Marshall County IL Biographies
H

Mrs. M. A. Hafley

 A. B. Hall

David M. Hall


Jesse Q. Hall

J. H. Hall

Mrs. S. P. Hallam

Egbert Halsey

Samuel Hamilton

William T. Hamilton

William M. Hamilton

Andrew Ramsey HANCOCK

James W. Hancock

Luther Hancock
William W. HANCOCK

James A. Hanson

John F. Hatton

Valentine Hatzenbahler

William HAWS

Russell E. Heacock

W. W. Heath

Daniel Heinrich

Robert Henry

Nelson G. Hentborn

Moses Hertley

Robert Hester

J. M. Higgins
R. E. Hills

Thos. B. Hinman

Abraham W. Hoagland

Jacob Hochstrasser

Charles D. Hodge

L. J. Hodge

John Hoffrichter  

F. H. Holeton

Samuel HOLMES

Lyman Horram

Henry Hoskins

John S. Hoskins

Isaac P. Howard

Peter Howe
Mrs. Eliza Smith Wheeler Hoyt

Huldah Hoyt


Matthew Hoyt

J. B. Hudson, M. D.

Alden Hull

J. S. Hunt

Lyman C. Hunt  

E. M. Hunter

A. L. Hupp

Hubbard G. Hurd

Jesse W. Hurd

H. L. Hutchins

John Hutchins

William Huwald


Mrs. M. A. Hafley {widow).
Mrs. Hafley is now a resident of San Francisco, California. She was born in Canada, and was married when only 14 years of age. Her husband died leaving her a widow at the age of 15. She came to the United States with her child and lived with her uncle in Plattsburg, N. Y., one year, and then went to Sacramento, Cal., and opened a private boarding house, which she kept until burned out, in 1852. She then ran the City Hotel, on the same street, until the flood of 1852, by which she lost $20,000 worth of furniture and her well established business. After this calamity she moved to Grass Valley, where she kept a restaurant, and in two years made 20,000. In 1865 she went to Iowa Hill, in the mining district, where she was again an unfortunate sufferer by the elements of destruction, losing some $25,000 by a fire which destroyed the town. She then moved to Orrville, where she was married to Mr. David Hafley, a merchant, in 1857. They went to Sacramento and opened the Western Hotel, securing at the outset the patronage of all the stage lines, some twenty conches per day, and entertained daily about 300 guests.

Mr. Hafley was taken sick, and finally died in Philadelphia, where she had sent him for his health. She erected a costly monument over his remains in Laurel Hill Cemetery, bearing the inscription "the wife's tribute,'" and retired from business. Soon after, however, she opened a first-class boarding house, deriving her patronage mainly from members of the legislature, and continued until the great flood of 1862, when she moved to San Francisco and purchased the residence of the late U. S. Senator Broderick, who was killed in a duel with Judge Terry, of California. After a residence of four years in private life she opened a first-class boarding house on Kearney street, corner of Washington, in which she continued until 1876, when she sold out and made a trip east, visiting the Centennial Exposition. Returning, she stopped to visit friends in Marshall County, and while here purchased the Hatfield farm, in Saratoga Township, for which she paid $10,000 cash.

In the meantime her daughter, Maria Agnes, was attending school at the seminary of the Sacred Heart, in Philadelphia, where she graduated with the highest honors after six years' study. She was the treasurer of the school, and a great favorite with all. On one occasion when news arrived of a brilliant victory gained by Gen. Grant, she was confidentially informed of it by one of the sisters, with a caution not to say anything about it to the young ladies, there being some 300 there, many of whom were from the south; but her patriotism overbalanced her caution, and when she got into the dining room she picked up a chair and called on all present to give three cheers for the grand victory; then holding the chair over her head, marched round the table, calling for three cheers more. At this point the principal came in and told her she should have her turned out of school for creating such excitement, and sent for her uncle, Mr. Hafley, a silk merchant of Philadelphia, who upon his arrival told her to give ten cheers for the next victory she heard of and then he would send her to Paris. She is now the wife of Mr. Charles Pond, hardware merchant, of San Francisco Mrs. Hafley is still an active business lady, living on the ample income from her property.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 704-705 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

A. B. Hall

Mr. Hall was born in Durbin County, Indiana, in 1839, came to Peoria in 1855, and to Henry in 1860. Married Mary E. Atkinson in that year, born in Indiana. They have one child living - Stanley, and three deceased. Has been street commissioner three years, and is serving as city marshal, la a member in good standing in the independent order of Odd Fellows.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 698 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 David M. Hall
Mr. Hall is a farmer living on sections 2 and 11, Evans Township. Post office. Wenona, Ill. He was born in Fayette County, Pa., in 1837, and located in this County in 1861. Married Elizabeth Smith in 1865, born in the same County, She died in 1868 leaving two children-Robert and Will Emmett. He married his present wife, Augusta Jones, in 1869, born in this County, Four children have been born to them-Susie, Kittie, Josie and Hubby. He owns 248 acres, all under cultivation. His wife's father, Mr. D. Jones, is one of the oldest settlers of this County,
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 721 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jesse Q. Hall

Mr. Hall was born in Hopewell Township in 1833 and is a son of James Hall, still living, who came there in 1830. He was brought up a farmer, obtaining his education at the old log school house on the Broaddus place. Up to 1863 he labored on the farm, when he came to Lacon, and entered the lumber business along with Captain Mayer in 1866. He also engaged in the livery business, following it very successfully for many years. In 1854 he married Bell Shepherd, born in Ohio, who died in 1864, leaving him three children - James, Eva and Cora. In 1867 he married Mary Weaklam, born in Essex County. New York. She was a very successful school teacher and much admired by her friends. Four children are the fruits of this marriage - Tracy Q., Burton J., Mabel L. and Edna June.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 690 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

J. H. Hall

Mr. Hall was born in Kelso, Scotland, in 1821, and came to the United States in 1833, stopping first at New Orleans, then at St. Louis, and coming to Henry in 1856. He first opened in the grocery business with which he connected real estate, dealt in grain etc., following this until 1867, when he visited Europe, taking in the French exposition, where his knowledge of various languages mode him a valuable companion to Americans. Returning to the United States he married Adaline C. Fisher and by her had three children - George O., Mary Josephine and John O. Mrs. Hall died in 1856, and he married Sarah I. Ham, of Saratoga Springs. To her were born four children-Jennie, Florence, Joseph and Gertrude. After his return from Europe he went into the carriage business and followed it several years, and then embarked in the hardware trade under the firm of J. H. Hall & Son.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 699-700 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Susan Woolf and Mrs. S. P. Hallam
Dress-makers, Wenona.
The subjects of this sketch, having opened up their establishment in August, 1879, are prepared to do all kinds of dress-making, plain and fashionable, at the shortest notice. Miss Woolf is a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, and came with her parents to Marshall County in 1858. She is a member of the M. E. Church. Mrs. Hallam is a native of Guernsey County, Ohio, and moved to Richland County, Ill., in 1861, and to Rutland in 1866. She married Mr. S. P. Hallam in 1867. He is a native of Washington County, Pa. They have three children- Anna M., Myro L. and Henry G. They are members of the Methodist Church.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 725 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Egbert Halsey
Mr. Halsey was born in Suffolk County, on Long Island. N. V., in 1833 and lived there until he attained his majority. The Halseys were seafaring men, and the family escutcheon bears the name and deeds of more than one gallant sailor in the days of clipper ships and privateers. In 1864 he came to Galena, and was junior partner in the wholesale grocery firm of B. F. Felt & Co. Disposing of his interest here, he came to Lacon in 1862 and helped form the firm of Ellsworth & Halsey, who did a large and flourishing business up to 1867, when the senior partner went into the newspaper business, and he succeeded to the business of the firm, which he his prosecuted successfully to the present time. In 1866 he married Mrs. Libbie J. Shaw (Maxwell), of Sullivan County, Ind., to whom one child was born, - Evelyn. Mrs. Shaw was widow of Captain Fred Shaw, a gallant officer of the 11th Ill., who fell at Donelson, and had two children previous to this marriage, - Mary Alice and Charles Fred.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 691 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Hamilton
Mr. Hamilton was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1814, and came to the west in 1853, purchasing the Burns farm, in Roberts Township, which he sold to his son-in-law, Mr. Myers, in 1866, and moved to Wenona. In 1835 he married Nancy McMorris, born in London County, Va., in 1814. She died in 1866. Seven children were born to them-Celia in 1837, William in 1840. Lizzie in 1844, John in 1847, Oscar (dead), Frank in 1852, and Roe in 1857. In 1866 he married Mrs. Harriet Gray (Hodman), born in Ohio in 1822. They are members of the U. P. Church. His son John is state senator from McLean County, and Frank is a teacher.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 717 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William T. Hamilton
Mr. Hamilton was born in Union County, O. in 1840 and came to Marshall County in 1854, residing in Robert's Township with his parents on the Burns farm and in Evans Township until 1867. He married Susan Clifford in 1862. She was born in Harrison County, Ohio. They have four children-Luetta, John F., James E. and Samuel O. Are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is an elder in the Church. He served two years as sheriff pro tem, filling the place with entire acceptability. He is directing his attention to raising graded cattle, Cotswold sheep and line horses.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 723 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William M. Hamilton

I was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, October 13, 1816. My father was Rev. Wm. Hamilton. I am the second son of twelve children, ten sons and two daughters, all of whom grew up to be men and women. The psalmist says, " I have been young and now am old, yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken nor his seed begging broad." I always considered my father a righteous man, and he must have been such, for I never knew of any of his seed begging bread.

