Illinois Genealogy Trails
Montgomery County, Illinois
 Biographies


Source: W.H. Perrin's 1882 Biographical Sketches
from the History of Bond and Montgomery Counties, Illinois

Transcribed and Sumitted by Norma Hass, except where noted.

[Harvel Township, Montgomery County, IL]
[Page 244]

W. W. ADAMS, retired farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Macoupin County, Ill., September 28, 1836, to Giles M. and Elizabeth (TAYLOR) ADAMS. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his native county afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. He embarked on his career in life as a farmer in his native county, where he remained until the spring of 1861, when he removed to Montgomery County, where he bought 240 acres of wild prairie, which he improved; also 160 acres more which he bought soon afterward. By business ability and energy he succeeded in accumulating a good property, and the social esteem of all well-disposed citizens. He has been a prominent farmer and stock-raiser. In 1880, he rented his farms, it being his desire to retire from active labor. Father was born in Halifax County, Va., in the year 1801; removed to Tennessee, and subsequently settled in Illinois, where he became one of the successful farmers of the State. He died in 1870, in Montgomery county. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Greenville, S.C., in 1809, and is now residing with her son, our subject, and enjoying good health. She is the mother of five children, three of whom are living - our subject, F. M. ADAMS and Nancy A. DILLIARD, residents of Macoupin County. Of the five children born to his parents, W. W. ADAMS was the fourth child. He has held the office of Supervisor of the township. In politics, he is identified with the Democratic party.

Clayton H. ADAMS, lumber, coal and agricultural implement dealer, Harvel, was born April 19, 1839, in Summit County, Ohio, to John and Sarah (KELSEY) ADAMS. He was brought to near Brighton, Macoupin County, in 1845, by his parents, when but six years of age, and from there removed to Gillespie, of the same county, in 1849, where they located permanently. He received his education from McKendree College, Lebanon, Ill., and high school at Hillsboro, and remained with his parents to the age of twenty-one, and then made a trip West to the Rocky Mountains, where he engaged in mining for two years, and at the expiration of that time returned home to Macoupin County, Ill., where he engaged in farming, and continued the same until 1866, when he engaged in grain and agricultural implement business at Gillespie, and in 1868 a milling business in connection with his other business. He continued the same until the spring of 1870, when he removed to Oregon, and there again resumed the occupation of a farmer, and on January 1, 1875, removed toHarvel, where he engaged in the lumber, coal and agricultural business, and by his energy and attentive business qualities, soon procured a good trade, and has since been steadily increasing until it extends far into Christian and Montgomery Counties. He has also a branch business at Morrisonville, under the management of S. S. WHITNER, being under the firm name of ADAMS & NELSON. His partner is Mr. R. S. NELSON. On January 22, 1878, in Litchfield, he married Miss Mary E. WILLIS, a native of Carmi, Ill., but raised in Missouri, born November 20, 1846, daughter of James E. Willis, a native of Kentucky, born July 23, 1820, came to White County, Ill., with his parents when a boy. In 1841, he went to Cape Girardean, Mo., and inSeptember, 1845, was married to Miss J. Rosanna SHORT, a native of North Carolina. Father of our subject was born in New Hampshire, in 1802, and died in November, 1867. He was a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Macoupin County. He was a Republican, and a very resolute man in all of his business undertakings. Mother was born in 1805, in New Hampshire, and is now enjoying good health in Sheldon, Iowa. She is the mother of six children, four daughters and two boys, subject being the fifth child. He is an active member of the A., F & A. M. order; has been a member since 1863. Politically, he is identified with the Republican party. Mr. and Mrs. ADAMS have had two children, one of whom is living. Charley Willis died in infancy; Florence Rosana was born April 5, 1881.

Henry AULL, retired farmer, Harvel, was born in St. Clair County, Ill., December 2, 1838, to Frederick and Elizabeth (SCHRAG) AULL. His education was limited to such as the common schools afforded. He remained at home to the age of twenty, when he left his home, at that time in Bond County, and returned to his native county, where he embarked on his career in life as a farm hand, but eventually settled inMontgomery County in May, 1862, and settled in Pittman Township. By his industry and business habits, he succeeded in gaining a good property. His first purchase of land in Montgomery County was forty acres, and has at the present time about three hundred acres. Father was born in Germany in 1813, and during his life followed the occupation of a farmer; he died in 1858. His wife, and mother of subject, was born in Germany in 1819, and died in 1857. She was the mother of eleven children, subject being the second child. Politically, independent.

Francis M. COX, M. D., Harvel, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., November 18, 1853. His father, Tipton COX, was born in Monroe County, Tenn., April 24, 1825. He was a farmer by occupation; came to Montgomery County in 1852, and settled nearDonnellson, where his death occurred February 12, 1880. He was in the Mexican war, and held a prominent position among the practical farmers of the county. His wife, Eliza WILSON, was also a native of Tennessee, born in 1827, and died in 1869. She was the mother of eight children, of whom Francis was the second child. His earlyeducation was received in the common schools of the county, and while out of school, he assisted his father upon the farm, where he remained until of age, when he began farming for himself, following in that occupation about five years, and two years of which, in addition to the duties of farming, he read medicine, and at the end of which time he entered the American Medical College, at St. Louis, where he graduated June 2, 1881, and received his degree as M. D. He located at Walshville, where he immediately entered upon the practice of his profession, and where he was very successful, and had a large ride. Six months later, he disposed of his practice, and located at Harvel, where he is successor to Dr. MATNEY, and where he is highly respected, not on account of his professional abilities alone, but owing to social qualities. He was married in his native county, January 28, 1875, to Miss Malissa BUZAN, who was born in the same county December 4, 1854. She has borne him two children, viz.: Norma D. and Walter E. Mrs. COX is a daughter of Thomas and Mary A. (MOSS) BUZAN.; he deceased in 1854; she liv-[Page 246]ing. The Doctor has held the office of Township Clerk of Grisham Township. Politically, he is identified with the Republican party.

Henry HAUPTMANN, hotel keeper and merchant, Harvel, was born in Germany April 3, 1833. He remained in Germany with his parents, receiving such an education as the common schools afforded, and learned the trade of a tailor with his father. In 1854, he emigrated to America and settled in New Orleans for a period of eight months; worked at his trade, and then removed to St. Louis, where he worked at his trade for one year and a half, and then removed to Morgan County, Ill., at Jacksonville, and there worked as a farm hand for three years, and then rented a farm and gave his attention to agricultural pursuits on his own account, and after renting there for seven years removed to Montgomery County in 1864, where he bought a farm of eighty acres of wild prairie, and by his energy and business habits, succeeded in accumulating over three hundred acres, and has been the owner of five different large tracts of land, being one of the men who has done much for the improvement of the county. In the fall of 1878, he started a hotel at Harvel, which he still continues in connection with his grain dealing, merchandising and meat market. In 1880, he sold out his land, his business in Harvel increasing to such proportions that he was compelled to retire from farming. In 1880, he built the large and commodious hotel he now occuies. In 1853, in Germany, he married Louisa HILGENBAEUMER; she died in 1873, aged fifty-six years. She bore him four children - Mary, Henry, George and Lizzie. In March, 1876, in Montgomery County, he married Mrs. Sophia KALKHORST, born November 12, 1845; she has borne him three children - Lena, Charlie and Nettie. Father was Henry HAUPTMANN, born in Germany in 1812, and during his life followed tailoring, and died about 1864. Mother died when he was only two weeks old. They were the parents of two children; subject the youngest child. Self and wife are religiously connected with the Lutheran Church. Politically, he is a Democrat.

William F. JORDAN, farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Maryland September 1, 1825, and when ten years of age his parents went to Trumbull County, Ohio, where he received his education, and assistsed his father upon the homestead until he was twenty-one years of age, when he came to Greene County, and eight years later removed to Montgomery County, and settled upon the farm where he now resides, and which was at that time unbroken prairie, and the house built at that time was the first in that portion of the county. He has since made all the improvements necessary for comfort, and which are usually found upon a well-regulated farm. His father, William JORDAN, was born in Maryland April 11, 1796, and died May 23, 1870. His wife, Catharine RUMMEL, was also a native of Maryland, born April 6, 1797, and is still living. She is the mother of ten children, viz.: William F., our subject; Hiram W., born February 3, 1827, and died August 5, 1831; Mary A., born December 9, 1828; Elizabeth J., born February 1, 1830, and died November 8, 1854; Cyrus H., born August 3, 1831; Lewis W., born April 28, 1833; Catharine E., born June 28, 1834; Montgomery P., born October 11, 1836, and died November 15, 1838; Alpheus C., born January 10, 1841; Emily A., born November 20, 1842, and died August 3, 1864. William, the eldest son, was married May 24, 1860, to Welta WINN, who was born in Greene County, Ill., in 1840, in April. She is the mother of nine children living, viz.: Josephine, Henry, William, Charles,[Page 247]Marion, Cora, Birdie, George and Hardan. Politically, Mr. J. has been identified with the Republican party, but now his sympathies are with the Greenback party. Although he grows all the crops usually raised upon a farm, he makes a specialty of grain.

John R. LEIGH, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Hunterdon County, N. J., January 28, 1846, to Samuel and Annie (CASE) LEIGH. He received his education from the common schools of his native county. His early days were spent upon the homestead farm. At the age of nineteen he left his home and removed to Jersey County, Ill., where he embarked on his career in life as a farm hand, and continued the same in that county for a period of seven years. In 1872, he bought 160 acres of unimproved land in Montgomery County, and removed to the same in the spring of 1873, where he has since remained engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has, by his studied economy and business habits, succeeded in accumulating 240 acres of land, all of which are under a high state of cultivation. Mr. LEIGH commenced his life very poor, and, by his hard work, succeeded in accumulating a good property, and a name and reputation which is beyond reproach. He was married in 1869, in Jersey County, to Miss Carrie M. DAVIS, a daughter of Wilson DAVIS, a native of North Carolina, and among the first settlers of Jersey County. Mrs. LEIGH was born in Jersey County, Ill., June 5, 1849. Subject's father was born in Hunterdon County, N. J., in 1804, and is nowresiding in New Jersey, where he has always been engaged as farmer and drover. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in New Jersey in 1806, and died April 16, 1882. She was the mother of six children, subject being the youngest child. He has held the offices of Road Commissioner and School Trustee. Politically, he is like his father, his sympathies being with the Democratic party. His wife is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. LEIGH is worthy of much credit for the interest he takes in all public improvements. He has met all the ups and downs of a business career, and now stands high in the estimation of his friends. Upon his farm he makes raising grain and hogs a specialty.

