Articles from Illustrated Industrial Edition

The Massac Journal Republican


MILLER BROTHERS
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss


As a representative businessman and one of Metropolis' most public spirited citizens, Dan Miller, the well known livery man, must be given a front place, because he has been prominently identified with the development of this city since his coming here in 1895.

Miller Bros., conducts the big livery enterprise on court square and has a wide and exceptionally favorable acquaintance all over Massac County.

Dan Miller was born in Jackson County on the 26th day of September, 1866, and moved with his parents to Hamilton County when he was only six years of age. About the time that he had grown to young manhood he moved to Metropolis, this being November 1895. He immediately engaged in the livery business and with the exceptions of a few months when he was city marshal and again when he was driver for the fire wagon he has been in that business ever since. He is now chief of the Metropolis Fire Department and has been a member of the same since he first came to Metropolis.

The livery business which Mr. Miller and his brother, Josh, conducts is one of the best and most complete of any similar concern in Southern Illinois. They have both livery and auto service and when we say service we mean service. A telephone call to the barns of Miller Bros. for a taxi or a carriage will receive instant response. They have made that a slogan and the motto for several years and that is one of the many reasons why they have made such a big success since coming to this city and engaging in that particularly chosen line of vocation. They endeavor to please the public and are accomplishing that desire.

Dan Miller is numbered among the boosters for Metropolis. He has from the first day he came here done his full share in any movement for the betterment of the city he wants to see Metropolis grow and he never lags in doing his part. He is co-operating with the Journal-Republican in the issuing of this expensive industrial edition, because he wants to help show the outside world just what we have here in the way of manufacturers, industries of other kinds and the many advantages this city offers to new comers. He was married in 1898 to Miss Nora Curtis, one of the county's best girls, and both he and Mrs. Miller are numbered among our best people. We are pleased to have him represented in our columns.


NORMAN F. INMAN, FOR CIRCUIT CLERK
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

(advertisement)

In compiling biographical sketches of various citizens the write will once in awhile take greater pleasure in certain individuals and he usually has a preference for professions and trades. In writing of the subject of this sketch it gives the writer great pleasure because Mr. Inman is one of those energetic honest and straight-forward farmers of Massac County.

Mr. Inman was born in Johnson County, Illinois, but reared mostly in Massac County.

His birth occurred on July 12, 1880, on the county border of Johnson and Massac counties.

Mr. Inman is the son of a widowed mother, his father died when he was but a small child, leaving him to weed life's row as best he could. Thus testing his steel found in him, if we have any conception as to the true make-up of an honest ambitious young man, we see it in the make-up of Mr. Inman.

His School Education was obtained in the public Schools of Johnson and Massac counties back when Mr. Inman was a boy at school he stood high in his class and was well liked by his teacher and schoolmates, in fact he was leader in his classes.

Having learned the rudiments of farming and desiring to enter public life, Mr. Inman will come before the people of Massac county on Wednesday, September 13th, and ask for their vote for the Republican nomination for circuit clerk of Massac county and if a splendid reputation goes for anything, if an honored life is deserving of the support and well wishes of the people, Norma F. Inman will be liberally remembered and vindicated by the voters of Massac county on the date mentioned above.

Mr. Inman is in every way qualified for the office he seeks and has been affiliated with the Republican party all his life-in fact inherited those principles of belief.

As a word of testimonial to Mr. Inman's integrity and high standing in his community one need but ask of him by those who have lived by him during his life. A man's neighbor generally knows the charter of the men in his neighborhood and that is one reason why we speak so well of Norman F. Inman.

He is one of the most progressive farmers in the county and desires at all times to help his community. The Journal-Republican takes pleasure in presenting the claims of Mr. Inman to the Republican voters on the 13th of September.


O.L. THOMPSON, MEAT MARKET
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

A man whose perseverance, enthusiasm and business sagacity has been largely instrumental in the establishment of one of Metropolis' leading industries is O.L. Thompson, who conducts an up-to-date meat market and deals in harness, buggies and all kinds of vehicles and whose place of business is located on Upper Market street. Mr. Thompson is a man in whom those potential elements that are essential and necessary in every successful career seem to center. He has been a resident of Metropolis since 1890. His advent here marked the entry of a young man who was scant of this world's goods, but he set to work with a determination to win and win he has.