Five of his sons followed farming, three were doctors, one preacher, and one was an editor-also a member of the Ohio legislature for a number of years; at the time of his death he was a representative in Congress. One son, Dr. J. W. Hamilton, has obtained some notoriety as a surgeon in Columbus, Ohio. His son, Dr. T. B. Hamilton, was surgeon of the 104th Illinois regiment, and died at Nashville, Tenn. My father died in the 78th year of his age. His sons ranged in height from five feet six inches to six feet two.

I being the nearest the ninth part of a man, my father bound me to Hon. James Henderson, of Zanesville, Ohio, for the term of six years to learn the tailoring trade. Nothing unusual or strange took place in my life until I was in the 11th and 12th years of my age. In those days almost every family kept liquor to be drank as a beverage. My father, though averse to drunkenness, kept whiskey in his closet by the barrel and a bottle in the cupboard, thus affording a chance to take a dram when I wanted it. My visits to the old clipboard became more and more frequent, till at length it was noised around that little Bill Hamilton was a drunkard. My sister, becoming alarmed, conveyed to my father the sad news. He called me to him and in an affectionate tone of voice said, "William, your sister tells me that you have become a drunkard. My son, I would rather follow you to your grave than you should become such." Thus, through the watchful care of my dear sister and the timely admonition of a loving father, I was as a fire-brand plucked out of the burning.

This occurrence took place in harvest time just after the organization of the first temperance society in that region, and my father had a number of hands employed. It was my office to wait on them with water and whiskey. One evening all the hands got ready to go to a temperance meeting, and I asked permission to go with them. On the way father's admonition kept ringing in my ears-" I would rather follow you to your grave than have you become a drunkard." After the lecture was over an opportunity was given to sign the pledge. The lecturer requested those who would sign to give their names. One of the young men that went with me sat in the seat in front of me, and I said. "Charles, I will sign," when he exclaimed in a loud voice, "Bill Hamilton." We returned home at a late hour I had to pass through my father's bed-room to get to mine, and he was awake. Perhaps the sad news that he had learned from my sister had drove sleep from his eyes, and he may have been praying, as thousands of fathers and mothers are today-" Lord keep my son from the vices of this world and save him from going down into a drunkard's grave and a drunkard's hell."

The first question he asked was, "William, were there many at the temperance meeting." "Yes, sir: the house was full." "Who signed?" I named all I could recollect, and closed by saying I signed. He asked no more questions. I don't know how he passed the balance of the night, but think he must have felt like the old father who said, "This is my son that was lost and is found," and he, with those that were invited to the supper, began to be merry. In the fall of that year my father built a large barn, and in asking his neighbors to help him raise it he told them he would not have any liquor on the occasion, All came that were invited, and the frame went up nicely. Never after this did my father keep liquor in his house to be drank as a beverage.

In the 13th year of my age I joined the Methodist Protestant Church that was in derision called radical's Church. A few years previous to this some of the leading spirits of the Methodist Episcopal Church published a paper styled Mutual Rights, contending that the laity should have an equal voice in Church government with the ministry. For publishing such views they were silenced, if not turned out of Church. This transaction gave rise to the Methodist Protestant Church, which now has a membership of over 100,000 in the United States.

The day I was 15 years old I went to Zanesville to learn my trade, and served as an apprentice until I was 21. After working at my trade in Ohio until early in the spring of 1843 I took passage at Marietta, on the Ohio river, for Cincinnati, remained one week, and then started for St. Louis where I arrived with 26 cents remaining in my pocket. While standing on the deck, up came a peddler with a basket of jewelry, and my last quarter went for a watch-key. I engaged board in the city at $2.50 per week, and at the end of three weeks I found myself $7.50 in debt, but I got a job and soon paid up my board bill, and commenced business in the upper part of the city and remained there until October, then took a trip up the Illinois river to visit my relations about Magnolia. In this month I was 27 years of age.

Being highly pleased with the country, I commenced business in Magnolia, and continued it from the fall of 1843 to the summer of 1851. During this time made four trips to Ohio, one via the lakes, two by wagon and one on horseback. During my third visit I traded my spring wagon and a lot of clothing I had with me for three more horses, bought on time eighteen mules, and started for New Jersey, where I sold one-half interest in my drove at a very nice profit. Being late in the fall we did not find sale for our stock until near spring. Notwithstanding our heavy expenses, I returned to Ohio $250 gainer. I there bought another drove of 33, pastured them until the next November, and returned to Illinois.

The latter part of August I started on horseback for Ohio. On my way through Indiana I bought seven head of mules and one horse. This made me a drove of 40 mules and two horses. At Zanesville, Ohio, I sold about one-half of my drove to California emigrants, and the balance I took to New Jersey. On this trip I cleared above all expenses $1002. I returned to Ohio and bought another drove of 40 mules and two horses, and hired their keeping until the latter part of that winter, and then drove them to Harrisburg, Pa., where I sold them at $800 profit, and then returned to Ohio. After giving away $500 I returned to Illinois with something over two thousand dollars, with a view to invest my funds in reserved lands of the Illinois Central R. R. They not coming into market as soon as expected, I bought a farm of 160 acres three miles northeast of Magnolia. I farmed one year, and then sold out to Daniel Horram at a handsome profit, 1 entered my Wenona lands January 10th, 1853, and my Chenoa lands Sept. 24th, 1853.

I was married to Rebecca Burns, daughter of Andrew Burns, Oct. 18,1855, five days after I became 39 years of age. Should we live until Oct. 18, 1884, we may give our friends an invitation to attend our silver wedding.

I voted the abolition ticket in 1838. After the organization of the Republican Party with a plank in their platform opposing the extension of slavery. I became identified with that party, as did the majority of the abolitionists. My father once remarked to an aunt, "I am afraid that William will render himself unpopular on this abolition question." Truth is mighty and will prevail. It was not long until father and all my brothers were ranked among the abolitionists. In those days men were egged, stoned and shot dead tor expressing their views. 1 once made the remark to a fellow stage passenger, "I believe the black man has just the same right to his freedom as you or I." He drew back his fist to strike me, and said, "You may compare yourself to a Negro, but you shan't me." In the winter of 1833, I heard a minister lecture on temperance who advocated the enactment of municipal state and national prohibition laws. I have been of the opinion ever since that the strong arm of the law as well as every other lawful means should he brought to bear against this soul destroying traffic.

In the winter of 1874, the Wenona temperance society elected Rev. Morrow and myself as delegates to attend a state prohibition convention at Bloomington. Since then, as opportunity affords. I have voted the prohibition ticket, but, as did the old abolitionists, hold myself ready to become identified with a party that can bring about the desired object quicker than the one I now support. In the winter of 1873 I drew up an amendment to section 2 of the dram shop act, making it unlawful to sell liquor in any quantity without first obtaining a license, also making it unlawful for the supervisors to grant license to sell liquor within three miles of any city, town or village. Previous to this time it could be sold by the quart without license. 1 sent the bill to Senator Baldwin, which he introduced. It was referred to the Judiciary committee and reported back to the Senate amended, making it unlawful to sell in less quantities than one gallon, and debating the supervisors from granting license to sell liquor within two miles of the corporate limits of cities, towns or villages. Thus amended it passed both houses.

Before the assembling of our last legislature I drew up another amendment to section 2 by adding, "provided cities, towns, and villages may enact ordinances prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquor in any quantity, thus giving us a local law by which we could avoid the evils of selling by the gallon. This bill I sent to my nephew, J, M. Hamilton, senator from Bloomington district. This bill was printed and ordered to the second reading. While thus pending I wrote to my nephew to amend the bill before its passage so as to give cities, towns and villages jurisdiction two miles beyond their corporate limits in prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors. In due time this amendment was presented, and referred to the Judiciary committee and there met the same fate of a number of other prohibition bills. I hope to live to see the day when the people of Illinois will elect representatives that will press the passage of such hills.

I served as school director in Wenona ten years, and was re-elected for a three years term. At the close of one year I resigned. I was once a candidate for mayor of the city of Wenona on a no-license ticket, and was beaten. In the spring of 1872 I was nominated by the Republican Party for County supervisor. Not feeling disposed to treat or leave money with saloon-keepers, to buy votes, and through the circulation of a lie, that I was opposed to a poor man having a vote, I ran behind my ticket, and was beaten five votes.

