Illinois Genealogy Trails
Montgomery County, Illinois
Biographies


Source: W.H. Perrin's 1882 Biographical Sketches
from the History of Bond and Montgomery Counties, Illinois

Transcribed and Sumitted by Norma Hass, except where noted.

[Walshville Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 187]

Dr. A. BARCROFT, physician, Walshville, was born in New Jersey in 1829; son of Ambrose and Ann (WOLVERTON) BARCROFT. Ambrose BARCROFT was born in 1793. He was for many yearsCaptain of an ocean vessel, but finally quit the seafaring life and became a farmer. He died in York County, Penn., in 1881. His wife was bron in New Jersey in 1795, and is now a resident of Washington, D. C. Our subject, the fourth child of a family of six, attended school at Pennington, N. J., from 1844 to 1847; at Baltimore College from 1854 to 1856, and, having chosen the medical profession, entered the National College, at Washington, D. C., from which he graduated in 1862. He first began life as a clerk in a drug store. After graduating at Washington, he practiced in the ArmoryHospital, in that city from 1863 to 1864. He is now practicing his profession in Walshville. In Armstrong County, Penn., in 1853, he married Charlotte D. Woodward, a native of that county, born in 1835, daughter of John S. and Caroline (BARKLEY) WOODWARD. From this union there have been born to them six children, two of whom died in infancy. The four living are Ellis W., Victor B., Anna C. and Ambrose. Dr. BARCROFT is a Republican, and a member of the A., F. & A. M.

V. B. BARCROFT, physician, Walshville, was born in Armstrong County, Penn., in 1855; son of Dr. A. and Charlotte (WOODWARD) BARCROFT. The Doctor, whose sketch also appears in this work, was born in New Jersey in 1829, and has successfully followed the practice of his profession for many years. His wife was born in Armstrong County, Penn., in 1835. Our subject, the second of a family of six children, began his education at Lincoln, Logan Co., Ill., and, having chosen his father's profession, entered the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, from which he graduated in 1879. He is now practicing medicine with his father in Walshville. He formerly taught school in Bond and MontgomeryCounties.

Jesse BOYD, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Franklin County, Va., August 22, 1810; son of Henry and Ellender (WOODS) BOYD. Henry BOYD was born in Franklin County, Va., in 1789, and died in Montgomery County, Ill., March 25, 1877. His wife, a native of Virginia,was born in 1789, and died in Montgomery county in 1872. Our subject, the second of a family of nine children, received his education in Warren County, Ky. He also attended school at Staunton, Macoupin Co., Ill. He has followed the occupation of a farmer in Macoupin and Montgomery Counties for the last fifty years. In Macoupin County, Ill., in 1832, he married Matilda VOYLES, born in Pendleton County, N. C., in 1811, daughter of Robert and Hester (MORRIS) VOYLES. From this union they have had twelve children, six of whom died in infancy. those living are Hester R., William J., Ellender M., Martha A.,Robert H. and Jessie S. Mr. Boyd is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the A., F. & A. M. He is a Republican in politics.

William BURKE, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Kentucky February 6 [Page 188] 1817; son of John and Catharine (BARLOW) BURKE, he born in Virginia in 1785, and died in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1846; she, born in Virginia, and died in this county in 1836. Our subject is the seventh child of a family of eleven, and received his education in the common schools of this county. In 1840, he married Temperance HOLIDAY, born in this county in 1820, and died here in 1860, and daughter of Elliott HOLIDAY. His second wife was Mrs. Sara BROWN, born in Kentucky, and died in this county in 1870, and his third wife, Mrs. Sarah M. DUKES, was born in Livingston County, Ky., October 18, 1823. He has had twelve children, ten of whom are living - John B., Martha J., Joe A., Mary E., William R., Sina L., Alice E., Adda B., Edna C. and Katie A. Mr. BURKE has always been a farmer, having farmed in this county for fifty years, and is known as one of the leading farmers in the district. He is a Presbyterian, a Democrat, an A., F. & A. M., and an I. O. O. F.

Antony BUERGER, farmer, P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, whose parents, John and Mary C. (FASTLABEND) BUERGER, were natives of Germany, was born in that country September 2, 1822. John BUERGER, who was a farmer, died in Madison County, Ill., October 18, 1846. His wife died in the same county in 1872. Antony, who was the eldest of a family of ten, received his education in Germany, and engaged in farming, which occupation he has always followed. He married in St. Louis, Mo., May 13, 1853, Louisa BARTMEN, born in Germany in 1830, daughter of John BARTMAN. From this union seven children have been born to them - Joseph, John F., Mary, Matilda, Henry, Louisa and Leonora. Mr. BUERGER is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and in politics a Democrat.

Mrs. Sarah D. CURRY, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Morgan County, Ill., in 1834, daughter of William and Tabitha (BELL) ELLEDGE, he born in Kentucky, and died in Morgan County, Ill., in 1836; she, born in Kentucky, and died in Pike County, Ill., in 1874. Subject was the sixth child of a family of seven, and was educated in Morgan and Pike Counties, Ill. She was married in Pike County, Ill., in 1845, to Riley J. CURRY, a farmer born in Kentucky, and died in this county August 13, 1876, son of Nicholas CURRY, a native of Ireland, who came to this country in an early day, and died in Morgan County, Ill., about the year 1850. Our subject is the mother of ten children, namely: James A., Tabitha E., George F., William R., Charles B., John F., Winefred L., Elbert G., Edwin H., Esther B. Mrs. CURRY is a member of the Christian Church.

Dr. Martin S. DAVENPORT, son of Jack S. and Lucy S. (LEWIS) DAVENPORT, was born in the State of Virginia, Charlotte County, November 1, 1818. His father was born in CharlotteCounty, Va., in 1780. His mother was also a native of Charlotte County Va., was born in 1784, and died in October, 1860. The family moved from the Old Dominion to Kentucky, where his father died in May, 1834. Left in orphanage, Mr. DAVENPORT, in connection with a younger brother, undertook the support of the widowed mother and family, and nobly did they work to this end. Naturally of an inquiring and literary cast of mind, and deprived to a great extent of school facilities, he commenced when quite young the work of his own education by the light afforded from burning fagots and pin knots. In his manner he acquired a fair English education. In Christian County, Ky., in April, 1841, he married Miss Lucy S. LEWIS, born in Charlotte County, Va., in December, 1813,daughter of Edgecome and [Page 189] Anna (DAVENPORT) LEWIS, both natives of Charlotte County, Va., the former born in 1780 and died in March, 1843; the latter born 1793, and died in July, 1847. Immediately after his marriage, he commenced the study of medicine, to which profession he had manifested a proclivity from the seventeenth years of his age. He received a medical diploma from Dr. CURTIS in 1848, and graduated at the Physio-Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1870. Mr. Davenport moved into Montgomery in 1848, and located in the town of Walshville in 1864. He has had a constant practice in his community for over twenty-six years, and is now regarded as one of the most successful practitioners in the county. Though now in his fifty-fifth year, he is hale, hearty and energetic, and in physique does not appear more than forty years old. This may be accounted for in part from his strictly temperate habits, never having during his life been under the influence of intoxicating liquor in the least degree. The DAVENPORTs are English in descent, and were among the first settlers in this country. Richard DAVENPORT, the Doctor's grandfather, held the office of Captain in the Revolutionary war, and was present and participated in the battle of Yorktown. At the close of the war, he settled in the State of Virginia, Charlotte County. He raised quite a family - Glover (deceased), of Norfolk, Va.; Martin W., a wholesale merchant of Lynchburg, Va.; Ballard (deceased), one of the pioneers of Kentucky; Mary (deceased), wife of John FRANKLIN, of Virginia, and grandson of Benjamin FRANKLIN, illustrious patriot, statesman and philosopher; Martha, wife of Barnet EDWARDS, of Kentucky; Mrs. Sarah (JOHN) MATHEWS; and Mrs. Catharine (PUTNAM) NORTH, both of Virginia, are some of the names handed down. Jack S., Dr. DAVENPORT's father, was a Lieutenant in the war of 1812. He served under Gen. Jackson. Glover was a Colonel in the same war. The Doctor has the following children: George W., John J. and Peter W. druggists, all of Walshville. George and Peter served as soldiers in the late rebellion. We believe they were both veterans in the Union service. Dr. DAVENPORT has good cause to feel proud in the comtemplation of his family record. Not one of the numerous and long family line was ever arraigned before the courts under a criminal charge, and they have always espoused the cause of patriotism, from the Revolution against English tyranny to the suppression of treason during the late war of the Southern States. They are a family noted for public spirit, literature and Christian morality.

Peter EGELHOFF, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Germany October 12, 1830; son of William and Mary (SCHROTH) EGELHOFF. William, who was a native of Germany, was born in 1806, and died in Jerseyville, Jersey Co., Ill., September 19, 1879, where his wife, born in Germany, in 1810, also died, March 23, 1866. Peter, the eldest of a family of seven children, received his education in Germany, and worked at the blacksmith's trade for some time. About twenty years ago, he moved to his present place, which at that time was rough and unimproved; but, by incessant labor and economy, he has made it one of the finest farms in Montgomery County. He has a fine, large barn, granary, stock scales, etc. In Montgomery County, in 1856, he married Mary A. OSTERMEYER, born in Germany September 22, 183, daughter of Frederick OSTERMEYER, a native of that country, and there have been born to them nine children - William F., John C., Louisa, George, Otto, Mary, Peter J. and two others who died unnamed. Mr. EGELHOFF, who is a Democrat, is one of the substantial men of Walshville Township.

[Page 190]

Dick ENGELMANN, farmer, P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, was born in Germany November 5, 1840. His parents, Henry and Tina (GOSMANN) ENGLEMANN, are natives of Germany, and are now living in Ostfriesland, Kingdom of Hanover. Henry was born November 13, 1820. Richard is the eldest of a family of four children, and received his education in Germany. He has always been engaged in farming and stock-raising. He has been HighwayCommissioner in Walshville Township for some time. Mr. ENGELMANN has been twice married.First, in Madison County, Ill., November 8, 1878, he married Lizzie E. ENGELMANN, born in Germany in 1844, and died in Montgomery County March 5, 1879. She was the daughter of Minke ENGELMANN. His second wife, whom he married at Hillsboro, Montgomery County, in January, 1880, is Gretchen ARKEBAUER, born in Germany in 1845. Mr. ENGELMANN has four children - Henry, George, Michael and Tine. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

I. P. FOGELMAN, farmer, P. O. Walshville, son of John and Elizabeth (KIRKLAND) FOGELMAN, was born in Montgomery County August 29, 1844. His parents were both born in MontgomeryCounty, and still reside there. His father was born April 8, 1819; his mother was born in 1819 or 1820. Our subject, who is the fourth of a family of ten children, received his education in the schools of Montgomery County, and engaged in farming, which occupation he has always followed. He is Assessor of Walshville Township, which office he has held for six years. During the war, he served in Company A., Ninety-first Illinois Infantry; was captured at Elizabethtown in 1862, by John MORGAN, and released on parole. Returning to service in July, 1863, he took part in the engagements at Vicksburg, New Orleans and Spanish Fort, on Mobile Bay, receiving his discharge at the latter place in 1865. In Montgomery County, in 1865, he married M. M. McPHAIL, born in Montgomery County October 12, 1841, daughter of Macon and Elizabeth (BEEDELS) McPHAIL. There have been born to them two children - Willis M. and J. W. M., the latter dying October 18, 1871. Mr. FOGLEMAN is in politics a Democrat.

James GRISHAM, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Dixon County, Tenn., January 14, 1811, son of Austin and Fanny (POWERS) GRISHAM, he born in Guilford County, N. C., March 10, 1771, and died in Montgomery County March 9, 1853; she born in Virginia October 10, 1775, and died in Montgomery County May 10, 1851. James, the fourth child of a family of five, finished his education in Montgomery County in 1829, and began life as a farmer, which occupation he has ever since followed. He is one of the firstsettlers of Montgomery County, having entered the land he now lives on in 1820. He took part in the Black Hawk war, in 1832. In Montgomery County, January 8, 1830, he married Martha R. GARRISON, born December 22, 1813, and died September 29, 1843. She was a daughter of John GARRISON, who died in Tennessee. In Montgomery County, November 30, 1845, he married his second wife, Pamelia CANNON, born in Illinois in April, 1828,daughter of William and Catharine (LOVINGS) CQANNON, he born in Kentucky, and died in 1880; she, also a native of Kentucky, is still living. Mr. GRISHAM has a family of seventeen children - John A., William S., Amanda C., Fanny M., Thomas K., Polly P., Melissa R., Martha R., Mary F., Margaret M., Alfred F., Elias E., Charles S., Henry R., Baby, Ulysses C. and Allen A. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and asupporter of the Republican party.

Mrs. E. R. HODGES, Walshville, was [Page 191] born in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1834, the daughter of James and Mary (BARLOW) BOSTIC, he a farmer, who died in this county in 1842; she, born in Tennessee, and also died in this county in 1838. Subject is the third child of afamily of four. She was educated in this county, and married in 1860 to Mr. HODGES< born in Tennessee in 1814, a son of Henry HODGES, a Virginian by birth, who moved to Tennessee and died there. Mrs. HODGES has had six children - Alice G., Mary E., Lucy F., Julia, Jessie C., and one dead. THe late Mr. HODGES was engaged in farming in his early life, but for many years before his death was a prominent merchant of Walshville, where he died May 13, 1876.

John B. JOHNSON, farmer, P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, was born in Germany January 1, 1830; son of Bornu JOHNSON, who was a native of Germany, and a farmer by occupation, died in Madison County, Ill., in 1856. His wife, also a native of Germany, who is now a resident of this county, was born in 1799. Of a family of six children, our subject was the third. He received his education in Germany, and emigrated to this country in 1851. He first settled in Madison County, Ill., for a short time; then removed to Macoupin County, Ill., where he remained eight years, after which he removed to Montgomery County and permanently settled on his presnt place. Mr. JOHNSON has followed the occupation of a farmer all his days, and now owns a fine farm near Mt. Olive. In Macoupin County, Ill., in March, 1857, he married Miss ROSMULLER, born in Germany in 1838, daughter of Fried ROSMULLER. From this union they have had the following children: John, Mary, Margaret, Friede, Ida and Frude. Mr. Johnson is a Republican, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

H. KEISER, farmer P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, was born in Germany October 8, 1839; son of John and Gerke (HEIEN) KEISER. John KEISER, who was a farmer, was born in Germany in 1816, and died in Macoupin County, Ill., September 6, 1855. His wife also a native ofGermany, and who now resides in Montgomery county, was born in 1810. Our subject, the eldest of six children, received his education in Germany, and, having emigrated to America in 1854, settled down to farming with his father in Macoupin County, Ill. He has been a farmer all his days. From Macoupin County he removed to his present place inMontgomery County. In 1874, he was elected Secretary of the Mt. Olive Coal Company, which office he held until 1881, when he was elected to his present position ofSuperintendent of the company. He has also held the office of Supervisor of WalshvilleTownship. In Macoupin County, Ill., July 11, 1863, he married Mary (KERREN) KEISER, born in Germany October 18, 1845, daughter of John and Folkea (VESSER) KERREN. From this union there have been born to them nine children - Annie G., John, Henry W., Hermann J., Katie H., Sophia W., Hannah M., Lydia E., Edward A. Mr. KEISER is widely and favorably known as a worthy citizen. In politics, he is a Republican. He is a member of the German Methodist Church.

Andrew KEISER, miller, Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, was born in Hanover, Germany, September 28, 1845; son of John H. and Gerke (HEIEN) KEISER, both natives of Germany. John H., who was a farmer, was born in 1816, and died in Macoupin County, Ill., September 6, 1855; his wife, who is now a resident of Montgomery County, was born in 1810. Our subject, who is the third of a family of six children, received his education in Germany, and has followed farming and milling since he came to this country with his parents. He has been twice married. [Page 192] His first wife, Annie ROSS, born in Madison County, Ill., daughter of Gird and Mary(ARKABAUER) ROSS, and died in Montgomery County September 28, 1875, leaving three children - Annie G., John and Mary. In Macoupin County, March 29, 1879, Mr. KEISER married his second wife, Frances ROSS, born in Madison County, ILL., March 9, 1855, daughter of John and Mary (ARKABAUER) ROSS. Mr. Keiser has head the office of Assessor and Collector in Walshville Township. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

T. C. KIRKLAND, tanner, Walshville, was born in St. Louis County, Mo., July 26, 1823; son of Isaac and Melinda (MANN) KIRKLAND, he born in Mercer County, Ky., December 25, 1796, a tanner by trade, and afterward a farmer, and died in Litchfield, Montgomery County, April 5, 1881; she, also a native of Mercer County, Ky., born November 16, 1799, and died in Jersey County, Ill., October 7, 1853. Our subject, the third of a family of four children, received a fair education in Jersey County, Ill., and began life as a farmer. In 1865, he moved to his present place, which is one of the finest farms in Montgomery County. He is a prominent member of the community, and has held the offices of Supervisor, School Director and Trustee for a number of years. In Jersey County, February 18, 1847, he married Edith IRWIN, born in Iredell County, N. C., March 1, 1823, daughter of Abijah and Elizabeth (EATON) IRWIN, he born in North Carolina February 1, 1791, and died May 15, 1863; she, also a native of North Carolina, born January 27, 1791, and died September 8, 1827. Mr. and Mrs. KIRKLAND are the parents of five children - Matilda Ellen, Sarah Elizabeth, Ann Eliza, John Harden and Mary Melinda. He is a Methodist, a supporter of the Republican party, and a member of the A., F. & A. M.

Charles KEUNE, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Germany July 7, 1837; son of Christine and Mary (KALTHAMMER) KEUNE, he a farmer, born in Germany, and died there in 1852; she, also born in Germany, and died there the same year. Our subject was the fifth child of a family of eight; was educated at Brunswick, Germany, and came to this country in 1856, located at St. Louis, Mo., and came to this county in 1881. He married Minnie SCHUEFFE, in St. Clair County, Ill., in 1867, born in Germany in 1844,daughter of William and Joanna (RENHAT) SCHUEFFE. Subject has six children - Andrew W., Arnold H., Charles, Emma S., Amelia and Minnie S. Mr. KEUNE is independent in politics.

George McPHERSON, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Scott County, Ill., in 1852; son of James H. and Elizabeth (JOHNSON) McPHERSON. James H., who was a farmer, was born in North Carolina, and died in Scott County, Ill., in 1879. His wife, a native of North Carolina, also died in Scott County, Ill., in 1846. Subject, who is the eldest of a family of seven children, received his education in the common schools of Montgomery County, finishing at Litchfield. He began the business of life as a farmer, and has ever since been in the same occupation, and is Road Commissioner at present. In Hillsboro, Montgomery County, in 1878, he married Alice KIRKWOOD, born in Jersey County, Ill., in 1850, daughter of David and Elizabeth (COWEN) KIRKWOOD. He is a Republican, and a member of the Christian Church.

Fred NIEMANN, farmer, P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, was born in Germany February 11, 1823, son of Casper and [Page 193] Anna (WITTE) NIEMANN. Casper NIEMANN was a native of Germany, and a farmer by occupation. He died in Germany in January, 1847. His wife, Anna, also a native of Germany, died there the same year as her husband, leaving eight children, of whom our subject was the second. The subject of this sketch began life as a farmer in his native land. In 1847, he emigrated to America, and located in Macoupin County, Ill., where he lived for twelve years; thence he removed to Montgomery County, where he purchased a tract of land, which, by push and industry, he has made a first-class farm. In Germany, September 6, 1850, hemarried Anna SHRODAR, a native of that country, born in 1833, daughter of Henry and MarySHRODAR. From this union there have been born to them five children - William H., Julius L., Frederick W., Hannah H. C. and Anna. Mr. NIEMANN is a member of the Lutheran Church. In politics, he is a Republican.

B. C. NEAL, plasterer, Walshville, was born in Logan County, Ky., December 28, 1824; son of Benjamin and Mary (HAYDEN) NEAL. Benjamin NEAL, who was a farmer, was born inVirginia, and died in Logan County, Ky., September 22, 1856. His wife, who was a native of North Carolina, was born in 1792, and also died in Logan County, Ky., in 1872. Our subject, the ninth of a family of ten children, received his education in his native county. He followed the occupation of a farmer for many years, but since learned theplastering trade, which business he now follows. In Allen County, Ky., in 1847, hemarried Susan F. WARDEN, a native of that county, born August 17, 1829, daughter of James and Rebecca (KELLEY) WARDEN. She died in Montgomery County April 5, 1870, leaving five children © Virgil s., Eloise, Martha P., Elnora C. and William S. Mr. NEAL is a member of the Christian Church. He is in politics a Greenbacker.