O.L. Thompson was born in Pope County in 1867 and worked on a farm until he was quite a young man. He gleaned his education by attending the country schools in his neighborhood and is familiar with the hardships of life. However, he was determined to win and then it was that he decided to come to Metropolis and engage in business. He selected that of the butcher and meat market business and as stated above he seemed to be endowed with a perseverance that always wins. He started on a small scale and gradually kept climbing. Today there isn't a more modern, more sanitary meat market in the south part of the state than that conducted by Mr. Thompson. His shop has every kind of meat--fresh and salted--and the lards and sausages are the very best. He also sells harness, buggies and all kinds of vehicles.

There's another splendid feature regarding the personality of Mr. Thompson. He is a progressive man, believes in helping boost the city of his choice and he is one of the great number of business men here who are co-operating with the Journal-Republican in putting out this big paper.

Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Kate Phelps, also of Pope county in 1891: one child, a daughter, was sent them, but the little one died at the age of three years. He is raising a son of his brother's Otto James Edward whose mother died in 1911.

Mr. Thompson belongs to the K. of P. lodge.


JUDGE LANNES P. OAKES
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

This gentleman is eminently deserving of recognition and representation among the men who have been strongly instrumental in promoting the welfare of Metropolis and Massac County, where he is now serving his third term as County Judge. The son of a family of ancient lineage and high birth, he has faithfully upheld the traditions of this house, and the name of Oakes is as bright and untarnished today as it was in the days of the oldest of the forefathers.

Judge Lannes P. Oakes was born in Massac county January 17th, 1864, being the son of Revilo H. Oakes, one of the county's most honored merchants and farmer citizens. After completing the curriculum of the country and high schools, Mr. Oakes was matriculated as a student in the law department of Wesleyan University at Bloomington, Ill., in which he prosecuted the study of law. He was duly graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Law and was admitted to the bar in 1890. He then returned to his home in Metropolis and began the practice of his chosen profession.

Judge Oakes has always held the confidence and esteem of the people of this entire county, In 1904 he was elected City Attorney of Metropolis and served the people well and faithfully for a period of two years. He was appointed Master in Chancery in 1898 and serving over six years as such official.

In 1905 he was elected County Judge and served with such universal distinction that he was again chosen for the same office at the election held four years later. It then dawned upon the people that he was the right man in the right place and for the third consecutive time Lannes P. Oakes was elected County Judge of Massac county, an honor that any man might well be proud of. He is an excellent citizen--kind, generous and progressive.

Judge Oakes has been married twice, The first ceremony occurred on June 3rd, 1891, to Miss Ruth E. Thrift. To this union one son was born, Horace F., who is now an ordained Methodist minister and is holding his charge at Broughton, Ill. Mrs. Oakes passed away March 14, 1895 and Judge Oakes chose as his second companion Miss Gleaner Risinger and they were married November 20, 1902. Six children were sent this last union, four of whom are now living, as follows: Cleland H., aged 12; Dorothy J., 10 years; Mildred A., 5 years; and Agnes Corrine, who is nearing her second birthday. Judge Oakes holds membership in the Presbyterian Church, is a booster for Metropolis and as honored citizen of Massac County.
 
 


METROPOLIS ICE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

In enumerating the many substantial concerns of Metropolis proper mention must be made of the Metropolis Ice Manufacturing Co., which is one of the best assets in the city.

The Company was organized in 1903 and has always been one of the foremost business concerns in the city. It is located at Metropolis and First streets and is made up of home capital and home men. The officers of the company are as follows:

Thos. Boyd, President.

A. Quante, Vice-President

Edward Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer and Manager.

H.C. Calvin, G.J. Murphy, A. Murphy, Mrs. T.M. Ford, Melville Smith, Henry J. Humma, Frank Johns, Mrs. Jas. House, Chas. Hilgeman, Dr. G.W. Walbright, C.C. Roberts, Ike Mizell, Wm. Foreman, Sam Daly and Ellis Mann as stockholders.