In the fall of 1875 I went to California with my family, consisting of my wife and four children, with a view of remaining there five years. After sojourning there one year, along the coast from Clear Lake, 80 miles north of San Francisco, to San Dingo, 600 miles south, I became fully satisfied that the climate had been misrepresented, and returned home in the fall of 1876, believing the statement once made by David Law, who died at Henry a few years since, was true. Said he, "I have traveled in every state in the Union, and I tell you, taking everything into consideration, there is not a better country in the world than this portion of Illinois."

On my return home, I learned the saloon-keepers had hung me in effigy on the morning of my departure. When I heard George McAdam and other highly esteemed citizens say that I had never been more highly honored, I felt still more joyful in this tribulation. Two years since, Dr. Reynolds, of El Paso, in an introduction said to Rev, Millsap: "Hamilton was one of the pioneers in the temperance work; that we are now occupying grounds that he occupied forty years ago;" and added, "Don't you recollect the time you visited me at Bowlingreen, Woodford County, some twenty-five years ago, that Elder R. invited us home with him on Sunday to take dinner, and that he had wine on the table, and how you opposed the practice?"

At this writing I have just entered on the sixty-fourth year of my age. In reviewing my past life I can see where I have erred and misimproved time, and some acts of my life are brought to my recollection that gives me great satisfaction, of which I never will have an occasion to write.
WM. M. HAMILTON,
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 726-728 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

Andrew Ramsey HANCOCK

[The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896. - Marshall county Biographical extractions pages 100-199 - transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass]

Andrew Ramsey HANCOCK, of Lacon, president of the Sparland Coal Company, is one of the best known men in Marshall county, having been prominently before the people for a quarter of a century, and very active in the councils of his political party, the democratic, having served as chairman of the county central committee, and is at present secretary of the same. He is not only well known locally, but throughout the state, having for many years attended every state and national convention of his party. A native of Marshall county, born in Hopewell township, November 23, 1848, he has here resided his entire life. His father, William W. HANCOCK, was a native of Dublin, Ireland, and came to the United States when a young man of twenty years. For a time he resided in Pennsylvania, and later removed to Dayton, Ohio, where he remained until the latter part of the '30s, when he came to Marshall county, and here resided until his death. Soon after coming here he formed the acquaintance of Elizabeth ORR, with whom he was united in marriage, and with whom he happily lived until separated by death. She was a daughter of James and Sarah ORR, natives of Maryland, and pioneers of Marshall county, the family locating in Lacon township, just north of Lacon. Her father died in 1867, at the age of seventy-eight, being born in 1787. Of the family only one now survives.

On coming to Marshall county, William W. HANCOCK worked for a time by the day and month until he had saved enough to purchase a small piece of land in Hopewell township, to which he removed and where he resided until his death. To his original purchase he subsequently added other tracts until he had a fine farm of six hundred and eighty acres, which he placed under a high state of cultivation. He was an excellent farmer, a good judge of stock and made a specialty of fine cattle. In addition to his home farm, he was the owner of three hundred and sixty acres in two farms located elsewhere. When he made his first purchase his capital consisted of six hundred dollars, the savings of years. By strict economy and careful attention to his business, he was enabled to place himself in comfortable circumstances and died the possessor of a fair share of this world's goods. His death occurred in 1890, at the age of seventy-seven years. His wife survived him one year, dying in 1891. They were the parents of six children: Ann Louisa married Morgan BOYS, and died in 1865, at the age of twenty-seven years; James Washington, while making his home at Lacon, is a storekeeper in the United States internal revenue service at Peoria; William Emmett resides in Lacon; Andrew R. is the subject of this sketch; Alpheus died at the age of nineteen years, and Ira F. resides in Lacon.

In politics, William W. HANCOCK was a democrat of the old school, and was well posted in the political and general history of the country, and knew how to express himself clearly and forcibly upon all questions of public interest. He cared nothing for the honors or emoluments of public office, but did care for the principles of his party, in which he had the greatest faith and confidence. For years he served as supervisor of his township and also school treasurer, and was such at the time of his death. At the Baltimore convention in 1860, at which Stephen A. Douglas was nominated for the presidency, he served as an alternate delegate. He was strictly a temperate man, using no liquor or tobacco in any form. Reared in the Episcopal faith, in later years he attended the Presbyterian church, and died in the faith of a blessed resurrection. He was always an active, pushing and hard working man, and kept his business intact until the last, giving personal attention to every detail.

Andrew R. HANCOCK, our subject, remained at home until he attained his majority, assisting in the farm work from the time he was old enough to "drop corn" or follow the plow. His education was received in the public schools, but he has always been a great reader and observer of passing events, and is therefore one of the best posted men in the country. It may be said that he inherited a taste for political warfare, and from the time he cast his first vote in the spring of 1870 he has been prominently identified with the political history of his county and state. For two terms he served acceptably in the office of supervisor from his township, and in 1880 was nominated for the office of sheriff. Notwithstanding at this time the county had a republican majority of six hundred, he entered the canvass with a determination to win. The large republican majority was not only overcome, but he received a majority of one hundred and forty-eight votes. Re-nominated, he was elected by over five hundred majority. During his term several important murder trials occurred, and in the discharge of the duties of the office he displayed great ability. His abilities were recognized by the State Sheriff's association by his election as president of that body, an office which he filled in a most acceptable manner. About this time he served one year as deputy United States marshal. After serving his second term as sheriff, he was nominated for the office of county treasurer, but was defeated by a small majority.

It must not be considered from what has already been said that Mr. HANCOCK is a politician pure and simple, for the fact of the case is he is recognized as one of the leading business men of the county, having for the past seven years been president of the Sparland Coal Company, and giving the business his personal attention. The company employs about one hundred miners and has a daily output of one hundred and twenty-five tons. Its main shaft is located near the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railroad at Sparland, and the company is now working its third vein, which is thirty inches thick. In addition to his duties in connection with the coal business, Mr. HANCOCK is engaged in buying and shipping stock, and supplying stock feeders with young animals. He has a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, five miles from Lacon, and also owns one hundred and forty acres of the old homestead. In looking after his various interests it can be conceived that his time is fully occupied.

Mr. HANCOCK was married December 16, 1880, to Miss Phoebe A. MYERS, a daughter of John and Mary (WRIGHT) MYERS, of Roberts township. Her father, who now resides in Peoria, came to this county with his parents before the Black Hawk war, which occurred in 1832. His father, also named John, died here when past seventy-eight years of age, and the old homestead is yet owned by him. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. HANCOCK - Tracy and Lura - both yet residing at home. Mrs. HANCOCK is a woman of domestic tastes and habits, a member of the Congregational church, and is well known and universally esteemed.

Fraternally, Mr. HANCOCK is a Mason, a member of Lacon lodge, No. 61, F. & A. M.; of Lacon council, R. A. M.; of Peoria commandery, No. 3, K. T., and also the Shrine at Peoria. In Masonic work he has taken an active part, and is well posted in the history and work of the order. He is a lover of fast horses, and is at present president of the Lacon Driving association. As a citizen he has the best interests of his town and country at heart, and at all times is ready to give his influence in behalf of any good work.


James W. Hancock
Mr. Hancock is a son of William Hancock, one of the early settlers of Hopewell, and belongs to a family bearing a deservedly high record. He was born in Hopewell Township, November 26 1842 and married Margaret J. Bullman, daughter of Lot and Ann Bullman, January 25, 1863. They have three children-Bruce, Blanche and Pearl. Mr. Hancock is an industrious farmer, who minds his own business, and knows how to make money. He served one term as sheriff, performing his duties conscientiously and well, and is much respected in the community.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 731 Hopewell Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper
 

Luther Hancock
Mr. Hancock was born in New Hampshire, Sept. 7th, 1815, and married Martha J. Colby, March 27th, 1844. She was born July 10th, 1825. They have three children, Lydia A., James and John, living, and two deceased.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 729 Hopewell Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

 William W. Hancock
Mr. Hancock was born in the city of Dublin, Ireland, Nov. 17th. 1813, and comes from an old Protestant family. When 15 years old his father died, and he was sent to his grandfather, a large farmer, to be educated, where he made himself useful, and was promoted to keep the books of the farm. He remained until 20, and then embarked for the new world, landing at Philadelphia. Letters of introduction found him friends, and upon their recommendation he went to the country and bargained with a man named Walker to labor a year and a half for the privilege of learning the mysteries of farming, but all he learned was that Walker got his services free and learned him nothing. Then he hired one year to a neighbor for $140, after which he joined a young man named Chapman and came to Dayton, Ohio, where he made the acquaintance of Ira and Norman Fenn and accompanied them to Illinois, embarking on board the steamer Paul Jones, and paying $18 for a cabin passage to Columbia (Lacon). This was in 1836.