William D. MATNEY, M. D., Harvel, was born in Shelby County, Ill., January 26, 1840. His early life was spent in assisting upon the homestead farm in the summer, and in winter attending the common schools of the county, where he received thefoundation of his subsequent learning. He remained at home until twenty-one years of age, when he entered the service at the commencement of the rebellion, in Company K, Fifty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with Capt. T. C. RODRIG; regiment commanded by Col. HARRIS. He remained in the service until the close of the war, when he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, following in that occupation about two year, when he began the study of medicine, and shortly after entered a drug store at Oconee, Shelby County, where, in addition to the duties of the store, he continued the study of his profession. He remained in the drug business about five years, practicing a portion of the time. In August, 1875, he located at Harvel, Montgomery County; went before the State Board of Health, where he successfully passed examination and received a license. Owing to his perfect knowledge of and the thorough manner in which he attended to his calling, he has been very successful and built up a large practice, the duties of which would fall heavily upon the shoulders of a man many years his senior. He has been twice married. The first marriage occurred in 1867, in Shelby County, to Sarah E. LOWE, who was born[Page 248]in Johnson County, Ind., January 28, 1840. Her death occurred October 16, 1876, at Harvel. She was the mother of six children, all deceased except the oldest child, viz., Mary Ellen, born August 2, 1867. The Doctor was again married September 30, 1878, to Miss Drucilla C. SCOTT, who was born at Portsmouth, Ohio, April 23, 1854, to Jeremiah and Sarah (DAVIS) SCOTT, he deceased, she still living. The father of William D., our subject, Leonard MATNEY, was a native of Tennessee, born in 1811, a farmer by occupation, and was in the Mexican war. He died in September, 1847. His wife, Mary BURRIS, was a native of Kentucky, born in March, 1821, and still living, and is the mother of six children, of whom William D. was the second and the oldest living. He has held the office of Postmaster at Oconee for five years, and is the present Clerk of Harvel. Politically, his sympathies are with the Republican party; has been an active member of the Masonic order at Oconee for a number of years. The Doctor has also become a successful inventor, and at present holds a patent upon a burglar alarm, which is operated by means of electricity.H. C. MILLOT, grain dealer, Harvel, was born in France September 13, 1850, to Peter F. and Justine (CARY) MILLOT. He was brought to this country by his parents when but about four years of age. His parents first settled in the northern part of New York, in Jefferson County, where he received his common school education. In 1864, he came with his parents to Montgomery County. Here he attended the Blackburn University, at Carlinville, and afterward the Illinois Industrial University, at Champaign, and Fort Edward Collegiate Institute, at Fort Edward, N. Y. Here he graduated in 1872, and then returned to the Blackburn University, where he attended for two terms, and left in 1874. In the fall of 1875, he entered upon his career in life by embarking in the grain business, in partnership with Mr. Henry NIEHAUS, and conducted a successful business in the copartnership until 1879, when he bought out the interest of his partner, and has since conducted it alone. Although large at first, his business has steadily increased until the present time. It assumed large proportions, extending far into Christian and Montgomery Counties. They found markets at St. Louis and Toledo, and for the last few years at the latter place. In 1876, in Montgomery County, he married Miss Margaret MARTINDALE, born March 1, 1858, a native of Indiana. They have two children - Henry F. and Roy. In politics, he is independent. His father was born in France, in 1809, and is now a resident of Harvel. He has during his life followed the occupation of a farmer. His wife, also, was a native of France, born in 1815, and is the mother of tree children, two of whom are living. Stephen is a prominent farmer of Christian County, and Augustus, who was murdered in 1866 by the Indians; served through the last rebellion, and entered as a volunteer soldier, and was mustered out as Second Lieutenant at the close of and in the year of 1866 removed to Kansas, where he was murdered by the Indians, in the same year. Our subject expects to remodel his large elevator, and embark in the milling business. Subject's father came first to America in 1830, and settled in Northern New York for two years, and then returned to France; married and came back to America in 1854.

Andrew J. NASH, farmer and Justice of the Peace, was born in Edmonson County, Ky., February 29, 1832, to Lewis C. and Millie (OLLER) NASH. He was born in Pulaski County, Ky., April, 1807, and died in Harvel, Ill., February 17, 1881. He was by occupation a blacksmith. She was born in Illinois in 1814, and is now a resident of Harvel. They were the parents of thirteen children, of whom Andrew J. was the second child. His early life was spent in receiving an education and assisting his father in the blacksmith shop. In 1848, with his parents, removed to Grayson County, Ky. In 1849, he embarked on his career in life as a farmer. In the fall of 1851, removed to Wayne County, Ill.; in June, 1854, removed to Macoupin County, Ill.; in 1869, removed to Christian County, and there remained engaged in Agricultural pursuits until February, 1879, when he removed to his present residence, where he has since remained engaged in farming in connection with his official duties. In Christian County, in May, 1877, he was elected Constable, and at the same time was appointed Deputy Sheriff, which offices he held for two years. In Harvel he is now holding the office of Justice of the Peace, in connection with several minor offices. In Grayson County, Ky., April 4, 1849, he married Miss Sarah HAYNES, a native of the same county, born March 1, 1830. They are the parents of nine children, three of whom are now living - George W., born July 22, 1851, and died August 18, 1874; Paradine, now the wife of John A. TOSH, and residing near Grayville, Ill.; Lucinda, now the wife of Charles A. VARNER, and residing in the county; Franklin E., at home; and Millie J., James M., Mary E., Arthur B. and Herchel, who are dead. Mr. NASH is an active member of the I. O. O. F., at Harvel Lodge, No. 607. In politics, he is identified with the Democrat party. Mr. NASH is regarded as an honest, fair-minded, liberal in his views, genial and gentlemanly in his social relations and an industrious, public spirited citizen.

Robert S. NELSON, grain and produce dealer, Harvel, was born near Brighton, Macoupin Co., Ill., March 9, 1837, to Robert S. and E. (KELSEY) NELSON. He was a native of New Hampshire, and was one of the early settlers of Macoupin County, having settled there long before a railroad intersected that part of the State. His death occurred in 1857. She was also a native of New Hampshire. Her death occurred in 1857. She was the mother of six children, of whom Robert S., our subject, was the youngest child. He spent his boyhood days in assisting his father in farming, and receiving such an education as the common schools of the neighborhood afforded. His first enterprise for himself was at Irving, Ill., where he entered upon his business career in the grain and agricultural business. He remained there two years, and then sold his interest to William CHAMBERLIN and removed to Litchfield, where he engaged in the same business, but remained only one year, when he removed to Harvel and erected a large grain elevator, and continued as a grain and produce dealer. His business, although large at the start, has been steadily increasing until now it has assumed very large proportions, and his custom extends far into Montgomery and Christian Counties. In 1879, he entered into partnership in the agricultural implement business with Mr. C. H. ADAMS, which he continues in connection with his other business. Mr. NELSON was married in Litchfield, Ill., April 4, 1872, to Miss Harriet A. JONES, who was born in Carrollton, Greene Co., Ill., May 23, 1850. They have but one child, R. S. Kent NELSON. Mr. NELSON in social life is one of the most genial of men, liberal in his views, and gentlemanly in his social relations. As a citizen, he is enterprising and public-spirited, and has ever taken a leading part in all matters calculated to advance the material interests of his town and county.

[Page 250]

Henry NIEHAUS, retired farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Germany in April 1814. Henry NIEHAUS, the father of this gentleman, was also born in Germany, in 1770, and died in 1836. During his life, he followed the occupation of a farmer. His wife, and mother of Henry, was named Miss SLATER. She was born in Germany in 1799, and died in 1854. They were the parents of ten children, of whom Henry NICHAUS was the second child. He received his education from the common schools of his native country, and began life by working as a farm hand in Germany, which he there continued until 1855, when he emigrated to America, and first settled at St. Louis, Mo., for a period of three months, and then removed to Morgan County, Ill., rented a farm, and began farming on his own account, and continued the same for eight years. In 1863, he removed to Montgomery County, where he bought a small farm. By his energy and business habits, he succeeded in accumulating over seven hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he made all necessary improvements. In 1877, in connection with his farm duties, built a large elevator at Harvel, and embarked in the grain business in partnership with Mr. MILLOT, but in the year 1879 sold out to his partner and retired from active labor, he having disposed of all his real estate at that time. In 1839, in Germany, he married Miss Katharine HIESELMAN. She died in 1868, aged sixty years. The result of this union was three children, of whom Mena and Katharine are living, and residents of Montgomery County. Mr. NIEHAUS has lived a blameless life, and, as hi sits down at nightfall, around the domestic hearth, he has the proud consciousness of knowing that he has wronged no one (at least intentionally), and that his peace is made with the Great King of kings beyond the shores of time. Thus does he live, and thus he awaits the last great change, which his locks, nowwhitened by the frosts of nearly seventy winters, indicate is not far distant.

John W. PETRIE, M. D., Harvel, was born in North Carolina November 7, 1832. His early life was spent upon his father's farm and in receiving his early education, the foundation of his subsequent learning. At the age of twenty-two years, he began the study of medicine, but soon after entered upon an extended tour through Central America, Great Britain, New Mexico, and eventually located in California, where he remained about five years, engaged at different times in mining, surveying, and upon a ranch. In the fall of 1860, he came to Montgomery County, Ill., near Hillsboro, where he entered upon the practice of his profession four years later, having spent most of the time in study at the Eclectic Medical College, at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he graduated in 1866 and received his diploma. In February, 1866, he went to Taylorville, remained two years, and then removed to Palmer, where he entered upon the practice of his profession,and remained twelve years, and during the time was very successful, having built up a large practice, the result of his knowledge of and his close attention to his calling. In the fall of 1881, he removed to Harvel, where his success has followed him, and where he has gained the highest esteem, socially, of the people, and professionally the good will of all. His father, John PETRIE, was a native of North Carolina, where he was born in the year 1778, and where he followed the occupation of blacksmithing and farming to the time of his death, which occurred April 4, 1872. His wife, Elizabeth JORDAN, was also a native of North Carolina, born May 1, 1792, and died in 1864. They were the parents of eight children, of whom John W. was the[Page 251]Seventh child. He was married in Montgomery County June 16, 1861, to Miss MournenFRANKLIN, who died in 1863. She was the mother of one child, who died in infancy. The Doctor was married again in October, 1869, to Anna O'ROURKE, a native of Ireland, and who has borne him seven children, viz., Ulysses S., David A., Henderson C., Scott T., Elery E., Margaret E. and Albert R., all of whom are living. The Doctor has been a member of the I. O. O. F., and the Encampment and Grand Lodge.

Herman POGGENPOHL, farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Prussia, Germany, March 7, 1833, where his early life was spent in attending the common schools of his nativecountry and assisting his father upon the farm. At the age of eighteen, his father sent him to America to view the New World. His expectations were more than realized, and two years later his parents followed him and entered 160 acres of land in Montgomery County, where they were among the first to break and improve the wild prairie. Francis POGGENPOHL, the father of Harmon, was born in Prussia, Germany, and died soon after his arrival in America. His wife, Maggie GURKA, was also a native of Germany, and died in 1874. She was the mother of six children, of whom Herman was the oldest child. After the death of his father, he bought the interests of the balance of the family, and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, at which he has since continued, and at which he has been more than ordinarily successful, making all the improvements himself, and has by his energy and industry accumulated about seven hundred acres of land, nearly all under cultivation. All the surroundings on Mr. POGGENPOHL's property show him to be a practical farmer, and well worthy of the high esteem in which he is held by the community socially. In 1873, he returned to his native country upon a visit,remaining there two months. In 1855, he was married to Dena BROKAMP, who was born in Germany and brought to America when a child. She died in 1872, leaving to his care six children, viz., Henry, deceased at the age of eighteen years; Mary, wife of L. YOUNG; John, at home; Lizzie, at home; Toney, at home; Maggie, at home. Mr. P. was again married in 1871 to Ragena MUSSHAFER, also a native of Germany, born June 7, 1852. She has borne him six children, viz., Frankie, Christina, Lena, Anna, Kattie and Charles. Politically, Mr. P. is identified with the Democratic party. Himself and family are connected with the Catholic Church.

George J. RAMSEY, druggist and hardware, Harvel. William Hamilton RAMSEY, the father of this gentleman, was a native of Pennsylvania. During his life has been engaged in agricultural pursuits; is now a resident of Milroy, Penn. His wife, and mother of George J., was Mary RARER, a native of Pennsylvania; she is the mother of nine children, of whom George J. RAMSEY is the fourth child. He was born in Pennsylvania September 17, 1849. He was raised upon a farm, and remained upon the old homestead with his parents during his school days. At the age oftwenty-five, he entered a drug store at Irving, Ill., as clerk, where he remained two years, and then removed to Harvel and engaged in the same business on his ownaccount, and has by his energy and close attention to business succeeded in building up a large and increasing trade. In 1880, he added to his business a full line of hardware and agricultural implements, taking into partnership a year later Mr.

