Illinois Genealogy Trails
Montgomery County, Illinois
Biographies 


Source: W.H. Perrin's 1882 Biographical Sketches
from the History of Bond and Montgomery Counties, Illinois

Transcribed and Sumitted by Norma Hass, except where noted.

[Rountree Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 278]

Noah LIPE, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro. The grandparents of our subject, Godfrey and Barbara (HOUSE) LIPE, were natives of Pennsylvania, and were of German descent, their parents having emigrated to America at an early date in this country's history. Godfrey LIPE and wife emigrated to Cabarrus County, N. C., and he was noted grain-grower, and withal one of the most practical farmers of the State, and it has been said of him that he drove the best team of horses from Cabarrus County to Charleston, S. C. They were parents of four boys and three daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, viz., John,Henry, Moses, Daniel, Sarah, Catharine and Eula, all of whom married in North Carolina, and of whom John and Daniel were the only ones that ever left their native State. John, the father of our subject, was born in Cabarrus County, N. C., in 1789. His early life was spent upon the homestead farm, and eventually he became the owner of land, married and raised a family of eleven children, which whom, in November, 1831, he emigrated to then distant wilds of Illinois, and located in Irving Township, where he entered a tract of wild prairie, which he eventually improved, and by his energy and industry accumulated a large amount of this world's goods, and at one time owned about 500 acres of choice land; although he had but a practical education, he was considered a good business man, and a practical farmer; he lived to see his youngest child married and a mother, and could say he never saw one of his family die. His death occurred in November, 1857. His wife, Rachael BLACKWELDER, was also a native of Cabarrus County, N. C., born in 1793. She was a kind parent, a true, sincere and consistent Christian woman; she died November 30, 1881, and which is something remarkable, was at the time of her death and mother ofthirteen children, 131 grand-children, 243 great-grandchildren, and 21great-great-grandchildren, making a grand total of 408 descendants, of which at the time of her death, there were living 304. Her own children were, viz., Barbara, was married in North Carolina to Michael HEFLY, and moved to Illinois in company with herparents, and settled in Irving Township, died about 1872; Nelson, also married in North Carolina, and came to Illinois with his parents, and settled near the homestead, died November, 1879; Allen, married in Illinois, was the third settler in Rountree Township, died in 1856; Ella, wife of Daniel BOST, died about 1862; Noah, our subject;Delila, wife of Michael WALCHER, living in Irving; Wiley, living in Rountree; Elizabeth,resident of Irving, wife of Milton NISLER; Helena, married Moses M. SICKLES, located in Witt Township, died about 1874; John G., living in Rountree Township; Martin, died in 1879; Catharine, wife of James MORRAM, Irving Township; Crissa Diana, wife of James T. FITE, Zanesville Township. Noah was the fifth child, and was born in Cabarrus County, N. C., January 20, 1818, where his early childhood was spent in assisting his father in hhis agricultural pursuits upon the homestead farm. At the age of fifteen, he was removed to Montgomery County, Ill., by his parents, and remained with them until he reached the age of twenty-four, and assisted his father in improving and cultivating the farm upon which he settled. At that early day there were no schools, but eventuallya subscription school was started, which he attended about one moth; he has, however,obtained more than an ordinary education by close observation and close study at home. He [Page 279] was married in Montgomery County, May 12, 1842, to Miss Elizabeth WELLER, who was born in Ohio, April 11, 1822, and came to Illinois with her parents when she was about eighteen years of age. She has borne him eleven children, viz., Columbus J., born December 16, 1843, a prominent merchant of Vincennes, Ind.; Martha Jane, born March 18, 1845, died September 13, 1845; John W., born March 6, 1847, died August 3, 1863; Lorenzo Dow, born September 17, 1849, a prominent farmer living near the homestead; Mary M., born May 17, 1851, wife of John KERR, living in Rountree; Kittie R., born December 5, 1852, wife of Erastus SHERE, living in Rountree; Charles E., born February 3, 1855, farmer living near here; Angelia, born December 28, 1856, wife of James SIMMS, living in Rountree; Alice, born April 8, 1859, at home; Etta, born December 11, 1860, at home;Nettie, born February 14, 1863, died April 27, 1864. Mrs. LIPE was a daughter of John and Mally (LINGENFELTER) WELLER, a native of Stark County, Ohio. He died in 1843; she is still living in Rountree Township, with her son Jacob, a wealthy farmer. At the age of twenty-four years, Mr. LIPE left home, and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, locating in Rountree Township, where he began life in a small way; built a small log cabin, having a sod chimney (the largest farm in the township was surrounded by a sod fence, containing sixty acres). He has gradually added to his possessions until at one time he had the satisfaction of conducting a farm consisting of 500 acres, whichrepresented the dollars earned by himself, the result of energy, enterprise and goodmanagement. He has a farm now under a high state of cultivation and is improved by buildings and all the necessary appliances for comfort and convenience. He has given all his children a good education, realizing from his own limited privileges how important a good education is to the rising generation. He has held the offices of School Director and Trustee, in the township. Himself and wife are connected with the Methodist EpiscopalChurch. He has been a member of a Christian Church about forty=two years. His uncle Dan came to Illinois and settled upon a tract of land adjoining that of our subject, in the year 1839, where he lived until 1869, and where he raised a large family; he is now located in Whiteside County. Two of his sons are Lutheran preachers; all the balance of his family held prominent positions.