He found board with Dr. Effner. who lived in a log cabin north of John Hoffrichter's, and after looking about some time purchased a claim east of Lacon from a man named Barnhart, where he has ever since resided. That year he married Miss Elizabeth Orr, and after more than 40 years of wedded life has never regretted his choice. She was born in Cecil County, Md., and their children are James W., William E., Andrew R. and Ira Fenn. Are members of the Presbyterian Church.

He has filled the office of supervisor, assessor and other positions, has often been chosen to settle estates and the confidence of the public in his honesty and integrity has been shown in various ways. Mr. Hancock has been successful in business and secured an ample competence for the future. His children have grown to man's estate and developed traits of character that shows they do not belie their training, and proved themselves worthy descendants of good parents. One event darkens their lives, the loss of their favorite and only daughter, but her place is filled by a granddaughter, Nellie, who remains with them.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 730-731 Hopewell Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 James A. Hanson
Mr. Hanson lives on section 9 of Henry Township, and was born in Peoria County, Illinois in 1847, and moved to Marshall County in 1866. In 1871 he married Eliza Smith, likewise born in Peoria County, and one child has since been born to them -Walter S. He owns eighty acres of good land, all under cultivation, on which he has just erected a fine dwelling house.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 706 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John F. Hatton
Mr. Hatton comes from an old family that settled here early in the history of the County, and has furnished citizens who have filled important positions. He was born in Virginia in 1823, and came to Marshall County along with his parents in 1835. He has been a farmer all his life, and owns one of the best farms on the prairie. He married Elizabeth McKinney, and they have eleven children-Mary Jane, Mark, Thomas, Jacob, Helen, Sarah E., Nancy A., Eda, Caroline, Francis, Tine. Mr. Hatton is well to do and takes the world easy.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 738 Belle Plain Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

Valentine Hatzenbahler
The gentleman here named is a farmer, who was born in Germany in 1826, and came to the United States in 1848. He staid in New York city one year and came to this County in 1859. Married Maria Hawk in 1848, born in Germany. Their children are Eliza, Mary, Kate, George, Conrad, Anton, Peter and John. He rents and cultivates 320 acres of land. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church. They are hard workers and of the class of steady, industrious Germans who add to the wealth of the County year by year. Such emigrants are always welcome.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 703 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

William HAWS

The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896. - Marshall county Biographical extractions pages 100-199

Transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass

William HAWS, a leading and representative citizen of Magnolia, belongs to a family that has been identified with the interests of Putnam county since the earliest days of its settlement. The first to locate here was his uncle, Captain William HAWS, who was born in Orange county, Virginia, September 23, 1800 and in 1805 was taken by his parents to Ohio, and there remained until reaching his majority. On the 27th of August, 1821, he became a pioneer of Sangamon county, Illinois, where he conducted a tannery for a time, and in 1826 came to Putnam county, settling on section 26, Magnolia township, which was, at that time, however, a part of Tazewell county. He built a log cabin and there made his permanent home. He married Lucinda SOUTHWICK, a native of New York, who was a typical frontier woman, brave and fearless, and shared with her husband all the trials and privations of pioneer life. Indians at that time were more numerous than the white settlers and wild animals lurked round their little cabin. Mrs. HAWS died on the 4th of July, 1867, leaving no children.

The captain secured his title as commander of a volunteer company in the Black Hawk war. At his house in 1831 Putnam county was organized, and he served on the first grand jury that here convened, the first term of court being held at the old traveling house near Hennepin. Governor Ford was then prosecuting attorney of the district. The captain died in March, 1885, and was buried in the Magnolia cemetery. After the death of his first wife he was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Louisa MOFFITT, nee DEFENBAUGH, now deceased, and to them were born five children, two still living: Clifford, who married in Boston, Massachusetts, and Joel.

In 1845, a sister of Captain HAWS - Mrs. KELLEY - and her family came to Putnam county, locating in Magnolia township, but three years later removed to La Salle county, Illinois, and about 1860 removed to Missouri. An unmarried sister came in 1838, and made her home here until her death, dying at the advanced age of ninety-two years, and was interred in Magnolia cemetery.

Joel HAWS, the father of our subject, was born in Madison county, Virginia, August 15, 1796, and was a son of Conrad and Susan HAWS, who emigrated in 1805 to Clinton county, Ohio, where both died. The grandfather and two brothers took up arms against the mother country in Revolutionary war, aiding the colonies in their struggle for independence. The father was one of a family of eight children, the others being Elizabeth, William, Mrs. Fannie JOHNSON, John, Mrs. Nancy KELLEY, Susan and Tandy, all now deceased.

Until ten years of age Joel HAWS lived in Virginia, and then accompanied his parents to Ohio, where he remained until coming to Putnam county, Illinois, in 1838. In Clinton county, Ohio, April 27, 1824, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth GIBSON, who was born in 1805, and was the daughter of John GIBSON. On coming to his state they lived upon Captain HAWS' place until 1845, when the father purchased the farm now owned by Gustave OTTO, becoming its original owner. This he continued to cultivate and improve until his death, which occurred June 24, 1883. His wife, who was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, died in January, 1876. They were the parents of ten children, namely: Mrs. Mary Ann HUBBARD and Thomas G., both of Magnolia; Mrs. Elizabeth McCULLUM, deceased; William, of this sketch; John, of Ottawa, Illinois; one, who died in infancy; Mrs. Sarah J. McCOMBS, of Ottawa; Mrs. Eunice L. OTTO (see sketch of Gustave OTTO on another page of this work); George W., of La Salle county, Illinois, and James A., of York county, Nebraska. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving with the Second Ohio Volunteers under Captain William Fordyce, in Colonel Sumalt's regiment and General Denoe's division, and was honorably discharged in 1814. He was an upright, honorable man, a faithful friend, liberal to a fault, and in politics a Jacksonian democrat.

Mr. HAWS, whose name heads this sketch, was born in Clinton county, Ohio, September 10, 1833, and when quite small was brought by his parents to Putnam county, where he became familiar with the arduous duties that fall to the lot of the pioneers. His education was such as the district schools of the locality afforded, and he remained at home until reaching maturity. For seventeen years he was then employed by his uncle, Captain HAWS.

In 1858 Mr. HAWS led to the marriage altar Miss Helen CLISBEE, a native of Marshall county, Illinois, born April 11, 1842. She was reared from childhood by Captain HAWS, and after a short married life died February 3, 1864. Two children were born to them, Minnie L., wife of Riley B. ROBERTS, of Magnolia township, by whom she has four children, Burl William, Helen Haws, Margaret Livingston and Ollie Marie, and Helen, deceased.

Mr. HAWS was again married March 2, 1865, Miss Mary Jane TRONE becoming his wife. She was born in York county, Pennsylvania, January 7, 1845, and is a daughter of David and Christiana (PHILBY) TRONE, also natives of York county, the former born January 9, 1816, and the latter in 1820. In the spring of 1847 her parents located in Caledonia, Magnolia township, Putnam county, Illinois, where the father died in June, 1863, and the mother in January, 1879. They had four children: Mrs. Margaret SMITH, deceased; Mary J., wife of our subject; Mrs. Elizabeth KIDD< deceased, and Jerry. The parents were earnest members of the Methodist church, and the father served as postmaster of Caledonia for some time.

Mr. HAWS is prominently identified with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Blue lodge at Magnolia, in which he has served as treasurer for many years, the chapter at Lacon and the commandery at Peru. Politically he has been a lifelong democrat, taking a deep interest in the success of his party, and has been called upon to serve in several official positions, being road commissioner one term, supervisor two terms, a member of the school board and also a member of the village board of Magnolia, of which for several terms he was president. Since the war he has devoted his time and attention exclusively to agricultural pursuits, and now owns a valuable farm of three hundred and sixty acres, well improved and highly cultivated.

Riley B. ROBERTS, Mr. HAWS' son-in-law, was born October 26, 1854, on the old Roberts homestead in Roberts township, Marshall county, and is a son of Livingston ROBERTS, now deceased. In the district schools he acquired his education, and on reaching manhood he was married June 26, 1876, to Miss Minnie L. HAWS, who was born in Magnolia township February 17, 1859, and, as previously stated, they have four children. They began their domestic life upon the farm where they now reside, a tract of one hundred and sixty acres, highly cultivated and well improved. Mr. ROBERTS raises a high grade of Jersey cattle and fine horses, and has sold some excellent teams. In Magnolia lodge, No. 103, F. & A. M., he holds membership and is past master, while he also belongs to the Modern Woodmen, in which he has served as the presiding officer. His political support is given the republican party, and for twelve years he has been road commissioner, and has also served as school director in his district.