Albert SCHON, farmer, P. O. Mt. Olive, Macoupin County, is a native of Hanover, Germany, was born May 17, 1833. His parents, Hiram and Folka (TIDEN) SCHON, were both natives ofGermany, and died in that country. Hiram SCHON, a farmer by occupation, was born in 1801, and died in 1875. His wife, born in 1804, died in 1879. Albert, our subject, the third of a family of eight children, emigrated to America in 1851, and located in Madison County, Ill., where he remained for about ten years. He then removed to Montgomery County, where he purchased his present property. He has always been a farmer, and is one of the influential men of Walshville Township. He married in Madison County, Ill., October 18, 1854, Miss A. ARKEBAUER, born in Germany February 15, 1837, daughter of Jordan and Frances (WAUHOFF) ARKEBAUER, and there have been born to them eleven children - Hiram, George, Mary, Frances, John, Willie, Zena, M. A., Annie, Lida, and one deceased (unnamed). Mr. SCHON is a Republican, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

T. T. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Madison County, Ill., April 29, 1838, son of Jonathan Green and Elizabeth (TINDALL) SMITH. Jonathan Green SMITH was born in Pittsfield, N. H. July 9, 1814, and died in New Mexico February 26, 1848. His wife was born in Madison County, Ill., December 11, 1820, and died there in September, 1844. Our subject, the eldest of a family of four, received his education in the common schools of Madison County, Ill. He married in Montgomery County February 21, 1861, Susan SACKETT, born in Madison County, Ill., December 25, 1842, daughter of Elisha and Elizabeth (VOYLES) SACKETT. Elisha [Page 194] SACKETT, a native of South Carolina, was born about the year 1812, and died in February, 1849. His wife, born in 1816, died September 24, 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of four children - Mary Lorett, Edgar Leighton, John Elvin and Bert(deceased). Mr. SMITH has always been a farmer, and is one of the substantial men of Walshville Township. He has held the offices of Supervisor, School Trustee and Highway Commissioner. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, he is a Republican.

W. J. WHITESIDE, retired farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Chester County, S. C., in 1801; son of Abraham and Janet (HANNAN) WHITESIDE. Abraham was born in South Carolina July 4, 1775, and died in Montgomery County August 24, 1857. His wife, born in NorthCarolina, died February 6, 1829. Our subject, the eldest of a family of five children,received a fair education in Maury County, Tenn., and learned the cabinet-making trade, which he engaged in for forty years. He has also been a farmer for many years; was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County. He married in Tennessee, in 1824, Mary G.BINGHAM, born in Guilford County, N. C., November 7, 1800, daughter of Robert and Martha (REED) BINGHAM. From this union there have been born ten children - Martha J.,Tennessee C., Zianna, John M., Sarah P., Thomas D., Mary E., Margaret A., Robert L. and William Newton. Mr. WHITESIDE is a Methodist and a Democrat. Robert L., the ninth child of the family, was born in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1842; received his education at Walshville, and engaged in farming, which occupation he still follows. He is a Democrat.

[Grisham Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 195]

G. R. AYDELOTT, farmer, P. O. Donnellson, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1844; son of C. C. and Levina (YOUNG) AYDELOTT; he born in Tennessee in 1806, died in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1865; she, a native of Kentucky, moved to that county in 1829. The subject of this sketch, who is the eleventh child of a family of thirteen, received his education in the schools of his native county, and began life as a farmer, his father having left him one of the finest farms in Montgomery County. He married in Montgomery County in 1866, Aurilla BROOKS, born in Warren County, Tenn., daughter of Loyal BROOKS, a native of Cheshire, Conn. Mr. AYDELOTT served two terms as Tax Collector of Grisham Township; has been Supervisor for many years, and was re-elected to that office in the spring of 1882; is a Methodist, a member of the Masonic fraternity; has always been a stanch Democrat.

Christian A. ANGERSTINE, farmer, P. O. Donnellson, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1825, son of Henry and Christina (KALALS) ANGERSTINE, both of whom were natives of Germany, and died there, he in 1852, she in 1879;subject is the youngest of a family of five children. He received his education in his native land, and began the business of life as a farm hand. In 1854, he emigrated to the United States, and has been living in Montgomery County for twenty-five years, during which time he has been engaged in farming. In St. Louis, Mo., in 1855, he married Wilhelmine BRAMER, a native of Germany, daughter of Hender BRAMER, also a native of that country. From this union three children have been born, viz., Christian, Alvina and Jane. Mr. ANGERSTINE is a member of the Lutheran Church at Hillsboro, Ill.; he is a Republican.

Rev. W. P. BAKER, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro; born in Macon County, Ill., in 1835; son of W. D. and Marilla (MARTIN) BAKER, who at present reside in Macon County, Ill. His father W. D. Baker, was born in Lincoln County,N. C., in 1800, and follows the occupation of a farmer. The subject of this sketch is the fifth child of a family of seven. He received his education in his native county, and engaged in farming, but has spent the greater part of his life as a minister of the Presbytarian Church; has preached for nineteen years in Southern Illinois, and is at present pastor of McDavid's Point Church in East Fork Township Mr. BAKER has been married twice; first in Macon County, Ill, in 1857, and the last time in Mongomery County, Ill., in 1864. The maiden names of his wives were Mary WILSON and Margaret McLANE. His children are Ora D., JosephM., Mary J. and William C.

R. H. BOYD, farmer, P. O. Walshville; born in Macoupin County, Ill., in 1846; son of Jesse and Matilda (MORRIS) BOYD; he born in Franklin County, Va., August 22, 1810; subject is the eight child of a family of twelve; he received his education in Montgomery County, and at Staunton, MacoupinCounty. In Montgomery County in 1866, he married Amelia F. WHITESIDE, born in that county in 1851, daughter of Thomas D. and Minerva J. WHITESIDE. Subject has five children - Thomas D., Jennie M., Jessie J., Hattie E. and Frederick R. He is a Republican; is a Northern Methodist,and has been a farmer all his days.

J. B. CARY, physician, Donnellson; son of [Page 196] Wilson and Mary Ann (CHILTON) CARY, was born in Bond County, Ill., December 29, 1843; his father was a farmer, born in Virginia and died in Bond County, Ill.; his mother was a native of East Tennessee. Our subject was the sixth of a family of twelve children; he graduated from the Hillsboro Academy in 1862; he was married in Lee County, Iowa, June 4, 1869, to Laura M. DONNELL, a native of Iowa, born February 25, 1848; daughter of William A. DONNELL, who was born in Guilford County, N. C. and of Callista (HAMILTON) DONNELL, a native of New York State. Our subject has been blessed with the following children: Flora C., Ada J., deceased, Alvin P. and Katie A. After graduating from the academy, he read medicine under Dr. HILLS, and has practiced in this county for eighteen years. During the late war, he served under Gen. J. J. PHILLIPS, of Hillsboro, in Company H, Ninth Illinois Regiment. The family are Presbyterian, and Mr. CARY is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 55, Donnellson.

P. L. DAVENPORT, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Charlotte County, Va., son of Jack S. and Lucy S. (LEWIS) DAVENPORT. His father was a farmer, born in the same county in Virginia, and died in Logan County, Ky., in 1836; his mother was also a native of Virginia, died in Trigg County, Ky., in 1860 They had four children, of whom our subject was the youngest; he received his education in the common schools of Virginia, and began life as a carpenter; he has worked at his trade and carried on farming in this county for a period of thirty years. He was married in Trigg County, Ky., in 1844, to Frances Elizabeth ROPER, a native of that county; she died in this county in 1857. Her parents were Henry C. and Nancy (LEWIS) ROPER, both natives of Campbell County, VA. Mr. DAVENPORT is at present Assessor of this township, and has held the office of School Director for many years. He has been three times married, his second wife being Mrs. Martha BROWN, a native of Fayette County, Ill., and the third, Mrs. Frances BISHOP, of this county. He has been blessed with the following children: Eliza C, Lucy S., Ann E., Louisa F., Sarah M., Ruth J., Martin S., Ulysses J., John J., Essa O., Tipton C., Thomas R. and Francis I. His religious connection is with the Christian Church, and his political sympathies are with the Republican party.

Charles H. EDWARDS, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., August 20, 1835, son of Thomas and Nellie (BROWN) EDWARDS, natives of Iredell County, N. C. Thomas EDWARDS, a farmer and also a miller, moved to Montgomery County, Ill., in 1827, where he died in 1857, and where his wife also died in February, 1837. Charles H., the subject of this sketch, is the tenth of a family of thirteen children. He received his education in Montgomery County, and began life as a farmer, which occupation he still follows; has been Justice of the Peace and School Trustee for many years. In 1861, he enlisted in Company A,Twenty-sixth Missouri Infantry, and was discharged in 1864. He married in Montgomery in 1858, Nora E. CANNON, a native of that county, daughter of William CANNON, born in Mercer County, Ky., in 1807, died in 1878; from this marriage nine children have been born, viz., Mary E., William h., Eddie C., Clara J., Thomas C., Charles M., James A., Jessie F and Minnie B. Mr. EDWARDS is a Methodist; has always been a Democrat; is a member of Grange No. 917, at Mansfield.

Walker F. HICKMAN, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, the fourth of a family of nine children, was born in Crittenden County, Ky., in 1838, and moved to this county in 1852. His parents were William and Eliza (WITHERSPOON)HICKMAN, the former born in Bourbon County Ky., in 1803, a farmer by occupation, and died in this county in 1857; the latter born in Crittenden County, Ky., and died in this county in [Page 197] 1867. Our subject was educated at Hillsboro Academy, and his occupation is that of a farmer. In 1862, he was married to Melissa McCLAIN, who was born in this county in 1836, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (PAISLEY) McCLAIN, the former born in Guilford County, N. C., in 1800, and the latter a native of the same county. Mr. HICKMAN has in addition to his farm labors, filled the office of School Director for many years; he was in the late war, a member of Company B, One Hundred and Seventeenth Illinois Regiment, having enlisted at Hillsboro, Ill., in August, 1862. His children are as follows: Alma M., Ellert M., Frank C., Eva O., Carl C. and Ethel E. Mr. HICKMAN is a Cumberland Presbyterian, and politically a Republican.

Fred HELFERS, farmer, P. O. Donnellson, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1849, son of John and Louisa HELFERS, both natives of Germany, and at present residents of Montgomery County, he born in 1821, and she in 1825. Fred HELFERS is the eldest child of a family of three; he was educated partly in Germany and partly in the common schools of St. Clair County, Ill.; he is a farmer, and has by his industry bought his present home. In St. Clair County, Ill., he married Margaret SCHAUMLEFFEL, who was born there in 1847; she is the daughter of Adam SCHAUMLEFFEL, a native of Germany; subject has two children - Charles F. and Leonard.

Robert LOGSDON, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Hart County, Ky., in 1828, son of William K. and Maria (REMUS) LOGSDON, he born in Hart County, Ky., where he died in 1832; was a farmer; she, born in North Carolina in 1808, died in Montgomery County in 1879; subject is the second child of a family of four; his education was obtained in Hart County, Ky., where, in 1852, he married Mary E. JOHNSEY, who was born there in 1831; she is the daughter of George B. and Jane (SIMMS) JOHNSEY;subject has the following children: John W., George, Marietta, Martha Ann, Celesta, Ida, Lucy M., Robert E., Lee and Ervin. Mr. LOGSDON is a practical farmer, and has one of the most highly cultivated farms in Montgomery County. He is one of the oldest settlers; himself and wife are Methodists; he is a strong Democrat.

John W. LOGSDON, farmer, P. O. Walshville; born in Hart County, Ky., in 1853, son of Robert and Mary E. (JOHNSEY) LOGSDON, both natives of that county, he a farmer by occupation, burn in 1828; she in 1831. John W. is the eldest of a family of twelve children; he received his education in the schools of Montgomery County, and engaged in farming, which occupation he still pursues. In Howard County, Ind., in 1876, he married Amy C. BEELER, daughter of William and Margaret (BURK) BEELER, he born in Pennsylvania in 1817, now resides in Adams County, Ind., she a native of Ohio. From this marriage two children have been born - Bertia and Hattie. Mr. LOGSDON is a Democrat.

J. H. McPHERSON, farmer, P. O. Walshville, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Muhlenburg County, Ky., December 13, 1826, and was raised upon a farm. He was brought to St. Clair County, Ill., by his parents when he was but an infant, where they remained about seven years, then removed to Morgan, now Scott County, Ill., near Winchester. He was there educated in the common schools, remaining in that county until nineteen yeas of age, when he embarked in the sawmill business, a business he has followed a good many years. He commenced business without a dollar, and has had many trials and disappointments, but by energy and perseverance has overcome them, and now owns 645 acres of good bottom land, well improved and in an excellent state of cultivation. He and his brother built the first flouring mill in Litchfield, where [Page 198]The noted steam mill now stands, but sold it in 1856, and then engaged in a machine shop until 1863, when he took an overland trip to California, but believing he could do better at home, returned within six months, andengaged in his old business, saw-milling. This he followed until December, 1878, since which time he has been engaged in farming. He was married in Scott County, November 19, 1851, to Miss Rebecca J. ASH, also a native of Kentucky, and who was born February 9, 1830. She was the mother of six children, and died May 13, 1870. Jesse ASH, her father, was born inKentucky, also her mother. His second wife, Margaret MISSMORE, was born in Hillsboro, Ill., February 3, 1833; her father was from North Carolina, and her mother a native of Tennessee. James McPherson, the father of oursubject, was born in North Carolina January 28, 1796, and was a farmer. He emigrated to Kentucky, and from that State to Illinois in 1827 where he bought land, and raised a large family of children, who grew up useful men and women. He was in the war of 1812, though he served but three months; he was in the battle of New Orleans; he died in October, 1879. His wife, Elizabeth JOHNSON, was a native of North Carolina; was born January 29, 1799, and was the mother of thirteen children, of whom our subject was the fifth.

Mrs. H. E. McCULLOCH, farmer, P. O. Donnellson, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1838, daughter of William and Jane E. (PAISLEY) YOUNG; he a farmer by occupation, born in Tennessee in 1810, now residing nearHillsboro, Montgomery Co., Ill., where his wife, a native of North Carolina, died in 1852. Subject, who is the fourth child of a family of nine, was educated in the schools of Montgomery County, where, in 1864, she was married to W. J. McCULLOCH, a native of that county, who died there in 1876. Their children are Samnel R. and Jennie. Her husband was a farmer, and for many years filled the office of Supervisor inMontgomery County; he was a Democrat. Mrs. McCULLOCH is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

John PRICE, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1816, son of Richard and Mary (JOHNSON) PRICE, natives of Virginia. Richard PRICE was a farmer by occupation; subject, the fifth child of a family of six, received the foundation of his education in the common schools of Montgomery County, and finished at Hillsboro in that county. He has always been a farmer; has been School Director for some time. In Montgomery County in 1841, he married Ellen Nora LOVRIN, born in Simpson County, Ky., in 1824, daughter of William and Keziah (MORGAN) LOVRIN, natives of Virginia. From this union there have been born the followingchildren, viz.: George W., John E., Thomas J., Mary C., Isaac K., James E., Joseph A., M.C., William H., Julia A., Sarah E. and Harriet L. Mr. Price is one of the leading men of Grisham Township; has been a member and class leader in the Methodist Church for thirty years, his membership being at Edwards' Chapel, in the above township. He is a Republican, and a member of the A., F. & A. M.

Asa SWAIN, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born in Washington County, N. C., December 22, 1811, son of Stephen and Priscilla (PHELPS) SWAIN, both natives of North Carolina; the former died in Macoupin County, this state, in 1846, the latter also dying in the same county. They had nine children, of whom Asa was the fourth, and received his education in his native county. He early learned the cooper's trade, and has followed farming in this and Madison County for half a century. He has been twice married, and has had the following children © Maria J., Stephen H., Clarissa E., Martha C., Snowden S., Sarah M., Asa F., and three who died unnamed. Mr. SWAIN is a leading farmer[Page 199]and an early settler, and highly respected citizen. His religious connection is with the Christian Church; his politics, Democratic. Martin VOGAL, farmer, P. O. Walshville, born in Baden, Germany, in 1826. His parents, Martin and Margaret (BOWER) VOGAL, were both natives of Germany; his father, who was a farmer, died there; subject, the third child of a family of eight children, received his education in his native town, and worked out for many years as a farm hand, and has been farming on his own account in Montgomery County for a long period. He has been twice married, at Belleville, St. Clair Co., Ill., and at St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. VOGAL, whose maiden name was KALA, was born in Hanover, Germany; her parents, Henry and Mary (MYER) KALA were natives of that country. Mr. VOGAL has four children - Martin, Mary, Fred and George. He is a Republican, and a member of the Lutheran Church.Joseph S. WHITESIDE, farmer, P. O. Walshville, was born Bond County, Ill., in 1837, son of Thomas D. and Eliza (BRUCE) WHITESIDE. Thomas D., a native of North Carolina, now resides at Litchfield, Montgomery County; his wife died in Bond County, Ill.; subject is the third child of a family of thirteen. He received his education in Bond and Montgomery Counties, and began life as a farmer, which occupation he still follows. In Montgomery County in 1859, he married Mary J. BARLOW, daughter of Joseph and Harriet (SMITH) BARLOW, natives of Tennessee. From this union three children have been born, viz., Harriet E., Laura B. and Eva F. Mr.WHITESIDE is a member of the Presbyterian Church; he is a Republican.

[Butler Grove Township, Montgomery County, IL]

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George W. BROWN, Jr., grain dealer, Butler, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., May 30, 1843; son of George W. and Sarah A. (JENKINS) BROWN, he born in Ohio July 9, 1819, a farmer by occupation, and coming to Illinois in 1836; she, a native of South Carolina, born June 30, 1819. They were the parents of six children. Our subject received his education in Hillsboro Academy. He came to Butler in 1865, and was employed as salesman by Joe Baum & Co. for two years, and in April, 1867, commenced business as a grocer, in the building known as Haywood's old stand. In a few months he and his brother, Charles O. BROWN, entered into partnership, constituting the firm of Brown & Bro. In the early part of the year 1869, they purchased the Haywood Building, and continued to do business in it until 1873. In 1871, they added to their stock dry goods and boots and shoes. In May, 1873, they purchased the McReynolds property, and moved their goods to this building, adding to their stock ready-made clothing, where they continued until April, 1881, when they sold their stock of goods to Hoes & Bro. In July, 1879, they commenced buying grain, to which business they now devote their entire attention. They have increased in business, and prospered greatly since their small beginning, until they now own 280 acres of excellent land, besides houses and lots in Butler, and an elevator at Hillsboro. They do a very extensive business, having handled in 1880-81 over 120,000 bushels of grain. January 4, 1865, Mr. BROWN was married to Miss Henrietta M. JUDSON, born in Newark, N. J., November 15, 1844, daughter of James P. and Elizabeth F. (GALE) JUDSON, natives of New Jersey. Six children have been born to Mr. BROWN - James Park, Winnie Pauline, Charles Judson, Frank Harold, Louis Sylvester and Roland Otis.

George W. BURRIS, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., February 22, 1860. He received his education in the common schools of the county, and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, and remained upon the old homestead until the death of his father, when he assumed all the cares and responsibilities of the family and farm. He was married in Montgomery County, November 3, 1881, to Miss Fannie V. HARRIS, who was born March 7, 1861, to John and Elvira HARRIS. Dewitt C. BURRIS, the father of George, was born in Jackson County, Ohio; was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County. He was an energetic and enterprising man, and a practical farmer, and, perhaps, no man has done more for public improvements and for the advancement of agricultural interests in the county than Mr. BURRIS. His death occurred January 4, 1879, at the age of fifty-three. He was a man of prominence in the township, and his loss will long be felt. His wife, Roseline MACK, was born in New Hampshire. She is still living, and is the mother of eight children - George, Emma J., wife of John WALLACE; Hattie Ellen, Carrie A., Elzina, William O., Charles D. and Wesley C., all of whom are living on the old homestead, except Emma, who, with her husband, is living in Butler
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Township. George, the subject, is identified with the Democratic party. He devotes his time to growing the usual crops and raising stock. The farm consists of about nine hundred acres of choice farm land, which he keeps in a high state of cultivation.

John BURNAP, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., October 2, 1854, son of Joseph S. and Sarah (HUGG) BURNAP, he born in Ohio September 21, 1821, a farmer by occupation; she born in New Jersey December 25, 1833. They had five children, John being the eldest child. Our subject, after attending the common schools of his county, began farming, which he has followed through life, being in charge at present of his father's fine farm of 340 acres of choice land, his father having removed to Texas, where he owns a large tract of land, upon which he expects to locate permanently. March 6, 1878, he married Rosa NAIL, born in Montgomery County September 21, 1856, daughter of Hiram and Susan (WILLIAMS) NAIL, he born in Indiana December 22, 1833; she in Montgomery County December 7, 1834. Three children have blessed the household of Mr. BURNAP - Earle, Tessie and Ina. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican.

