winnebago in 1858, and came to Henry in 1867 and established his present business. He married Mary Ann Crawford in 1854, born in Pennsylvania. Three children have been born to them - Henry, Lewellen C. and Mabel. Mr. Gould has been quite successful in business, and commands a large trade. His credit is No. 1, and he thoroughly understands the demands of the market.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 697 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Edward S. Gould
Mr. Gould was born in the State of New York in 1832, his parents moving to Detroit when he was five years old, where he obtained an education, and he became a bricklayer. In 1852 he wedded Lotta Castello, also born in New York, who bore him one child-Ella E., born December 5, 1853. This daughter grew up and wedded William H. Parrett. They have one child and its name is Bessie. Mr. Gould is a member of the Masonic order.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 722 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

H. G. Grawburg

Mr. Grawburg was born in the state of New York in 1825 and came to Henry in 1856. He married Loretta C. Snyder in 1858, and in 1859 began business in Henry. Mrs. G. was born in Pennsylvania and is the mother of five children - E. Alva, May Henrietta, Dora V., William and Beatrice I. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., a stockholder in the Henry bridge company and weighmaster.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 700 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 G. W. Gray
Mr. Gray was born in Muskingum County, near Zanesville, Ohio, in 1817, and came to Illinois and located in Putnam County, near Magnolia, in 1845, where he engaged in farming. He married Miss Juliann Wilber, Feb. 4, 1837. She was born in Connecticut, and died July 12.1877. They had five children - Thomas Ligget, died in the army from disease contracted there, Angeline, George W. Jr., William H. Charles, Wesley and Mary K. His present wife, Elizabeth Conard, Was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1833. They were married in May, 1878. Are members of the M. E. Church. He was assessor in Groveland Township, LaSalle County, the first time it was assessed; was school director and trustee several terms. He is steward of his Church, and bas been a member some 40 years. Mr. Gray has also been a member of the M. E. Church since childhood.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 721-722 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William H. Gray
Mr. Gray is descended from an old family that came here previous to the Black Hawk war, and his mother, Mrs. Polly Gray, is still living. He was born in 1839 and followed farming all his life. In 1858 he married Miss W. A. Kircher, born in Miamisburg, Pa., in 1841, by whom he has one son, John R., born in 1858. They are members of the M, E. Church at Phelps chapel. He has filled various township offices and owns 187 acres of good land in this Township under excellent cultivation, and 160 acres in Bennington.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 743 Richland Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

Edward Green

This gentleman is a resident of Lacon and a dealer in boots, shoes, stationery and notions. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1834 and with his parents came to Marshall County in 1837. In 1864 he married Miss Sarah Ellis, a native of Peoria County, Ill. They have five children - Julia E., Anna M., Albert E., Clara M. and Florence P. Mr. Green has been in business for himself since 1858 and keeps constantly on hand a large stock of boots, shoes, books, stationery and notions.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 685 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Enoch George Green
Mr. Green is a wealthy and influential farmer of Whitefield, born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1827, and son of Philip and Nancy Adddington Green, to whom twelve sons and daughters were born, nine of whom survive. Their names are Malissa Pettitt, Isaac A., Susan M. Lake, Sally Berry, Caroline Hepperly, Philip H., Samuel L. and Elizabeth M. Doty. Mr. G. came west in 1837 with his parents, and lived in Peoria County until 1849, when he moved to Henry. Has been a resident of Whitefield Township 13 years. In 1849 he married Harriet M., daughter of J. B. Coykendall, of Allegany County, N. Y., and to them were born nine children, seven of whom survive as follows: Braganza and Andrew J., living at Yates City; Jonathan at San Jose, Cal,; Mary Grayson at Russell. Iowa, formerly tight years a teacher in Farmiugton and Lewiston); John R, Tecnmseh, Kansas, and Horatio G., at Bismarck, Dacotah. One sister, Augusta, died in infancy, and Elizabeth W. was a very successful teacher in Peoria County, who died in 186I. Jonathan is engaged in the packing business at Ban Jose, and John R. was a gallant soldier in the 11th I1I Cav., serving until the close of the war. Horatio went into a Wisconsin battery a private and returned with a captain's commission. Mr. Green was for a number of years in the lumber trade at Henry, and has always acted a conspicuous part in the business and politics of the County, He filled the offices of supervisor, justice and several others, and bears a high reputation for ability, loyalty and integrity. He owns a large farm, and is " well to do" in the world.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 762-763 Whitefield Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Nathanial P. Green
Mr. Green is a prosperous farmer, and was born in Albany County, New York, in 1826. He came west and located on his present farm in 1851, and married Miss Hannah Powell in 1854. She was born in Green County, N. Y. They have two children, - John W. and Ann E. They are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Green is also a member of the Masonic order. He has served as road commissioner and school director, and is trustee in the Church. He owns 280 acres of land, with fine improvements. Mrs. Green's father and mother reside with her. Henry Smith their oldest child, died when two years old.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 748 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Mark Gregory
A native of Ohio, born in Ashtabula County in 1835. whence he moved with his parents in 1837 to Auglaize County, in the same state, and from there to Peoria County, Ill., in 1843, where he remained until 18 years of age. In 1853 he came to Marshall County, where he has since made his home. He resides on section 8, is engaged in farming, and owns 160 acres of land with first-class improvements, all under thorough cultivation. In 1866 he married Eleanor Ursula Goodrich, a native of Vermont. They have one child living. Charles D. , and one deceased. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. is now road commissioner and a member of the board of school directors.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 707 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Grieves