 Russell E. Heacock
Mr. Heacock is a native of the Dominion of Canada, having been born in Leeds County and removed to the vicinity of Henry in 1841, In August. 1848, he married Sarah H. Davidson, horn in the same County with himself. Up to 1857 he lived in Henry, where he served some time as mayor, and as aldermen. Was assessor two years, and filled other positions, Mr. H. is interested in the early history of the place and County, and possesses much valuable information. He is a good talker, a pleasant, genial gentleman, and owns a good farm with first class surroundings,
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 705 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 W. W. Heath
Mr. Heath was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1823, and came to Henry in 1849. He began the grocery business here in 1854, and built up a healthy, lucrative trade, which he continues to the present time. He was married in 1851 to Mary J. Puffer, born in New York, and they have three children - Edgar H., (married to Jennie Bradley), Mary Ella and Clara L. Mr. Heath has been actively engaged in educational matters, and served as city treasurer, clerk, etc. He carries a full stock of groceries, flour, etc., and has a flourishing trade.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 697 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Daniel Heinrich
Mr. Heinrich was born in Alsace formerly a province of France, but conquered and annexed to Germany in 1871. He was born in 1846, and came to the United States in 1868, remaining in New York city two years, and came to Lacon in 1870. He married Ida Boers Oct. 5th. 1873, a native of Prussia, and two children have been born to them - Bertha M. F. and Holdie S. He is a member of the German Workingmen's society, and an intelligent, useful citizen. He has been in the saloon business since 1877,
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 686 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Robert Henry
Mr. Henry is a large farmer, living on section 29, Evans Township, Post office, Wenona. He was born in Westmoreland County, Pa. in 1816 and moved to Ohio with his parents in 1820. They located in Harrison County, where he lived until 1843 and then went back to Washington County, Pa. He came to Marshall County, Ill., Dec, 1851. He married Mary Hathaway in 1863, a native of Kentucky. She had two children by a former marriage David L. and William A. Smith. Mr. Henry is a member of the V. P. Church. She is a member of the Christian Church. He was assessor and road commissioner several years. He owns 166 acres of land, all in a good state of cultivation
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 719 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Nelson G. Hentborn
Mr. Hentborn was born in Fayette County, Pa., in 1810 and moved with his parents to Perry County, Ohio, in 1813 and to Marshall (then Putnam) County in 1835. His family were among the earliest settlers of Lacon, his brother-in-law, Gen. Babb, having been one of the prospectors of the place. His father was one of the founders of the M. E. Church here and its first leader. He was the second person interred in the Lacon cemetery. Mr. Hentborn married Elizabeth C. Moeller in 1835 and came to Lacon to live in 1848, following the trade of contractor and builder. Six children have been born to them - Charles O., living in Chicago, George, in Peoria, Maria, (Mrs. Clapp), Sarah and Laura, (teachers), and Lincoln living at home. Mr. Hentborn has served as circuit and County clerk for several years and filled various minor offices. He is an excellent penman and each of his children inherit his skill. Two of his sons, Charles and George, served in the army during the rebellion.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 685 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Moses Hertley
Mr. Hertley was born in England in 1826, and came to the United States with his parents when only three years old. They located in Wheeling, Va. He went to St. Louis in 1845, and in 1854 came to Henry, Ill.., where he followed his trade of bricklayer until 1861. He purchased 160 acres of land and removed to his present homestead. He married Jane Maxwell in 1851, born near Wheeling, W, Va. They have three children, Britt, Annie J. and Adna. He has served as school trustee several terms. He purchased 80 acres in Saratoga In 1861, and 80 acres in Whitefield Township in 1871, which he maintains in excellent cultivation.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 758 Saratoga Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Robert Hester
Mr. Hester is a farmer, and his home is on section 36, where he owns 400 acres of fine farming land. He was born in Boon County, Kentucky, and came to Marshall County in 1847, where he married Miss Lydia Davidson, born in New York, by whom he had one child, Effie Z. Mrs. H. died May 14, 1863, and he wedded Nancy McKeever to whom has been born two children - Simeon L. and Cora V. Mr. Hester is one of the leading men of the County, and has filled various offices of trust and responsibility. Has served one term as sheriff, has been a member of all important conventions, and his name favorably mentioned as a member of the legislature. He took a deep interest in the war and emancipation, and always occupies the front rank in every movement that tends to elevate the human race. He has just completed one of the best residences in the County,
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 738-739 Belle Plain Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 J. M. Higgins, M. D.
Dr. Higgins was born in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, October 25, 1826. He moved west in 1842, and located in Racine, Wis., then to Almira, Jefferson County, Wis., in 1844, and to Quincy. Ill., in 1851, where he studied dentistry. He married Clara Story in 1853, born in Lockport. N. Y. , and to them one child, Clarence M., was born. Are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Masonic order, and he and Mrs. H. are members of the Chapter of the Eastern Star. They moved to Havana, III., in 1863. where he practiced dentistry till 1866. when they removed to Chicago, where they continued the business up to 1869, during which time he was studying medicine, and graduated from the Bennet Eclectic College in that city. The same year he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, where he practiced medicine and dentistry for one year, then returned to Quincy. After that he lived in Galesburg and Streator, and finally located in Wenona in 1878. Besides the acquirements already enumerated the doctor is a fine singer and good musician, and is an excellent photographer.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 710 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

R. E. Hills
Mr. Hills was born in Waterloo, Seneca County, N. Y., in 1825, He came to St. Charles, Kane County, in 1855, and to Henry in 1866 where he set up in the grocery and provision trade, which he has since followed. In 1849 he married Elizabeth F. Owens, born in Geneva, Ontario County, N. Y. He keeps all desirable goods in his line, is a heavy shipper of poultry and produce, and has the reputation of being a fair dealer with whom it is a pleasure to transact business.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 701 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

 Thos. B. Hinman
Wagon Manufacturer.
Mr. Hinman was born in New Milford, Litchfield County, Conn., in 1817. He went to Binghamton, N. Y., when only 16 years old, where he commenced to learn the trade with two older brothers. Worked there until 1833, when they moved to Tazewell County, Ill., where his brothers established business and he served out his time, five years. He then moved to Canton Fulton County, and after working at jour work for a while, went into partnership with his employer, whom he soon after bought out and run the business there about eight years. He then sold out and purchased a farm and worked it until 1851, when he sold out all his interests in Fulton County and moved to Marshall County, purchasing 200 acres in Bennington Township. He lived upon this about eleven years, then sold out and moved into Wenona, where he built and established his present business in 1865. He married Martha A. Sherwood in 1845, a native of N. Y. They have five children-Hanford H., Eliza A., Sarah E., Ada E. and Benton E. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. He was school trustee and director, road commissioner, and justice of the peace in Bennington Township. He was one of the first aldermen in Canton, Fulton County He is a finished mechanic and has facilities to turn out all kinds of carriages, buggies and wagons to order on short notice.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 711-712 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Abraham W. Hoagland
Mr. Hoagland is a native of New York state where he was born in 1812, and with his parents came to Putnam County in 1856. In 1868 his father died. His mother is still living. When President Lincoln called for "six hundred thousand more" he shouldered his musket and became a soldier in the 87th Ill., serving until the end of the war. He owns 120 acres of land in a high state of cultivation, with a good house and other buildings.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 706 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Jacob Hochstrasser
Mr. Hochstrasser is a brewer by profession, born in Wurttemberg, Prussia, in 1846, and has been a resident of this country since 1865. He first located in Dunkirk, N.Y., whence he moved to La Salle, Ill., in 1867. He came to Lacon in 1873, where he embarked in the brewing business under the firm name of Jacob Hochstrasser & Co. The works combine all the modern improvements and their beer is popular everywhere, finding large sale in private families as well as saloons. They have a capacity of 75 barrels per day, and supply all the towns around. In 1869 he married Caroline Boers, a native of Prussia, and they have four children living - Augusta E., Louis W., Annie M. and Herman W, Two are dead. Mr. H. is a liberal German, honest in his transactions, and has a large circle of friends.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 685 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Charles D. Hodge
The subject of this sketch is a farmer, living in Belle Plain Township. He was born in New York, and came to Marshall County in 1855. He married Miss Mary Dusten, in the State of New York, in 1853. She was born in Grafton, New York, November 22, 1828. They have eight children living - Dora Charles Homer, Myron, Elmer, Chalmers, Sumner and Annie. Joseph died September 13. 1856, Mr. Hodge cultivates 20 acres of land.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 738 Belle Plain Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

L. J. Hodge
This gentleman, a member of the firm of Howe, Hodge & Ralston, bankers, of Wenona, was born in Monroe County, Ohio, in 1841, and came west with his parents in 1852, locating in Putnam County, He came to Wenona in 1855, and in 1866 embarked in the lumber business, which he followed until 1877 when he became identified with the above firm. In 1864 he married Harriet E. Howe, a native of this state. They have two children, George O. and John G. Are members of the M. E. Church.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 712 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