Jacob CRESS, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Harrisburg, Washington Co., Ind., May 5, 1818, son of Jacob and Catharine (BOST) CRESS, natives of North Carolina, he born December 26, 1779, a cabinet-maker by occupation and dying November 10, 1865; she, born August 28, 1786, and dying February 1, 1859. They had ten children. Our subject, after receiving an ordinary education, began life as a farmer, which he has continued to the present time. When but a few weeks old, the parents of Mr. CRESS moved to Montgomery County, and located a mile northwest of Hillsboro, on what is known as the Cress Mill farm, but on the 5th of May, 1840, Jacob removed to the farm he now owns, and upon which he resides, two miles east of Butler. He contains 784 acres of land, and is highly improved, having fine buildings, etc. He also owns 200 acres in Kansas, eighty acres in Franklin County, and eighty acres in Missouri. December 23, 1840, he married Miss Helena SCHERER, born in Pendleton County, Va., October 8, 1818, daughter of Rev. Daniel SCHERER, a native of North Carolina, and eleven children have blessed the union - Alexander A., John M., Jacob D., William S. Samuel E., Benjamin L., Sophia Lucretia, Joseph E., James H. (deceased), Mary Illinois (deceased) and Thomas J. Mr. CRESS has served as Road Commissioner six or seven yeas, is a member of the Lutheran Church, and a Democrat.

Mary BASSETT CLINESMITH, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Middlesex, Yates Co., N. Y., September 18, 1828, daughter of Ira and Louisa (CLEAVELAND) BASSETT, he an architect by profession, born April 10, 1788, and dying July 29, 1844; she, born August 26, 1798, and dying February 2, 1873, being a native of Massachusetts. They were the parents of nine children, Mrs. CLINESMITH was educated in Rushville, Yates Co., N.Y., and married March 4, 1861, in Athens, Mo., John CLINESMITH, a native of Pittsburgh, born December 18, 1812, and died January 20, 1876, leaving one child, Orville H., born May 27, 1862. When eighteen years of age, Mrs. CLINESMITH, then Miss Mary BASSETT, who had adopted the profession of school teaching, and which she followed afterward for sixteen years, went to Warren County, Penn., where she remained one year, after which she spent one year in Geauga County, Ohio, when she removed to Fond du Lac, Wis., where she resided ten years, after which she removed to Lee County, Iowa, and remained
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There two years. After her marriage with Mr. CLINESMITH, she removed with her husband to Montgomery County, where he settled on a farm in Butler Township, and where he died.

S. F. CRESS, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Montgomery County November 8, 1847, son of Absalom CRESS, who was a native of North Carolina, and a farmer by occupation. He had eight children born to him, all of whom are living. Our subject, after receiving an education in the schools of his native county, bagan the life of a farmer, and in connection with that has followed milling about eight years. He has a fine farm of 200 acres of land in Montgomery County, and fifteen acres in Litchfield. Mr. CRESS married, in January, 1868, Miss Jennie CLODFELTER< born in 1847, daughter of William and Susan (SHERER) CLODFELTER, he a native of North Carolina. Mr. CRESS has four children living. He is a Democrat.

Isaac DOYLE, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Greene County, Ill., June 14, 1842; son of Thomas and Mary (COATS) DOYLE, both natives of Kentucky, who emigrated to Greene County in 1832. They were the parents of eight children, Isaac being the sixth in order of birth. Our subject received an ordinary education in the common schools of his native county, and commenced life as a farmer, in which he has continued, owning at the present time 160 acres of well-improved land, three miles northeast of Butler. September 15, 1869, he married Miss Mary MITTS, born in Sangamon County, Ill., March 15, 1845, daughter of Jesse and Zerilda (SHELTON) MITTS. Two children have been born to them - John L. and Noah E. Mr. DOYLE has served as School Trustee, is a Mason and a Democrat.

John C. GRASSEL, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born January 10, 1853; son of George C. and Kathrine (ESPERT) GRASSEL, both natives of Bavaria. They had ten children, our subject being the second child. Shortly after their marriage, the parents removed to this country, first settling in Ohio, and afterward in this State, where, in Montgomery County, he owns 800 acres of land, upon which the son, our subject, has a fine residence, with all suitable outbuildings. After receiving an ordinary education, he adopted the life of a farmer, in which he has continued. In April, 1879, he married Miss Mollie LEWEY, born in this county in 1853, daughter of Oliver and Jane (STEVENSON) LEWEY, and the union has been productive of one child, Harry Lewey. Mr. GRASSEL has served as School Director two years, and is a Republican. His wife is a Presbyterian.

C. H. HOES, merchant, Butler, was born in Washington County, Md., September 15, 1845; son of Hartman and Elizabeth (KNOBLE) HOES, he a native of Germany, a tailor by trade, who emigrated to America in 1837, dying in 1864; she, a native of Maryland, born January 1, 1814. They were the parents of nine children, eight boys and one girl. Our subject received his education in the common schools of his county, and commenced life as a farmer, which he followed for eight years. In 1869, he went to California, where he remained two years, and then returned to Butler, and went into merchandising, in which he is still engaged, the firm being known as Hoes Bros. Mr. Hoes was in the late war for the preservation of the Union, having been a member of an Illinois regiment. April 7, 1868, he was married in Montgomery County, to Miss Mary A. RUSH, born in Kentucky in 1847, daughter of Isaac RUSH, a native of Pennsylvania. Three children have been born to Mr. HOES - Lillian, Lucretia and George E. He is a Republican.

L. Scott HOES, merchant, Butler, was born in Hancock, Ind., September 6, 1853;
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son of Hartman and Elizabeth (KNOBLE) HOES, he a native of Germany, a tailor by trade who emigrated to America in 1837, dying in 1864; she, a native of Maryland, born January 1, 1814. They were the parents of nine children, eight boys and one girl. At the age of three years, our subject was taken to Freeport, Ill., and at four years to a farm near Butler, where he lived until 1877, during which time he followed threshing for about ten years, and farming. In 1877, he took a trip to California for the purpose of going into mining with his brother. After working several months without turning up a dollar's worth of the shining metal, he at last “struck it rich,” and to such an extent as to justify the erection of a ten-stamp mill, which proved profitable, paying large dividends. He remained in California until the fall of 1880, when he returned to Butler, leaving his brothers to control the mining interests, and in the spring of 1881, engaged with his brother Charles in merchandising. September 14, 1881, Mr. HOES married Miss Ida E. SHEELOCK, born June 21, 1861, in Decatur, Ill., daugther of Thomas and Mary WHEELOCK, he a native of New Hampshire, born November 29, 1830; she, born February 10, 1830. Mr. HOES is a Republican.

Thomas F. HODGES, farmer, was born in Jersey County, Ill., September 29, 1851, son of E. M. and Nancy (DAVIS) HODGES, he born in Missouri in 1820, and died in 1875; she born in Kentucky in 1821. They had nine children, Thomas F. being the fourth child in order of birth. Our subject was raised to the life of a farmer, and attended the common schools, receiving such an education as they afforded. In 1872, he removed from Greene County to his present place. He owns two shares in 370 acres of fine land, which belongs to the heirs of his father's estate. In September 1875, he married Miss Mary SHERER, born in 1857, daughter of John and Nancy (PETERS) SHERER, all natives of this State. Three children have been born to them - Arthur, Gracie and Walter. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is a Democrat.

Matthew McMURTRY, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Doagh, County Antrim, Ireland, December 12, 1807; son of Ezekiel Simm and Jane (McALLISTER) McMURTRY, of Thorndyke, Ballyclose, Antrim, Ireland. At the age of fourteen, our subject went to Belfast to learn the trade of millwright, and the first steam flouing –mill built in Belfast was built during his apprenticeship, by his uncle. Matthew was afterward employed at mill–wrighting in this mill until he came to America, in 18831. Arriving at New Orleans, he went to Nashville, Tenn., where he remained about one year; then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and from there to Covington, Ky., where he lived many years. In 1855, he went to St. Louis, and other points, prosecuting his business, and in 1858 moved with his family to this county, and settled on the farm which has been his home ever since. He has dealt in grain, also, to some extent, in Butler. October 8, 1827, at Strandtown, County Down, Ireland, he was married to Elizabeth SMYTH, born in 1804, daughter of Robert and Janet (LAIRD) SMYTH, resident of County Down, Ireland, and by this union they have had the following children: Jane, born July 24, 1828, at Belfast, Ireland, and died November 2, 1937, at Covington, Ky.; Sarah, wife of Robert BRYCE, born November 9, 1830, at Belfast, Ireland; Elizabeth, born February 22, 1833, near Nashville, Tenn., and died October 27, 1837, at Covington, Ky.; Mary Ann, born December 26, 1834, at Covington, Ky., and died August 2, 1855, at St. Louis, Mo.; Ezekiel James, born August 17, 1837, at Covington, Ky., and died November
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1, 1837, at Covington, Ky.; Jane Elizabeth, wife of James S. McMURTRY, of St. Louis, Mo., born November 13, 1838, at Covington, Ky.; Susanna Esther, born February 10, 1841, at Covington, Ky.; James Matthew, born April 20, 1843, at Covington, Ky., and died September 17, 1877, at Davidson, Colo.; Abigail Emma Simm, born March 12, 1847, at Covington, Ky., and died April 16, 1861, near Butler, Ill. Mr. McMURTRY is a member of the Seceder Church.

M. L. MOYER, physician, Butler, was born in Iredell County, N. C., March 19, 1850, son of J. M. and M. A. (KIMBALL) MOYER, he a farmer, born in Cabarrus County, N. C., April 7, 1820; she, also born in North Carolina, April 7, 1825. They had four children, two of whom are dead. Our subject received his primary education in the schools of Hillsboro, and commenced his business career as a carpenter, afterward trading in stock, dealing principally in the far South. In 1876, he began the study of medicine and attended the Medical College at Keokuk, Iowa, from which institution he graduated in 1880. He immediately located in Butler, where he has worked into a fine practice. The Doctor is an able and conscientious practitioner, having been and still is a hard student, leaving no modes or processes untouched that may increase his skill in his profession. He is a genial gentleman, and highly respected in the community where he has made his home. He has been for sixteen yeas a member of the Lutheran Church, and is an Odd Fellow and a Democrat.

Francis PHILLIPS, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Randolph County, Ill., February 14, 1827. His education was limited to such as could be obtained in the old log cabin schools at that early day. He commenced his career in life as a farmer. He purchased his first land in Butler Township, the farm containing 200 acres of land, only a part of which was improved, and on which the only building was a log cabin. He remained on the property for about seven years, when he sold it and bought the property he now resides upon. He has made all the improvements himself, but had the misfortune to have his buildings all destroyed by fire in 1872; but, being possessed with a stout heart and an energetic spirit, he at once erected a new residence, and the appearance of his property denotes Mr. PHILLIPS to be a practical farmer and a man who labors for public improvements, and for the advancement of the agricultural interests of the county. He has endured the hardships of a trip to the gold regions of California, where he remained about one year, and returned to his native State, the recollections of which trip are still fresh in his memory. He was married on February 1, 1826, to Miss Sarah Jane SCHERER, who was born in North Carolina, and brought to this State while yet a child. She is the mother of two children living - Harriet Virginia and David. The father of Francis was Burrell PHILLIPS, a native of one of the Southern States, but sought a home in the far West, and settled in Randolph County, Ill. He was a prominent farmer in an early day. His death occurred in 1832. His wife, Harriet BROWN, was the mother of four children, of whom Francis was the youngest. Politically, his sympathies are with the Republican party. Religiously, himself and wife are connected with the Lutheran Church. He has been a prominent member of the Odd Fellows order of a number of years.

Michael REMENSNIDER, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Germany in 1826, son of Andrew REMENSNIDER, he a native of Germany, and a farmer by occupation, born in 1793, and died about the year 1863. Subject, who is the youngest of a family of four children, received a fair education in the common schools in Germany, and began life as a farmer. When he was twenty-six years old, he emigrated to America; landed in New York, where he remained ten months; removed to Indiana, and lived there seventeen years, and in 1870 came to Sangamon County, Ill., where he stayed six years, and finally removed to Montgomery County, where he now resides on a farm of 155 acres of fine, improved land. In Indiana, in 1856, he married Miss Recilla SHEAR, born in Ohio in 1839, and died in 1861, leaving two children - Elizabeth and Alain. Her father, Christian SHEAR, was a native of Germany; her mother of Pennsylvania. Mr. REMENSNIDER's second wife, Noretta REED, born in Ohio September 24, 1838, daughter of James REED, a native of Pennsylvania, who died leaving seven children. His third wife is Eliza BROWN, born in Illinois December 15, 1841, daughter of Samuel BROWN, a native of Kentucky; she is the mother of one child, Henry. Mr. REMENSNIDER is a Democrat and member of Charter Oak Lodge, No. 232, A., A. & A. M., Litchfield, Ill. His son, Alain, an energetic young man who has just begun farming on his own account, owns a farm adjoining his father's, and bids fare to be one of the leading agriculturists of the county.

Joseph STICKEL, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in York County, Penn., August 26, 1814; son of John and Mary (BENZLY) STICKEL, he a farmer, born about 1791, and dying in 1869; she, born about 1791, and dying in 1862; both natives of York County, Penn. They were the parents of nine children, Joseph, our subject, being the eldest. After receiving the education obtainable in the common schools of his native county, Joseph began his business life as a farmer and carpenter. After following for three years the businesses named, he entered into merchandising, after which he went into milling and farming, in which he has continued since, in the meantime filling the position of School Trustee and Director of his township. He owns a fine farm of 308 acres of land, which is highly improved. Mr. STICKEL has been married three times; first, in Pennsylvania, and twice in Illinois. The first wife was named Susanna SHELLY, the second, Catharine SMITH, and the third, who is living, was Sarah SCOTT, born in Kentucky October 9, 1828, their marriage occurring November 8, 1855. Mr. STICKEL has been blessed with eight children, three deceased - Francis M., Susanna M., Fletcher A., Nancy A., John A., Alexander W., James H. and Ellie C. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Republican.

John M. TUMES, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Hillsboro, Montgomery Co., Ill., April 27, 1848, son of Thomas and Theresa (ALLEN) TUMES, he a native of Ireland, she of Illinois. They had eight children, John M. being the second in order of birth. Our subject received his education in the Hillsboro Academy, and commenced life teaming and farming, in which latter occupation he has been engaged to the present time. October 26, 1876, he married Mrs. Fannie M. (CHAPELL) HARKEY, whose husband, Daniel Lee HARKEY, died in 1875, leaving two children - Ida Sophia and Ella Lee. Mrs. TUMES is the daughter of George and Rebecca CHAPELL, the latter having departed this life in 1862. One child, Mattie H., has been born to Mr. and Mrs. TUMES. He is an Odd Fellow and a Democrat.

Justus H. WARE, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born at Ware's Grove, near Butler, Montgomery Co., Ill., July 11, 1834; son of Benjamin and Sarah (SLAYBACK) WARE, he born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., N. H., May 27, 1796, a farmer by occupation, and dying July 31, 1855; she, born near Lexington, Ky., September 13, 1805, and still living. They had two children born to them, our subject being the second. Mr. WARE, after attending the schools of his county, began life as a farmer, and at present owns a farm of 280 acres of excellent land, which is under a high state of cultivation, and with good improvements thereon. He was married in Keene, N. H., September 26, 1860, to Miss Luceba A. BRIGHAM, born at East Alstead, N. H., August 25, 1836, daughter of Aaron and Susan (PROCTOR) BRIGHAM, and the following children have been born to them: Mary Flora, born November 29, 1862; Carrie Susan, born May 5, 1864, and died December 1, 1866; George Vincent, born September 5, 1867; Amy Lillian, born April 24, 1873. Mr. WARE has served as School Director of his township, is a member of the Lutheran Church and a Republican.

Dr. W. A. WESNER, druggist, Butler, was born in Indiana February 27, 1851, and emigrated to Montgomery County in 1874. His father was Jacob WESNER, born in North Carolina in 1800, and died in 1860; his mother, Elizabeth (KILLIAM) WENER, born in 1806, and dying in 1857. They had eleven children. Our subject, after his education in the schools of his county, when to farming, and then in the restaurant business. In 1872-73, he attended medical lectures at Indianapolis, and, after finishing his course, located first at Nokomis, Montgomery Co., Ill., and remained one year practicing medicine, and in drug business. He moved to Butler in 1878, where he has a large and remunerative business in the drug line, it being the only establishment of its kind in that town. March 29, 1876, he married Mary J. PHILLIPS, born in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1860, and three children have been born to them - Glen Allen, Donard Clayton and Iva Leena. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, an Odd Fellow and a Democrat.

Henry WARE, farmer, P. O. Butler, was born in Butler Grove Township May 4, 1845; son of Obadiah and Electa (POST) WARE, he born in Gilsum, Cheshire Co., N. H., January 2, 1795, a farmer by occupation, and dying September 24, 1876, she born in Addison County, Vt., July 15, 1800, and dying November 15, 1859. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his county, and began life as a farmer, in which he has been and still is engaged, owning at the present time a fine farm of 240 acres of well-improved land, lying on the cross road running from Springfield to Hillsboro. In addition to general farming, Mr. WARE makes a specialty of raising fine sheep, having a large flock always in his fields. In Lee County, Iowa, January 24, 1867, he married Miss Louisa H. MORRISON, born March 14, 1846, daughter of Joseph and Miriam (BAUGH) MORRISON, he a native of Tennessee, and she of Kentucky.

William WATSON, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro. Among the prominent families of Butler Grove Township is that of him whose name heads this sketch. Mr. WATSON, whose portrait appears in this volume, was born in Machery Knappen, parish of Refo, County Donegal, Ireland, January 14, 1800; his father, James WATSON, was a native of Ireland, and was born about the year 1755; he married Margaret McCLARY, a native of Ireland; they had four children, of whom the subject was the eldest; he died in 1825. Our subject was educated in the schools of the country, and emigrated to America, arriving at Albany, N. Y., when he was eighteen years of age; he went from there to Geneva, N. Y., where he remained ten years, then removed to Genesee County and lived there ten years, when, on the 26th of November, 1839, he came to Montgomery County, Ill., and settled on the farm where he now resides, five miles north of Hillsboro. He was married, August 4, 1834, in New York, to Miss Mary TAFT, who was born December 10, 1815, and is a daughter of William and Elizabeth (DAVIDSON) TAFT, all of Ireland; Mr. and Mrs. WATSON have had born to them the following children: William, Aaron, Margaret, John James, an infant (died without name), George W., Anna, Augusta, James, Eliza and Isabella. Mr. WATSON is one of the stanch farmers of the county, who settled in it more than forty years ago; has grown up with it, advanced in prosperity, and has grown in wealth and importance; has become identified with it in its growth and development, and is a part of its history; he has never sought office nor political preferment, but has always been an energetic friend of education, and a determined advocate of all public improvements calculated to promote the welfare of his adopted county. Politically, he is a Democrat, and socially, a warm friend and pleasing companion. His wife is a woman of intelligence, a helpmate to her husband, and a zealous member of the Presbyterian Church. William WATSON, Jr., deceased, the eldest son of the above, died from the accidental discharge of a pistol in his own hand, March 20, 1882; he was born in Genesee County, N.Y., November 20, 1835, and came with his parents to Illinois in 1839; he was never married, but owned a fine farm some five miles north of Hillsboro, and his brother John, and sister Margaret (likewise unmarried), lived with him; he was a dutiful son, and, to the day of his untimely death, never undertook any enterprise without consulting his parents, whose advice and more mature judgement he always heeded; he left to mourn his sad fate his aged parents and his brothers and sisters - Aaron, Margaret, John, George, James, Eliza and Isabella; though not a member of any church, he was a moral man and a constant reader of the Bible; he never swore an oath, was temperate in all his habits, and a firm believer in Christianity; he lived nobly, prospered in wealth, won the confidence of all, and died an honest and upright man. Aaron WATSON, the second son, was born also in New York, February 7, 1837, and brought by his parents to Illinois in 1839; he was reared on the farm, and received his education in the common schools of the county, and began life for himself as a farmer; owns forty acres of excellent land, in a fine state of cultivation, and which joins the old homestead; politically, he is a Democrat, and socially, he is - unmarried. John WATSON, Jr., was born in Montgomery County, Ill., January 28, 1840, and is the third son of William WATSON, Sr.; he was brought up on the farm, and received such educational advantages as the common schools afforded; he began life as a farmer, and purchased eighty acres of land, to which he has added since until he now owns an excellent farm in Butler Grove Township; he is an energetic and industrious farmer, and, like his father, is a good Democrat. George W. WATSON, the fourth son, was born in Montgomery County July 8, 1842; he attended the common schools, and afterward took a regular commercial course in a business college at Poughkeepsie, N.Y., from which he graduated in 1865; he then entered the telegraph office there, in the employ of the Hudson River Railroad, remaining two years, when his health gave way and he was obliged to return home, since which time he has engaged in farming; he lives in Rountree Township (this county), where he owns a farm of 360 acres of well-improved land. On the 23d of December, 1869, he was married to Miss Lucy A. PECK, a daughter of William H. PECK, of Montgomery County; they have three children living, viz., Estella, Lenna and Rolla; also have three children dead. Mr. WATSON is Treasurer of Rountree Township. James WATSON, the youngest son, was born on the homestead, in Montgomery County, in 1849; he was brought up on the farm; educated in the common schools of the neighborhood, finishing his education at Hillsboro Academy; he commenced his business career as a farmer and stock-raiser, which business he has successfully followed to the present time; his first purchase of land was twenty-three acres, to which he has since added until he now owns 188 acres of as fine land as any in Butler Grove Township; he makes a specialty of raising and handling cattle, but gives more or less attention to all kinds of stock; he is liberal in his views upon all matters of public enterprise, and contributes freely of his means to promote the prosperity and welfare of his town and county; he has always been identified with the Democratic party, believing its principles to be the foundation stone of our free institutions; he still lives with his parents, and takes care of them in their old age, thereby winning the respect and approval of his neighbors and friends. The Watson family own about two thousand acres of land, well improved and well cultivated; they are noted far and wide for their enterprise, public spirit and generous hospitality.