Clisby SIMS, in the agricultural department. Mr. RAMSEY has a thoroughknowledge of business, and possesses the faculty of making himself agreeable to the public, and socially enjoys the[Page 252]highest esteem of the community at large. He was married in Montgomery County November 5, 1878, to Miss Laura T. AUSTIN, a native of Mississippi, born July 22, 1856. They have one child living, Charles Earle RAMSEY, who was born January 19, 1881, and one dead. Politically, Mr. RAMSEY is identified with the Republican party. He has served as Township Clerk for a term of three years, and was appointed Postmaster in 1877, which position he still holds. He is identified with the growth and prosperity of the town by way of public improvements and educational privileges.Clisby SIMS, farmer and agricultural implement dealer, Harvel, was born in MadisonCounty, Ill., February 10, 1824. His early life was spent in attending the common schools of his native county, and in assisting his father upon the homestead farm. At the age of nineteen he left home and began his career in life in a saw mill, inMissouri, where he remained eighteen months, at the end of which time he purchased a farm in Missouri, consisting of eighty acres of unbroken prairie and ten acres of timber land, upon which he made all improvements. He remained in Missouri eight years, and then removed to Macoupin County, Ill., and rented a farm and continued in that occupation there about three years. He then moved to Shaw's Point, same county, where he remained six years, and then removed to Montgomery County, where he has improved three farms, and in addition to attending to the duties of his farming interests, he has been engaged about four years in mercantile business, three years of the time at Harvel. At present he owns a farm of 100 acres ofwell-improved land in Missouri, and town property at Harvel. In January, 1882, he entered into partnership with George J. RAMSEY, in dealing in agricultural implements, at Havel, and where they have succeeded in building up a fair trade for the time they have been engaged in the business. Mr. SIMS is a thorough business man and a practical farmer, and socially enjoys the highest esteem of the entire community. His marriage occurred in 1848, in Morgan County, to Elizabeth J. MASTERS, who was born in Morgan March 9, 1824. She has borne him eight children, viz., Thomas Q., Nancy Ellen, Malissa Ann, James B., William, Benjamin, Jane and Emma Isabell, the tow latter of whom are deceased. Mrs. SIMS is a daughter of Irving MASTERS, born in Kentucky, and died at the age of forty-nine, and Mary Jones, born in Morgan County, and died in 1836. The father of our subject, James SIMS, was a native of Kentucky, born in 1810, a farmer byoccupation, and one of the early settlers of Madison County, Ill, and still living in Macoupin County. His wife, Margaret ROBINSON, was a native of North Carolina, and died in 1865 at the age of sixty years. The result of their union was six children, of whom Clisby, our subject, was the oldest child. He served the people of the county as Justice of the Peace for four years. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party. Religiously, himself and wife have been members of the Baptist Church for several years.

George W. SLATER, lawyer and farmer, Harvel, Ill., born in Lawrence County, Ill., July 14, 1832, to William and Jane (WILSON) SLATER, he being a native of England, and she of Kentucky. The early education of George W. SLATER was very limited, owing to the fact that no schools were near his native place. His time was fully employed upon his father's farm. In 1843, he removed with his parents to MontgomeryCounty; here his parents settled upon an unbroken timber fam near Audubon. At the[Page 253]Age of fourteen, his father died, and he lived with his older brother for about one year, and then engaged as a farm hand, and entered upon his career in life, which has been more or less varied. He continued in the occupation of a farmer until 1863, when he went to Litchfield and ran two wood saws by horse power, inthe employ of a railroad company, with whom he remained over four years, at the end of which time he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, at which he remained one year, and then went to milling, and continued the same for over four years. While in Litchfield Mr. SLATER was elected to fill the office of Street Commissioner, and was appointed Deputy Sheriff. He has, since his residence at Harvel, served the people in the different offices of Constable and Justice of the Peace, and is now a member of the Town Board. He has obtained more than ordinary education by his observation and study. He has been practicing law in the Justice's Court about seven years in connection with his other duties. He was married, August 19, 1851, to Sarah MATTHEWS, who was born in Christian County March 16, 1832. She is the mother of eleven children, five of whom are now living, viz., Elie, Lewis L., Serene A., James E. and Sarah E. Mr. SLATER is an active member of the A., F. & A. M.

Andrew Jackson THOMASON, merchant, Harvel, was born in Carrollton, Greene Co., Ill., February 16, 1843. His educational privileges were limited to the common schools of his native county. His early life was spent on the homestead farm, but at the age of eighteen he entered the service during the rebellion in Company G, of the Sixty-first Illinois Infantry, with Capt. J.B. NELTON, his regiment beingcommanded by Gen. Jacob FRY. He remained in the service a period of three years, and, after his discharge, he took upon himself the duties of a farm life, locating in Greene County, where he remained three years, and then removed to Montgomery County, where he continued the same occupation five years, at the end of which time the town of Harvel had just been incorporated, and he erected the third store in the town, and opened a grocery store, having at that time disposed of his farming interests. By his energy, courteous manners, and strict attention to business, he soon built up a large and steadily increasing trade, which demanded an increase of stock, until now he is engaged in a general merchandising business, and has also enlarged his storeroom in order to make room for his increasing stock, and to better facilitate his business. He has always been identified with the growth and prosperity of the town, and held a prominent position in the advancement of public improvements and educational privileges of the town and county, having held the different offices of School Director, Village Trustee, President of the Board of Trustees, Trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and President of the CoalCompany. He was married in Carrollton, Green County, September 7, 1879, to Miss Mary Jane SWIRES, who was born in New Jersey February 7, 1849. By this union they have had seven children, viz., Alice, Freddie, Frankie, Bertie, Roy, Flora and Nellie. Mrs. THOMASON is a daughter of James and Elizabeth (LISLES) SWIRES, who were natives of England; they are both living. The parents of Mr. THOMASON, Spencer and Mary (STONE) THOMASON, were natives of North Carolina, and early settlers of Greene County, having emigrated to that county in 1830. He was a farmer, and died in 1847, she died in 1861. They were the parents of seven children, of whom Andrew J. our subject, was the fifth child. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M. at Raymond, and[Page 254]also a member of the Royal Arch Chapter at Litchfield. In politics, he is a Democrat. Mr. THOMASON has, by his own unaided endeavors, made life-work thus far more than ordinarily successful, and is entitled to a place among the substantial men of Montgomery County.

John H. TODT, farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Germany October 21, 1834. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his native country afforded, and in working as a hired hand upon a farm. At the age of seventeen, he left his native country and sailed for America, when he settled in Greene County, Ill. Here he embarked on his career in life as a hired hand upon a farm for three months, and then removed to Jersey County, where he remained two years engaged in the same occupation, when he spent two years in Montgomery and Macoupin Counties, working summers in the former, and winters with his own people in the latter place. In 1857, he had, by his energy and business habits, accumulated enough funds to enable him to make a small purchase of land, which he did in Macoupin County, a tract of 120 acres of unimproved timber land. Here he remained for a period of eight years; during the time he improved his tract. In 1865, he sold his farm and removed to Montgomery County, where he first bought 160 acres of mostly wild prairie. Here he has since remained, and by his own endeavors has succeeded in accumulating a large tract of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation. He is now the owner of 480 acres, upon which he built a fine residence, by his own design, in 1879. He has also built large barns, etc., and everything about his place denotes the home of a first-class farmer. Much credit is due to Mr. TODT for the interest he has taken in improving surroundings, all of which show toward the wlefar of the county. In 1857, in Madison County, he married Miss Maria POGGENPOL, a native of Germany, born April 15, 1835. She is the mother of nine children, five of whom are living, viz., William, Herman, Frank, Elizabeth and Margaret; all are at home. Father of subject was Joseph TODT, who was born in Germany; during his life followed farming; joined the army when but seventeen years of age, and fought bravely under Napoleon Bonaparte I. He died in 1835, aged about forty-seven years. His wife, and mother of our subject, was Elizabeth MILLER. She was born in Germany in 1801; came to America with her sone in 1851; she died in April, 1873. She was the mother of seven children, John H. being the fourth child. He was appointed Postmaster in 1866, and held the office about three years. He has also held the office of Road Commissioner, and has been holding the office of School Trustee for eighteen years. He is also serving the people as County Supervisor to the satisfaction of all. He was elected in 1881.Religiously, self and family are connected with the Catholic Church. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party. When he first came to the county to live, it was but thinly settled, between his place and L. H. THOMAS', of Bois D'Arc, there was no settlement a distance of thirteen miles.

B. TULPIN, merchant, Harvel, was born in France April 5, 1836, where he received his education. On August 14, 1855, when nineteen years of age, he was married, and on the day following, emigrated to America with his bride, and landed in Virden, Ill., where he did his fist day's manual labor of Mr. John MORRELL. He remained near Virden and Girard about three years, working by the month. From there he went to Assumption, Christian County, and commenced farming. He followed that occupation two years in that [Page 255]county, and three years in Montgomery County, at the end of which time he entered upon a mercantile business at which he has since continued. In 1865 or 1866, he erected a store building about half a mile south of where Harvel is now located, and between the surveys of two proposed railroads. His was the first store, and he the first to engage in an enterprise of this nature. His facilities for doing business were somewhat limited, and his stock necessarily small, but being energetic and enterprising in business, and possessing the faculty of making himself agreeable to the public, he was soon enabled to increase his stock. His principal drawback was in speaking the English language, which, during his business career, he has mastered. In 1870, his stock and business had increased until it demanded more room, and he erected the building he now occupies, and where he has the satisfaction of conducting a large and increasing trade, the result of a successful business career; and, perhaps, no man has done more for public improvements and for the growth and prosperity of Harvel than Mr. TULPIN. He is always first in all enterprises, and socially enjoys the highest esteem of the entire community. He has at different times held town offices, but usually declines the honors which would otherwise be bestowed upon him. Aside from his business relations, he has added materially to the growth of the town by way of erecting several dwellings. He received his naturalization papers October 8, 1868, and has since been identified with the Republican party. His family consists of his wife and five boys, four of whom are living at home, Arthur, the oldest being married, but assisting his father in the store. Mr. TULPIN has had the misfortune to lose five children, for girls and one boy, all of whom died quite young. He has been a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity for several years. Although usually able to oversee his business, his health has been impaired to such an extent that he is at times obliged to remain at home. His children are Arthur Victor, Hector Maxamillian, Frank Octave, Charles Albert and Maurice Emmanuel, five boys, all living.

George W. VanSANDT, carpenter and joiner, Harvel, was born in Fleming County, Ky., December 14, 1817, where he received a common school education, and where his childhood days were spent upon the old homestead farm with his father. During the winter season, his time was employed in working at and learning the millwright and carpenter's trade, and at which he still followed when, at the age of twenty-one years, he left his home and entered upon his career in life. He remained in his native State until he was forty-five years of age, when his politics as a Whig did not make it pleasant for him at the breaking-out of the war, and, not being willing to take the oath to not oppose the Confederacy, he removed to Aberdeed, Ohio, where he remained two years, and then came to Montgomery County, Ill., and located in Butler Township, and there worked at his trade for about five years. In January, 1870, he removed to Harvel, his present residence, which was then just laid out and was surrounded by wild prairie. He built the first house which was erected at Harvel, and has also built many others, several of which belonged to him, which he rented to others. To him is due much of the credit for making Harvel the prosperous town it now is. For one year he was engaged in the mercantile business, but eventually returned to his trade. He was married in Lewis County, Ky., July 2, 1840, to Miss Isabella A. COOPER, who was born March 15, 1819, to Murdock and Elizabeth (PARKER) COOPER, natives of Kentucky.[Page 256]She died January 2, 1875, leaving five children, viz., Allen Jerome, George B., Eliza Bell, James C. and Nelson M. Mr. VanSANDT was married again in Montgomery County Ill., January 1, 1878, to Miss Mary A. B., who was born in Buffalo, N. Y., in March, 1842; she has borne him one child, Hattie. Mr. VanSANDT has been an active member of the Masonic order for about thirty years. Politically, he is identified with the Republican party. Religiously, he and wife are connected with the Methodist Church at Harvel. His father, William VanSANDT, was born in Kentucky in 1794; during his life, followed the occupation of a millwright and farmer. He lived to the advanced age of eighty-four years. His wife, and mother of our subject, was Margaret WILLIAMS; she was also a native of Kentucky, and lived to be about sixty years of age, and raised a family of nine children, all of whom grew to man and womanhood.

Conrad WILLAR, farmer, P. O. Raymond, was born in Germany, December 17, 1840. He received such an education as the common schools of his native country afforded, and in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of fifteen, he left his home and began working as a farm hand, continuing the same until he was tenty-five years of age, and then, in the year 1865, came to America, making his first stop at St. Louis, where, at the end of a month, he was compelled to leave, not being able to obtain employment. He then went to Butler, Montgomery County, and hired out as a farm hand, continuing thus for four years. In 1869, he married, and bought 240 acres of the farm upon which he now resides, and began farming on his own account. By his energy and business habits, he succeeded in paying for this tract, and in 1871 bought eighty acres more, which makes his farm consist of 320 acres, and it is as fine land as any in the State. January 13, 1869, in Montgomery County, he was married to Miss Elizabeth MUNSTERMAN, born in Germany, daughter of Henry and Margaret (WUCHERBFENNIG), both natives of Germany, from which union has been born five children, four of whom are living - Minnie, Henry, Joseph C. and Elizabeth K., all of whom are at home. The father and mother of our subject were both natives of Germany, and the parents of six children, two girls and four boys, Conrad being the third child. Mr. WILLAR and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat.