John Hoffrichter

A resident of Lacon, a stock dealer by occupation and proprietor of a meat market. Mr. Hoffrichter was born in Prussia in 1829, came to the United States in 1854, and in 1859 located in Lacon. The same year of his settlement here he married Margaret Krach, a resident of St. Louis, born in Bavaria. They have four children - Louisa E., Clara M., Anna T. and Bertha E. They are members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. H. belongs to the Masonic order and the I.O.O.F. He has been in business in the same location since 1859. - Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 682 Lacon Township. Transcribed by Nancy Piper


 F. H. Holeton
Mr. Holeton was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1819, and located in this County in 1857. He married Hannah Cockerel previous to coming to this County, She was born in London County Va. They have two children, James W. and George H. Are members of the M. E. Church. He has been road commissioner and school trustee, and was postmaster at Evans station nearly two years. Mr. Holeton owns a very fine property near the station, and his farm is one of the best on the prairie. He is well posted in all the affairs of the day, has a plenty of this world's goods, and takes the world easy. One of his sons is publisher of the Chillicothe Review.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 719 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel HOLMES

The Biographical Record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois, Published in Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. 1896. - Marshall county Biographical extractions pages 100-199

Transcribed March 2011 by Norma Hass

Samuel HOLMES, known throughout the entire section of the country in which he lives as Squire HOLMES, is one of the most prominent citizens and farmers in Hopewell township, Marshall county. His father, also named Samuel, was a native of Lancashire, England, born in 1786, while his grandfather, James HOLMES, was also a native of the same shire. His mother was Hannah JACKSON, a native of Chestershire, England, and a daughter of James JACKSON, who came to America in 1812, locating in New Jersey, near Trenton, where he made a permanent home. Samuel HOLMES, the father, came to America in 1818, landing in New York city, and going from thence to Clinton, New Jersey, where he married Hannah JACKSON. Shortly after their marriage they removed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a common laborer for a time, and subsequently operated a lumber yard.

In 1835 the family came west and settled in Putnam county, Illinois, in the heavy timber land. The country was then very sparsely settled, and the father at once commenced the clearing up of the small farm. In his native country he had been educated as a veterinary surgeon, and it is said that he had not a superior in this line in America. Before coming to this country he was veterinary for the Earl of Balcares, and had considerable experience in the line of his profession. He never followed that business in this country for money simply, but responded to calls from Ottawa to Bloomington, and throughout this entire section of country.

Samuel HOLMES, Sr., was a pioneer in Putnam county, and came to this country with his wife, two sons and a step-son. One child died in infancy. Of the sons, Joseph, born November 20, 1819, married Miss Avis TABER, and now lives in southern California. They are the parents of four children, Mary, J. H., Avis and Samuel J. The latter is a graduate of the state university of California, and is a professor of biology in the Chicago university. The other son is the subject of this sketch. In 1850 the father went to California, making the journey overland, and there died shortly after his arrival, October 29, 1850. The mother survived him many years, dying on the old homestead in 1876. Under the old constitution of Illinois, Mr. HOLMES became a voter, but never became a partisan politician and never held office.

Samuel HOLMES, our subject, was born January 4, 1822, at Trenton, New Jersey, and commenced attending the public schools at Philadelphia after the removal of the family to that place. He also attended one or two terms in the pioneer schools of Illinois. His education, it may be said, was principally obtained by reading and observation. In his desire to acquire knowledge he has many times jumped upon a horse, ridden ten miles to borrow a book, then by means of a dip made of lard, in a saucer, with a rag for a wick, he and his brother would study after their day's work was completed. The two brothers helped clear the farm in Putnam county, and both remained at home until after attaining their majority. For some seasons they made brick, which they sold throughout the country. On one occasion after manufacturing a large number of brick they constructed a flatboat to carry their product south, but were prevented from doing so by low water. In the fall of 1843, in company with another man, our subject engaged in cutting wood for the steamers on the Illinois river. After piling up some eight hundred cords and looking hopefully forward to the time when they could dispose of the results of their hard winter's work, the flood of 1844 came upon them, carrying every stick of their wood down the river. He then went to work with his brother on the farm, and worked thus for nearly two years.

On the 6th of November, 1846, Mr. HOLMES was united in marriage with Miss Sarah WHITE, a native of North Carolina, and daughter of William WHITE, also a native of the same state, but who came to this county about 1836. By this union there are four children, Anna, who married George HUME, is now deceased; Jane, who married Amos DeBAULT, now resides in Oklahoma; Samuel, who married Hulda NEWPHINE, now lives in the state of Washington, and Emma B., who married Joseph TABER, is now deceased.

Soon after marriage Mr. HOLMES purchased a tract of wild prairie land in Henry township, of which he improved one hundred and sixty acres, building thereon a small cabin, in which the family lived from the spring of 1847 until 1849, and then sold out. In the summer of 1850 he went to the gold fields of California, across the plains. He started from Council Bluffs, Iowa, with four men under contract to work for him a year. They crossed the Missouri river May 28, and arrived at Placerville, California, August 21. After working in the mines until the spring of 1852 he returned to his home by the Nicaragua route, arriving home August 1, 1852. While he was away his wife purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land lying east and south of his present farm, but was living in the house where they now reside. From that time until the present he has followed farming, with the exception of two years spent in visiting his brother in southern California. For the past six years he has rented the farm, which comprises two hundred and forty acres of well improved land.

Mrs. Sarah HOLMES, his first wife, was born in 1825, and died in 1868. One year later he married Miss Sarah C. TABER, a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and a daughter of Benjamin Nerab (COFFIN) TABER, the former a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and the latter of Nantucket, Massachusetts. They came west in 1837, and settled in Knox county, Illinois, where he died many years ago. The mother died and was buried in the cemetery at Henry. They were the parents of eight children, three of whom are now living: Dr. Benjamin, now residing in Dallas, Texas; Sarah C., the wife of our subject, and Avis, who married Joseph HOLMES, and now resides in southern California. Mrs. HOMES was born January 30, 1816, and was educated in the public schools of New Bedford, finishing her course in the seminary at Providence, Rhode Island. The Taber family were descended from the Coffin family, which was founded by Tristam COFFIN, who settled at Salisbury, Massachusetts, in 1642.

In politics Mr. HOLMES is an uncompromising democrat, and has taken a somewhat active part in local affairs. For four years he served as justice of the peace in Hopewell township, three years as commissioner of highways and school director and trustee for many years. His grand-daughter, Maud E. HOLMES, is a graduate of the Henry high school, and has been a successful teacher. She is a very cultured and highly refined lady, and takes great interest in ancient lore, especially all matters pertaining to the history of the family.


 Lyman Horram
Mr. Horram is one of the oldest living settlers of Putnam or Marshall Counties, first visiting this section fifty-three years ago. He was born in Orange County, Vermont, in 1806, moved with his parents to Philadelphia when two years old, and to Trenton, N. J., three years later. In 1814 his father moved to Lawrenceburg, Ind., purchasing a flat-boat and floating down the stream to their destination. When 16, his parentsl moved to Hamilton County Ind., on White river, and again to Tippecanoe County, where his father laid out the town of Dayton, and was one of the three first settlers in the County, In 1827 he started, along with others, for the newly discovered lead mines near Galena, went to the portage of the Kankakee, and purchasing canoes, floated down that stream and the Illinois to Chillicothe, and thence journeyed on foot over "Kellogg's trail" to their destination. He staid one year and returned, visiting the mines again the succeeding year. Going back to Indiana, he married Eleanor Baker in 1828, and removed to Putnam County, six miles east of Henry, where he opened a large farm and was very successful up to the time he retired from business, about fifteen years ago. He was a hard worker, and his plans were made with judgment. Both himself and wife were industrious and prudent, and fortune smiled upon them; he has a competence of this world's goods, and in his old age can sit beneath his own vine and fig tree and enjoy the legitimate fruits of a well spent life.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 698 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Henry Hoskins
Mr. Hoskins was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1822, where he lived until he was twenty years old and then settled in Steuben Township. His wife was Mary A. Bonham whom he married in 1862. She is a native of Ross County, Ohio. They have eight children - Clayton, Eveline, Clarissa, Eliza, William, Louis, Thomas and Elmer. They are members of the M. E. Church. He has served as road commissioner 12 years, and school director several terms. In the dark days of the rebellion, Mr. Hoskins being unable himself to give his personal services to the government, he furnished a substitute to whom he paid $800. He owns 254 acres of land in Marshall County and 300 acres in Livingston County, He is not in good health but is reconciled to the will of Providence.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 753 Steuben Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John S. Hoskins

Taken From the Henry Republican
December 6, 1877

John S. Hoskins, the subject of this sketch, died of consumption, Nov. 3, 1877. Was born Jan. 12, 1814, near Chillicothe, Ross county, Ohio. Was married August 10, 1834 to Eliza Bonham, daughter of Warford Bonham, deceased. Emigrated to Illinois the same year with the family of his father-in-law, landing in Tazewell county October 24. In the spring of 1835 came to Marshall county; settled and improved a farm two miles north of Sparland. In the spring of 1850, removed to his late residence, where he lived until his death. He was a good and useful citizen, filling offices of church and township with fidelity and trust. Was a member of the M. E. church 35 years, and labored earnestly in its support. He leaves a wife and six children, who are bereft of a kind companion and indulgent father. The funeral services were conducted at the Bethel church, by the Rev. A. Beeler, after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery near Sparland, followed by many sympathizing relatives and friends - Journal