[Raymond Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 209]

Daniel E. ADAMS, baker and grocer, Raymond, was born in Macoupin County, October 13, 1840. His early childhood was spent in attending the common schools of his native county, and in assisting his father upon the homestead farm. At the age of twenty years, he embarked upon his career in life as a farmer, in Macoupin County, where he remained two years, and then removed to Montgomery County, and purchased forty acres of wild prairie land, which he improved and eventually sold. He then returned to the same section where his last farm was located, and purchased sixty acres of prairie land, which was partly improved. Soon after he sold it, and purchased 110 acres near by, and lived upon it three years, at the end of which time he sold out again and returned to Zanesville Township, and abought eighty acres. He continued in the occupation of a farmer until 1880, when he again sold out and removed to Raymond, where he purchasedtwenty-eight acres of village property, and entered into a grocery, at which business he was more than ordinarily successful, and by his energy, business habits, and the pleasingmanner in which he attended to the wants of his customers, he built up a large trade. Heeventually sold his interest and entered into partnership in a general mercantile businesswith W. H. WILBANKS, with whom he continued about one year, when he bought his partner'sinterest and continued in the business by himself. In January, 1882, he sold his business,and at present is engaged in conducting a bakery, grocery and restaurant, where, for theshort time he has been in the trade, he has succeeded in building up a large and steadilyincreasing trade. He was married, October 24, 1860, to Elizabeth Jane WAGNER, who was born in Washington County, Ill., November 14, 1840. She is the mother of eight children - Emma Elnora, born in Macoupin County, August 19, 1861, wife of P. B. BURGO, now living in Nebraska; Anna Nevada, born August 2, 1863; Jacob L., born January 20, 1867; Charles W., born March 16, 1871; William H., born February 23, 1874; Viola Jane, born March 16, 1879, and two infants, deceased. Mrs. ADAMS is a daughter of Jacob D. and Lucinda (McDONALD) ADAMS, he born in Illinois, and one of the early settlers of Macoupin County, and still living; she, born in Tennessee, deceased. William C. ADAMS, the father of oursubject, was born in West Virginia; moved from there to Tennessee, but eventually to Macoupin County, in 1827, a farmer by occupation. His death occurred January 21, 1853. His wife, Margaret WARD, was a native of Tennessee, and is still living. She is the motherof twelve children, of whom Daniel was the ninth child. He was elected Constable in 1873, and served one year. In 1874, he was elected a Highway Commissioner of Zanesville Township, and served three years. He has been an active member of the I. O. O. F. order for a number of years. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party.Religiously, himself and wife are connected with the Christian Church.

[Page 210]

Peter BERRIE, retired farmer, P. O. Raymond, is a son of Thomas BERRIE, who was born in Pennsylvania, of English descent. He was a farmer by occupation. His wife, Susan LARK, was also a native of Pennsylvania; she died in 1823. The result of their union was twelve children, of whom Peter, the subject of this sketch, was the seventh child. As educational privileges were very much limited at that early day, his education wasnecessarily limited. His early life was spent in assisting his father in his agriculturalpursuits. He remained at home until he reached the age of nineteen years, when he enteredupon the battle of life with all the energy of a young man bound to make his way in theworld. He engaged as a farm hand, near home, receiving but a small compensation for hislabor. He soon tired of that occupation, and tried river life for a few months, but soon concluded that a farm life was preferable, and he again took upon himself the dutiesof a farm life, following in that occupation in different localities, and eventually came to Montgomery County, Ill., where he has since resided. In 1841, he purchased his first real estate, consisting of eighty acres of unimproved prairie land, to which he hascontinually added, until his farm now consists of about two hundred and twenty-five acres of choice farm and timber land. He has made all the improvements necessary for comfort and convenience, and has placed his farm in a high state of cultivation, and it will compare with any of the best improved farms in the county, and he is proud of the fact that, having started upon his career a poor boy, his present possessions represent thedollars earned by himself. He was married, December 15, 1841, to Mary J. CASS, who was born January 27, 1821, and died November 13, 1865. She bore him eight children, viz.:Adolphus, born May 26, 1843, and died July 15, 1864; Aurelius, born August 14, 1845, and died November 11, 1871; Isabelle, born July 7, 1848, and died February 25, 1853; Clarence, born November 17, 1850, and is still living; Florence, born March 8, 1853, and died January 26, 1875; Lockwood, born September 23, 1855, and died November 12, 1868; Mary, born May 14, 1859, and died in infancy; Chester, born December 17, 1861, and is still living. Mr. BERRIE was married again June 22, 1869, to Mary J. GUTHRIE, who was born in Charleston, Coles Col, Ill., November 16, 1843. She is the mother of one child,Fannie, born November 11, 1870, and died July 4. 1871. Mrs. BERRIE was a daughter of Green J. and Mary J. (VanDEREN) GUTHRIE, natives of Kentucky. He died in 1850; was aprominent merchant of Charleston, Ill.; she still living, at the age of sixty-one. She is the mother of five children, of whom Mrs. BERRIE was the second child. She is a ladypossessing all the womanly graces. Mr. BERRIE is not a politician, but has always beenidentified with the Republican party. Although possessing all the energy and enterprise that has characterized all his efforts, he has retired from farm life, and is now enjoyingthe fruits of a well-spent life.

Ira BARTON, physician, Raymond, was born in Grant County, Wis., April 17, 1844, where he received his early education, the foundation of his subsequent learning. The ears between fourteen and twenty-one were employed in assisting his father in his agriculturalpursuits. He then entered the service in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-second IllinoisVolunteer Infantry, with Capt. J. W. BROWN; regiment commanded by Col. STEPHENSON. Heremained in the service about seven months, and soon after his discharge he began the study of medicine, reading with Dr. A. B. PENNIMAN, at Woodburn, [Page 211]Macoupin County. He attended three courses of lectures in the Medical Department of theUniversity of Michigan, from which institution he graduated in 1869, receiving his diplomaas an M.D. He did not enter regularly upon the duties of his profession until June of thefollowing year, when he located at Raymond, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, with the exception of one year, when he took the place andpractice of his old preceptor, at Woodburn. He has, by his thorough knowledge of, and strict attention to, the duties of his calling, succeeded in building up a reasonably good pratice, which is steadily on the increase, and socially has gained the highest esteem of the community. He was married, December 17, 1871, to Miss Mary H. SCOTT, who was born in Steuben County, Ind., August 15, 1845. She is the mother of three children, viz.: John H., Sarah and infant, the latter dying in early infancy. Mrs. BURTON was adaughter of Joseph H. and Mercy (KINSMAN) SCOTT, natives of New York, he living, shedeceased. John H. BARTON, the father of our subject, was born in Massachusetts in October, 1805, and is still living. At the age of twenty-one, he sought a home in the then far West, and located near Jacksonville, Ill., where he remained several years, but eventually resided in Wisconsin and Minnesota, and has engaged in several occupationsduring his life, such as lead mining, farming, merchandising, etc., and now, at an advanced age, he is enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. His wife, Mary N. REID, was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1812, and is also living. They have lived together as man and wife fifty-three years, and the result of their union was seven children, three of whom have reached manhood and womanhood, viz.: Sarah, wife of A. B. PENNIMAN; Mary, wife of William P. HAMILTON, and Ira, the subject of this sketch. He has always been identifiedwith the Republican party. Religiously, he is in connection with the Presbyterian Church, and was on e of the six members who organized the church at Raymond; has always taken aprominent part in all temperance movements.

A. BRYAN, lumber dealer, Raymond, was born in Arkansas March 20, 1850; received his education principally in the common schools of that State; came to Montgomery County, Ill., in 1864. His first enterprise for himself was school teaching, but eventually took upon himself the duties of a farm life. Since 1873, he has been working at the carpentering and joiner trade, and in January, 1882, bought the lumber yard and business of D. J. PARRATT & Co., located at Raymond. On the 29th of March, he entered into partnership with D. C. KELLEY, in the same business. They are enterprising and energeticbusiness men, and have built up a large and steadily increasing trade. Mr. BRYAN has just completed a fine frame residence on one of the principal streets of Raymond. He has done most of the work himself, and the house does honor to the town and to Mr. BRYAN as a competent workman. He was married in Pulaski County, Ark., February 18, 1872, to MissMatilda POWERS, daughter of Oliver and Margaret (HUSTIN) POWERS. They have three children living, viz.: Leta, William and Claudie May; Ira died in infancy. The father of the subject, Darius BRYAN, was a native of North Carolina, and was one of the earlysettlers of Arkansas. He was a farmer by occupation; his death occurred in 1876. His wife, Susan Elizabeth HAMILTON, was a native of Illinois, and died on the same day as her husband, and both of small-pox. He is a Democrat.

William L. BATEMAN, lawyer, Raymond, was born in Knox County, Ohio, Oc-[Page 212] tober 13, 1858, son of Luther and Mary Jane (SHURTLIFF) BATEMAN. Luther, born in the same house in which his son William L. was born, June 7, 1833 is a farmer by occupation. He moved to Montgomery County in March, 1867, and located on a farm near Raymond, where he remained until the spring of 1870, when he moved to Walshville, and there engaged in the carriage and wagon painting business. In the spring of 1873, he left Walshville and moved to Litchfield, where he continued the same business; also doing house painting and sign writing; left Litchfield in 1877, and returned to Walshville, where he remained but a short time; then moved to Hillsboro, where, in addition to painting, he carried on the manufacture of carriages and wagons. In 1880, he removed to Raymond, where he carried on business until 1882, when he sold out to Isaac DUDSON, and is now engaged as traveling salesman for J. S. CULVER, Taylorville, Christian Co., Ill. His wife, born in Hebron, N. Y., October 2, 1835, is the mother of two children - Nettie and William L.Subject attended school in his native town, in Knox County, Ohio, and finished at Litchfield, Ill. After the completion of his education, he commenced the study of law under the instruction of Judge Jesse J. PHILLIPS; was admitted to the bar at Mt. Vernon,Ill., in February, 1880, and entered upon the practice of his profession at Raymond. He is a supporter of the Republican party, and is correspondent for a number of newspapers.

Winfield P. CARTER, stock dealer, Raymond, was born in Madison County, Ill., November 11,1843. His father, Henry T. CARTER, was born at Knoxville, Tenn., in 1811. He remained in his native State until he was eighteen years of age, when he entered upon his career in life, and sought a home in the then far West, locating in Alton, Ill., and entered 320 acres of wild prairie land, a large portion of which he eventually improved and resided upon until his death, which occurred July 21, 1844. He was married in 1832, in MadisonCounty, to Miss Hannah DAVIS, who was born at Trenton, N. J., July 12, 1815, who was brought to Illinois by her parents when but seven years of age. She was the mother of five children, viz.: Harriett, wife of J. H. STAHL, of Madison County; Louisa, wife of Edward SANDERS, of Macoupin County; Henry D., now living on the old homestead; Julia A., wife of M. V. McKINNEY, of Madison County, and Winfield, the subject of this sketch, all of whom were small children at the death of their father. Mrs. CARTER continued upon thefarm, which was managed by herself until the children were able to take the duties uponthemselves, and to assist in the support of the family. She is still living and resides upon the homestead with her son Henry. Winfield remained at home until he was seventeen years of age, assisting in the labor of the farm, and attending the common schools, to which his educational privileges were limited. In 1862, when he left home, he entered into the service in Company B, Eightieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with Capt. A. F.ROGERS, in the regiment commanded by Col. ALLEN. He remained in the service twenty-twomonths, receiving his discharge on account of injuries received from a bayonet, and being otherwise injured while removing a battery; was taken a prisoner by John MORGAN, but was paroled soon after. Upon his return home, he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, remaining at home about one year, at the end of which time, in company with two others, he turned his face westward, to try his fortune in California, where he engaged in mining and farming. At the expiration of two years, he returned to his native State,[Page 213] and continued in the occupation of a farmer. On January 25, 1868, he was married to Miss Anna H. MAYHEW, who was born at Shiloh, N. J., September 26, 1849. They have five children, Viz.: Philip Henry, born October 25, 1869; Mary Louisa, born June 1, 1871; Edward B., born September 20, 1872; Maud E., born August 1, 1874; Ernest M., born June 25, 1876, and died June 3, 1877; Clyde W., born August 6, 1878. Mrs. CARTER is adaughter of James and Sarah (HOWE) MAYHEW, natives of New Jersey. He was a farmer byoccupation, born at Shiloh, N. J., in 1809, and died in 1858; she born in 1814, and is still living. Mr. CARTER remained in Madison County, upon the farm, until 1870, when he removed to Raymond and opened a lumber yard, which was the first enterprise of the kind in the town. He continued in the business until the fall of 1872, when he sold out and entered into partnership with C. M. DAVIS in a general merchandising store. Two years later, he purchased his partner's interest, and continued in the business until 1878, when he disposed of his stock, since which time he has been engaged more or lessextensively in dealing in stock. He has a small tract of land in the outskirts of the town of Raymond, upon which he has erected a fine dwelling, surrounded by a fine grove of maple trees, planted by himself. The prospects for Mr. CARTER's residence becoming the finest place in Raymond are very flattering. Mr. CARTER has taken a great interest in the growth and prosperity of the town, and to him is ascribed the honor of having been the first Treasurer. He has also served upon the Town Board two years, and was Deputy Postmaster for about six years, at an early date in the town history. Politically, Mr. CARTER has always been an exponent of the Democratic party. He is an energetic andenterprising business man, and socially enjoys the highest esteem of the community. Upon his return from California, his trip was anything but pleasant, as he was called upon to pass through several perils. He purchased a ticket from San Francisco to New York, upon the steamer Daniel Webster; but, before sailing, met a friend about to sail upon the steamer Moses Taylor. He disposed of his ticket, and took passage upon the Moses Taylor. Both steamers left the wharf the same day, and were caught in a storm in which the Daniel Webster was lost with all on board. The Moses Taylor, however, reached San Juan del Norte, although badly damaged. They crossed Luke Nicaragua in a terrible storm, and, while passing down Nicaragua River, ran on a shoal. The steamer then had to beabandoned, and, after being exposed eleven days to storms and hardships, with a scarcity of food, part of the time walking and part of the time in skiffs, reached Greytown, on the Atlantic shore, from which place he embarked upon the Santiago de Cuba, for New York; but again they were doomed to pass through a storm, which disabled the steamer, which was towed into port at Charleston, S. C. Having passed safely through the perils of the deep, he determined to finish his journey be rail, and the train upon which he was carried, while running at a high rate of speed, was thrown from the track, killing fourpersons. Having escaped injury in all of these misfortunes, he at last arrived home safely, after forty-nine days dangerous travel, the recollections of which trip are still fresh in his memory.

Robert CHISM, proprietor of the Raymond House, Raymond, was born in Grayson County, Ky., June 24, 1831, and was brought to Macoupin County, Ill., when one and a half years of age, and his education was received in the common schools of that county, [Page 214] and his early childhood was spent upon the homestead farm, assisting his father in hisagricultural pursuits. When he attained the age of twenty years, he entered upon the battle of life for himself, continuing in the same occupation he had followed at home, until 1857, when he opened a hotel at Litchfield, Ill., where he remained one year; sold out, and again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, this time in Greene County, where he remained two years, and removed to Macoupin; remained there two years, then returned to Montgomery County, where he remained three years. He then purchased a farm consisting of eighty acres of prairie and timber land, in Macoupin county, part of which was improved, and the balance of which was improved by himself. He remained upon this farm about twelve years, when he sold his property, and followed in the stream of emigrants westward, and eventually located in Kansas, where he located 320 acres of land, and again opened a hotel. He remained in Kansas only two years, and then removed to Missouri, and found employment in a machine shop, operated by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company. He remained in the employ of the company two years, at the end of which time he returned to Macoupin County, Ill., and again took up agricultural pursuits. Four years later, he removed to Raymond, and entered a hotel upon the 22d day of August, and on the same night the building was destroyed by fire with its contents, the inmates barely escaping. However, being an energetic andenterprising man, and possessing a stout heart, he did not give up to despair, butimmediately commenced the erection of the building he now occupies, which he moved into about three months after the fire, and where he is now performing the duties of mine host in a manner pleasing to all his guests and where he has succeeded in building up a large and steadily increasing trade. He was married in Macoupin County, June 24, 1852, to Catharine SKAGGS, a native of Kentucky, born in 1830, and died July 4, 1869, leaving to the care of her husband six children, viz.: Lizzie, Edward, Sophronia, Mally, Laura and Robert. Mr. CHISM was again married in the same county, March 21, 1871, to Helen (EUBANK) REED, widow of A. H. REED, and daughter of Stephen G. and Sarah (WAGGONER) EUBANK, he a native of Tennessee, and died in 1872; she, born in Sangamon County, Ill., and is still living. Mrs. CHISM was born in Menard County, Ill., August 31, 1846; she is the mother of three children, viz.: Alice Beryl, Bessie May and Sarah Grace. Although Mr. CHISM does not take much interest in politics, he is identified with the Democraticparty. He has been a member of the A., F. & A. M. for a number of years.

William CHAPMAN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in England March 23, 1817. His father, Luke CHAPMAN, was a native of England, born in 1790, and was a mechanic by occupation. Soon after the birth of William, he emigrated with his family to "Virginia, where his death occurred in January, 1833. His wife, Grace REYNOLDS, was also a native of England, born May 28, 1796. She died in Greene County, Ill., August 20, 1871. She was the mother of six children, of whom William was the oldest child. His early life was spent in rendering what assistance he could to his parents, and attending school in the neighboring log schoolhouse, common at that early day, and to which his early educational privileges were limited. At the age of twenty years he had virtually reached his manhood, possessed with all the energy andenterprise of a man bound to [Page 215] make his own way in the world, and he determined to try his fortunes in the then far West, and distant wilds of Illinois. He located in Morgan County in 1836, and during the following year went to Greene County, in what is now called Roodhouse Township, where he remained until the spring of 1852, when he removed to his present place ofresidence, one and a half miles north of Raymond, where he has since remained, engaged more or less extensively in farming and stock-raising. He was married in Greene County, Ill., September 15, 1842, to Miss Ann Maria ALVERSON, who was born in Kentucky to Benjamin and May (JEFFRIES) ALVERSON, natives of Kentucky, February 25, 1826. She has borne him eleven children, viz.: Joseph R., born August 1, 1843, a prominent young farmer living near the homestead. (See history.) Benjamin H., born October 28, 1846, graduate of Iowa and Chicago Law Universities, practicing law at Vandalia, Ill.; William L., born March 3, 1853, also a lawyer, graduate of Ann Arbor, Mich., Law College, now residing in Houston, Tex.; Adam M., born February 7, 1855, now engaged in dealing in stock in Washington Territory; Ulysses G., born January 20, 1864, living at home; Mary Ann, born November 18, 1848, widow of T. BERRY, living with her parents; Emma, born March 27, 1861, also at home; Amanda J., died at the age of four years; Xenophon, born October 13, 1844, a graduate of the Chicago Medical College, died inLeadville, Col., May 17, 1880; two infants deceased, not named. Realizing from his ownmeager opportunities the value of a good education, Mr. CHAPMAN has spared no means to provide his children with advantages, and four of whom have received a thorough collegiate education. During the rebellion he took no active part other than to assist the Union soldiers, by caring for their families at home. He served the people of the county as Associate Judge four years, the duties of which office he performed with marked zeal and integrity. He has also been Township Treasurer over twenty years, and has served as one of the Board of Supervisors. Being a progressive man himself, Mr. CHAPMAN is fully alive to every progressive movement favoring the growth and prosperity of the county and for the advancement of religious and educational privileges. The state of cultivation under which Mr. CHAPMAN keeps his farm, consisting of about six hundred acres of choice farm land near Raymond, denotes him to be a practical farmer, and one of those men who add to the prosperity of the county.