W. W. WHITLOW, farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Greene County, Ill., April 1, 1834; son of Daniel and Fanny (RAY) WHITLOW. The early life of our subject was spent on his father's farm, and, at the age of nineteen, hired out as a farm hand. In 1854, with his brother, he took charge of his father's farm and in 1856, whent to Macoupin County, where he contracted in breaking prairie. In the fall of 1857, he rented a farm at Macoupin Point, and remained there one year, when he returned to Macoupin County; then six years more in Macoupin County. In 1865, he removed to Montgomery County and settled upon a portion of the farm upon which he now resides, which at that time consisted of 240 acres of land, most of which has been improved by Mr. WHITLOW, and to which he has added until he has 560 acres. In 1881, he erected from his own designs a fine residence upon his farm, which, with barns, windmill, stock scales, etc., make the surroundings complete. In 1858, in Greene County, he married Miss Fannie THOMASON -  a native of Greene, born September 16, 1835, who has borne him ten children, six of whom are living - Mary A., born September 25, 1860; Flora A., May 31, 1862, George E., September 1, 1863; William A., March 21, 1865; John W., January 26, 1867; Sarah T., September 10, 1868, dead; Eva E., March 26, 1871; Olive, March 20, 1874, dead; Oscar, March 20, 1874, dead; Herbert, December 1, 1875, dead. Mr. WHITLOW is a Patron of Husbandry, and a Democrat; has held the position of Commissioner of Highways for ten years. The father of our subject was a native of Kentucky, a farmer, and died in 1878; the mother a native of North Carolina, and died in 1867. They had three children, subject being the oldest.

John P. YOUNG, farmer, P. O. Harvel, was born in Germany May 19, 1839. His father was Vincent YOUNG, who was born in Germany in 1799; during his life, followed rafting on the River Rhine, acting as steersman. He died October 25, 1851. Mother was Katharina (GLASER) YOUNG; was born in Germany in 1803, and died in 1865. She was the mother of ten children, of whom John P., our subject, was the ninth child. His education was limited to such as the common schools of his native country afforded. His early life was spent at home. At the age of eighteen, he left his home to see the New World. His first settlement in America was in Jersey County, Ill., where he began life as a hired hand upon a farm; he remained here one year. In 1858, he removed to New Orleans, where he worked unloading cares for one winter, when he returned to Jersey County for one year, following farming again. In 1859, he removed to Wisconsin, where he followed farming and other different kinds of work. In the spring of 1860 he returned to Illinois and settled in Montgomery County, where he rented a farm for three years. In the fall of 1863, he removed to Macon County, Ill., where he also rented a farm. In 1865, he removed to Decatur and engaged in meat market business for one year. In 1866, he returned to Montgomery County, where he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, where he has since remained. By his energy and business habits he succeeded in saving enough funds to buy him a place of eighty acres, all of which ha been improved by Mr. YOUNG. He commenced life a poor man, and by his own unaided efforts he has succeeded in gaining a good property and a name and reputation which is beyond reproach, being well worthy of the esteem in which he is held by his neighbors. He was married in 1867, in Decatur, to Miss Stefania FEHR, a native of Germany, born in December, 1843. She is the mother of seven children, six of whom are now living, viz., Frank, Mary E., Annie K., Mena, Sophia K., John P.; Frederick G. is dead. Mr. YOUNG is now holding the office of School Director. Religiously, himself and family are connected with the Catholic Church. Politically, his sympathies are with the Democratic party.

Orson YOUNG, mechanic, Harvel, was born in August, 1810, in Otsego County, N. Y., to Elam and Irene (EATON) YOUNG. His father was born near Ballston Springs, N. Y., and during his life followed his profession in the practice of medicine. He servedthrough the war of 1812. He died in Oregon, several years ago. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Otsego County, N. Y., and died in Oregon; she has also been dead many years. They were the parents of eight children, six boys and two girls, Orson YOUNG being the oldest child. He was brought to Clermont County, Ohio, by his parents when but six years of age. Here he received such an education as the common schools afforded. At the age of fifteen, he apprenticed himself at the trade of cloth dressing in the factory of Timothy SPRAGUE, and remained three years, but, be-[Page 258]ing more adapted to mechanical tools, gave up his trade and followed that of a carpenter. In the summer of 1853, he removed to Montgomery County, Ill., and entered 320 acres of wild prairie, he being among the early settlers of that county. In 1877, he removed from his farm to the town of Harvel, his present residence, where he is engaged in wagon-making. From 1853 until 1877, in Montgomery County, he worked at the carpenter's trade, and was the builder of many pioneer churches and dwellings. He is a man of good moral habits, and has the esteem of all well-disposed citizens of the community. In 1878, he was elected to the Board of Trustees, which office he filled to the entire satisfaction of the community. He has been twice married. The first time in Clermont County, Ohio, to Miss Hanna BURNETT, April 28, 1833. She was born in Clermont County, Ohio, April 13, 1810, and died in 1846. The second time, hemarried Miss Sarah HALL, May 31, 1846, a native of Ireland; she was born in 1824. By his first marriage he had five children, Elizabeth A., residing now in Ohio; Sarah E., now a resident of Indiana; Mary J., Irene and William B. who are dead. By his second marriage he as had six children, Samuel H., a resident of Montgomery County; Edmond B. and George D., of Iowa, and Matilda, of Montana, John and James O., who are dead. Mr. and Mrs. YOUNG are members of the Methodist Church, he having been a member for forty-five years.

[Pittman Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 259]

Albert BURNET, retired farmer, Raymond, was born in New York City May 17, 1812, to William and Catharine (HUTCHINGSON) BURNET. He was born in New Jersey in 1787; during his former lie, worked at the trade of a carpenter, and for several years previous to his death followed the occupation of a farmer; he died in 1849, in his native State; he was of English descent. She was born in Scotland in 1791, and died in 1856; she was the mother of seven children, of whom Albert was the fifth child. He remained with his parents till the age of sixteen years, receiving such an education as the common schools of his native State afforded; when he left home, he apprenticed himself at the blacksmith's trade in a small town where now is the city of Newark; here he remained until 1851, when he removed to Jersey County, Ill., where he worked at his trade for one year and six months; he then removed to Alton, Madison Co., Ill.; again worked at his trade for one year and a half; he then, in the spring of 1854, removed to Montgomery County and entered 160 acres of wild prairie; here he has remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits; by his energy and business, he succeeded inaccumulating a good property and a name and reputation which are beyond reproach; he is now the owner of 240 acres. In 1835, in New York City, he was married to Miss Sarah A. Cook, a native of New Jersey; she was born in 1815, May 1, to Samuel and Mary (KING) COOK. Mrs. BURNET is the mother of eight children, five of whom are living, viz.: Sarah C., now the wife of W. S. Palmer and residing in Litchfield; James M., now a resident of Pitman Township, Montgomery County; Jane Elizabeth, at home; Henry Cory, at home; Oswald Joseph, at home. Mr. BURNET has held office of School Commissioner. Mr. Burnet and family are religiously connected with the M. E. Church, he having joined the church in 1828; politically, is identified with the Republican party.

Rev. John R. BARBEE, clergyman, Girard, son of John and Mary (RAY) BARBEE, was born in Green County, Ky., December 26, 1828, where also he was raised, educated and married. His marriage to Miss Nannie, daughter of John and Hila (ROGERS) BOTTOM, was celebrated November 24, 1852, in Taylor County, Ky. In the fall of 1864, Mr. BARBEE moved into Pitman Township, Montgomery Co., Ill., where, about the same time, he bought a farm, comprising 103 acres of very rich land, well drained, and containing an abundant supply of stock water; he has quite recently erected on these premises a fine two-story frame dwelling house. Mr. BARBEE has a family of ssix children - Mary Ray, the wife of William HOWLAND, residents ofMontgomery County; Hila, the wife of Faris HOWLAND, residents of Pike County; Joseph Eller, John Waller, Elias William and Lilla May. Mr. BARBEE was ordained to the ministry of the Baptist Church about 1858, while residing in Kentucky; he is regarded by the public as devoted, talented and pious; to this sentiment we give approbation, and add, as an opion of our own, that he is one of the most industrious workers to be found in his denomination. Mr. BARBEE has a family record of which he has a right to feel proud; the relationship has been patrioticallyrepresented in every war of the nation from the Revolution to the late civil war of the great rebellion; his grandfather, Elias BARBEE, a seventh son, and six of this brothers, were soldiers in the war which gave independence to the American colonies and freedom to the world; Joshua and Thomas are the only names of these brothers handed down. Elias raised four sons - John, Elias, William and Thomas. Of these, John, Mr. BARBEE's father, with his uncle, Col. Joshua BARBEE, were soldiers in the war of 1812; John was in the engagement in which the celebrated Indian chief, Tecumseh, fell. John BARBEE, Mr. BARBEE's immediate ancestor, raised a family of nine children - Mrs. Lucy (Benjamin) THURMAN, of La Rue County, Ky.; Catharine; Mrs. Elizabeth (David) MEARS, of Green County, Ky.; Mrs. Julia (Thomas) LENDRUM, of McLean County, Ky.; Mary; Mrs. Lydia (John) ROBINSON OF Taylor County, Ky.; Elias, deceased; Joseph, of California; and John R., of this sketch. Elias was a soldier in the Mexican war, and was wounded in the battle of Buena Vista, in the same charge in which the brave Col. John J. HARDIN was killed. Mr. BARBEE himself was a Chaplain during our late civil strife, for the Thirteenth Kentucky Infantry, and was in the siege of Knoxville. The writer of this history has known this family for a number of years, and takes pleasure here to testify to their excellent standing and character, and heartily wishes that the old friendship and strong ties of sympathy may continue.

Charles H. BURTON, farmer, P. O. McVey, was born in Greene County, Ill., near Greenfield, to William L. and Rachael (DAVIDSON) BURTON, July 25, 1833; he was born in Virginia July 3, 1797; emigrated to Kentucky, and subsequently removed to Illinois about the year 1825, and settled in Greene County, Ill., near White Hall, in 1829 or 1830; here he remained until about 1858, when he removed to Montgomery county and resided with his son, our subject, to the time of his death, which occurred October 5, 1862; during his life, followed the occupation of a farmer; it is supposed he was of German descent; his wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Maryland January 9, 1798, and died January 21, 1852; they were the parents of ten children - five boys and five girls, viz.: Henry James D. (dead), Mary Jane (widow of Nathan T. MAXFIELD), Elizabeth C. (wife of William F. CARRICO, of Kansas), David Parker (dead), Martha A. (first wife of William CARRICO - dead), Margaret K. (second wife of Volentine CASWELL; she is now dead), John F. (dead), Charles H. (our subject), Sarah M. (dead), William A. (dead). Charles H. BURTON received his education at Greenfield, from the common schools and the Greenfield Academy; he remained with his parents to the age oftwenty-one, assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; he then embarked on his career in life as a school teacher, in Montgomery County, where he removed when he left his home; he taught during the winters of 1855 and 1856; in the summer of 1857, bought a farm of eighty acres and began farming; his farm was located in Section 16 of Pitman Township; here he remained until February, 1859, when he bought a farm adjoining his present residence, where he resided until the spring of 1863, when he removed to his present place, where he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits; he is now the owner of 100 acres of well-improved land, and under a high state of cultivation. On October 15, 1856, in Montgomery County, he married Samantha ROGERS; she was born in Macoupin County, Ill., April 18, 1835, to Benjamin and Lydia (SNOW) ROGERS, who were native of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. BURTON have had seven children, six of whom are now living; James O., born November 5, 1857; Lydia Estella, December 9, 1858; Rosa, July 9, 1860; George E., January 26, 1862; John A., April 6, 1863, died September 10, 1864; William W., October 25, 1867; Benjamin R., June 28, 1872. Self and family are religiously connected with the M. E. Church. Mr. BURTON was elected County Supervisor in 1877, and served three years; School Treasurer since 1869, and still holds office; Highway Commissioner at present; politically, a Republican; he is a member of Grange Lodge, No. 970, in Pitman Township, and called Washington Lodge. But three of Mr. BURTON's children are at home.