Eli NUSMAN, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Hillsboro, Montgomery Co., Ill., April 9, 1824. His father, John NUSMAN, was born in Cabarrus County, N. C. He was a farmer byoccupation, came to Hillsboro, Montgomery County, in about 1820, hwere he remained about ten years, and then removed his family to Rountree Township, where he was one of the first settlers, and where he remained, engaged in agricultural pursuits, up to the time of his death, which occurred May 27, 1852 aged about seventy-five years. His wife, Catharine FOGLEMAN, was also a native of Cabarrus County, N. C., born in 1791; she died August 13, 1846. She was the mother of eleven children, of whom Eli, the subject of this sketch was next to the youngest child. As school privileges were very limited at that early day, he was unable to receive such an education as he would have liked;however, by contact with the world, and by observation, he has accumulated more than an ordinarily pracrtical education. His early childhood was employed upon his father's farm, in assisting him in improving the place, and at the death of his parents remained upon the homestead, which he has never left, and which he has at the present time in a high state of cultivation. Mr. NUSMAN is considered one of the most popular men in thetownship, and also ranks with the practical farmers of the County. He was married inMontgomery County, May 6, 1858, to Sarah Elizabeth LITICKER, who was born in Cabarrus Co., N.C., [Page 280]April 6, 1840. They have six children, viz.: Harriet Catharine, born April 15, 1859; Peter, born March 19, 1861; Mary Emiline, born March 16, 1863, Clara Henrietta, born January 12, 1866; Nellie Jane, born March 27, 1868; Elizabeth Nora, born December 12, 1869; all of whom are living. Mrs. NUSMAN is a daughter of Arba and Mary Ann (McCOY)LITICKER, natives of North Carolina, both still living in Montgomery County. Mr. NUSMAN has in his possession about three hundred acres of choice farm land, upon which he grows the usual farm crops and raises all kinds of stock usually found upon a well-regulated farm. Although not much interested in politics, Mr. NUSMAN is identified with the Democratic party. He is a man who ranks very high socially, and now in his declining days he is enjoying the fruits of an energetic and prosperous career, surrounded by his family of children, all of whom are living at home. Elizabeth NUSMAN, a sister of Mr. NUSMAN, is also one of the household, they having always lived together since childhood. There are but two others of the original family living, viz. John L., at Ramsey, and Sarah, wife of J. KENNEDY, living in Missouri. At an early time in his life, Mr. NUSMAN was considered a great hunter, and while still a small boy he shot and killed two deer, in the morning before breakfast, and has since killed four in one day. Mr. N. is the oldest living first settler in township.