Needham CRANE, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio, November 14, 1829, to Norris and Elizabeth (STANLEY) CRANE. He was a native of New Jersey, born March 10, 1799, and during his early life worked at the trade of a stone mason, and later followed the occupation of a farmer. His death occurred in Montgomery County August 19, 1852. She was born at Hamilton, Ohio, December 30, 1803, and died in Montgomery County March 10, 1854. The result of their union was eleven children, of whom Needham was the fourth child. He was educated in the high schools of Hamilton, Ohio, and when fifteen years of age was brought to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Ill., by his parents, where he remained two years, and then was removed to Montgomery County, and settled in Butler Grove Township, in 1846, his parents being among the first settlers of the county. He assisted upon the homestead until the death of his father, when he took upon himself the management of the farm, and remained with his mother until 1856, when they removed from the homestead, and he joined the first surveying party of Kansas, where he remained six months, and then returned to Montgomery County, and followed hunting until 1863, when he married, purchased the farm he now resides upon, and spent the winter in getting out rails for fencing, and in the spring of 1864, moved upon the farm where he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is now the owner of 120 acres of prairie land, under cultivation, and twenty acres of timber land. November 12, 1863, he was married to Miss Cordelia CASS, a native of Montgomery County, born December 25, 1832, and died November 24, 1868. She was the mother of three children, one of whom is living, viz., Abbie, born September 22, 1864. Politically, Mr. CRANE is a Republican. His brother, Norris, was the sixth child of Norris and Elizabeth CRANE, and was born atHamilton, Ohio, October 2, 1834. He received the principal part of his education in hisnative county. His early life was spent in assisting his father upon the farm, and his first business for himself was teaming upon the Quincy & St. Louis Railroad, where heremained one year. He then engaged as a farm hand and followed in that occupation severalyears. He was elected by the people as Constable, the duties of which office he performedabout fifteen years. He clerked in a merchandising store at Butler one year, and was thefirst person to sell goods at Raymond, where he was engaged with Van Ever & Van Darren as clerk. He remained with them something over a year, since which time he has been engaged in farming, in connection with his brother. He has served the people as DeputySheriff one term, and has been an active member of the I. O. O. F. order for a number of years. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party.

Morgan COSTLEY, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Greene County, Ill., July 21, 1836, and received his education in his native county, where his early life was spent upon the homestead farm. He came to Montgomery County in 1856, and purchased 144 acres of wild prairie land, which he improved, and upon which he remained until 1873, when he removed to his present place of residence, where he has 200 acres of as well cultivated land as can be found in Raymond Township. He has accumulated a large amount of his world's good, and has at one time had in his possession about five hundred acres of land. The high state of cultivation under which he keeps his farm shows him to be a practical farmer, and well worthy of the high esteem in which he is held by the community. He has also been a prominent dealer in and feeder of stock, chiefly cattle and hogs. Although he grows all the crops usually raised upon a well-regulated farm, he makes a specialty of grain. He was married in Montgomery County in 1859, to Miss Melvina McGOWN, who was born in Greene County to Alexander and Louisa (McNEAL) McGOWN.She has borne him six children, viz., William A., John P., Della, Charles, Alta L. and Perry, the latter of whom died in infancy. William COSTLEY, the father of Morgan, was a native of Kentucky, a farmer by occupation, and died in 1869. His wife, Elizabeth Mathis, was a native of Illinois; she died at Raymond in 1875. She was the mother of thirteen children, of whom Morgan was the fifth child. Politically, he is identified with the Democratic party. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.

Edwin R. CARTER, grain and coal dealer, Raymond, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio,December 2, 1842; son of Daniel W. CARTER, a native of Maryland, born in 1811; a farmer; died in the spring of 1865. Jane TINKLER, his wife, was born in New York in 1819, and isstill living with [Page 217] subject, who left Ohio when ten years of age, and lived in Indiana until the fall of 1869, when he removed to Pana, Ill., and eventually to Raymond. His first enterprise for himself was farming. On his arrival at Raymond he engaged in the coal and grain business, at which he still continues; built his elevator in the fall of 1879; commencedwithout any available means, and is a self-made man, and his business ability and enterprise have added largely to the growth and prosperity of Raymond. He was married at Reynolds, White Col, Ind., February 25, 1866, to Miss Mary CARTMELL, who was born in Clark County, Ohio, April 3, 1845. They have four boys and two girls living, viz.: Bruce, Charles, Benjamin F., Asbury L., Ruth and Naomi; two boys died in infancy. He has served as Township Clerk, Collector, Assessor, and Police Justice, or Magistrate, for several years; was Sergeant in Company K, Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry,with Capt. J. SOUTHARD, regiment commanded by Col. HAMILTON; in service three years; is a Republican; has been a member of I. O. O. F. several years. Himself and family areMethodists. His father's family consisted of four children, viz.: Jesse, died in 1864, aged twenty-eight years; William, of Logansport, Ind.; Ferguson, in San Francisco, clerk in State House, and Edwin R., subject of sketch.

Prof. Charles E. COOK, Principal of schools, Raymond, was born in Fillmore, Putnam Co., Ind., July 12, 1857; son of William H. and Elizabeth (ROBINSON) COOK, he born in KentuckyMarch 27, 1833, a physician by profession, and practicing at East Fork, Montgomery County; she, born in Indiana October 1, 1835, the mother of four children, still living,viz.: Ella, Melville and Charles, William R. having died in infancy. The education of our subject was commenced in the common schools, from which he advanced to the academy at Hillsboro, where he remained several terms, teaching part of the time. He entered the Normal School at Valparaiso, Ind., in the fall of 1878, where he graduated the following year, his academic education having fitted him for the advanced classes, which he entered. After receiving his diploma, he entered upon the duties of his profession at Fillmore, but eventually became Principal of the public schools of Raymond, where he is still engaged, and in connection with those duties is engaged in the study of the law with the intention of fitting himself for and entering upon the practice of that profession. In Hillsboro, September 14, 1881, he was married to Miss Jennie B. SHIMER, born April 10, 1860, daughter of Isaac and Jane (GUNNING) SHIMER, natives of Ohio. Mr. COOK has served as County Assessor one year, and is a Democrat.

Joseph R. CHAPMAN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born August 1, 1843; son of William CHAPMAN (see history), and was raised to a life of farming. April 25, 1867, he married Miss Catharine HENDRICKSON, born May 18, 1844, who died July 22, 1878, leaving three children - Robert, Gideon P. and Samuel Byron. July 29, 1880, he married Miss Isabel ROGERS, born April 18, 1856, daughter of William ROGERS, of Macoupin County. By this union Mr. CHAPMAN has one child, Grace Reynolds. Mr. CHAPMAN served during the late war as a member of Company H, One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Infantry, under Capt. James F. STEWART. He is a Methodist, and a Republican. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

Albert ESTABROOK, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Madison County, Ill., September 13, 1830. The father of this gentleman, John ESTABROOK, was born in Boston, Mass., in March, 1799, and in 1818 settled in Madison County, where he engaged [Page 218] in farming up to the time of his death, which occurred May 2, 1881. His wife, Nancy WHITE, was born in North Carolina in August, 1795, and died in December, 1881. She was the mother of ten children, five boys and five girls, viz.: John, Edward, Lucy, deceased, Emeline, James W., Albert, Harriet, William, Clara and Sarah J., all of whom grew to man and womanhood, and all of whom, with one exception, are still living, and at the death of their parents the youngest was forty-two years of age. The subject of this sketch spent his early childhood in attending the common schools of the county, to which his educational privileges were limited, and in assisting his parents upon the homestead farm. At the age of eighteen years, he entered upon his career in life for himself, and concluded to try his fortune in the gold regions of California, where he remained about four years, at the end of which time he returned home and entered a grist-mill, owned by his father, at which occupation he continued until the sale ofthe mill required him to look for a new occupation, and caused him to engage in a saw-mill, in Iowa. He soon tired of his work, and engaged in merchandising business in Wisconsin, where he remained about ten years, and then took a like position in amerchandising store in Nebraska. In the spring of 1872, he turned his attention toagricultural pursuits, and purchased a tract of land in Washington County, Kan., where he remained about two years, and he says it is his opinion that Kansas is just the place for a poor man to live if he wishes always to remain poor all his life; but if he wishes to get rich, go to Illinois, to which State he returned in 1874, and settled upon the place upon which he now resides, and where he has since been engaged in farming. His farm consists of 360 acres, which may be termed as three improved farms, each of which is well fitted up with all the buildings and other improvements necessary for comfort and convenience. Mr. ESTABROOK is considered one of the most practical farmers in the township, and, being a progressive man himself, he is always fully alive to all enterprises favoring the growth and prosperity of the county, and for the advancement of religious and educational privileges. He was married January 15, 1857, to Sarah Jane BOMLEY, who was born May 13, 1839, and died September 2, 1866. She was the mother of two children, viz.: Julia Nannie, born January 30, 1859, wife of Henry NEWMAN, living in Madison County; Sarah Minnie, born April 20, 1865. Mr. ESTABROOK's second marriage occurred November 25, 1869, to Miss Crara KING, who was born November 12, 1850, to Hilleary T. and Louisa (DORSEY) KING, natives of Calvert County, Md., he born November 10, 1815, and is still living in Davis County, Iowa, a farmer by occupation; she, born June 9, 1818, and died June 19, 1860. Mr. ESTABROOK took no active part in the rebellion other than to assist the Union soldiers by caring for their families at home. He has been a member of the order of I. O. O. F. for a number of years. He has been termed a black Republican, and says he is proud of the name.

William FITZJARRELL, retired farmer, Raymond, was born in Warren County, Ohio, October 3, 1815. He received a limited education, and at fifteen years of age he was brought to Macoupin County, Ill., by his parents, but permanently located in Jersey County. In 1849, he bought land and moved where Plainview now is, in Macoupin County, where he remained seven years. He then moved to Montgomery County, and settled 200 acres of land, on which he was the first settler. He erected a farm residence, and made all otherimprovements, and by his en-[Page 219]ergy and industry he soon added to the above property, which numbered at one time nearly hour hundred acres. He devoted his time to growing the usual farm crops and raising stock, and, perhaps, no man has ever done more for the advancement, growth and prosperity of the agricultural interests of Montgomery County. He was noted for his hospitality, and his house was made the stopping place of all travelers. He was regularly ordained as a Baptist minister on Christmas Day, 1842, but previous to this had received a license and had been preaching in the neighboring towns and villages. For something over twenty years he filled the pulpit at Little Flock Church, at Honey Bend; has served the people of the county as Associate Judge four years. He was married in Greene County, November 10, 1836, to Miss Elizabeth COURTNEY, born in Madison County February 20, 1817. They have six children, viz.: William R., Tabitha A., Cyrus, Naomi, Harriet and Meredith. All his sons are farmers, and his daughters are all married - Tabitha, wife of J. W. ASH; Naomi, wife of Isaac F. LAWLER; Harriet A., wife of James F. THOMAS. Mrs. FITZJARRELL was a daughter of William COURTNEY, a native of Kentucky, and one of the early settlers of Illinois. He settled in Madison County in 1809; his death occurred in May, 1835. His wife, Margaret BARNETT, was also a native of Kentucky; she died in 1845. The father of William, the subject of this sketch, Eli FITZJARRELL, was a native of New Jersey, and one of the early settlers of Macoupin County; was a farmer andstock-raiser by occupation in Warren County, Ohio, but had in an early day taught school in New Jersey. He died December 18, 1854. The mother of William, Tabitha KELSEY, was also a native of New Jersey. She was the mother of sixteen children, of whom William was the second. She died October 24, 1856. In early life, Mr. F. was identified with theold Whig party, but since its day his sympathies have been with the Democratic party. He has always been an energetic worker in the cause of temperance.

Cyrus FITZJARRELL, farmer, P. O. Raymond, son of William and Elizabeth (COURTNEY)FITZJARRELL, he born In Ohio in 1815; she born in Madison County. They have six children, Cyrus being the third child. Our subject received his education in the common schools of Macoupin and Montgomery Counties, and came to Montgomery County in February, 1857; remained with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age. In September, 1867, he was married to Miss Eliza A. GREENWOOD, a native of Kentucky, born in 1843, who removed with her parents to Macoupin County when about two years of age. In 1867, he, our subject, commenced farming on his own account by renting a farmand working the same, and continued on the same farm as a renter until 1876, when he bought 165 acres, and in 1881 bought eighty acres more and added to it; now is the owner of 245 acres of choice land, upon which he makes the raising of wheat, oats and corn; also stock of good grades - mules, horses, hogs and cattle. Upon his farm stands a fine residence, erected from his own design in 1878. Upon his place he has a wind-mill,scales, etc. Everything about his farm denotes his ability as a farmer. His farm is a portion of the same tract settled by his father when he first came to the county, valued at that time at $5 or $6 per acre, and is now worth $50 per acre. When our subject's father came to the county there were no neighbors inside of two miles, and now houses dot the county as far as the eye can see. Plenty of deer, wolves, etc., were here whenhis father came; farm is inclosed with hedge fence, probably five miles of hedging. Five children, three … [Page 220] living - Etta, Harry, and William Ross; all at home. He is a Democrat.

John GREENE, banker, Raymond. The grandfather of our subject was a native of Kentucky. In 1819, he sought a home in the then far West, and became a resident of Greene County, Ill. In many ways he will be long remembered as one who helped materially toward makingGreene County one of the most flourishing counties in the State, and which was named in honor of himself and his brother John. His death occurred in 1828. He was the father of five children, of whom Nelson, the father of our subject, was the fourth child. He was born in the year 1822, and grew up to be a stout and vigorous boy, early becoming inured to the hard work of a farm. He was married in 1847, to Ann E. GANO, a daughter of John S. GANO, a Virginian. In his own language - "I borrowed the clothes I wore to the marriage" - and subsequently borrowed many of the household utensils that formed the simple furniture of his cabin; but he worked hard, and thus paved the way for future success. He is the owner of 120 acres of land in one of the best townships of Greene County; is a whole-souled, liberal gentleman, and enjoys the confidence of his many friends. He was twice elected Justice of the Peace, serving eight years. He is the father of eight children, namely: Emily, wife of N. M. PERRY, Jr., at Olathe, Kan.; Mary, wife of Luther SNELL, of Carlinville, Ill.; Sarah, wife of Scott GREENE, of Tallula, Ill., a prominent farmer and stock-raiser; Lucy, Herschel, Robert, Clarence, and John, the subject of this sketch, who was born on the old farm homestead April 15, 1847, receiving a liberal education from the common schools of his native place. His first venture in business was made with Mr. N. M. PERRY, in the town designated as Old Kane, where a general merchandising business was done. Subsequently, Mr. GREENE purchased the interest of Mr. PERRY, and conducted a successful business for a number of years. In September, 1880, he opened a general banking business at Raymond, and, in addition tothe duties of this business, he is Township Collector, elected by the Democratic ticket. He was married August 31, 1870, to Miss Emma E. PERRY, who was born in Greene County December 26, 1846. They have two children - Mabel, born August 18, 1871, and Morrison, born December 26, 1877. Mrs. GREENE was a daughter of Col. N. M. and Eliza (HILL) PERRY. He was born in Orange County, Va., November 30, 1806, and was the sixth child of James and Ann PERRY, who were of English descent. In 1864, he was nominated and elected as acandidate of the Democratic party to a seat in the legislature of Illinois, and in thatresponsible position acquitted himself with honor. His death occurred in 1875, and that of his wife in 1861. Mr. GREENE is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. He is a man of unsullied reputation, and well worthy of the high esteem in which he is held by the community at large.

George W. GREENAWALT, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Sangamon County, Ill., February 24, 1831. As educational privileges were limited in the county at that early day, hiseducation was also limited to such as could be obtained in the common schools. He remained upon the homestead, assisting his father upon the farm, until he reached the age of twenty-one years, when he entered on the battle of life in reality, rented a farm, and continued in the occupation of a farmer; at the end of three years, he had accumulatedenough funds to enable him to purchase land, which he did, in his native county, the farmconsisting of [Page 221]148 acres of unimproved prairie land, upon which he erected a residence and all otherbuildings necessary for comfort and convenience, and also placed his farm in a high state of cultivation. At the end of sixteen years, he disposed of the property and removed to Macoupin County, where he remained five or six years, but, during two years of the time, carried on farming in Montgomery County. In March, 1874, he removed to Raymond and retired from active labor, but, being of an energetic nature, he is continually adding improvements to his already beautiful place. He was married, atSpringfield, Ill., February 2, 1854, to Miss Lemira HOLLOWAY, who was born in KentuckyNovember 3, 1832, to George W. and Harriet (TADE) HOLLOWAY, natives of Kentucky, he living, she deceased. Jacob GREENAWALT, the father of George, was born in Kentucky; was a farmer by occupation; he died February 24, 1863, aged fifty-nine years; his wife, Mary BRADNER, was also a native of Kentucky, and is still living, at the age of seventy-two years; she is the mother of eight children, of whom George was the third child. He has now in his possession about four hundred acres of choice prairie land in Bois d'Arc Township, which is now rented, but all of which is under cultivation. Mr. GREENAWALT has been an active member of the order of A., F. & A. M. about sixteen years, and has attained the degree of Master Mason. Although possessing all the energy and enterprise of a thorough business man, his health has been impaired for a number of years, necessitating his retirement from active life. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party.

Edward GRIMES, farmer, P. O. Raymond, born in Jersey County, Ill., May 24, 1843, son of Jarratt T. and Charity (BROWN) ROGERS. Jarratt, a native of Jersey County, was born January 29, 1820; he is a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, and has been identified with the growth and prosperity of his native county; his wife was a daughter of Joseph BROWN, who was a native of Virginia, and one of the early settlers of St. Charles, Mo., where she was born May 3, 1820; she died July 21, 1876, leaving nine children, of whom subject was the third. His education was commenced in his native county, and completed at Shurtleff College, Madison County, Ill.; he began the business of life as a farmer, on the farm whiere he now lives. He came to Montgomery County in 1867, and, at Butler, in that county, October 7, 1868, married Emma E. SAMMONS, born in Lewis County, N. Y., January 4, 1850, daughter of John C. and Elizabeth (BEDELL) SAMMONS, natives of Lewis County, N. Y., he born August 18, 1821, follows the blacksmith's trade at Butler; she, born September 1, 1827, died January 19, 1882; of her six children, three are now living, viz.: Emma (Mrs. GRIMES), Estella and Leonard E. Mr. and Mrs. GRIMES are the parents of five children - Eugene E., born August 18, 1869; Charles E., born October 15, 1871; Frankie, born May 16, 1873, diedSeptember 3, 1873; Ernest Robert, born August 17, 1874; and Leroy, born January 5, 1878. He owns 280 acres of fine farm land, which he keeps in a high state of cultivation; his house was built in the year that he came to Montgomery County; he is a Democrat; a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity since 1868; has served as Township Supervisorfor two terms; his wife has been for a number of years a member of the Presbyterian Church at Butler.