Charles GILLMAN, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Girard, was born in Germany, July 17, 1835, to Charles and Hannah GILLMAN. His early life was spent in receiving acommon-school education; at the age of fourteen, he was hired out to work on a farm by his father, as a shepherd, tending sheep; at the age of twenty-one, he bade his home farewell and emigrated to America; he made his first settlement in Sangamon County, Ill., and was under the employ of Charles HOPPIN for over five years; by his close attention to business and his economy, he was able, at the end of that time, to buy 360 acres of land in Pitman Township, Montgomery County; here he commenced farming in 1863 on his own account; by his energy and business habits, he has succeeded in accumulating about nine hundred and thirty acres of land, all lying in one tract in Pitman Township, with the exception of ten acres of timber; he is now principally engaged in stock-raising, making cattle and hogs a specialty, although he raises large quantities of all other kinds of stock; he is now the owner of over two hundred head of cattle; in about 1872, he enlarged his residence making it very large and commodious. In 1862, in Sangamon County, Ill., he married miss Anna HANTLA; she was born in 1846 in Germany; she is the mother of nine children, eight of whom are now living - Frank, Willie, Anna, Henry, Carrie, George, Emma and John. He has served the people as School Director. Himself and wife are religiously connected with the Lutheran Church. Mr. GILLMAN is strongly in favor of the Republican party.

William R. HOUCK, farmer, P. O. Raymond. The father of this gentleman was Ross HOUCK; he was born March 4, 1804, in Pennsylvania; here he received a limitedcommon-school education; he remained with his parents to the age of sixteen, assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of sixteen, he left his home, with a pack on his back, with only 25 cents in his pocket, to embark on his career in life, it being his intention to settle in the far West; he first stopped at Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked at the trade of a carpenter, which he had partially learned before he left his home; here he remained or one year, when he engaged with Virgil HICKOX, at a salary of $50 per month and expenses paid, selling books; he remained in the employ of his gentleman for about two years, during the time, by his economy and business habits, succeeding in accumulating enough funds to enable him to start in the same business on his own account, which he did in the State of Illinois, where he continued successfully for a term of five years; during the time, he had accumulated about $5,000, with which he entered land in Madison County, improved land, bought stock, and also opened a general merchandising store; he remained in Madison County for several years, but finally removed to Alton, where he filled official offices, which took the[Page 262]Most of his time; in 1843, he entered 160 acres in Macoupin County, which he improved, and removed his family to the same in 1845; he added to this tract until he owned 380 acres in that county; in about 1850, he entered 840 acres in Montgomery, which he had improved, but at the time made his home in Macoupin County; at the time of his death, he had accumulated 1,140 acres of land; his death occurred December 24, 1868; he was one of Macoupin County's most successful farmers and business men. His wife, and mother of our subject, was Lucinda Ann(GUNTERMAN) HOUCK; she was a native of Kentucky, born November 27, 1811, and is now residing in Macoupin County upon the homestead farm; she is the mother of seven children, all of whom are alive, William R. being the oldest child; he was born in Edwardsville, Madison Co., Ill, January 21, 1833; he received his education from the common schools of Alton, Woodburn, and the McKendree College at Lebanon. At the age of nineteen, he left his home, went to Bunker Hill, Ill., and embarked on his career in life as a clerk in a store; he remained here until 1854, when he started a general merchandising store at Edwardsville, Ill., on his own account, in partnership with Mr. John PRICKETT; in 1856, he sold his interest to his partner, when he returned to Bunker Hill, and with Mr. James RIDER, bought out the interest of his old employer, T. J. VanDORN; here he remained for a period of twelve years, during which time he had purchased the interest of his partner; in 1862, he purchased a flouring-mill, which he ran in partnership with P. C. HUGGINS until about the close of the war, when he took an interest in a store at Vicksburg; he remained here about one year, when he returned to Bunker Hill and engaged in farming on the old homestead; in 1870, he removed to Montgomery County and settled on a farm of eight acres, where he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits; by his energy and business, he has succeeded in accumulating 200 acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation. In Macoupin County, October 8, 1855, he married Miss Lucinda A. ALLARD, a native of Cape Cod, she born June 3, 1836; she is the mother of nine children, seven ofwhom are living - Carrie L., July 18, 1856; Edward R., March 28, 1858; William A., July 8, 1859; Elmira L., November 4, 1861; Mary E., February 24, 1864; Henrietta V. D. and Thomas V. D. (twins), April 17, 1866; Ross, July 4, 1868; Jessie M., May 12, 1870; Elmira L. and Jessie M. are dead. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M. Lodge, No. 151, at Bunker Hill; in politics, is identified with the Democratic party; self and family are connected with the Methodist Church.

John HAYNES, retired farmer, Atwater, was born in Harrison County, Ind., May 6, 1816, to William and Ann (TOTY) HAYNES; he was born in Person County, N. C., July 28, 1790; he was a farmer by occupation; from North Carolina he went to Kentucky, where he remained until after he was married, and then removed to Indiana, where he remained about three years, at the end of which time he returned to Kentucky,remaining only about three years, when he again returned West, and located in a portion of Morgan County which is now Cass County, Ill., where his death occurred the following year, May 25, 1830; his wife was also a native of North Carolina, born in 1791, November 27; died May 4, 1868; she was the mother of twelve children, all of whom, with one exception, grew to manhood and womanhood, and of whom John, the subject of this sketch, was the fifth child. His early boyhood was spent in assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits; owing to the limited school privileges. At that early day, his education was necessarily limited; but he has succeeded, by observation and by contact with the world, in receiving more than an ordinarypractical education. At the death of his father, he assisted his mother in the management of the property and in the support of the family; he remained with mother about three years, at the end of which time he apprenticed himself to learn the brick-maker's and brick-mason's trade, which he followed about twenty-two years; he eventually entered land in Morgan County, which he sold a few years later, and, in 1855, purchased 120 acres of the land upon which he has since resided, and to which he has continually added, until he now has thesatisfaction of managing a farm consisting of 276 acres of fine farm land, which will compare with any of the best regulated farms of the township, and places Mr. HAYNES in the list of practical farmers; at present, he is retired from active labor, but still remains upon the homestead, overseeing the cultivation of his land and enjoying the fruits of a well-regulated life and successful career. He was married, in Morgan County, October 18, 1842, to Miss Harriet SEYMOUR, who was born in North Carolina October 7, 1819; she is the mother of nine children, viz.: James, born September 25, 1843; Sarah Ann, born December 8, 1844, deceased; Green,born September 7, 1846; Mary Jane, born September 28, 1848; Alexander, born September 28, 1850; Charles, born November 28, 1852; an infant, born November 9, 1854, deceased; Henry, born July 12, 1857; John, born November 28, 1859 - thelatter of whom is now at home with his parents. Mrs. HAYNES was the daughter of James P. and Levina (LONG) SEYMOUR, natives of North Carolina, both deceased. Mr. HAYNES is not much interested in politics, and may be said to be independent in politics, and, as he says, votes for men and principles.

William HACKNEY, retired farmer, Atwater, born in New York City June 30, 1820, to William and Margaret (KEGLER) HACKNEY; he was born in Schenectady, N. Y., July 23, 1789; was a blacksmith by trade, but, during his life in the Est, worked in a foundry, and was the man who first burned coal upon a steamboat for making steam; he emigrated to Delhi, Jersey Co., Ill., in 1836, where he followed the occupation of a blacksmith; he died November 8, 1875, at Brighton; his wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Albany, N. Y., March 22, 1794, and died December 7, 1879; they were the parents of nine children, of whom William was the second child, of whom six are now living. William HACKNEY was removed to Troy, N. Y., by his parents in 1828, where he received his education from the high schools of Troy; at the age of thirteen, he began his career in life by working as a cabin boy, and afterward acted as cook, upon the Hudson River; in 1836, with his parents, removed to Illinois and settled in Jersey County, and again followed life on the fiver as deck hand and watchman for about nine years; he then commenced farming in Jersey County, on a farm of eighty acres; here he remained until 1863, when he removed to his present residence and bought 250 acres, a part of which was in timber and part prairie, lying in Macoupin and Montgomery Counties; by his energy and business habits, succeeded in accumulating a good property, name and reputation which stands beyond reproach; he is now the owner of about three hundred and twenty-five acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation, and has all the necessary improvements; upon his place he makes grain and stock a specialty. In 1842, December 1, in Jersey County, he married Caroline M. WILKINS, a native of Greene County, Ill., born February 8, 1824; she is a daughter of John And Elizabeth (LURTON) WILKINS, who were natives of Kentucky, and among the first settlers of Greene County. Mr. and Mrs. HACKNEY were the parents of nine children, two of whom are dead - Margaret E., Sarah T., Joseph, Matthew, John W., Carey O., Henry D., Udolpho and Katie G. Mr. HACKNEY is an active member of the fraternity of A., F. & A. M., No. 692, at Raymond. In politics, his sympathies are with the Democratic party.

Jeduthun B. NEWELL, retired farmer, P. O. Girard, son of Asahel and Elizabeth (BUSHNELL) NEWELL, was born in Rome, Oneida Co., N. Y., April 13, 1811; the family came to Greene County, Ill., in 1832; they moved to Calhoun in 1834, where they remained about ten years, during which time the mother died; after the death of his wife, Mr. NEWELL's father lived among his children during the remainder of his life; he died December 8, 1877; they both lived to a good old age, he dying in his eighty-fourth year, and she in her sixty-fifth; they were members of the church, and each had the reputation of being a devoted Christian. Mr. NEWELL bought his first land in Calhoun County, a tract of ninety-eight acres, lying on the banks of the Illinois River. November 27, 1834, he married Miss Eunice, daughter of Chuza and Sarah (BACON) BUSHNELL, by whom he had four children - William and Sarah, died in infancy; Ira B., died at forty years of age; and Alonzo C. His second wife, Lucinda UNDERWOOD, was born in Harrison County, Ky., February 5, 1817, daughter of Francis and Margaret (JARVIS) UNDERWOOD, he a native of Shropshire, England, died in 1853 she, born in Fayette County, Ky., in 1784, died in 1857; from this second marriage, four children have been born to them - Moses A., a teacher by profession; and Mrs. Mary A. HOOVEBECK, both of Harvel Township, Montgomery County; Lucy E. and William R. died in infancy. In 1844, Mr. NEWELL sold his farm in Calhoun County, and bought another farm in Greene County about five miles southwest of Carrollton, on which he moved, and where he resided till 1852, at which time he came to Montgomery County, Pitman Township, buying a farm of 280 acres of land where he now lives; this farm is well improved, and has a fine, rich, productive soil. Mr. NEWELL and wife are both members of the Methodist Church, in which denomination they have good standing; as citizens, they rank high. Mr. NEWELL has been, and is yet, rather a prominent man in society, and whose judgment is revered; he served three terms as Justice of the Peace while in Calhoun County, and three terms since in Montgomery County; in fact, he held the office as long as he would have it at all; his judgments were generally sustained in higher courts. The NEWELLs are supposed to be of English origin; it is not now definitely known when they came to this country; they were here, however, before our independence as a nation. Mr. NEWELL's grandfather, Solomon NEWELL, lived and died in the Sate of Connecticut. March 4, 1784, Asahel, Mr. NEWELL's father, emigrated, after his marriage, to Oneida County, N. Y., about 1807; he raised a family of seven children - Isaac, Jeduthun, Mrs.Elizabeth (Alonson) TWITCHELL, Asahel, Mrs. Clarissa (Thomas) REYNOLDS, Mrs. Louisa (Charles) THURP and Mrs. Ruth (Solomon) DESPAIN; Isaac died when about twenty-three years old; three of these children are now living - Jeduthun, Mrs. REYNOLDS, of Macoupin County, and Mrs. DESPAIN, of Granite City, U. T.