Mr. Grieves comes from Selkirk, Scotland, where he was born in 1826 and obtained his education in the schools of the place. He was early put to work in the mills and obtained a thorough knowledge of the woolen manufacture in all its details. He set out to master the details and fit himself for something better than a mere laborer and succeeded. Finding there was little opportunity to rise in the profession in the overcrowded manufacturing cities of the old world, he determined to emigrate and came to the United States in 1848, finding employment in Lawrence, Mass. In 1851 he was offered the superintendency of a new mill at New Edinborough, Canada.

Remained till 1858, when he went to Utica in charge of a department in the celebrated Globe Mills. From there he went to West Troy and assumed charge of James Roy & Co.’s Shawl Mills. About this time the Lacon Woolen Manufacturing Co. was organized, in which Mr. Grieves became a stockholder, furnished the plans for the mill and purchased most of the machinery. He was its first superintendent and continued there until about 1870 when he went to Beloit, Wis., and to Peoria in 1872, returning to Lacon in 1876, and assumed his present situation as superintendent and manager of the Lacon Woolen Manuf. Co. In 1848 he married Elizabeth Heart and to them were given, George Isabelia, Jessie, John, Oliver and Christine. He has two children by a former marriage – Elizabeth and Mary. Two daughters are married and live in Peoria and one – Jessie, who was a very promising young lady, is buried in the Lacon cemetery.

[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 682-683 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper ]

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John Grieves, senior member of the firm of John Grieves & Sons, woolen manufacturers of Lacon, has been identified with the business interests of the city for thirty years. He is the pioneer in the manufacture of woolen goods in this section of the country.

The woolen industry in Lacon was the outgrowth of an article in the Chicago Tribune about the close of the war from the pen of Spencer Ellsworth, which attracted the attention of Samuel Saque and John Grieves. Correspondence between these gentlemen and Mr. Ellsworth lead to a meeting of a few of the representative citizens of Lacon and the appointment of William F. Fisher and Mr. Ellsworth a committee to confer with Saque and Grieves with reference to the establishment of a manufactory at this point for the production of woolen goods. A favorable report being made, a company was organized with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars, which was later increased to one hundred and twenty-three thousand. The first board of directors were Archibald Riddell, John Grieves, William F. Fisher, Spencer Ellsworth, Dr. Thomas, Alonzo Roberts and P. Stevens.

The company known as the Lacon Woolen Manufacturing company, after being duly incorporated commenced operations, having elected John Grieves as superintendent. It was in January 1866, when Mr. Grieves, and all the machinery bought by him.

There were many difficulties to be overcome in the establishment of such an enterprise in the west, and it required boldness in any one to come in competition with the old and well established houses of the east. The company was fortunate in the selection of Mr. Grieves as superintendent and general manager. A thorough master of his trade, and, with good business instinct and tact, he took hold of the enterprise with a determination to make it win.

The erection and equipment of the mill with necessary machinery exhausted the capital of the company, leaving it without a dollar with which to purchase necessary supplies. Nothing daunted, Mr. Grieves went to Chicago, and stating his case to dealers, secured he dyes and other material needed, and work was commenced. The first output of the mill was fancy cassimeres. A fine fabric was made, comparing favorably with those of any eastern mill. The product was put with the commission houses of Chicago, but with ill success. Mr. Grieves then went to that city, and with samples of cloth visited the trade, and after many disappointments succeeded in selling the goods.

After a trial Mr. Grieves and the directors of the company were convinced that a change would have to be made in the manufacture of goods, as such prices for cassimeres and flannels could not be obtained as could justify the making. It was then agreed to engage in the manufacture of shawls, being the first mill, in the west to engage in that line. For five years Mr. Grieves continued in charge of the mill, when her resigned his position and removed to Peoria, where he also engaged in woolen manufacture.

During the succeeding five years the Lacon woolen mill made no progress, and Mr. Grieves was persuaded to return and occupy his old position as superintendent and manager. From 1876 to 1894 he filled those positions and during that time dividends on the stock were made and paid, save for the years 1892 and 1893. In the spring of 1894, the directors of the mill took charge, and until November of that year were engaged in cleaning out all stock on hand. In the spring of 1895 the mill was rented to John Grieves and Sons, who are stilloperating it with success, turning out about seventy-five thousand dollars worth of products annually. Employment is given about seventy-five hands.