John P. HITCHINGS, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., May 20, 1810, to John and Lydia (RAMSDELL) HITCHINGS. John HITCHINGS was born at Malden, Mass., July 8, 1773; he was a farmer; he removed to Otsego County, N. Y., in about [Page 222] 1800, where he remained six years, and then removed to Onondaga County, N. Y., where he remained to the time of his death, which occurred in 1852; he was married, in Onondaga, N. Y., by Jonathan A. NICHOLAS, April 18, 1809, to Miss Lydia RAMSDELL, the mother of our subject; she was born in Greenwich, Mass., September 30, 1783, and she died in Onondaga, N. Y., in 1854; they were the parents of the following children: John P., our subject, May 20, 1810; Horace V., born July 8, 1812, dead; Daniel E., February 3, 1815, dead; Jane, October 27, 1817, now of Syracuse, N. Y.; Francis, August 8, 1819, dead; Eliza, June 6, 1821, now in Syracuse, N. Y.; James, May 14, 1824, Iowa; Joseph O., August 2, 1826, died in California; Mary, December 17, 1828, Memphis, N. Y.. John P. HITCHINGS received his education at a select school, Skaneateles, N. Y.; he remained with his parents, receiving an education and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; on June 13, 1831, left home and removed to the State of Vermont; there he engaged in farming, raising stock and general dairy farm. In 1834, he returned to the old homestead in New York, and remained two years; in 1836, bought a farm of fifty acres in the town of Cicero, N. Y.; remained but one year; in 1837, again returned to the old homestead for only one year; in 1837 went to Michigan, boughtfarm of 160 acres, and removed there in spring of 1839; here he remained until 1854, and removed to his present residence; he there bought 200 acres of wild prairie, thirty-one acres of timber; here he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits; he has also taught school winters since 1830, and every winter, with the exception of three. In 1833, August 22, in Vermont, he married Miss Eliza Ann HOUGHTON; she was born at Rowe, Mass., July 3, 1815, and died in Montgomery County, Ill., in December, 1858; she had borne him the following children: Lydia M. (dead), Frances C., Henry H., Horace E., Lydia M. (No. 2 - dead), John P. (dead), Ann Eliza, Laura J. (dead), James C., Charles E., Joseph M., Leon L. Mr. HITCHINGS was elected to the House of Representatives in Michigan in 1851, and served for one term, and in his town in Michigan held the following offices: School Inspector and Supervisor, held for fifteen years; Justice of the Peace, eight years; and in Montgomery County, was first Supervisor elected to the Raymond Township, and held only term; in politics, is identified with the Greenback party; was a member of Independent Order of Odd Fellow and Grange Lodges. In 1868, he married his second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth E. KINSER, a native of Ohio, who was born in 1838. He is a member of the Universalist Church. She is a member of the Methodist Church.

Henry H. HITCHINGS, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., December 27, 1837, to John P. and Eliza HITCHINGS (see history); at the age of eight years, removed to Jackson County, Mich., with his parents, where he received his education in the common schools. When nineteen years of age, he removed with his parents to MontgomeryCounty, Ill., and, two years later, entered into business for himself as a farmer, whichoccupation he still follows; his first purchase of real estate was a small tract of land near Harvel, where he eventually accumulated 120 acres, which he sold in 1873; he then rented a farm near Raymond, where he remained two years, and at the end of which time he purchased his present farm, consisting of 200 acres, which was then unimproved prairie; he has erected fine buildings and made all other improvements necessary for comfort, and which are found upon all well regulated farms, and everything about the [Page 223] premises denotes his energy and ability as a first class farmer. In 1879, he purchased eighty acres of land near Harvel, which he is now renting. In November, 1859, he was married, in Montgomery County, to Miss Martha E. WELKER; she died in 1871, aged twenty-six years; she was the mother of four children, of whom George H. and Clara are still living; John, the oldest son, and an infant, deceased. In September, 1873, Mr.HITCHINGS was again married, in Montgomery County, to Miss Jane KING, daughter of John KING (see history); she is the mother of four children, viz.: John M., Eliza Ann, William and Catherine. Mr. HITCHINGS is a member of the Masonic order at Raymond. Politically, he is identified with the Greenback party. Mrs. HITCHINGS is a member of the Methodist Church.

William F. HICKS, physician, Raymond, was born in Henderson County, Tenn., July 31, 1842, son of Butler C. and Martha E. (McPEAK) HICKS, he born in North Carolina, a farmer, comingto Illinois in 1843, settling in Montgomery County and dying in 1863, aged sixty years; she, born in Kentucky, and still living, at the age of seventy years. They were the parentsof nine children - four boys and five girls - Isaan J., died in 1870; Susan C., died in 1869, was the wife of John T. DONALDSON; Emarentha C., wife of W. F. DAVIDSON, of EurekaSprings, Ark.; Hiram B., of Missouri; Elizabeth, wife of Jackson DONALDSON; Elvina L., wife of Sike BARBEE, of Oak Grove, Kan.; one who died in infancy; James F., living on the old homestead; and William F., our subject. The education of our subject was limited until he was sixteen years old, when he began studying by himself and teaching, which he continued eight years; in connection with his other duties, he studied medicine with Dr. ?MES  of Litchfield, and attended lectures at the medical college of St. Louis, graduating from that institution in March, 1871, and immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Raymond, where he has built up a very successful business; he is connected with the Library Association and Reading Club of Raymond; was also honored with the ad eundem degree at Chicago Medical College being one of two who passed examination for the degree; he is crop reporter for the department of agriculture at Springfield; also serves in same capacity for the crop bureau at Dwight, Ill.; the Doctor has served also as Township Collector. November 9, 1871, he was married to Miss Mary S. SEWARD, born at Seward's Point February 6, 1856, daughter of Oscar and Mary (CASS) SEWARD, all of Montgomery County; himself and wife are members of the MethodistChurch, and he is a Democrat.

U. H. HARTWICK, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Raymond, was born in Jersey County, Ill., November 2, 1845, to James and Eliza (SKILLMAN) HARTWICK. He remained with his parents until twenty-one years of age, receiving such an education as the common schoolsafforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of eighteen, he enlisted in the Federal army, in Company D, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, with Capt. Pat KELLEY, under the command of Col. HARPER, and remained in the service twelve months. At the age of twenty-one, he left home, and embarked on his career in life as a farmer, inGreene County, where he remained for a period of four years. In 1872, he removed to hispresent residence, where he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He wasmarried, in Jersey County, In February, 1868, to Miss Mary E. GRIMES, who was born in Jersey County, in May, 1848 (see history of E. GRIMES); she has borne him six children, four of whom are [Page 224] Living, viz.: James F., William Henry, Belle and Frederick. Politically, Mr. HARTWICK is identified with the Democratic party; is an active member of the order of A., F. & A. M. at Raymond. His father was born in New Jersey in 1811; is a farmer by occupation, and resides in Macoupin County; his mother was also born in New Jersey, in 1810, and is still living. They are the parents of seven children, of whom our subject is the fourthchild. He is the owner of one of the finest horses in Montgomery County, called“Independence, Jr.,” and is of St. Lawrence and Eagle stock; Mr. HARTWICK is also a breeder of Short-Horn stock.

Jacob HAUSER, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Germany August 11, 1842. At the age of twenty-two years, he emigrated to America and settled in Pennsylvania, but soon after joined a German army corps and entered the service, where he remained six months, and then went to Greene County, Ill., where he remained ten yeas, and came to MontgomeryCounty, and soon after purchased the farm he now lives upon; he has made nearly all theimprovements himself, and his surroundings show Mr. HAUSER to be an energetic andenterprising man; his farm consists of eight acres of choice farm land, situated nearRaymond, and which, as a practical farmer, he keeps in a high state of cultivation, and which denotes his interest in public improvements and advancement of agricultural interests in the county. He received a very good education in Germany, and has alwaysperformed the duties of a farm life. He was married, in Montgomery County, July 4, 1875, to Dora REESER, who was born in Germany, and came to America when twenty-one years of age; she is the mother of two children, viz.: Mena and Anna. Politically, Mr. HAUSER isindependent; devotes his time to growing the usual farm crops and raising stock. Socially, he enjoys the highest esteem of the entire community.

George Henry HOOSER, miller, Raymond; first business for himself was that of carpenter and joiner, which he followed sixteen years, when he turned his attention to farming, and which he followed ten years; he then built a grist-mill at Raymond and engaged in a general milling business, in which he has been successful and built up a large trade; had nothing but his hands with which to enter upon the battle of life, but, being possessed with an energetic spirit, determined to make his way in the world. His education was limited to the common schools. He was born in Todd County, Ky., August 27, 1827; his father, William HOOSER, was a native of North Carolina, and was taken by his parents to Kentucky at a very early day, and when there were but few settlers in that State; he was a farmer, miller and distiller by occupation; his death occurred in March, 1880. His wife was Purety FAULK, also a native of North Carolina, and grew to maturity in Tennessee; her death occurred in 1879; she was the mother of seven children, of whom George was the third. He was married, in St. Louis, in 1858, to Lucy CHENEY, who was born in New York, daughter of Louis CHENEY; by her he had two children; she died in 1862, and he was again married, in 1864, to Martha PETTJOHN, of North Carolina, by whom he has six children; his children are William, Dora, Ralph, Mary, Margaret, James, Frank and Lewis. Mr. HOOSER is a Republican, and is a prominent member of the Masonic order.

Corder JONES, Police Magistrate, real estate and collecting agent, Raymond, was born in Macoupin County, Ill., July 12, 1848; his education was limited to such as could be obtained in the common schools. When seventeen years of age, he came to Montgomery County and engaged in farming in Litchfield Township. In 1878, he located at Raymond, and worked at the carpenter and joiner's trade, but eventually took up the trade of a painter, which he still follows. In 1880, he was elected on the people's ticket to fill the office of Police Magistrate, the duties of which he has filled with marked zeal and integrity, and to the full satisfaction of the citizens of the village. In addition to his other duties, he is engaged in dealing in real estate and as collecting agent. He was married, in Montgomery County, December 20, 1872, to Leonora A. GORE, who was born in St. Louis, Mo., August 4, 1856; she is the mother of two children, viz.: Olive W., born August 20, 1874; and Orion N., born August 8, 1878. Mrs. JONES was a daughter of John P. and Martha (HARDY) GORE, he born in Illinois, she in Kentucky. The father of the subject, Isaac N. JONES, was born inIllinois, a farmer by occupation, and is also a Justice of the Peace in North LitchfieldTownship; his wife, Keturah STONE, is a native of Tennessee; she is the mother of sixchildren, of whom Corder, our subject, is the third. Politically, he is identified with the Democratic party; he is also a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. order at Raymond.Religiously, himself and wife are connected with the Baptist denomination at Honey Bend; is an advocate for the advancement of the cause of temperance.

Joel JONES, farmer, P. O. Raymond, born near Bunker Hill, Macoupin Co., Ill., April 11, 1836, son of Simeon and Dorothy (STARKEY) JONES, Simeon, a farmer, and Treasure of Bunker Hill Township, Macoupin County, for fifteen years, was born in Madison County, Ill., February 2, 1811, and was identified with the growth of the county up to the time of his death, which occurred December 30, 1850; his wife, also a native of Madison County, born June 27, 1812, is now living with her son Joel, the subject of this sketch; of her ten children, of whom Joel was the third, six are living. Subject received sucheducation as the country schools of that day afforded, and entered upon the business of life as a farmer, and has, by his energy and industry, accumulated 180 acres of fine land near Raymond, which he, as a practical farmer, keeps highly cultivated; he has lately erected a large and commodious frame residence. He married, in Montgomery County, April 13, 1871, Mary C. BLACKWELDER, born in Cabarrus County, N.C., September 5, 1843, daughter of Martin and Malinda (OVENSHINE) BLACKWELDER, both natives of Cabarrus County, N. C., and both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. JONES are the parents of fivechildren - Alva W., Jesse V., Charles E., Eugene D. and Emily A. He formerly was a Democrat, but is now a Greenbacker; is a member of the Baptist Church.

John KING, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., September 10, 1826; his education was limited to such as could be obtained in the old log schoolhouses of that early day; however, by observation and encounters with the world, he has attained a very good practical education. At the age of fifteen, he went with his parents to Indiana, and located in Shelby County, where he remained fourteen years, employed on a farm as farm hand. He entered upon the battle of life a poor boy, but, being possessed with a stout heart and an energetic spirit, he determined to make his way in the world. He came to Illinois in 1854, and permanently located in Montgomery County in October, 1859, and rented the property he now owns; by his industry and economy, he soon was able to purchase eighty acres of land, which he has continued to increase until it now [Page 226] amounts to 210 acres of choice farm and timber land, which he has improved, and which, as a practical farmer, he keeps in a high state of cultivation. Mr. KING is one of the most prominent farmers in the township, and has always taken an interest in all publicimprovements, and in the general growth and prosperity of Montgomery County; he makes no specialty of crops, although he has always been a large grower of corn and wheat, and handles no stock in particular but what he raises on his farm. He was married, in Shelby County, Ind., September 26, 1850, to Mary HACKER, who was born in Virginia March 10, 1827; she has borne him three children - Margaret J., Thomas R. and Marshall E., the latter dying at the age of seventeen; Margaret is the wife of H. H. HITCHINGS, aprominent young farmer of Raymond Township. Mr. KING is independent in politics, and, as he says, votes for men and principles; has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for a number of years. He has been twice married; his first wife died September 29, 1856, and his second marriage occurred June 7, 1857, to Catharine HACKER, who was born May 15,1821, and is a sister to his first wife. Mr. KING has always been identified with thetemperance workers, and has been a member of the Christian Church since he was sixteen years of age.

Isaac F. LAWLER, retired farmer, Raymond, born in White County, Ill., May 9, 1836. Hisgrandfather, John LAWLER, was a native of Tennessee, a farmer by occupation, and, during the war of 1812, Captain of a pack-horse company. John T., the father of our subject, was the third son of a family of eight children; was born in Talladega County, Ala., March 22,1805; a farmer, and, in his younger days, a pilot on the Wabash and Lower Mississippi Rivers; came to Fayette County, Ill., in 1831; remained one year; removed to White County, where he lived several years; thence to Greene County; stayed one year, andsubsequently moved to Montgomery County, where he died August 15, 1863. During his life, he represented the Democratic party of White County in the Legislature for two terms; had previously been a magistrate, and, for eighteen years, Colonel of the State militia;during the Mexican war, he raised and equipped a company of soldiers, of which he wasCaptain, but which was not called out, though held in readiness till the close of the war. His wife, Susan BRADBURY, born in Kentucky May 15, 1801, died December 1, 1860. Isaac, the subject of this sketch, and the eldest of a family of four children, received a fair education, and began life as a merchant at Butler, where he built the third building used for business purposes in that town; there he remained one year, and then,giving up mercantile business, turned his attention to farming, which occupation he followed till 1865; in that year, he removed to Kansas City, Mo., where he followed the business of supplying contractors with sand for building purposes for twelve years; then, returning to Raymond, Ill., he purchased a farm, which he worked for a time, buteventually retired from farm life, rented his property and moved to Raymond with his family. He has been twice married; his first wife, Nancy C. CAYCE, whom he married inMontgomery County June 31, 1855, was born in Sangamon County, Ill., February 22, 1838, and died April 27, 1871; she was the mother of five children – Juliet, Jehu Henry, John A., Abigail A. and James Franklin; her father, Elijah CAYCE was born in Kentucky; ;hermother, Dorcas A. WILLIAMS, was a native of Virginia, born May 18, 1806. He was married the second time, February 25, 1874, to Mrs. Naomi McGOWN, born in Macoupin County, Ill., June 15, 1849, daugh- [Page 227] ter of Rev. William and Elizabeth (COURTNEY) FITZJARRELL; from this second union one child has been born - Cyrus Floyd. Mr. LAWLER has been Constable and Commissioner for several years. In politics, he is independent; is a member of the Methodist Church, and of the I. O. O. F.

Elias W. MILLER, farmer, P. O. Raymond, is descended from the Knickerbockers of New York and the Huguenots of South Carolina, and the eldest of a family of ten children, and was born December 16, 1827, a mile and a half west of Eaton, Preble Co., Ohio, near the monument on an Indian mound, which marks the site of one of the bloody fights preceding St. Clair's defeat. In 1840, his father removed to Somerville, Butler County, and in the summer of 1846, Elias W. enlisted, at Newport, Ky., as a private in Company D, Eighth Regiment United States Infantry, for five years, or during the Mexican war. Landing, under Gen. Scott, at Vera Cruz, his regiment bore its part in the siege of that fortress; it rendered conspicuous service in the affairs of the march to the capital, and distinguished itself in the sanguinary battles in the Valley of Mexico. In July, 1848, he was honorably discharged at New Orleans, and returned to his home in Preble County. Marrying Miss Eminoh C. SWALLOW in the summer (May) of 1850, he departed in the fall for the West; reaching Alton by the river, he walked to Hillsboro, and, in May, located his land warrant for a quarter of a section in Butler Grove Township, about two miles north of Butler, on the great road from Hillsboro to Springfield. Youth, health, courage, hopefulness, industry, land and a prudent wife, are the thresholds to wealth; while not neglecting his farm, Mr. MILLER cut cord-wood and worked on the railroad, and for two years was Roadmaster of the Western Division of the Alton & Terre Haute Railway; he tilled his land well, and was fully rewarded; several times be sold his farm, only to buy another in the neighborhood, and in 1866 became the owner of the extensive domain near Raymond widely known as Seward's Point. In the modernized aspect of his home, the traveler will see little to remind him of the brick house which, in 1827, was the best residence in the county, and had its nearest neighbor to the north a day's journey distant. During his minority, he attended school only six months, going only on the days when it rained too hard to work on the farm; yet he is well educated in whatever helps a man to succeed in his sphere of life; his home abounds with books and newspapers, and he was a keen politian;mathematically, he is a plus man, and is best described by positive qualities; when a political party in his State formally denounced in 1863, the further “offensive prosecution of the war,” Mr. MILLER penetrated the order of the Golden Circle – which, in its sympathy with the South, aimed to precipitate the county into armed resistance to the Government – compelled its leaders to avow their schemes and purposes, and refused their favors; once discovered, their plans came to naught, and at last were publicly abandoned. He was conspicuous in the Grange movement; no man in the county was more industrious or valuable in the local canvass which, in 1873, defeated the dominant party and restored the normal relation between the office holder and the tax-payer. Thrice elected Supervisor of Raymond, he was seeking a seat in the Legislature, when the death of his wife, in 1876, led him to give over those labors and quit the political arena. In April, 1877, he married Miss Lucy J. LAMSON, of Ipswich, Mass., and home and farm life now bound his ambition; he has thriven in fortune, and is hospitable and prudent.

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Ishmael McGOWN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Johnson County, Ill., June 14, 1821. He was removed by his parents to Greene County in 1830, where he received his education, and where he remained with his parents, assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of twenty years, he left the homestead and entered upon his career in life as a farmer; in 1850, he entered eighty acres of wild prairie land in Montgomery County, and, in the year following, removed with his family to their new home, and where he still resides; he made all the improvements himself, such as building fences, orchards and all other improvements necessary for comfort, and which are found upon all well-regulated farms; by his energy and economy, he continued to add to his original purchase, and at one time had in his possession 200 acres, and at the present owns 160 acres of fine farm land, which, as a practical farmer, he keeps in a high state of cultivation, which denotes him to be one of the successful farmers of the county. He was married, in Greene County, August 4, 1840, to Clarinda JACKSON, who was born in Greene County March 10, 1823; she is the mother of eight children, three of whom are living, viz.: Shadrach, William A. and Anderson Monroe. Mrs. McGOWN was a daughter of Shadrach, Jackson a native of North Carolina, and one of the early settlers of Greene County; his death occurred in Texas, in May, 1879; his wife, Prudence FINLEY, was born in Madison County; she died December 31, 1855; the result of their union was eight children, of whom only three are now living. Samuel McGOWN, the father of our subject, was born in Tennessee, and was one of the early settlers of Greene County, where he followed the occupation of a farmer for a number of years;his death occurred in 1861. The mother of our subject, Nancy WESTBROOKS, was born in North Carolina, but raised in West Virginia; she died in the spring of 1852; they were the parents of eight children, four of whom are still living, and of whom Ishmael is the third child. Politically, he is identified with the Democratic party. Religiously,himself and wife have been connected with the Christian Church for a number of years.Although Mr. McGOWN grows all of the usual farm crops, he makes grain his principal crop. He is a public-spirited man, and has always taken an interest in the growth andprosperity of the county, and, when Raymond was first laid out, furnished a large portion of the land now covered by the village, and perhaps no man has taken more interest and done more for the prosperity of the town than Mr. McGOWN.

William A. MAXEY, merchant, senior member of the firm of MAXEY & STARR, grocers, Raymond, was born in Montgomery county, Ill., August 27, 1856, and received a common-school education; he remained upon the homestead until he attained the age of twenty years, when he entered into the mercantile business as clerk at Hillsboro; he followed in that occupation at different places until November, 1880, when he entered into business for himself at Raymond; he was very successful in his new enterprise, but, at the time Raymond was destroyed by fire, he was one of the sufferers, his stock being nearly all destroyed; he did not despair, however, butimmediately secured a new room and continued the business, which gradually assumed larger proportions, and now, in connection with his partner, Mr. STARR, has thesatisfaction of conducting a large and steadily increasing trade, the result of a thorough business knowledge, energy and enterprise; their store is centrally located on the principal street of Raymond, and any one may feel sure of a welcome and receiving kind atten-[Page 229] tions from the gentlemanly proprietors. Wilson M. MAXEY, the father of our subject, was born in Kentucky, and was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County; is a farmer by occupation, and still living upon the place of his original purchase; his wife, Eliza NEWCOMB, was a native of Virginia; she died in about 1864; was the mother of seven children, of whom William was the third child. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party; he was elected by the people of Raymond, in the spring of 1882, to fill the office of City Clerk, which office he still holds; he also holds the office of Secretary in the I. O. O. F. order at Raymond, of which he has been an active member for about two years.