Joseph H. PITMAN, retired farmer, Raymond, was born in New Jersey in 1822, October 19, to Samuel and Fannie (PHILLIPS) PITMAN; he was born in New Jersey in 1795; during his former life, followed the trade of a weaver, but, during the latter years of his life, followed farming; he removed to the State of Illinois in 1839, and settled in Jersey County, which was at that time Greene County; here he remained to the time of his death, which occurred in 1855; she was born in New Jersey in about 1897, and died in her native State in 1829; she was the mother of seven children, Joseph H. being the fourth child; his school education was very limited, and only such as the common schools afforded; he has received the most of his learning by observation and study by himself; he remained with his father, assisting in managing the farm, to the time of his death, and remained upon the farm ten years after his father's death, supporting and caring for his father's family. In the spring of 1866, he removed to Montgomery County and settled upon his tract of 160 acres of uncultivated prairie land, which he had bought several years previous; here he has since remained, and made all necessary improvements upon his farm, until now it is in a high state ofcultivation; in 1879, he rented his land, it being his desire to retire from active labor, having, by his energy and business, accumulated a good property, and a name and reputation which stand beyone reproach. Mr. PITMAN has filled many township offices, and has been serving the people as County Supervisor for eight years, to the entire satisfaction of all well-disposed citizens. In politics, hissympathies are with the Republican party. The township of Pitman, of which he is a resident, was named from Mr. Joseph H. PITMAN.

Daniel C. RICHARDS, farmer, P. O. Raymond. The father of this gentleman was Samuel S. RICHARDS; he was born in Lima, Livingston Co., N. Y., February 22, 1818, where he was educated and brought up on a farm. In 1836, he removed to Illinois, settled at Rockford, Winnebago County, where he has been engaged in farming and merchandising, giving his attention principally to the former; he is the owner of 160 acres of land at the present time, he having accumulated, during his life, a large tract of land, all of which he improved; he is a son of Daniel RICHARDS, a native of New Yorl, The mother of our subject was Sarah BROWN, who was born in North Carolina February 19, 1818; she was brought to Illinois by her uncle, Aaron FELTS, in 1836, and settled in Winnebago County, Ill.; she remained with her uncle, Aaron FELTS, and her brother, William BROWN, to the time of her marriage, which occurred in 1837; she is the mother of fourteen children, three of whom are now living - Daniel C., our subject; Oscar L., of Rockford, a farmer; Clara M., now at home. Mrs. RICHARDS, the mother of our subject, is the daughter of Daniel BROWN,who was a native of North Carolina, and was of German descent. D. C. RICHARDS was born in Harrison Township, Winnebago Co., Ill., August 11, 1838; his early life was spent in receiving such education as the common schools of his native countyafforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm, which at that time was very wild and unimproved. At the age of twenty-one, he left home and moved to Michigan, where he embarked on his career in life as a farm hand, and, during the two years' stay in Michigan, his time was divided in farming, teaching school and attending a select school taught by a Miss BROWN; the opportunity afforded him a chance to complete his education, which he improved. In the summer of 1861, he returned to his home, and taught school the following winter, when he entered the Durand Academy, at Durand, in his native county, for a period of four months, and, on the 5th of July, in 1862, he enlisted in the Seventy-first Illinois Infantry, under command of Col. GILBERT; he served in thisregiment for three months, at the expiration of which time he returned home. After the battle of Stony River, he was engaged as clerk in the Quartermaster's Department, and remained in the employ of Quartermaster's Department at Murfreesboro, Nashville and Clarksville, Tenn., until about the 1st of April, 1865; he then returned to St. Louis, and subsequently to Pitman Township, Montgomery County, and settled on his present residence June 1, 1865; he remained here for about one month, and returned to his home in Winnebago County, where he remained until fall of the same year, when he located permanently on his place, October 3, 1865; here he has since remained, engaged in stock-raising and farming; in stock-raising he has been engaged quite extensively, at times keeping about two hundred head. He is now the owner of 80 acres of, but generally works about three hundred; his farm is well improved, and under a high state of cultivation. At St. Louis, October 25, 1864, he married Miss Hannah P. HOUCH, a native of Macoupin County, Ill., who as born June 14, 1839; she is the daughter of Ross and Lucinda A. (GUNTERMAN) HOUCK; he was a native of Pennsylvania; she was of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Richards are the parents of one child, Frank Claud; he was born March 9, 1882. Mr. RICHARDS is now serving the people on his second term as Justice of the Peace; he also has been School Director for a number of years. Mr. RICHARDS is a member of the fraternity of A., F. & A. M., No. 166, at Rockford; of the Grangers' Lodge, Maple Grove Grange, at Pitman Township; was Master of the same for several years, and Secretary of County Council for several years; in politics, is identified with the Republican party; he and wife are religiously connected with the Baptist Church; he has been Clerk of the Baptist Church for about nine years, since its organization. Mr. RICHARDS has been actively engaged in Sunday school work and temperance work.

James ROGERS, farmer, P. O. McVey, was born in Macoupin county, Ill., January 11, 1838; his early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his native county afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of fourteen years, he was brought to Montgomery County by his parents, who settled on the same farm he is now residing on; he remained with his parents to the age of twenty-four, when he married and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, at which he still continues, having, by his industry and business habits, succeeded in accumulating ninety-five acres of land, all of which (eighty-five improved and ten acres of timber) is under a high state of cultivation; in 1878, upon his farm he erected, by his own design, a handsome frame cottage; upon his farm he makes stock-raising and all general crops a specialty; his farm is located mostly in Montgomery County, his timber land being in Macoupin County. The father of this gentleman, Benjamin K. ROGERS, was born in Greene County, Ky., January 30, 1815; emigrated with his parents toMontgomery County, Ill., in the fall of 1830; his life was spent in following the occupation of farming; was a man who stood high in the estimation of his fellow-men; at the time of his death, he was holding the office of School Treasurer, and, in Macoupin County, served several terms as Justice of the Peace, and as many terms in Montgomery County; he joined the M. E. Church in 1850, and, at the time of his death, was a faithful member; he lived to see all his children but one in the church; his death occurred December 11, 1868; during his life, he succeeded in accumulating a good arm, all of which he improved; his wife, and mother of our subject, was Lydia SNOW, who was born in Simpson County, Ky., May 26, 1816, and died January 19, 1850; she was the mother of eight children, seven of whom are now living, James ROGERS being the third child. He was married, in Greenfield, Greene County, November 13, 1861, to Eglantine, the daughter of Valentine and Louisa (MADISON) CASWELL; Mrs. ROGERS was born in Greene County, Ill., December 29, 1843; her father was born in Shawneetown, Ill., June 12, 1820; he has, during his life, been engaged in farming, but is now retired, and residing in Greenfield, Ill.; his wife was born in Ohio June 8, 1824, and died March 7, 1853. Mr. and Mrs. ROGERS are the parents of four children - Rollie B. is now the wife of Edgar MASSA, of Macoupin County; Dora M., Frederick O., Grant V., at home. Mr. ROGERS is now serving the people as School Director of the township; self and family are members of the Methodist Church; politically, he is identified with the Republicans.

John D. STREET, retired farmer, Girard, was born in Shelby County, Ky., August 10, 1820, to David and Catharine (DUNCAN) STREET; his early life was spent in receiving a common-school education and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; he was brought to Illinois, Macoupin County, by his parents, in 1831; in 1841, he left houme and embarked on his career in life as a hired hand; in 1842, he moved ot Iowa, where he remained four years, and, while there, experienced many hardships, such as are found in a pioneer life; one instance he remembers of going sixty miles to a mill to get his corn ground, and, after making the trip, found it impossible to get his grist, as the water was so high as to prevent the running fo the mill; he returned, and, to keep from starving, used a coffee-mill to grind corn enough to live on. In 1847, he returned to Macoupin County and engaged in farming, which he followed for about one year, after which he again worked by the month, or day, at carpentering, and, in fact, at anything he could find to do and receive a compensation for his labors. In 1856, he went to Texas, where he followed hunting; while there, he bought 600 acres of land, but was defrauded out of it by the last rebellion; he returned to Montgomery County, Ill., in 1857, and, in 1861, bought 120 acres of unimproved land in Pitman Township, upon which he removed his family in 1862; here he has since remained, engaged principally in raising stock; his farm now consists of 231 acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation. Mr. STREETcommenced life a poor man; by his honesty, industry and economy, he has succeeded in accumulating a good property now, in the later years of his life, he is surrounded with those comforts and enjoying those pleasures that are ever the result of honesty, industry and economy. Mr. STREET was married, April 3, 1862, to Mary E. BANNING; she was born in Illinois in 1838; she was the mother of sevenchildren, of whom six are now living - Andrew T., Sarah C., John W., Jennie A., Charles M. Antoinette G. and Bessie Lula, all of whom are at home. The father of Mr. STREET was born in Virginia in 1785, and died in 1855; he was a farmer andstone-mason; he was among the early settlers of Kentucky, and also of Illinois; his wife, and mother of J. D. STREET, was born in Virginia August 26, 1788; was brought to Kentucky by her parents when quite a small child; she died November 4, 1838; she was the mother of eleven children, of whom our subject was the sixth child. In politics, Mr. STREET is a Republican; is a member of Washington Grange, Lodge No. 970, of Pitman Township; in the lodge, he has acted as Treasurer; he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

Peter STUMP, farmer, P. O. Girard, was born in Hocking County, Ohio, June 1, 1819, to John and Catharine (FOUSTER) STUMP; he was born in Pennsylvania in 1797; was brought to Hocking County, Ohio, by his parents when a child; here he remained until 1857, when he removed to Illinois; during his life, followed the occupation of a farmer, and died in Montgomery County in 1872; was of German parentage; she was born in Pennsylvania in 1807; her parents were natives of Germany; she died in 1852. They were the parents of twelve children - six boys and six girls - of whom Peter was the third child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of Hocking County, Ohio, afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; he remained at home until he was twenty-five years of age, when he embarked on his career in life as a hired hand in a saw-mill. In 1852, he removed to Knox County, Ill., where he remained two years, following farming and working in a saw-mill; in 1854, he removed to Macoupin County, where he commenced farming on rented property; by his honesty, industry and economy, he succeeded in saving some money, with which, in 1862, be bought 160 acres of partially improved land; here he has since remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits; he is now the owner of 210 acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation. In 1845, in Hocking County, Ohio, he married Miss Samancy BUSHY, a native of Ohio; she died in 1857; she was the mother of four children - John, married, living in Missouri; Daniel, married, near Harvel, Ill.; Catharine, wife of Rutledge FOX, of Pitman; Luelza, dead. In 1860, be married Mrs. Nancy MAYS; she was born in Greene County, Ill.; she is the mother of one child, Lydia Ann, now at home. Politically, he is a Democrat; himself and wife are religiously connected with the Methodist Church. When he first commenced life as a hired hand in the saw-mill, he worked three years and only missed seven days; worked a portion of the nights; he worked very hard to make a living.

George W. WAGGONER, deceased, was born in Hardin County, Ky., October 8, 1826, to Adam and Mary Ann (TERRY) WAGGONER, natives of Kentucky. The WAGGONER family is of German extraction, but came to America before the war of the Revolution; in the struggle, they esponsed the patriot cause, and bore their part in the struggle to throw off the yoke of British oppression. David, Adam WAGGONER's father, was a soldier in the war, and he was the fortunate father of a family who have ever been loyal to the calls of their country. Adam WAGGONER was born January 30, 1800, and died August 8, 1860; his wife was born August 11, 1800, and died January 26, 1874; she was the daughter of Jasper and Sarah Terry; this family is of English descent, and has a history running back to the period of the earliest settlements of this country. George WAGGONER was brought to Jersey County, Ill., in 1830, by his parents, who were among the first to enter upon pioneer life in the then far West; his early life was spent upon the homestead farm, assisting in improvements and in all the agricultural pursuits incident to early pioneer industries; his educational privileges were limited to the common schools at that early day. In 1849, he entered 480 acres of wild prairie land in Montgomery County, which he eventually increased until he had in his possession about eight hundred acres of land, nearly all of which he improved, and Which, as a practical farmer, he kept in a high state of cultivation. Mr. WAGGONER was one of the few men possessing all the energy and enterprise of a man bound to make his mark in the world; he entered uon his career in lifecomparatively a poor man, and his subsequent possessions represented the dollars earned by himself, and through the result of his good management and thorough and practical business ability; he was a public-spirited man, always interested in all public improvements and enterprises, and generous in his donations for the advancement of educational and church privileges; he was for a number of years prior to his death an active member of the Baptist Church, and, in his daily walk in life, emulated the principles of Christianity. He was married, in Macoupin County, Ill., December 2, 1851, to Elizabeth J. McCOLLOUGH, and, during the fifteen years of married life, Mr. WAGGONER proved himself to be a kind father and devoted husband; his death occurred September 29, 1866; he was the father of four children, viz.: Horace G., George B., Henry Q. and John M., all of whom have grown to maturity. Mrs. WAGGONER was born in Rocking ham County, Va.; March 22, 1827; at the death of her husband, she was left with a family of small children, the oldest of whom was but eleven years of age; she took upon herself the management of the property and support of her children; she is a lady possessing all the womanly graces, combined with energy and enterprise, and she also has the faculty of managing business affairs with a shrewdness and ability which but few women possess, whether thrown upon their own resources through misfortune or otherwise; she has added to he property, left by her husband, about twelve hundred acres of land, and most of which is now rented, but all of which has been under her own management; she is now surrounded by her children, in the declining days of her life, which to her is a comfort and a blessing; the farm lands now consist of about twenty-two hundred acres of land, which Mrs. WAGGONER and her suns have mutually decided to divide the property without the assistance of administrators or otherwise. Mrs. WAGGONER was a daughter of John and Sarah (McCREA) McCOLLOUGH; he was a native of Belfast, Ireland, born September 24, 1791, and was one of the earlysettlers of Macoupin County; he was a farmer by occupation; his death occurred August 30, 1844; his wife was born in Pendleton County, Va., March 27, 1799; she died April 30, 1851; she was the mother of eight children, of whom Mrs. WAGGONER was the second child; she was educated in the common schools of Macoupin County. Mrs. WAGGONER may well be proud of her family of boys, all of whom are steady and industrious, following business in a manner like their father; her father was in the war of 1812.