 Isaac P. Howard
Mr. Howard is a farmer, living on section 12 Evans Township, Post office Wenona. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1824 and moved to Putnam County in 1851. He married Rebecca Wilson in 1853. She was born in Belmont County, Ohio. They have six children- Mary Ida. Lewella J., Hattie R., Henrv W., John M. and Delbert J. Are members of the Quaker Church. Mr. Howard has been school director several years. He owns 160 acres of land, all under cultivation, with good improvements. He possesses a generous nature and is a good farmer.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 718 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Peter Howe
Banker
Mr. Howe was born in Windsor County, Vermont, in 1816 and when seventeen years old left his native place and went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he learned his trade of brick making. This was in the year 1833. He visited Putnam County and remained one year, after which he worked in various places, taking care of his money and storing his mind with information. He spent the year 1840 in Alton; then he went up to Galena, where he passed the winter of 1841-2. His wife was formerly Miss A. C. Parks, and they have five children-Marion A, Harriet E., Jerome, Charles and Ida. Mr. Howe is one of the wealthiest farmers in Evans Township, and his money was honestly come by. There was no Credit Mobilier for him, no orphans were defrauded, nor were his gains the result of a fortunate gambling speculation on the Chicago board of trade. Himself and wife live in their comfortable home and looking back along their busy lives see little to regret and less of duty that remains undone. In the year 1878 he established the Wenona Bank, in connection with Messrs. Hodge and Ralston, but it is understood the most of its capital was furnished by him. In religion Mr. Howe and his wife are Baptists, to the support of which denomination they largely contribute.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 713 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Huldah Hoyt
Mrs. Hoyt is widow of the late Chauncy B. Hoyt, and was born in New Canaan Conn., in 1806. She was married in 1825, and her husband died December 13, 1860. Her only living child is Emily M. Two sons, Samuel and John Benedict died in Connecticut, and a daughter died in 1863. She is a member of the Congregational Church, an active worker in the cause of temperance, and bikes a deep interest in the cause of morality and religion.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 702 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Matthew Hoyt

Taken From the Henry Republican, Henry, IL
January 22, 1874

The cold clods of the valley fell and covered the mortal remains of Mr. Matthew Hoyt, on Tuesday afternoon. He was one of the pioneers of this prairie, an old settler, who endured much of the struggles of the early day, of whom a few words of honorable mention is not only fitting but deserved.

He was born on Trenton, Oneida county, N. Y., September 18, 1803, and at the time of his death had reached the age of three score years and ten. His boyhood was spent in his native town, where he also married Eliza S. Wheeler, in December 1829. He followed his father to Illinois in November, 1839, and for several years lived in a house (now torn down) on the Locke farm in Snachwine township. And here it may be noticed that he was one of the first men who settled there, Riddle Taliaferro being the only survivor who settled there before Mr. Hoyt. Mr. George Sparling came soon after Mr. H. and boarded some time in the family.

He moved to Henry in May, 1844, where all of his future life has been spent. At one time he was justice of the peace, holding the same four years, and was also a member of the board of supervisors many years ago. He was always a quiet, unpretending man, but a good and estimable citizen, one whose life and habits were swayed by the best of motives.  He has had feeble health for many years, which has compelled him to forego farming, and all hard work, though he was always industrious. His wife is six years or more his junior, hale and hearty, and coming of a family whose longevity is proverbial, promises to survive her husband many years. She was one of 12, 10 of whom are living, the oldest 75, and the youngest over 50, all robust and strong.

The funeral took place at the homestead in the north part of town, on Tuesday, where were present his brothers Ephraim and William Hoyt of Chicago, formerly of Henry, and all his children, viz.: Frederick Hoyt of Clinton, Iowa; Ephraim Hoyt of Clarence, Iowa; Mrs. Charles Fulford of Peru; Mrs. T. F. Capp of Bloomington; and Miss Theola Coyt of this city. Thus passes away old and young - like the flower cut down and is withered - not knowing who may go next.

Eliza Smith Wheeler Hoyt

Taken From the Henry Republican
August 21, 1879

On Saturday morning last Mrs. Matthew Hoyt passed from earth. Her disease was dysentery, her illness being but a week. Her birth place was Russia, Herkinner county, N.Y., near Rome, where she married Matthew Hoyt of a neighboring town. Mr. Hoyt accompanies Silas Locke and family to Illinois in 1839, his family following soon after, occupying for a couple of years a log cabin on the farm now owned by Ed. Sparling at Snachwine Lake. Subsequently Mr. Hoyt bought land near town, and for the last 33 years Mrs. Hoyt has been the occupant of the homestead, where she ended this mortal life.

Her husband, Matthew Hoyt, died a few years ago, both living to that venerable epoch which scores three years and ten. Five of seven children survive the parents - two sons and three daughters. The daughters - Mrs. Charles Fulford of Dixon, Mrs. Frank Sapp of Bushnell, and the unmarried daughter living with the widowed mother, were present at the funeral on Sunday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. M. Moore of the Presbyterian church, from the house.

There was a large gathering of the friends and neighbors to pay the last offices for respect to one they had associated with of 30 years and upwards, and of whom they cheriched high regard. Of this number we notices Mrs. Chauncey Hoyt, Mrs. John Locke, Mrs. Orsemus Culver, Mrs. William Gallaher all of whose heads were silvered with age, and we might repeat the list ad infinitum had we space. The sons Frederick and Ephraim, residents of Iowa, were unable to be present at the obsequies. Mrs. Hoyt was one of the pioneers of the west side, and was one of the few left who endured the trials and privations of the early days of the settlement of the Prairie State. She rounded the cycle of a good old age ere she was gathered to the life to come.


 J. B. Hudson, M. D.
Dr. Hudson was born in 1841 and came to Lacon with his parents in 1845. going from thence to Janesville, Wis., in 1851. He attended school at Evansville and Milton and completed his education at the state university. Madison. He studied medicine and graduated at the Bennett Medical College, in Chicago, and settled in Wenona, where he has been engaged in practice for 17 years. In 1878 he married Maggie Lawless, of Bureau County, Ill., a member of the Catholic Church. He is a good physician and very successful, having built up a good practice.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 708 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Alden Hull
Mr. Hull is a retired farmer, born in Cheshire, N. H., in 1793. He left with his parents when ten years old and moved to Essex County, N. Y., and located in Illinois soon after. He staid one winter in Jacksonville and then moved to Pekin where he lived ten years. He then moved to Peoria County and remained until 1851, when he located in Marshall County where has lived ever since. Mr. Hull represented the County of Tazewell in the legislature three sessions, was justice of the peace, and also a County commissioner under the old law. He was a member of the legislature when it met at Vandalia, and during his term the seat of government was changed to Springfield. He was justice of the peace in Peoria County, He was supervisor and town treasurer 12 years. Since 1860 he has retired from active business, but retains full control of his affairs. He has been an active influential citizen, always laboring for the best interests of the community, and his life would do well to pattern after. By industry and frugality he has amassed a large property. Mr. Hull was never married.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 746 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 J. S. Hunt
Mr. Hunt was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1825, came west in the fall of 1830, and located in Putnam County, He moved to this County in the fall of 1832, and to Wenona in 1859. He is a carpenter and builder by trade, and has steadily followed this vocation since arriving at man's estate. In 1848 he married Mary A. Myers, born in Pennsylvania. They have six children.-Jacob A., Clam J., Salathiel M., Frank P., George and Mary J. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which his father, John S. Hunt, was the organizer in this County, He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and has been constable and Township collector two terms each.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 712 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Lyman C. Hunt

LYMAN C. HUNT, an agriculturist of energy and ability, who is residing on section 15. Whitefield township, Marshall county, was born in Putnam county, April 20. 1835, about four miles above Magnolia, at the head of Sunday creek, and is the son of Richard and Ruth (Hor­rom) Hunt, both natives of New Jersey. The mother's birth occurred at Trenton, in 1812, and as early as 1832 she came to Illinois with her brother Lyman Horrom. Her mother having died, her father, Dr. Timothy Horrom, came to Illinois soon afterward, and engaged in practice near Morris, but his last days were passed at the home of his son Daniel.