The Company manufactures ice and also does a retail coal business. Fifty tons can be made each day about one-fifth of which is consumed here in Metropolis. The water used in making this ice comes from a deep well 344 feet deep. All ice is made from steam, distilled and filtered. In 1917 a storage is to be added to the plant which will have a capacity of about 150 tons, in addition to the present storage.

They are boosters for Metropolis and strong believers in the future of the city. Any question that has for its aim the betterment of the city gets quick support from each member of the Company.

Many people believe that ammonia is placed in the ice to freeze it or that it gets in the ice at least. The public is invited to call at any time and see how ice is manufactured and also see how utterly impossible it is to get ammonia in the ice. Nothing can be made purer that our ice, important adjuncts to the health of any community. Metropolis is peculiarly fortunate no sandy, muddy river water, no hard, limey water, but the purest well water from a well 344 feet deep clear as a crystal and pure as the driven snows. Ice made by the Metropolis Ice Co., cannot be compared to the dirty so-called lade ice taken from ponds of the stagnated waters or rivers.

The Metropolis Ice Manufacturing Company is a distinct credit to our city. Long may it prosper.
 
 


HENRY H. HALEY, DEPUTY CIRCUIT CLERK.
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

The call of the business life is today widely irresistible, and we frequently find brainy and aggressive young men who by inheritance and native gifts might be thought to belong naturally to the "learned profession", departing from their family traditions and entering the, perhaps, broader fields of business. The lure of these various enterprises and phases of public life draws alike the talented sons of physicians, clergymen, lawyers and farmers. Henry H. Haley, the polished deputy Circuit Clerk under Mr. Finley, illustrates this condition in this city. The is a scion of one of the oldest families in Massac county, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Perry Haley, prominent residents of the northeastern portion of the county.

Henry H. Haley was born in Massac County on October 7th, 1894, and after graduating from the country schools, he went to the Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale and completed his studies. He taught three terms in this county and a few weeks ago he was appointed deputy Circuit Clerk by Mr. Finley.

Mr. Haley is a splendid young man, one of those straightforward, sturdy, farmer-raised young men who really know no harm. He is gifted with a vein of affability that will make him a favorite in the Circuit Clerk's office. He is a Mason and also belongs to the Woodmen of the World. He affiliated with the Baptist church and is in every way a model young man and a good citizen. He is also a life-long Republican, inherited those principles and has been of much good to the ticket in his own precinct. The Journal-Republican is always pleased to write of such good boys as Henry H. Haley.



GROFF AND QUANTE
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

The success of a nation is nothing more than a history of the individuals comprising it and as they are characterized by loftier of lower ideals, actuated by the spirit of ambition or indifference, so it is with a state, county or town. Success along any line of endeavor would never be properly appreciated if it came with a single effort and unaccompanied by some hardships for it is the knocks and bruises in life that make success taste so sweet. The --------- accentuate the success, thus -------ing recollections of the former as dear as those of the latter for having been the stepping stones for achievement. The career of Peter Groff, senior member of the grocery firm of Groff & Quante, is a combination of ambition, brains and a willingness to work.

Mr. Groff was born in Princeton, Indian, on the 16th day of March 1863. He was the son of Peter Groff, Sr., long since deceased and who will be remembered by all the older citizens of Massac county as a man of sterling worth and integrity. The younger Mr. Groff who is now in his 53rd years, came to Metropolis with his parents when he was an infant, and he has since resided in this city. He has been selling goods behind a counter for fifty years and is still healthy and vigorous.

The Groff & Quante grocery is located at Third and Ferry streets and is numbered among the really good grocery stores in Metropolis. The junior partner is Louis Quante who is connected with the shoe store of J. H. Groff. Peter Groff is in charge of the grocery and has been since its incorporation and he knows the grocery business thoroughly. The stock is always fresh and embrace everything kept in an up-to-date grocery.