Winter P. WAGGONER, stock-raiser, P. O. Decatur, was born in Pitman Township, Montgomery Co., Ill., April 8, 1861, to William R. and Sarah R. (McCOLLOUGH) WAGGONER; he was born in Jersey County, Ill., September 9, 1833, where he received his education; he remained in his native county with his parents, assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm until he was twenty-one years of age, when he removed to Pitman Township, Montgomery county, and entered a small tract of land; here he remained, engaged in farming and stock-raising, during his life, and succeeded in accumulating 1,300 acres of land, all of which he improved and put under a high state of cultivation; in connection with his farming and stock-raising, he shipped a great deal of stock, finding a market in St. Louis for the same; for about five years previous to his death, which occurred January 20, 1871, he followed the later business alone; was a member of the Baptist Church; his father was Adam WAGGONER, who was of German descent; his mother, was Mary A. (TERRY) WAGGONER, who was of English descent. Adam WAGGONER served through the Black Hawk war as Captain; in the possession of our subject is a rifle used by his grandfather. Adam WAGGONER came from Kentucky, his native place. William WAGGONER was married, in Macoupin County, April 16, 1857, to Sarah R. McCOLLOUGH; she was born in Virginia December 3, 1832, and died June 2, 1866; she was the mother of four children, two of whom died in infancy; our subject, Winter P., and E. Leroy, are now living; E. Leroy was born September 23, 1863, is now clerking in dry goods store of W. C. MILLER & Co., of Hillsboro. In 1867, in Greene County, Mr. WAGGONER married a second time, Susan C. RACE, a native of Virginia; she died in 1880, aged thirty-eight years; she was the mother of one child, S. Colfax WAGGONER, who is following the occupation of a farmer. Adam WAGGONER was born January 30, 1800, in Hardin county, Ky.; emigrated to Illinois in the year 1830; he died August 8, 1860; he was a farmer; his wife, and grandmother of our subject, was Mary A. (TERRY) WAGGONER, born August 11, 1800, in Virginia; she died in January, 1874; they had seven children, of whom Winter was the third child. Our subject received his education at Valparaiso, Ind., at the Northern Normal School, and the Blackburn University, at Carlinville, in connection with hiscommon-school education; his father died when he was ten years old, when he made his home with William SEWARD, and remained there four years, when he made his home in Pitman Township. In the fall of 1879, he commenced farming, and continued the same until the fall of 1881, when he removed to Decatur, where he has since remained, enjoying himself. He was married, March 7, 1880, in Carlinville, to Miss Cora B. RENSHAW, a native of Decatur, Ill.; she was born January 20, 1861; is the daughter of Lucius and Martha J. (WALKER) RENSHAW, he born n Nashville, Tenn., October 27, 1824, died December 27, 1862; he was a contractor, and was the owner of about four hundred acres of land near Decatur; she was born October 22, 1838, in Carlinville, Ill.; she is now residing in Decatur, and is now the wife of William TAGGART. Mr. and Mrs. WAGGONER are the parents of one child, Winter Preston, Jr.; he was born January 7, 1881; in politics, is identified with the Republican party. Mr. WAGGONER is the owner of 540 acres of land, lying principally in Pitman and Zanesville Townships, it being one of the finest farms of the townships; upon his farm he has all modern improvements, and it is under a high state of cultivation, upon which he intends to remove in the spring of 1883, and engage in stock-raising; he and wife expect to spend the summer at Eureka Springs, in Arkansas.

William B. WOOD, farmer, P. O. McVey. The father of this gentleman, Alfred WOOD, was born in Tennessee in about 1817; emigrated to Montgomery County with his parents in about 1820; during his life, he followed the occupation of a farmer; he died in about 1847; his wife, and mother of our subject, was Malinda BAKER; she was born in Arkansas in about 1812, and died in about 1852; she was the mother of seven children, of whom William B. WOOD was the oldest child. He was born in Montgomery County April 2, 1842; his early life was spent in receivingsuch an education as the common schools of his native county afforded, and in assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm; he remained at home to the age of nineteen, when he embarked on his career in life as a farm hand; he continued as a hired hand until he was twenty years of age, when he rented a farm of forty acres in Pitman Township, where he commenced farming on his own account; her remained here about six months, and removed to Honey Bend and commenced farmingon the old homestead farm; in 1862, he bought thirty-five acres in Pitman Township, of timber land; upon this farm he remained only about one year, when he sold out and bought forty acres of the same farm he is now residing on; here he has sinceremained, engaged in farming. In 1862, February 27, he married Miss Mary E. MILLER; she was born in Montgomery County March 18, 1845, and died June 11, 1864; she was the mother of one child, Julia A.; she was born August 16, 1863; is at home. On March 15, 1866, he married Miss Hiley A. ROGERS; she was born in Macoupin countySeptember 15, 1843; she is the mother of four children - Nancy M., born May 4, 1867; Alfred B., born October 13, 1869; William E., born February 24, 1872; Nellie, born February 10, 1876. Mr. WOOD is now serving the people in his third term as Justice of the Peace; himself and wife are members of the Methodist Church; politically, is identified with the Republican part. In 1865, he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry; he served one year and twelve days.

[Bois D'Arc Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 272]

George H. BROWNING, farmer, P. O. Girard, was born in Greene County,
Ill., April 22, 1834; his education was obtained in the common schools of his native county, where his early life was spent in assisting his grandfather upon a farm. At the age of eighteen, he returned home and took upon himself the support of his mother and her family, which duties he performed until he reached the age of twenty-five years, when he embarked upon his career in life as a farmer, and has followed that occupation up to the present time; his first purchase of real estate was in Greene County, and consisted of forty acres of land, which he improved, added to and eventually sold; in 1866, he purchased the property he now owns, and has built most of the buildings and made all other improvements which are usually found upon a well-regulated farm, and everything about the premises confirms the reputation Mr. BROWNING bears as being a successful and enterprising farmer; he has, by his energy and industry, accumulated a large property, and now owns 200 acres of choice prairie farm land all of which, as a practical farmer, he keeps in a high state of cultivation, and upon which he grows all of the usual farm crops; he also raises all the stock he handles upon his place. He was married, in Greene County, December 20, 1860, to Louisa E. ADCOCK, who was born in Greene County April 15, 1838; she has borne him twelve children, viz.: Maxie J. (wife of George Simon), Edward M., William A., Cora L. (deceased), George C., Lena L., John W., Jacob O., Sarah E., Aquilla E., Perry L., Myrtle (an infant. Mrs. BROWNING was a daughter of Issan and Rachael (STINNET) Adcock, natives of Kentucky, he deceased, she still living. Matiac BROWNING, the father of George, was a native of Kentucky, and was one of the early settlers of Greene County; he was a preacher by profession; his death occurred in 1842; his wife, Maxie WOOD, was also a native of Kentucky; she died in 1860; she was the mother of nine children, of whom George, our subject, was the fourth. Politically, he is identified with the Democratic party. Mrs. BROWNING is connected with the Baptist Church.

William EVANS, farmer, P. O. Virden, was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., February 12, 1828, and was brought to Illinois when but nine years of age; his father, Henry EVANS, settled in Alton when there were but three log houses in the town; he remained there about twenty years, engaged in blacksmithing, and his was the first shop in the town; he was a native of Ireland, and, when twenty-four years of age, emigrated to America with his wife and one child; he died in 1861, aged sixty-five years; his wife, Isabella GORDON, was also a native of Ireland; she died in 1854, aged fifty-seven years; she was the mother of nine children, of whom William was the second child. He assisted his father in his shop until he was nineteen years of age, when the family removed from Alton and settled upon a farm, where the father of our subject remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits up to the time of his death. William remained upon the farm until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he entered upon his career in life, following in the footsteps of his father, as a blacksmith; he continued in that occupation at Otter Creek, Jersey County, about twenty years, at the end of which time he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, purchased the property upon which he now resides, and upon which he has made all the improvements, which denote his energy and enterprise as a man, and show him to be a practical farmer; he farm consists of 160 acres of choice land, all of which is under cultivation; although he grows all of the usual farm crops, he makes a specialty of grain. He was married, in Jersey County, April 7, 1847, to Miss Louisiana NOBLE, who was born in Mississippi July 4, 1829; she has borne him eight children, viz.,: Henry (deceased), Isabella, Martha Ann, Albert, Kate, Benjamin, Hattie, William (deceased). Mrs. EVANS was a daughter of Solomon and Louisiana (SOJOURNER) NOBLE, natives of Mississippi. Mr. EVANS has served the people as Supervisor two years; was once elected Justice of the Peace, but declined to serve; politically, he is identified with the Republican party; he has been a member of the I.O.O.F. for a number of years, and is also an active member of the A., F. & A. M. at Virden. Socially, he ranks high in the community, and in him are found the elements which, combined, make a man a good neighbor, a kind husband and an indulgent father.

Charles T. HOPPIN, farmer, P. O. White Oak, was born in Madison County, N. Y., June 8, 1817, where he received his education in the common schools, and assisted his father upon the old homestead until he was twenty-five years of age, when he married and engaged in farming for himself. He remained in New York three years, and then concluded to try the pioneer life in the then far West, and settled in Sangamon County, Ill., where he began handling sheep upon the prairies, and was at one time one of the largest sheep and wool dealers in the State; by his energy, he also accumulated a large amount of land in Sangamon and Montgomery Counties, which he improved and cultivated himself, and held a position as one of the practical farmers of the day. He was married, in 1842, to Eliza McCONNELL, who bore him three children, who grew to manhood and womanhood; she died in 1853, an, tow years later, he was again married, to Phinett PARMETER, who is still living, and is the mother of eight children, all of whom are living, and all at home. Politically, Mr. HOPPIN is a Republican.

William A. KNOCK, farmer, P. O. Virden, was born in Fulton County, Ill., August 27, 1833; his education was limited to such as could be obtained in the common schools of his native county; during his school days, and up to the time he was twenty-nine years of age, assisted his father upon the old homestead; at the breaking-out of the war, he entered the service in Company F, Eighty-fourth Illinois Infantry, with Capt. C. B. COX, his regiment commanded by Col. WATERS, he remained in the service until the close of the war, and then purchased the property he now owns, and once again took upon himself the duties of a farm life; he erected a fine farm dwelling, which does honor to the county and to Mr. KNOCK as an architect; he has also made all the other improvements that are necessary on a well-regulated farm, such as outbuildings, orchards, fences, etc.; his farm consists of 120 acres of fine farm land, which, as a practical farmer, he keeps in a high state of cultivation, and which denotes his energy and enterprise, and makes him worthy of the position he holds as one of the leading agriculturists of the county; he has always taken a leading part in all public improvements and in educational privileges; socially, he enjoys the highest esteem of the entire community. His father, D. C. KNOCK, is a native of Delaware, and was one of the first to enter upon pioneer life in Fulton County, Ill., where he is still living, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life, with his wife, Phoebe EASLEY, who was born in Freeport, Ohio; she is the mother of thirteen children, of whom William is the second child. He was married, in Morgan County, August 21, 1867, to Sarah J. (KINNETT) MILLER, who was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, March 23, 1836; they have two children, viz.: Luetta and Sarah Phoebe, both of whom are at home and attending school. Mrs. KNOCK was a daughter of W. P. and Ann (BROWN) KINNETT, natives of Ohio, and still living. Mr. KNOCK has held several town offices; is also a prominent member of the Grange; politically, he is identified with the Republican party.