In 1883, Grieves, Halsey & Company erected the Ettrick mill at Lacon at a cost of thirty-four thousand dollars. It first engaged in the manufacture of hosiery yarn and continued in that line until it became unprofitable in consequence of the low prices prevailing. The looms were then changed and the manufacture of shawls were commenced, and later another change was made to dress goods. John W. Grieves, the son of our subject, succeeded Mr. Halsey, and the present firm was started, that of John Grieves and Son. This mill, which is run night and day, also gives employment to about seventy persons and the combined pay roll is about four thousand five hundred dollars per month. The products of these mills are mainly disposed of in Chicago, though selling in all of the principal cities.

Our subject was born in Selkirk, Scotland, November 9, 1826, and there grew to manhood. At the age of ten years he entered a woolen mill in his native city, learning the trade in all its departments, and remaining there until after attaining his majority. In 1848 he came to America and secured a position as a weaver of shawls at Lawrence, Massachusetts, being thoroughly conversant with that line of business. After two years he took charge of a weaver's room in a mill near Boston, remained tow and a half years, then went to New Edinburg, Candada, and became superintendent of a cassimere mill.

Returning to Massachusetts, he was in charge of a weaver's room at Andover for three years, and again went to Canada for one year. He next went to North Andover, Massachusetts, then to Utica, New York, as boss weaver. From Utica, he went to the mill of James Roy & Co., West Troy, New York, having charge of the shawl mill of that firm. From Troy he came to Lacon in 1866. John Grieves and Isabel Heart were united in marriage, April 17, 1848. Their two sons, John W. and George H., are associated with their father in the business. John is a designer and makes all the patterns used by the firm. George H., is superintendent of the Ettrick mill. Each of the firm understands the business thoroughly, and the product of their mills always gives the best satisfaction.

Transcribed and Donated by Nancy Piper
Taken From The Biographical record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois., Chicago: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1896, Page 49-50

 H. R. Griffin
Mr. Griffin was born in Fayette County, Pa., in 1823, and came west and located in this County in 1865, He married Nancy Cassady in 1851. She was born in the same neighborhood in Pennsylvania as himself, in 1822. They have six children,-Mary E., Ann M., George W., Rebecca S., James L. and John D., and are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He owns 320 acres of land, all under cultivation. Miss Sally Moats, who has been in his father's family since a girl, is now 75 years old, and is kindly provided for by him, in compliance with his father's will.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 724 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 S. C. Griffin
Mr. Griffin was born in Fayette County, Pa. in 1853 and came to this state in 1865. He married Miss Isabella Cusac in 1877-born in this County, They have one child. Lena May. Are members of the M. E. Church. He is a member of the patrons of husbandry and of the temperance society. Ha cultivates 60 acres of land. Comes from a family noted for their ability to make money, and is bound to get along.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 724 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Melchi Grove
Mr. Grove was born in Union County, Pa., May 6, 1820, and moved to the western reserve with his father when 4 years of age. He lived there until Feb. 8, 1842, when he married Miss Amelia Clemmer, born in Hottan, Upper Canada, in 1821. They have six children living,-John E., Henry A., Reuben M.-who enlisted in the army and died from hardship and exposure at the age of 22. - Clara B. (Lapslay), Rosabella, Shirley Ann and Shindon. They are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Grove himself is a disciple of Alexander Campbell. He is a lover of his country, and proved his devotion to it by himself and three sons (the youngest being under age) enlisting in the army during the rebellion. He moved from Ohio in 1848 in a two-horse wagon, containing himself, wife and four children, and all his worldly goods. They stopped at Trivola, Peoria County, until 1850, when he moved to his present farm. At that time there was but one house in view from it. He served as first lieutenant in company E, 86 Ill. Vols., until incapacitated by disease contracted in the service, when he resigned, and is since an invalid and always will be. Although suffering from the effects of his service in his country's cause, he does not regret the sacrifice. He is the same unyielding, staunch, outspoken lover of his country that he has always been, and always hopes to he while he is on earth. He has been always prominent in the local councils of the Republican Party, and has filled the position of delegate to many important conventions.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 746 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 W. C. Guyer
Mr. Guyer is a farmer and dairy man residing on section 9. He was born in Mifflin County, Pa., in 1839, and located in this County in l869. In 1864 he married Malinda Fibbs, also a native of Pennsylvania. They have five children,-Lloyd H., Doffie D., Charles A., Ida M. and Fannie R. Mr. Guyer and his wife are members of the United Brethren Church, He owns 56 acres of land adjoining Henry, and has made a specialty of the dairy business since 1876, keeping 12 cows and supplying the city with milk. He is at this writing a member of the board of school directors.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 707 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 

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