J. G. MOORE, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1828, the son of a farmer, who moved to Missouri in an early day (1842), when there were no railroads, but when land could be bought for $1.25 per acre; they settled in GasconadeCounty, and began operations in true pioneer style, making their own plows and living in the simplest manner; they broke the land up, however, burned timber out for a clearing, and finally had excellent farms; the necessaries of life were hard to get hold of, and all groceries had to be obtained in St. Louis, a hundred miles away. Mr. MOORE married in 1852. During the war, he was engaged buying horses and mules for theGovernment, but lost a good deal of property in consequence of military raids through the section where he resided. In 1865, he moved to Montgomery, where he has since followed farming; he has had quite an eventful life; has seen many ups and downs; hasmade and lost a great deal of money, but, thanks to his energy and economy, is nowcomfortable in this world's goods.

Hezekiah MOORE, farmer, P. O. Raymond, born in Holmes County, Ohio, November 7, 1833; son of Thomas MOORE, born in Ohio, a stone-mason by trade, who moved to Missouri in 1840, and was one of the first settlers of Gasconade County; his death occurred in July, 1852. Catharine BEST, wife of Thomas and mother of subject, born in Ohio, died in March, 1872; she was the mother of twelve children, of whom Hezekiah was the sixth. His education was limited to such as could be obtained in the common schools in the country at that day. He commenced his career in life as a farmer, remaining in Missouriuntil 1868, when he removed to Montgomery County and purchased the farm on which he now lives, and made all the improvements; the surroundings and state of cultivation show Mr. MOORE to be a practical farmer; since his advent into the county, he has beenidentified with its growth and prosperity, particularly with its agricultural interests. He was married, in Missouri, May 9, 1860, to Rose Ann COLEMAN, who was born in MissouriJanuary 9, 1841; they have four children, viz.: John, Emma, Thomas and Lillie; and havelost three, viz.: Hattie, Nettie and Willie, all of whom died in infancy. Mrs. MOORE is a daughter of Ephraim COLEMAN, a native of Ohio, a farmer by occupation, and now livingwith the subject of this sketch. Nancy BEST, a native of Ohio, died in December, 1879. Mr. MOORE has served the people as Road Commissioner several years; entered the service in Company M, Fifty Iowa Cavalry, with Capt. D. A. WATERS, regiment commanded by Col. W. W. LOWE; remained in the service three years. Politically, his sympathies are with the Republican party; he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for several years;before the war, he was connected with the I. O. O. F. at Linn, Mo., but, during the war, the order gave up its charter. He owns 280 acres of choice farm land, on which he raises con-[Page 230] siderable stock, besides the usual crops; has also 150 acres of land southeast of Raymond, and twenty-eight acres of improved town property in Raymond. He and his wife are connected with the Methodist Church.

Millard F. MAY, Clerk of township and village, and carpenter and joiner by occupation,Raymond, was born at Girard, Macoupin Co., Ill., March 15, 1860, son of Jesse W. and Mary (KITZMILLER) MAY, he a prominent stock-dealer, born in Tennessee in 1830, who came to Illinois in 1855; she, also of Tennessee, born in 1835; they had five children – Florence, wife of J. A. BRADLEY; Millard F., Mary, Dora and Jessie; the latter died when four years of age. Our subject, after receiving an education in the schools of his native county, learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, and has assisted in building some of the principal business blocks of Raymond; he is at present (1882) engaged in building a residence for himself on one of the principal streets of Raymond.October 31, 1881, he married Miss Belle MILLER, born in Montgomery County April 21, 1862, daughter of Lemuel G. and Lucinda (LEE) MILLER, both of Greene County, Ill. Mr. MAY is a Freemason and a Democrat.

Joseph W. POTTS. Joseph W. POTTS, the subject of this sketch, was born on a farm nearChapman's Point, in the north part of Macoupin County, Ill., on the 19th of September, A. D. 1841, where his parents remained until the year 1852, when they moved to near the head of Bear Creek, in same county, where they carried on the business of agriculture for five years, at the end of which time his father purchased a large tract of land at and near Pleasant Hill, Montgomery CO., Ill., to which place they moved in the fall of 1857. Joseph W. remained on the farm working with his parents until his marriage, on the 12th day of March, A. D. 1862, with Miss Mary J. MILLER,daughter of Lemuel G. MILLER, one of the then leading farmers and stock-raisers ofMontgomery County, Ill. William B. POTTS, father of Joseph W. POTTS, was born in Frankfort, Ky., on the 22d day of February, A. D. 1814, where he resided until the year A. D. 1820, when he emigrated to Illinois with his father, Richard F. POTTS, and his brother and sister, Jessie POTTS and Millie POTTS, and settled in Morgan County, near Old Berlin. After his father was comfortably situated, he hired himself as a farm hand to Jacob STRAWN, the great cattle king of Illinois, for whom he worked constantlyuntil his marriage with Miss Rhoda A. RICHARDS, of Macoupin County, Ill.; the issue of this marriage was twelve children - six boys and six girls. Joseph W., the subject of this article, was the fifth in order of birth. Richard F. POTTS, grandfather of Joseph W., was born on the 4th day of July, 1776, near the present site of Bentonville, N. C.,where he resided until he was four years old, when his father, Washington A. POTTS, moved to Kentucky, near Munfordsville, where he erected a water-mill on one of thetributaries of Green River; after many days of arduous labor and great privation, having to work by day and watch the prowling red man by night, the mill was built; but the thinly settled country necessarily brought him poor returns for the money and laborinvested; finally, on Christmas night, in the year 1786, a prowling band of Indians burned the mill and tomahawked the whole family, consisting of sixteen, with the exception of Richard F., who made his escape across the hills to the celebrated Mammoth Cave, where he subsisted for several days on the blind fish that inhabit its waters; he was finally rescued by a party of hunters, consisting of Daniel BOONE and others, and taken to Boonesboro, where he was kindly [Page 231] cared for in the family of BOONE until his uncle, Christopher A. POTTS, commander of a British man-of-war cruising off the coast of South Carolina, was notified of his safety and whereabouts, ordered him to be sent to Charleston, S. C., where he met him and took him on board his ship, where he served in the capacity of midshipman for several years in Her Majesty's service. At the age of eighteen, he returned toOwensboro, Ky., where he resided until his marriage with Miss Elizabeth CUMMINGS, when he located on a farm near what is known as the Yellow Banks, on the Kentucky River, where he remained until he emigrated to Illinois. Washington A. POTTS, commander of the British man-of-war, as before mentioned, received orders from Commodore DOWNIE,commander of the British fleet near Quebec, to proceed to Quebec, near the mouth of the St. Lawrence River; his ship was caught in a storm and wrecked, with the loss of the entire crew, and among them Washington A. POTTS perished, in the year A. D. 1814.Ezekiel E. POTTS, brother of the deceased, ordered the remains to be returned to NorthHampton, England, the home of the family, where they were sepultured in the familycemetery; a beautiful monument marks the family resting place; he who passes that way can read the monumental inscription; it is as follows: "Here resteth Solomon Q. POTTS, father of Ezekiel and Washington A. POTTS; also his son Ezekiel, who lost his life in Her Majesty's service (Queen Anne) in foreign lands. May they rest in the hope of aglorious resurrection." We will deal no more with the ancestors of the subject of our sketch; suffice it to say they are of pure Norman origin. We will now return to Joseph W. POTTS. After his marriage, in 1862, he settled on a farm near Pleasant Hill, in Montgomery County, where he resided for eleven years, at the expiration of which time, he, becoming wearied with farm life, entered into the mercantile business in Raymond, Ill., a town which sprang up as if by magic on the Wabash Railroad in the year 1871, where he has since constantly resided. During his residence in Raymond, Ill., he has been engaged in various pursuits of life, filling many offices of trust, and is now editor and proprietor of the Raymond Independent, a weekly newspaper of large circulation and unlimited influence wherever circulated. Joseph W. POTTS is now forty-one years old, hale and hearty, and bids fair to live long and enjoy the rewards of a well-regulated life, and the blessings of his wife and their two sons, Lemuel L. POTTS and Roy A. POTTS.

John C. REBHAN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Germany December 6, 1843, and brought to New Orleans by his parents when he was quite young; his father is living in St. Clair County, this State, where he owns and cultivates a fine farm. Our subject was educated partly in New Orleans and partly in St. Clair County, and, when, a youth,learned the saddle and harness making business, but eventually became a farmer. May 10, 1870, in St. Clair County, he married Miss Emma E. SANDICK, a native of that county, born April 2, 1847, and from which union has resulted four children – James L., William Charles, Edward A. and Emma Virginia. Mr. REBHAN held a position in the railway postal service for ten years, after which he came to Raymond and purchased the farm on which he now lives, a fine tract, highly improved, of 160 acres of land; is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, and is aRepublican.

William SCHMIDT, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Germany August 21, 1834, where he received his education in his mother [Page 232] tongue, and assisted his father upon the old homestead farm until he was fifteen years of age, when he engaged as a farm hand, receiving but a very small compensation for his labor; he followed this occupation for about three years, when he concluded to tryhis fortunes in the New World, and emigrated to America, where he found himself a stranger in a strange land; but, being possessed with a stout heart and the energynecessary to make his own way in a strange country, he set to work with a will, and rented a farm in Morgan County, Ill., where he remained eight years, and by his energy and industry, succeeded in laying up enough funds to enable him to make a purchase of land for himself he purchased a part of the property he now owns, and removed with his family to Montgomery County, where he has continued to add to his possessions until he now owns 200 acres of as fine land as can be found in Raymond Township, and which he has improved by way of buildings, orchards, fences, etc., until it will compare with any of the well-improved farms of the county, and places Mr. SCHMIDT in the list of practical farmers. His father, Henrick SCHMIDT, was a native of Germany, and was a farmer by occupation; he died in 1862, leaving his wife and five children to mourn his loss; his wife, Louisa PASCHER, survived him two years. William was theyoungest child. He was married, in Morgan County, March 15, 1858, to Hannah SCHELP, who was born in Germany in November, 1843, and brought to America when but eleven years of age; she is the mother of six boys and six girls, viz.; Jennettie, wife of Henry WEBER; Christ William, George Henry, Louisa Rachel, wife of Aug BEDER; Emma Anna, Carolina Louisa, John Henry, Harmon, Minnie Anna, Dora Gusta, Edward Martin, Henry Phillip - all of whom are still living. Mrs. SCHMIDT is a daughter of Philip SCHELP, a native of Germany and a prominent farmer of Morgan County, where his death occurredNovember 29, 1863; his wife, Rachael LAKERS, was also a native of Germany, and is still living in Morgan County, and is the mother of five children, three of whom are still living, viz.: William, a wagon-maker in Morgan County; George, a farmer in samecounty; and Hannah, the wife of Mr. SCHMIDT. Mr. SCHMIDT has a brother and sister living in this county, viz.; Chris and Henrietta, widow of W. GANOEFT. Politically, Mr. SCHMIDT is a Democrat, and religiously, himself and wife are connected with the Lutheran Church.

D. Will STARR, merchant, Raymond, of the firm of MAXEY & STARR, was born in Greensboro,Guilford Co., N. C., November 17, 1853, where his early childhood was spent in assisting his father upon the homestead farm and in attending the common schools of his native county. At the age of ten years, he left home and attended an academic school two years, at the end of which time he began learning the painter's trade, and followed in that occupation about fourteen years in different localities; he then purchased a livery stable at Raymond, Ill., but sold his interest in a few months, and, on March 15, 1882, became one of the firm of MAXEY & STARR, dealers in groceries, at which business they have become more than ordinarily successful, owing to their strict attention to business and the pleasing manner in which they attend to the wants of their many customers; in business, they are energetic andenterprising, and socially, enjoy the highest esteem of the community at large. Mr. STARR, the junior member of the firm, sought a home in the North when he was abouttwenty-two years of age, and eventually located at Raymond. He was married, at Palmer, Christian County, December 25, 1881, to Miss Maggie LEE, who was born December 25, 1857, daughter of [Page 233] Capt. E. T. and Mary A. (HILL) LEE, he a native of Virginia, one of the early settlers of Bear Creek, Christian County, a very prominent farmer and stock-dealer, at whichbusiness he has become very wealthy; his wife, Mary, is a native of Kentucky, and still living. Daniel M. STARR, the father of our subject, is a native of North Carolina,and still living in his native State, engaged in farming and fruit-raising; his wife, Sarah M. LOW, is also a native of North Carolina, and is still living; she is the mother of eleven children, of whom D. Will is the fourth child. Although he does not take muchinterest in politics, he is identified with the Republican party.

David Y. SCHERER, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Montgomery County February 3, 1842; received a common-school education and entered upon his career as a farmer, and the land he first owned is still in the possession of the family; purchased his presentproperty in 1869, and has made all of the improvements himself, and the surroundings show him to be an energetic and enterprising man and a practical farmer; his farm consists of 160 acres of choice farm land, which he keeps in a high state of cultivation;he devotes his time to growing the usual farm crops and raising stock of all kinds; he has taken an active part in public improvements, and in the advancement of agriculturalinterests in his neighborhood, and in the educational privileges he also takes a leading part. He was married, in Montgomery County, December 11, 1862, to Louisa MORRELL, who was born in Ohio; they have six children, viz.: Mary E., William J., Robert A., Oliver F., Alice R. and May L. Mrs. SCHERER was a daughter of Robert and Rebecca (SPANGLER) MORRELL. David SCHERER, the father of the subject, was a native of North Carolina, a farmer by occupation; he died in 1860; his wife, Mary ElizabethWAGGONER, is also a native of North Carolina, still living, in Butler Township; she was the mother of fourteen children, of whom David is the eleventh; has been SchoolDirector; is a Republican; himself and wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

Scott S. TILDES, druggist, Raymond, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., October 18, 1853, son of Dr. Joseph G. and Ann W. (HILL) TILDEN; he born in Vermont and came toIllinois in 1837, settling in Montgomery County, and still living, in Raymond; she born in Kentucky, still living, and the mother of nine children; those living are Joseph, Jr., living in Alabama; John H., physician at Litchfield; Scott S., our subject; Emeline, wife of H. C. COLEMAN, of St. Louis; Seth H., living in Raymond; and George A., at home. Our subject, after receiving an education in the common schools, entered a drug store at Nokomis as clerk, where he remained one and a half years, then moved to Kansas City, where he remained two years, and then returned to Raymond and worked for his father eight years, and entered into business for himself in September, 1880, in Raymond, where he conducts the drug, oil, paint, lead, wall paper and fancy goods business; he has lately moved into a new and commodious room, fitted up sepectially for his business. In Montgomery County, January 1, 1879, he married Mary A. NEAL, born March 4, 1862, and one child has blessed the union, Anna May, born March 4, 1881; his wife is a member of the Methodist Church.

Gilbert H. WHITEHEAD, farmer, P. O. Raymond, is a native of Louisiana, having been born in that State December 18, 1846, and came to Illinois in 1867, first settling in Jersey County, whence he came to Montgomery County one year later. His father, Wyatt J. WHITEHEAD, was a native of[Page 234] South Carolina, a farmer by occupation, who married Miss Adeline ZEIGLER, of Mississippi, and who was the mother of five children, Gilbert H. being the second; the father died in 1873, and the mother followed her husband the next year. Mr. WHITEHEAD, our subject, married, in Montgomery County, in 1875, March 11, Miss FannyDEVASIER, a native of Montgomery County, born March 26, 1853; four children have been born of this marriage - Rosa Lee, Samuel, Nancy and Zenora. He owns 131 acres of choiceland, and affiliates with the Democratic party.

Samuel H. YOUNG, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, December 12, 1852, son of Orson and Sarah (HALL) YOUNG, he a farmer and mechanic, born in New York State; she a native of Ireland - both of whom are living, in the township of Harvel, Montgomery County, this State; they are the parents of six children, Samuel H. being the second, who, like his father, is a farmer. Our subject married, in Montgomery County, December 31, 1871, Mary Amanda GRUMMON, born in Madison County May29, 1857, daughter of John L. GRUMMON, of St. Clair County, Ill., from which union have been born four children - John O., Samuel L., S. Catharine and Irene; Minnie died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. YOUNG are members of the Methodist Church, and he is a Greenbacker in politics.

[Zanesville Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 235]

William A. BEATTY, farmer, P. O. Raymond, born in Grayson County, Ky., January 29, 1847; received his education from the common schools of his native county. He remained with his parents in Kentucky until 1864, when he enlisted in the Federal army, Twenty-sixth Kentucky Volunteers, commanded by Burbridge, afterward by Maxwell, last by Col. Farley; served about thirteen months; mustered out in July, 1865; in 1866, removed to Montgomery County, hwere he commenced by working as a farm hand, continuing the same until 1872, when he rented a farm of 160 acres and worked it until 1876, when he bought 100 acres, and has since added 100 to it, now having 200 acres. In 1876, January 27, in Montgomery County, he married Sarah A. BOWLES, a native of Greene County, Ill., born in 1857. When he commenced on his farm, there were no improvements; upon his farm he has a good residence; wheat, corn, oats, cattle and hogs of good stock;father was Joseph BEATTY, born in Grayson County, Ky., in 1823; now lives near Raymond;mother, Sarah AKRES, born in Kentucky; she died in 1847, aged about twenty-one years; parents had one child, our subject. Subject has had four children, three living - Oliver M., William A. (dead), Orrie, Bessie. Politically, Republican.

R. B. BOWSHER, farming and livery stable, P. O. Barrett. Jesse, the father of this gentleman, was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, in 1812; during his life, followed theoccupation of a farmer, and died February 20, 1856. His wife, and mother of our subject; was Elizabeth Clayton; she was born in Wyandot County, in 1814, and died in February, 1850; they were blessed with five children, R. B. BOWSHER being the second child. He was born in Upper Sandusky, Wyandot Co., Ohio, May 19, 1837; his early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his native county afforded, and assisted his father in tilling the soil of his farm until 1856, when he removed to Macoupin County, Ill., where he engaged in agricultural pursuits on his own account; he remained in Macoupin County until the spring of 1882, when he removed to MontgomeryCounty, where, in connection with his farming, he is engaged in the livery business, and has a good stable, well stocked with fine horses, buggies, etc., and, in fact, everything to complete a first-class livery stable. He was married, in Macoupin County, in 1861, to Miss Mary RANGE, a native of Macoupin County, Ill., and the daughter of Allen and Agnes (CROUCH) RANGE; they have five children - Columbus, Baker, Leon, Nellie and Maud. Mr. BOWSHER is a progressive and energetic business man, a kind neighbor and a good citizen; he is one of those men who add to the prosperity of the county; he is an active member of the order of A., F. & A. M., Lodge No. 171, at Girard; in politics, is identified with the Democratic party.

James W. CLINE, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Montgomery County February 27, 1837, to Reuben H. and Nellie (SMITH) CLINE. Mr. Cline's early days were spent in receiving an education and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; he re-[Page 236] mained with his father to the time of his death, and for a few years previous to his death, took the entire management of the same; in 1859, removed to Bond County and hired out as a farm hand, and continued working by the month until 1862, and married and removed to the southwest corner of Montgomery County, where he rented a farm of eighty acres, and, in 1863, returned to Bond County, and in 1865 removed to Madison County, where he bought a farm, in 1867, of 120 acres, and remained until 1869, when he sold it and moved to the Bluffs, near St. Louis, and again rented, and in 1870 again removed to Madison County, and bought a farm in Rountree Township of 165 acres, and continued on that farm and added to it until he had 220 acres; he remained there until the fall of 1879, when he removed to his present residence, and has now 410 acres of land, and one of the best farms of Montgomery County, upon which he has a fine residence, barns, with wind-mill and everything for use on a good farm; makesstock-raising and trading in stock a specialty. In October, 1862, in Montgomery County, he married Miss Mary E. THOMPSON, a native of Licking County, Ohio, born in 1844; they have had four children, all of whom are living – Leighton W., Susan C., Alex C., James S. In 1861, he enlisted in the Federal army, under Col. Marshall, and was taken prisoner by Gen. Price, and was discharged in October, and was again discharged in July, 1862. Himself and family are members of M. E. Church; Republican in politics; member of A., F. & A. M., No. 692, at Raymond. Commenced life a poor man; has now a good property; parents had eleven children, subject being the oldest child.