Martin McLEAN, farmer, P. O. Girard, was born in Ireland in 1819; his education was limited, owing to the fact that his early life was spent in assisting his father upon his farm, and that the facilities for gaining an education were also limited; at the age of twenty-six, he embarked upon his career in life as a farmer upon his own account. In 1845, he emigrated to America, and remained in New York seven months, and in New Jersey about fifteen years, engaged as a farm hand, at the end of which time he removed to Montgomery County and purchased 160 acres of prairie land, upon which he has made all the improvements necessary for comfort, and which are found only upon the best regulated and cultivated farms; by his energy, industry and economy, he has continued to add to his possessions until now he has the satisfaction of overseeing the cultivation of 480 acres of as choice prairie farm land as can be found in Montgomery County, and to him are due all honors that can be paid any man who has begun the battle of life as a poor boy, and has, by energy and enterprise, worked his way through the world until he is now known and recognized as one of the most successful and practical farmers of the county; although he grows all the usual farm crops, he makes a specialty of grain, and raises nearly all the stock handled upon his farm; he is a man who ranks high in the estimation of the community, and of which he is well worthy; he is a public-spirited man, and has long been identified with the growth and prosperity of Bois D'Arc Township, and especially in gaining the position it has attained as being one of the best townships in the county; although he takes no leading part in politics, he is identified with the Democratic party. In 1847, he married Mary CAREY, who was born in Kings County, Ireland, and emigrated to America when she was twenty-seven years of age; she is the mother of two boys and one girl, viz.: John James, William Henry and Margaret, all of whom are still living; John is Circuit Clerk at Hillsboro; William H. married and living on the homestead farm; Margaret, living at home. James McLEAN, the father of Martin, was a native of Ireland, a farmer by occupation; he died in 1868; his wife Julia QUINLAND, was also a native of Ireland; she died in 1866; she was the mother of thirteen children, of whom Martin was the seventh child; himself and family are connected with the Catholic Church. St. Martin's Cemetery is located upon Mr. McLEAN's farm, the property being donated by him to the society, and the cemetery named St. Martin in honor of Mr. McLEAN.

Abel S. RANDOLPH, farmer, P. O. Virden, was born in New Jersey August 5, 1831; his father, Louis RANDOLPH, was also a native of New Jersey, but moved to Jacksonville, Ill., in 1835, and remained there one year, and then removed to Jersey County, where he is still living; he was one of the early settlers of the county, and holds a prominent position among the agriculturists of the county; his wife, Mary COMPTON, was also a native of New Jersey, and is still living; she is the mother of seven children, of whom Abel was the second child; he received his education in the common schools of Jersey County, and assisted his father upon the old homestead until he was thirty years of age, when he came to Montgomery County and continued his occupation as a farmer for himself; he erected his dwelling and made all other improvements on the farm himself, and has now in his possession 200 acres of choice farm land, well fenced, well stocked, and which he keeps in high state of cultivation; the surroundings on Mr. RANDOLPHS's farm denote energy and enterprise, and show him to be a practical farmer, and well worthy of the position he holds as one of the leading agriculturists of the county; he devotes time to growing the usual crops, and raises all the stock he handles; politically, his sympathies are with the Republican party. He was married in Jersey County, June 9, 1869, to Minerva EDWARDS, who was born in Ohio October 27, 1838; she has borne him one child, Henry, born April 21, 1870. Mrs. RANDOLPH was a daughter of Andrew and Mary (DARLINGTON) EDWARDS, natives of Ohio. Mrs. RANDOLPH is connected with the Methodist Church at Wesley Chapel.

Lewis H. THOMAS, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (ISLEY) THOMAS, was born May 24, 1827, in Greene County, Ill., where he was raised; after receiving, in the district schools, an education, he commenced the study of surveying, completing the latter at Carrollton Academy; in the spring of 1851, Mr. THOMAS entered 970 acres of land in Township 12 north, Range 5 west, Montgomery County, the entry being the fourth and by far the largest, up to that time, in the township; after entering the land, Mr. THOMAS put a hedge around the entire tract, which was so successful that the name of the plant, Osage Orange, or Bois D'Arc, was given to the township; he also planted groves of timber, and it is a remarkable fact that, in eleven years from the time of planting a fifteen-acre lot, he cut wood enough from it to burn 300,000 brick, with which he built one of the finest mansions in the State. Mr. THOMAS is one of the most progressive men in the State, and is always making improvements on his fine estate; he has been a stock-dealer since his boyhood, having inherited the business from his father; he is operating a ranch in Kansas, where he has considerable land inclosed with fences, for convenience in handling high grade stock. Mr. THOMAS has been twice married, each time to a daughter of Isham and Sarah LINDER, of Greene County; the first marriage, to Miss Minerva C. LINDER, occurred May 23, 1854, but she only lived ten days after the birth of a son, who also died a few months after his beloved mother “fell asleep in Jesus.” Mr. THOMAS, November 11, 1863, married Miss Sarah A. LINDER, who has blessed her husband with seven children, five of whom are living - ETTIE, John I., William H., Mary L. and Samuel; an infant son and daughter, Harry and Matilda, are dead. The THOMAS family are of Welsh extraction, and the father of our subject, Samuel THOMAS, was one of the early pioneers of this section, having come to Greene County in 1818, and there he lived until his death, which occurred December 23, 1873; the wife of Samuel, and mother of Mr. L. H. THOMAS, was Miss Elizabeth ISLEY, daughter of Rev. William Jones, a Baptist minister.

Samuel R. THOMAS, farmer, P. O. Virden, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (ISLEY) THOMAS, was born May 2, 1829, in Greene County, Ill., where he was raised and educated; in his education he had only such advantages as were common to district schools; he nevertheless made an extraordinary advancement in literature and science, considering his surroundings, mastering not only the ordinary branches of an English education, but philosophy, higher mathematics, surveying and navigation; these branches were studied without the assistance of a teacher; his mind, by a kind of natural intuition, reveled in mathematical calculation; and in leisure hours he wrote down Colman's Treatise on Algebra; to give an idea of his aptitude in calculation, we mention the fact that, when in his thirteenth year, he mastered all the problems in Smith's Arithmetic in a thirty-days' study; he also, at an early age, familiarized himself with the science of astronomy; he kept his father's books from the time he was thirteen till he commenced business for himself; in connection with his brother Lewis, he managed, for some time, the business of his father's farm, buying, selling and shipping; he was, in truth, a kind of confidential adviser. When in the twenty-first year of his age, he entered a section and a half of land in Township 12 north, Range 5 west; his entry was made in the fall of 1850, and in 1851 he broke a hedgerow, inclosing this entire tract; this was a part of the first prairie-breaking done in the township. December 29, 1851 he married Miss Elizabeth M., daughter of Matthew and Margaret (TAYLOR) DAYTON, of Greene County, Ill.; the DAYTONs also were old pioneers of this section of the State; Mrs. THOMAS' grandfather, Thomas DAYTON, with four of his sons, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Matthew, were soldiers in the war of 1812, and took part in the battle of Plattsburg, next to the last engagement of any consequence of that war; the family are descended from Wales, and settled in the United States of America prior to their independence of the mother country; Mrs. THOMAS' aunt on her father's side, Betsey Ann JACOBS, of Vermont, when in her seventieth year, cut a new set of teeth, and was re-endowed with an eyesight equal to that of her youth; this fact is mentioned as confirming the theory that nature, in its primitive state, had the power of recuperation and renewal. Mrs. THOMAS is of a good family, well educated and intelligent; in fact, during her school days like her husband, she was considered the prime student of her school; before she was married, she taught one or two terms. Mr. THOMAS remained some two years in his native county after his marriage, and then came to Montgomery County and occupied his farm; here he has since resided, adding improvements to his lands, and engaged in the stock business, and is the heaviest stock-grower in the county; his farm now consists of three sections of land, as fine as are to be found within the county or State, in a very high state of cultivation; the residence is a handsome and commodious frame building, possessing all the conveniences and apartments adapting it to the wants and requirements of a country seat; a cistern is placed in the attic story, from which the water is conveyed to every room fo the house; instead of a cellar, an attachment is made, which consists of a room formed of double walls, and floor some two feet below the grade of the earth's surface; this attachment joins onto the kitchen, and keeps vegetables and fruits as well as a cellar, and does not add a mold to butter and other articles; we advise any one contemplating building to take a look through Mr. THOMAS' house first; we are satisfied that it would pay. Mr. THOMAS contemplates another improvement which is worthy of notice. A wind-mill and cor-sheller stand at a convenient distance from his house; he meditates putting a large cistern in the tower part of this building, and then running pipe to supply his bath-room and a fountain in the yard; two other wind-wheels run as many pumps at convenient points on the farm; from one of these the water is conveyed 120 rods, to supply feed lots; we believe now that every 160-acre tract is well supplied with stock water; he has also on his farm a very nice grove of cultivated timber, consisting of about twenty-five acres. Mr. THOMAS' family consists of the following children: Henry Matthew, who married Miss Lydia Ann BAIRD September 25, 1873, daughter of Zebulon BAIRD, of Harvel Township; Ann Amanda, Elizabeth Jane, Catharine, Samuel Dayton and Mary Lenora. The parents have spared neither means nor care in education their children, and have been rewarded with both gratitude and success.

Claud J. WILLIS, farmer, P. O. White Oak, was born in England April 19, 1842; he obtained the principal part of his education in his native country, under the instruction of his mother and a governess; at the age of thirteen years, he was brought to America by his parents, who settled in Jacksonville, Ill. Charles WILLIS, the father of Claud, was a parliamentary lawyer in England, but his health failed him, and he came to America and traveled for his health; his death occurred in 1856; his wife, Ann C. ROW, who is also a native of England, and is still living, at Jacksonville; she is the mother of two children, viz.: Charles and Claud. The latter, at the age of twenty years, took upon himself the duties of a farm life, and followed that occupation in Scott County a few years, when he gave up his farming interests and engaged for about ten years in the stock trade, with John ALEXANDER and several other men of Morgan County, who are known as large and extensive operators in nearly all markets. In 1878, he came to the place he now resides upon, and again turned his attention to farming; the farm had been rented for several years before Mr. WILLIS took charge of it, and had been very badly cultivated, but, owing to the energy and enterprise of Mr. WILLIS, it will now compare with any of the best-improved farms of the county, and places Mr. WILLIS in the list of practical farmers, and he is also the largest stock-dealer in the township at the present day. He was married in Greene County, December 23, 1881, to Miss Jane E. ELDRED, who was born October 24, 1839, to Elon and Jane (STUART) ELDRED; he was one of the very early settlers of Greene County, and also at an early day one of the first to enter and improve land in Montgomery County, and became very noted as a landholder, having accumulated at different places about three thousand acres of land, all under cultivation, and managed by himself personally; to him is due all the credit of the early improvements made upon gthe place now occupied by the subject of theis sketch, and his death occurred in 1871, while on the way to make a visit to his Montgomery farm, having expressed a wish to see the "White Oak" farm again - the farm so named from a white oak tree, which is located on the corner of the farm, and being at one time the only tree standing for many miles around, and which served as a landmark and guide to travelers in crossing the prairie before settlement; his wife survived him five years; she was the mother of three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living, with one exception, viz., the oldest son, William; they are all residents of Greene County; Lucius, a leading hardware merchant at Carrollton; and Charles, a prominent farmer and stock-dealer; Louisa, wife of L. F. WHEELER, retired merchant, living at Carrollton; and Julia, wife of R. PEARSON, banker at the above place. Mr. WILLIS is identified with the Republican party; religiously, himself and wife are connected with the Presbyterian Church.



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