Mr. Groff was married June 21, 1873, to Miss Jennie Hause, a popular and well known young lady of this city. She was taken away from her companion in 1887 and he has been alone since. However, he has been surrounded with a long chain of friends and he is held in the very highest esteem by our people. He is a stanch friend of Metropolis and all of Massac County and he has proven that by his desire to assist the Journal-Republican in issuing this big booster edition, believing that it will advertise this city to the outside world. The town would be better off if it had two hundred men of the same progressive ideas which inhabit the breast of Peter Groff.


COUNTY SCHOOLS GRADUATING EXERCISES.
Taken from The Massac Journal-Republican:Volune 51-No. (Section 2) (Pages 9-16)
The Illustrated Industrial Edition
Thursday, August, 10, 1916
Submitted by Norma Jean Huss

Will be Held on Saturday Afternoon, September 2nd, in the Christian Church at Metropolis. Eighty-Four Scholars in the Graduating Class.

The Graduating Class of the common Schools of Massac County will hold their commencement exercises in the Christian Church in this city, Saturday afternoon, September 2nd, beginning at 1:00 o'clock. The county superintendent and the members of the class extend a cordial invitation to the general public to attend the exercises. Following is the

PROGRAMME

Music------------------------------Orchestra
Invocation-------------------------Rev. R.B. Butler
Song---------America---------------Class
Presentation of Class--------------Luther L. Evers
Salutatory-------------------------Oriando Ford Garrett
Music------------------------------Orchestra
Valedictory------------------------Alice Erma Roberts
Music------------------------------Orchestra
Diplomas Conferred-----------------Co. Supt. W.A. Spence
Music------------------------------Orchestra
Class Address----------------------Hon. W. Duff Piercy
Benediction------------------------Rev. Van B. Sullins
Music------------------------------Orchestra

CLASS ROLL

Inez Pearl David, Oriando Ford Garrett, Alice Erma Roberts, Inez Pearl Oliver, Amelia Schmidt, Charlotte Marie Kotter, Ada Pearl Holt, Della Vivian Jones, Ruby Annetta Pope, Juanity May Phillips, Pauline Lillian Tucker, Florence Elise Buddenbaum, Norma Wantland, Alma Emma Fahrenkamp, Essie May Parker, Gertie May Loven, Mabel Elizabeth Trumbo, Mildred Jones, Hazel Wood, Robert Edward McGee, Earl Wood, Netha Reba Miller, Albert William Schmidt, Charles Bennie Alexander, Lydia Rozena Hinners, Mary Ewart Parker, Charles Clarence May, Charlie Carman, Floyd Wilke, Bessie Elizabeth Oliver, Wendell Esseck Phillips, Otis Richard Nutty, Verna Marion Nutty, Beulah Smith, Bessie Teague, Ocie Cagle, Ray Harper, Fred Napolean Sharp, Nellie Elizabeth Wymer, Edna Brinker, Beatrice Mildred Kineman, Anna Isabelle Willis, Katherine Fay Harris, Necie Audrey Owens, John Henry Meyer, August Meyer, Jr., Alma Lucille Dye, William May, Grace Marla Anderson, Cordie May, Lottie Kuhlman, Jesse Marie Arensman, Golda May Bonifield, Fannie Grace, Simon William Eicholz, Geneva Rebecca Arensman, Daisy Elnora Long, Joseph W.F. Wieneke, Erma Shelton, Naomi Ruth Shelton, Marion Chick, Leda Grace, Mabel Carrie Sielbeck, John Desso Chick, Calvin Shelton, Viola Maurice Blackwell, Leona Katherine Fisher, Rubye Edith Dunn, Golda Francis Noble, Reuben Hosfelt, George Alvin Verbarg, Nina Marie Kotter, Lena Sophie Teckenbrock, Fern Margie Arensman, Molly May Borman, Gilbert George Pansing, Carrie William Kuhlman, Ottis Wiseman, Bennie Buldtman, Charles Louis Adkins, Lorenz Korte, Nettie Equilliah Blackwell, Emery Blackwell, Chrissie Korte
 


Return to Index

Copyright © 2001 by Debbie Woolard. All rights reserved.

Copyright includes all contents of this site and does not extend to any other entity. It may not be quoted or retransmitted without a full citation to the author, and may not be put into print--in whole or part--without the individual author's express permission. Submitters retain all copyright, along with the hosts.