On the 1st of January, 1833, Ruth Horrom became the wife of Richard Hunt, and they be­came the parents of the following children-Ly­man C., of this review is the eldest; Mahlon L., who during the civil war became a member of Company B, Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteer In­fantry, was wounded at Lookout Mountain, from the effects of which he died in the hospital in Oc­tober, 1862, at the age of twenty-five years, and his remains were brought home and interred six months later; Timothy owns and operates a farm which belonged to his father; Sylvia is the wife of A. J. Deihl, of Henry, Illinois; Eleanor is on a claim at Hennessey, Oklahoma; Jennie, 'who became the wife of R. H. Delmedge, died at their home in Lorimer, Iowa, July 26, 1894, at the age of forty-seven years, leaving a husband and three children to mourn her loss; Ruth is the wife of Benjamin Andrews, of Ford county, Illinois, and Mary 1S with her sister on a claim at Hennessey, Oklahoma.

It was in 1828, that Richard Hunt, the father of our subject came to Illinois, located a claim on Ox Bow prairie, and three years later the family removed to the place. Although born in New Jersey, from the age of nine years he had resided near Zanesville, Richland county, Ohio, whence he came to Marshall county. After a two years' residence here, his father. Enoch Hunt, went to Bloomington, where he made his permanent home and there died, but his sons, John, Cornelius and Richard, all made homes near the head of Sunday creek. There the uncles of our subject reared their families and spent their last days. For some time his parents lived on the Ox Bow, and for two years at the head of Sunday creek, after which they returned to the former place. In 1842, however. they settled on the west side of the river in Whitefield township, Marshall county, then but sparsely settled. He entered several tracts of land, which he would subsequently dispose of and in this way made considerable money. The land office was then located at Galena, a distance of one hundred and twenty-five miles, and the journey thither would occupy one day and two nights, and he would generally reach the land office in time for it to open at nine a. m. He had many a race to that city in order to get ahead of some competitor. He dealt in land quite ex­tensively and still had at the time of his death one thousand acres, which were divided among his children. He improved two good farms of about one-half section. He participated in the Black Hawk war, being a member of a scout­ing party for four months and helped to bury the Davis family who were massacred and two of the Hall girls carried away. His death occurred in September, 1881, at the age of seventy-seven years. Originally, he was a democrat, but later supported the Republican Party, whose princi­ples he staunchly advocated, and did all he could to sustain the government during the civil war. Though not a member of any church, he was quite familiar with the Bible, and gave his sup­port to religious organizations. Mrs. Hunt sur­vived him until the summer of 1894, when she too was called to her final rest. They were buried side by side in Whitefield cemetery, where a nice family monument marks the spot.

Lyman C. Hunt, whose name introduces this review, spent his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of farmer's sons, and remained under the parental roof until thirty-five years of age. the last ten years having charge of affairs. He first settled on land adjoining the old homestead. which he had partly improved while .at home. but since 1873 has lived upon his present farm. which consists of five hundred acres of valuable land. He has engaged quite extensively in stock raising, making a specialty of horses, and has had some imported Shire horses upon his place. He has also raised cattle and sheep in consid­erable numbers. Besides his home farm he has also invested in lands in Kansas and Nebraska.

In 1871 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hunt and Miss Mary Coan, daughter of David Coan, of Henry, and to them were born two children. but one died in infancy. The other Ola Grant, is operating a farm near his father. In 1874 the wife and mother died, and on the 8th of March. 1882. Mr. Hunt was again married, his second union being with Miss Maria Van Allen, who was born near Wenona, Illinois, in La Salle county, and is the daughter of J. L. and Sarah Van Allen. Previous to her marriage she had engaged in teaching in Marshall county. Three children grace the second union- Lawrence R. and Elmer Lee, both in school, and Estella, who for the past two years has been in ill health, and receives the watchful and tender care of her mother.

Although not taking an active part in politics, Mr. Hunt always supports the republican ticket and generally attends the county conventions. He and his estimable wife hold a prominent po­sition in the social circles of the community and have the confidence and esteem of all who know them.

[Source: The Biographical record of Bureau, Marshall and Putnam Counties, Illinois. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1896., Page 361-363 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


 E. M. Hunter
Mrs. Hunter was born in Philadelphia, and came to Ohio with her parents when seven years old and to La Salle County two years later. She married William Phillips in 1850. She was only 13 years old. He was born in England. They have three children-Nelson Clara, and Fannie. He died in Oct. 1864. Mrs. Hunter owns a farm at Lostant, La Salle County, of 62 acres and a home and 4 lots. She sold a farm of 160 acres, in 1876, which she distributed among her children, who are all married. Mrs. Hunter is a dressmaker and follows her business industriously, although having no necessity to do so. She prefers business to occupy her mind. She has purchased the property she is now occupying, subject to minor's claim, having rented her own large residence at Lostant as she did not require so large a house since her children married.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 725-726 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 A. L. Hupp
Mr. Hupp was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, in 1842, and came to Henry in July, 1879, having lived in Wenona since 1868. He married Miss Beatrice Kinder in 1873, who was born in Ohio in 1852, and one child, Ira Lee, is the result of this marriage - born May 31, 1877. He has a first class saloon and billiard hall, where gentlemen will find quiet company and good tables.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 699 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 Hubbard G. Hurd
Mr. Hurd was born in New Hampshire in 1808, and came to this state in 1839, locating first in Fulton County, then in Peoria County, and in the spring of 1840 he went to driving stage from Peoria to Farmington, Fulton Co. He went to Trivola in the same year, and in 1850 he moved to Lawn Ridge. Marshall County, and has lived in this County most of the time since. In the winter of 1860 he went to Michigan, Mendon, St. Joe County, where he conducted a hotel, and in 1862 he went to Waterloo City, Ind. where he run another hotel, and in 1863 sold out and went to Goshen, thence to Lazinaier. He then went to Kendaiville, Ind., where he run the "Air Line" hotel, and remained then: until 1865, when he came to Chicago and run the "Jarvis House" until 1866, when he returned to Marshall County, where he improved his property and has since lived. Married Miss Mary D. Hoyt in 1835, born in New Hampshire. They have four children, - Horace, Caroline D., Mariam L. and W. Owen. Himself and son own 240 acres of land with good improvements.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 750 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jesse W. Hurd
Mr. Hurd is a farmer, and was born in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, in 1824. He moved to Monroe County, N. Y., in 1836, went to Wisconsin in 1842, to Tivoli, Peoria County, in 1844 and located in Marshall County in 1848. He married Phoebe E. Porter in 1849, a native of Chenango County, New York. They have two children living, Mary E, and Elbert C., and are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Hurd owns 80 acres of land in a prosperous state of cultivation, with good improvements. He has been supervisor for the last ten years, has been largely identified with the Township in which his home is, and has taken a leading part in all the moral enterprises of the day. He is a strong temperance man, a Sabbath school worker, and a friend to religion. It is to such men as he that society and Christianity are indebted for steady, successful progress.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 746 La Prairie Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 H. L. Hutchins
Mr. Hutchins was born in Killingly, Conn., in 1806, and removed to Cazenovia, Madison County, N. Y., in 1830 and to Henry in 1854, since which time, up to 1876, he has been in active life, principally in the wool commission business. In 1831 he married Lucretia Camp, born in Madison County, N. Y., and by her has four living children - Mary L. (Mrs. Bishop), Cornelia (Mrs. Hull, and a widow), E. H., a merchant of Henry, and A. V., a merchant of Joliet doing a large business. Mr. Hutchins is deservedly proud of his family, as well he may be.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 701 Henry Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 John Hutchins
Mr. Hutchins is a successful merchant of Lacon, who has followed the mercantile business many years. His native place was Worcester County, Mass,, where he was born in 1829 and lived until twenty years old, when he went south and followed steam boating on the Red River and the Mississippi until the spring of 1851, when he came to Lacon and embarked in the mercantile business. In 1860 he went south again and was appointed by Gen. Allen agent for the quartermaster's department of the U. S. army serving under Generals Curtis, Strong and others. He saw much military service, and was occasionally called upon to shoulder a musket to repel expected raids, but in the course of three years obtained a sufficiency of military glory, and in 1863 resigned his position and returned to Lacon. In 1857 he married Nellie E. Eckly, born in Columbus, Georgia, of an old and highly esteemed family, and to whom two surviving children have been given - Geo. W. and Lacy. In 1863 he formed a very successful partnership with D. C. Wallace, the firm doing a large and prosperous business until Mr. W. retired, since when Mi. Hutchins has continued it alone. He is one of the best buyers in the country, a careful manager, and carries a very large stock. He has filled various official positions of trust and responsibility, has been an active worker in Church and Sabbath schools, and sympathizes with all the great reforms of the day.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 685-686 Lacon Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Huwald
Mr. Huwald was born in Halstine, Germany, in 1845, came to the United States in 1865, located at Chicago and worked at his trade until 1867. He then moved to Ottawa and lived there until 1877, when he located at Wenona and established his present business that of a wagon and carriage maker and blacksmith shop. He married Johanna Seppel in 1871, born in Saxony, Germany, and they have two children-Charlie and Edward. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He manufactures all kinds of carriages, buggies, and wagons, and does a general blacksmithing and repairing business.
[Source: Record of Olden Times or 50 years on the Prairie, 1880, Page 714 Evans Township - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]