William COLEMAN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Crawford County, Mo., August 25, 1842, to Ephraim COLEMAN and Nancy (BEST); father was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1812; during his life, followed farming, and now resides in Montgomery County, Ill., with his children; mother was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1813; she died in 1877, in Missouri; parents had eleven children, eight of whom are living - four boys and four girls; subject was third child. He received his education from the neighborhoodschools of Fayette County, Ind., at the time living with his uncle, Thomas COLEMAN; commenced life by trading in stock in Missouri in 1863, and continued until 1870; shipped to St. Louis, where he engaged as brakeman on the Missouri & Pacific, and, at the end of a year, was given a train, and acted as conductor until 1875, when he commenced farming in Osage County, Mo., by renting; in 1877, he bought a farm of 105 acres in same county, where he continued until 1881, when he sold out and removed to his present residence, and is now the owner of eighty acres of well-improved land, upon which he has a good residence, good barns, etc.; he intends to make stock-raising aspecialty. In 1878, he married, in Missouri, Miss Susan PHELPS, a native of Osage County, Mo., born in 1842, daughter of Charles PHELPS, of Missouri; they have no children; wife is a member of Christian Church; in politics, is a Democrat; he gave up railroading because he disliked it.

John J. CLARKSON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Walker County, GA., June 30, 1845, to J. P. and Lavina (MASSA) CLARKSON; father was born in Georgia October 9, 1822, and died December 24, 1844, in Georgia; his life was spent in Georgia, engaged in agricultural pursuits; mother was born in Lawrence County, S. C., February 25, 1826, and now lives with her only child, our subject. Mr. CLARKSON came to Montgomery County in 1850 with his mother, and, in the [Page 237] Fall of 1851, removed to Macoupin County, where he received his education in the UnionSchool; in 1867, began farming on his own account, and continued the same in Macoupin County until the spring of 1881, when he removed to his present residence, where he has a farm of ninety-two acres; wheat, oats and corn; some stock. In 1867, in MacoupinCounty, he married Mrs. Mary E. BEVERS, a native of Tennessee, daughter of T. W. andElizabeth WHITFIELD, by whom he has had two children - Charley and an infant girl; inpolitics, unites with the Democratic party. The father of Mr. CLARKSON died when John J. was an infant.

James DEULEN, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Green County, Ill., October 30, 1849, to Kelen and Sarah (DAWSON) DEULEN; father was born in Greene County; was a farmer, and died in January, 1875, aged about fifty-five years; mother was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, and now lives in Iowa; she had nine children, subject being the second child; received his education from the common schools of Greene County, and, at the age of sixteen, with his parents, removed to Wayne County, Iowa, where he also attendedschool. In 1869, he returned to Greene County and began business for himself as a farm hand; in 1870, returned to Iowa, and in 1871, returned again to Greene, where he rented a farm for one year, and again hired out as a farm hand for four years. In 1874, he married and removed to Montgomery County, and rented a farm, and in 1873 bought the farm upon which he now resides, having ninety acres of land, and is also renting about sixty acres. In 1874, he was married, in Montgomery County, to Lucy RUMMONS, a native of Warren County, Mo., and the daughter of John and Juliett RUMMONS; they have two children - Charley and Edna. In politics, he votes with the Republican party.

William FOOKS, deceased, was born in London, England, in 1815; he was educated in London; married and came to Bunker Hill, Macoupin Co., Ill., in about 1845; his wife died soon after he settled in Illinois. In 1860, at Bunker Hill, he married Jane TAGGART, his second wife. In 1864, he, with his family, removed to her present residence, and, during his life, accumulated in Montgomery County about two hundred and twenty-five acres; was a very successful farmer, and also very industrious; he was a member of the Presbyterian Church; he was a Republican; a man who believed in doing right in every respect; he died in 1875; his children by his first wife were three, all now dead; his children by his last marriage were four, three living - George, Fanny and Jane - all at home, George being the one who carries on the farm; family are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. FOOKS took great interest in making his home comfortable and caring for the happiness of his family.

W. C. GALBRAITH, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Wayne County, Tenn., June 14, 1834, to Alexander and Margaret (SNODGRASS) GALBRAITH; father was born in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1808; was a farmer; he died in December, 1871, in Johnson County, Ill., where he had resided for ten years previous to his death. In an early day, he took great interest in politics; was Justice of the Peace of Wayne County, Tenn., for a term of twelve years; was an Old Time Whig; he was son of Thomas GALBRAITH, a native of North Carolina, son of John GALBRAITH, a native of Scotland. Subject's mother was born in North Carolina in 1800, and died in 1854, in Macoupin County, Ill. Parents had one girl and four boys, subject being third child. Subject lived in Wayne County, Tenn., until he was fourteen years of age, and there attended school; in 1848, with his parents, re-[Page 238] moved to Henderson County, Ill.; in 1850, removed to Macoupin county, where he receivedthe most of his education from the neighborhood schools. In 1855, he hired out as farm hand; in 1856, rented a piece of land until 1859, when he bought land in Montgomery County and removed to this county and settled in what is now known as Pitman Township, where he remained until the spring of 1864, when he sold out and bought land in Zanesville Township, and in six months, sold out an bought another farm adjoining the land he now owns; in 1867, bought his present residence and farm, and has made all the improvements on it, there was not even a house there; he built a comfortable farm residence, and upon his place has a pair of stock scales, and everything for a first-class farmer, and now is the owner of 120 acres, making wheat a specialty, and trades some in stock. In 1857, in Macoupin county, he married Miss Lydia Ann GRAY, a native of Macoupin County, born in 1837, a daughter of John GRAY, a native of Tennessee; four children - Alzirah, Antoinette, William J. and Anna J., at home; Alzirah is now the wife of A. C. McPHERSON, and now lives in Kansas. Member of order of A., F. & A. M., No. 692, at Raymond; self and wife are members of the Methodist Church for about twenty-five years; politically, a Republican; was nominated and elected Justice of the Peace in 1878; held office for three years, filling vacancy; in 1881, was re-elected for same office for a term of four years. Mr. GALBRAITH commenced life a poor man; when he left his parental home, he had only 25 cents in his possession, and, by his honesty, industry and economy, has succeeded in gaining a good property, and a name and reputation which is beyond reproach.

Francis McGOWN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Johnson County, Ill., July 10, 1830, to Samuel and Nancy (WESTBROOK) McGOWN; father was born in Warren County, Ky.; he was a farmer; came to Johnson County, Ill., being among the early settlers; and, in the fall of 1830, removed to Greene County, and in the spring of 1851 removed toMontgomery County, where he died in 1861, aged seventy-seven years. Mother was born in Kentucky, and died in Montgomery County in 1852, aged sixty-three. They had six children, subject being the youngest. He was taken to Greene County when an infant, by his parents, where he received his education from the common schools; he remained with his father to the time of his death, assisting him in farming, and, for years previous to his death, took the management of the farm. In the fall of 1850, he removed to Montgomery county; settled on same farm he now occupies; bought ninety-five acres, and is now the owner of 120 acres, and continued to till the soil of the same until 1875, when he was compelled to give up work on account of rheumatic affliction; at the present time, is unable to do any work; the farm is now carried on by his son and son-in-law. In 1854, in Greene County, he married Miss Elizabeth BANNING, a native of Greene County, born in 1835; they have had thirteen children, and now have three living - Edward A., Nancy E., Julia; self and wife are members of the United Baptist Church; Democrat.

George A. NORVELL, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., November 28, 1813, to William and Mary (PAYNE) NORVELL; father was born in Frederick County, Va., August 4, 1771; he was a farmer; was in the war of 1812; removed from Virginia to Tennessee in 1800; in 1828, removed to Macoupin County, Ill., where he died January 24, 1833; mother, born in Botetourt County, Va., March 10, 1775, and died May 10, 1872, in her ninety-eighth year; [Page 239] they were married in 1800; they had twelve children - six boys and six girls - George A. being the seventh child. Subject received some of his education in Tennessee and some in Macoupin County, Ill. He came to Macoupin County wit his parents in 1828. He began life by farming upon his father's farm, and continued until 1853, when he removed to his present residence, where he has since remained, engaged in farming and is now the owner of a large tract of land. In 1852, in Macoupin County, he married Miss Mary Ann KING, a native of Jefferson County, Ky., born October 10, 1834; they have eleven children living - William J., James F., John S., Charles H, Mary A., Edward E., Jennie B., Nathaniel F., Erastus W., Effie S. and Helen E.; and two dead - George A. and Ruth S. Mr. NORVELL has held the position of Justice of the Peace in Macoupin County, and was formerly an Old-Line Whig, but is now a Greenbacker; his wife is a member of theMethodist Church, and he is a member of the A., F. & A., M., at Girard, Ill. Mr. NORVELL is one of the first settlers of Macoupin County, and was there before it wasorganized as a county.

Daniel P. ROGERS, farmer, P. O. Litchfield. That there is no "royal road to success" is well illustrated in the history of Mr. ROGERS. In 1861, he entered 160 acres of land near where Butler now stands; this land was entered with the proceeds of an interest in a wheat crop raised on his father's farm. April 12, 1854, he married Miss Lavina C., daughter of James and Rebecca (PARKS) SINCLAIR. In 1855, he sold out his land near Butler and bought 120 acres of fine land in Zanesville Township, where he now resides; the same season, he "broke out" forty acres; when this land was broken, the prairie grass, then several feet in height, appeared as a wall surrounding it on every side; the next season, a small frame house was erected, into which he moved. He has continued to improve and add to his farm until it now amounts to about three hundred and eighty acres of good land - 320 in cultivation; this land is very rich and well drained. The ROGERS family descended from German ancestry, who came to the United States when they were dependent colonies. Capt. Henry ROGERS, Mr. ROGERS' grandfather, won his epaulets as a Revolutionary soldier; he distinguished himself at the battle of Trenton, and the sword which he took from a Hessian officer is now in the possession of the grandson, the subject of this sketch. Henry ROGERS, after the close of teh war,settled in New Jersey, where William H. Mr. ROGERS, father, was born. William raised the following family by his wife, formerly Miss Catharine PERRINE; Henry, of Monmouth County, N. J.; Robert, who died in California; Daniel P. and Charles A., of MontgomeryCounty; Mrs. Elizabeth WOOD, deceased; Mrs. Catherine (CORNELIUS) DEY, of Macoupin County; Mrs. Sarah (Edward) ATKINSON, of St. Louis, Mo.; Mrs. Margaret (Capt. Charles)BORDEN, deceased, of Fall River, Mass.; and Mrs. Jane (William) PITMAN, of Jerseyville, Ill. Mr. ROGERS is not only represented in the war giving birth and being to our liberties, through his immediate paternal ancestry, but also can boast of anothergrandfather, Robert PERRINE, his mother's father, who served in the Revolutionary war as a Captain; his sword is also handed down, and is now in the possession of Mr. Charles ROGERS, of Zanesville Township. Mrs. ROGERS also had two grandfathers who were Revolutionary soldiers - Grandfather SINCLAIR, on her father's side, and John PARKS, of her mother's lineage. Mr. and Mrs. ROGERS have the following children: William Pitman, Robert P., and Misses Lizzie A. and Jennie A.; one son, [Page 240] Tolbert A., died September 12, 1858. Mr. ROGERS' chances of an education were rather poor, never getting the opportunity to attend school during his school days more than two months in a year; he has nevertheless secured a fair business education; he certainly has a strong intellect and keen discrimination. He forms a part of the County Court as Supervisor for his township, and well does he fill the position; and many of his friends expect him to fill still higher positions in the gift of the people. Mrs. ROGERS is one of those whole-souled, excellent Christian women whom we think it would be hard to praise too much. Mr. ROGERS and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and enjoy the friendship, confidence and esteem of all good people where they are known. With the greatest of pleasure we introduce them to the good people of Montgomery County, and shall ever regard the privilege as one of the most agreeable duties connected with a long, and we hope, a lasting friendship.

Oscar RUMMONS, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Warren County, Mo., July 6, 1849, to John and Juliett (PRINGLE) RUMMONS; father born in Madison, Ky., in 1810; during his life, was a farmer, and died in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1874, where he had resided, engaged in farming, since 1868; mother born in Litchfield, Conn., in 1811, and died in 1865; parents had three children who grew to maturity - one daughter and two boys; subject youngest child. Subject received his education in Warren County, Mo., and came to Montgomery County with parents in 1868, and remained with parents to the time of their death. He now has a farm of 140 acres of well-improved land, making wheat and corn a specialty, also stock. In 1876, he was married, in Montgomery County, to Julia B. MITCHELL, a native of Cooper County, Mo., born in 1857, daughter of Thomas C. MITCHELL; two children - Hattie May, Maggie Laura; member of order of A., F. & A. M., No. 692, at Raymond; politically, Democrat.

J. C. SINCLAIR, farmer, P. O. Litchfield, was born in Greene County, Ill., in 1837, to James and Rebecca (PARKS) SINCLAIR; father was born in Tennessee; was a farmer, and died in 1850; mother was born in Tennessee, and died in 1850; parents had nine children, subject being the fifth child; at the age of thirteen, left Greene County with his parents, and settled in Macoupin County, where he principally received hiseducation; at the age of twenty, left Macoupin County and removed to Montgomery County, and settled upon the place where he now resides, and where he has ever since been engaged in tilling the soil of his beautiful farm of 1,300 acres; he rents the largest portion of the farm, having retired from active labor in 1881. In September, 1863, he married Elizabeth JONES, a native of Macoupin County, Ill., and the daughter of Lodowick JONES, from which union there have been born four children - James C., C. A., Eva M. and Vesta; in politics, unites with the Democratic part; subject's father was in the war of 1812.

Ezra STARKEY, farmer, was born in Madison County, Ill., March 21, 1833, to David and Mary (JONES) STARKEY; father was born in Virginia in 1802; was taken to Madison County by his parents when quite a child; he remained in Madison County to the time of his death, which occurred in 1869; he was a farmer; he was the son of Russell STARKEY, a native of Virginia; mother was born in Madison County in 1809, and died in June, 1877; she was the daughter of William JONES, a native of Tennessee, who was a Baptist preacher; parents had eleven children, our subject being the third child. He remained with his parents, receiving an education, and assisted in tilling the soil of his father's farm until 1861, when he bought the farm upon which he now resides. In 1861, in Madison County, he married Mary S. DECK, a native of Madison County, born January 7, 1836, daughter of Nicholas and Elizabeth (DUGGER) DECK, first a native of Virginia, and the latter ofTennessee. Mr. and Mrs. STARKEY have had eight children, five of whom are living - Eliza J., Virginia, Charles, Forest and Tilden. He is a Democrat. Mrs. STARKEY's grandfather, Michael DECK, was in the Revolutionary war.

Joseph VIGNOS, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in the eastern part of France, December 1, 1817, to Claud and Margaret (BARQUIN) VIGNOS; his father was born in France, where he followed the occupation of farming during his life; he died in 1858, aged sixty-two years. His mother was also a native of France; she died in 1862, aged seventy-two years. They were the parents of nine children, Joseph VIGNOS being the oldest child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of France afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm, and, for two years previous to his departure from home, taught school. In December, 1835, he bade his parents and native place farewell, and emigrated to America, where he followed the dyeing business in New York City for nearly two years, and then traveled through Pennsylvania, Cincinnati, Louisville, New Orleans and St. Louis, and, when he first came to Montgomery County, was a peddler of notions. While staying overnight at Zanesville, the citizens persuaded him to embark in the mercantilebusiness at that place, at which he was successful until 1857, when he bought the same farm that he is now residing on and commenced giving his attention to agricultural pursuits; he is now one of the representative farmers of Zanesville Township, and is the owner of a large tract of land. In 1846, he married Miss Sarah J. ALLEN, a daughter of Robert ALLEN; she died in May, 1852. In 1853, on January 6, he married a second time, Miss Harriet E. BAYDY. By his first marriage he has two children - Agnes, who is married and living in Kansas; and Francis A., who is now in Texas. By his second marriage he has six children, viz.: Joseph, Claud M., Jerome, Josephine, Mary and Susan. He and family are members of the Christian Church. As a business man, no man stands higher than Mr. VIGNOS; his word is regarded in everything equal to his bond; hence he has the esteem and confidence of all well-disposed citizens.

William WHITE, farmer, was born in Italy, near Venice, April 24, 1816, to John and Ellen (MURRY) WHITE, who were also natives of Italy; was education as a seaman, and was on the ocean from the time he was five years old, and made his last trip in 1837, when he followed steamboating on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. In 1846, he came to Jefferson County, Ill.; farmed in summer, and was on the river in winter; in 1851, he removed to Morgan County, where he followed only farming - being compelled to give up navigation on account of an accident in dislocating his shoulder - where he remained until the spring of 1865, when he came to his present residence, where he has since remained, engaged in farming; when he came here, he bought 100 acres of land; there were but few improvements, and only a small house; he now has a large house, which shows that he is as well adapted to farming as he was to navigation. He was married, in 1835, in Arkansas, to Delia THOMPSON, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, born in 1828; she died in 1881; she bore him four daughters and three sons; his son, John H. WHITE, was [Page 242]In the Federal army, under gen. Sherman, as a member of a regiment from this State; he was wounded, and died sixteen months after he returned home. Mr. WHITE has been selected for office at different times, but has uniformly declined all such honors; self and family are members of the Methodist Church, he having held connection with that church since 1850; is an Odd Fellow, and helped to get a charter for the lodge located at Mt. Vernon; is a Republican.

Frederick WIEGREFFE, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, April 26, 1835, to Frederick and Henrietta (PERCEL) WIEGREFFE; father was born in Germany in 1797; was a miller; emigrated to America and settled in Jersey County, Ill., in 1853, and in 1855 removed to Montgomery County, where he died in the same year - fall of 1855; mother was German, born in 1799, and now resides in Litchfield, Ill., with her son William; parents had six children; subject fourth child. He was educated from the common schools of Germany, and, in 1852, emigrated to America and settled in Jersey County, and commenced farming with his brothers; in 1855, removed to Montgomery County with his parents, where he has since remained, engaged in farming, having accumulated a large tract of land of 240 acres; makes wheat and corn a specialty. In 1869, in Montgomery County, he married Mary KUHNE, a native of Germany, born in 1848; they have had four children - George, Anna, Flora and Bessie; self and family are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a Republican; commenced life a poor man, and made all his property by hard work.E. F. WOODMAN, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born near Carrollton, Ill., January 8, 1841, son of Nelson and Zerelda (BOILES) WOODMAN, he born in Vermont July 12, 1815, she born near Lexington, Ky., in 1825. Nelson WOODMAN came to Greene County in 1821, being one of the earliest settlers of that section, and where he now lives; he had twelve children – eight boys and four girls, E. F. being the second. Our subject came to Montgomery County in the fall of 1843 with his parents, and remained with them till seventeen yeas of age, when he commenced as teamster and breaking prairie, going to school between times, receiving the education that he has after leaving home. In 1859, he rented a farm of forty acre, and in 1860, bought forty acres, and is now the owner of 700 acres, principally located in Montgomery and Macoupin Counties, this State, and in Nebraska. December 28, 1871, in Litchfield, Ill, he married Miss Annie SHAW, born in Lyons, N. Y., February 15, 1854, daughter of Joseph and Betty M. (WOODRUFF) SHAW, both of New York State; two children, both boys, have blessed the household of Mr. WOODMAN - Loy Legrand WOODMAN and Commodore Beacher WOODMAN. In 1864, Mr. WOODMAN went across the plains and remained in Colorado about four years,accumulating considerable property, merchandising, contracting, etc. He is a Blue Lodge Mason, a Royal Arch and a Knight Templar, always “governing himself accordingly;” also a Democrat.

Dexter WADSWORTH, farmer, P. O. Litchfield, was born in Westboro County, Mass., December 27, 1822, to John and Percis (KIMBROUGH) WADSWORTH. He was born in Grafton, Mass.; during his life, followed the occupation of a farmer, and died in his native State. She was born in Massachusetts, and died in Scott County, Ill. They were the parents of ninechildren, Dexter WADSWORTH, our subject, being the eighth child. He was educated in the common schools of his native State, and, at an early age, apprenticed himself at the shoemaker's trade, at which he[Page 243] continued to work until 1857, when he removed to Scott County, Ill., where he engaged in farming, and continued the same until 1859, when he removed to Montgomery County, where he has since remained, engaged in farming. He served in the Federal army for about one year, in the Twentieth Illinois Regiment, Company A. In 1881, he erected, by his own design, a handsome residence upon his farm. In Massachusetts, in 1843, he married Miss Mary J. MILLER, a native of Massachusetts, born in 1825, and died in 1858. Mr. WADSWORTH has three children, viz.: Ellen, Mary E. (wife of F. C. WEBSTER) and Warren W. In politics, he is identified with the Republican party.



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