Joseph WALERS, farmer, P. O. Morrisonville, was born in the Parish of Christ Church, South Wales, Great Britain, March 18, 1835, where he received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen years was apprenticed to learn the trade of boiler-making, at which occupation he was engaged about four years. Arnold WALERS, the father of oursubject, was also a native of South Wales, and was a railroad and turnpike contractor by occupation. His death occurred in about 1843, aged fifty-three years. His wife, Mary PIERSON, was also a native of South Wales. She died March 5, 1855, aged about fifty-five years. The result of this union was five children, viz.: Henry, a contractor by occupation, and was assisting in constructing the railroad across the Isthmus of Panama, when he was taken sick with the yellow fever, and died in 1863; John, an attache of the British Navy, supposed to be still living; Maria, wife of John GREEN, now living in South Wales; Ann, wife of William BAILEY, living in South Wales. Joseph, the subject of this sketch, at the age of twenty years, emigrated to America, and eventually went to New Jersey, where his brother Henry was at that time engaged in constructing turnpikes;Joseph also engaged in the same occupation, at which he remained about four years, at the end of which time he turned his face toward the setting sun, and eventually located in Jersey County, Ill., where he took upon himself the duties of a farm life. In the fall of 1866, he purchased the property upon which he now resides, and removed with his family to their future home in Rountree Township, where he has since remained engaged inagricultural pursuits. His original purchase consisted of ninety acres, to which he has continued to add until now he has the satisfaction of conducting a farm consisting of about one hundred and seventy-five acres of as choice and well-cultivated farm land as can be found in Rountree Township, the result of energy, enterprise and thorough business habits; being a progressive man himself, he is fully alive to all progressivemovements favoring the prosperity of the county, and for the advancement of religious and educational privileges. He is now filling the office of Justice of the Peace, the duties of which office he has performed two terms previous to the present, and which duties he has performed with honesty and integrity, and in a manner approved by all the people. He was married in New Jersey, to Delilah CONNOVAR, who was born in New Jersey to Peter[Page 281] CONNOVAR, native of New Jersey, deceased, in August, 1835. She is the mother of threechildren, viz.: Mary, wife of Frank McNORTON, living in Rountree Township; Emma, wife of John McCALLUM, living near the homestead; Hattie, single, living at home. Mr. WALERS is identified with the Democratic party, and is always interested in the political issues of the times.

[Irving Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 282]

Samuel T. BARTLETT, dry goods, drug store and farmer, P. O. Irving; born in Henry County, Ky., in 1819. He is the second son of a family of eight, born to Samuel and Elizabeth (OWENS) BARTLETT, natives of Virginia. Samuel was born about the year 1777; came to Kentucky when a young man, and settled in Henry County, where he farmed and taught school. In 1833, came to Illinois, where he died April 29, 1835. His wife Elizabeth was born about the year 1786, and died in Illinois in 1858. Subject received his education principally in Illinois in the common schools. In Montgomery County, October 2, 1838, he married Martha MAXEY, who was born in Warren County, Ky., about the year 1820. She is the daughter of Edward and Elizabeth (BERRY) MAXEY. He was a Virginian by birth, removed to Kentucky, then came to Illinois, where he died in 1860. His wife was a native of Kentucky, and also died in Illinois in 1837. To Mr. And Mrs. BARTLETT have been born nine children, seven now living - John, Charles L., Edward, Henry, Hiram, Douglas and Mary; George and Jane, deceased. Mr. BARTLETT still carries on farming, in connection with his other business of dry goods, drugs, etc., in which he has been engaged since 1869. He has held the offices of Township Treasurer and Deputy Sheriff for eight years. Mr. BARTLETT and wife are Methodists. He is a Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. He owns about seven hundred acres of good prairie land, nearly all of which is under cultivation, besides town property, consisting of five dwellings and one business house. His son Henry assists him in the dry goods department, and his son Douglas in the drug department of his business.

Thomas G. BLACK, farmer and grain dealer, P. O. Irving, was born in Kentucky February 21, 1828, son of James B. and Mary G. (McCASLIN) BLACK, he, a farmer, born in Kentucky October 7, 1799, died about the year 1876; she, born July 3, 1793, died September 14, 1836. Subject, the second child of a family of four children, came to Illinois with his parents when three years of age, and stayed one year in Bond County; then moved to Montgomery County, where he received his education in the common schools. He assisted his father on the farm till he wastwenty-one years of age, then engaged in the tanning business, which, not provingsatisfactory, he abandoned, and began farming. He bought a farm in 1853, but sold it in 1854, and moved to the town of Irving, where he and James N. BERRY built the first business house in the place in 1855, and engaged in the mercantile and grain trade, which he followed for twenty years, when he bought the place where he now lives, about a half mile from Irving, and engaged in his present occupation of farming and stock trading, which he carries on successfully. In 1852, he married Nancy A. WHITLIDGE, a native of Illinois, who died February 21, 1857; her parents were natives of Kentucky. From this union three children were born, one only now living, viz., Mary M. His second wife, Sarah E. BERRY, was born February 18, 1838; her parents were natives of Kentucky. She has borne him ten children, of whom eight are living. Mr. BLACK served in the army three months in 1862, as Lieutenant of Company C, Seventieth Illinois Volunteers, principally on guard duty; has been Supervisor of Irving Township for two terms, was Chairman of the Committee [Page 283]of the Poor Farm, and has done much toward the improvement of the town. He is aRepublican, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

W. Milton BERRY, of the firm of KELLY & BERRY, dealers in general merchandise, was born in Woodford County, Ill., in 1850, and came to this place in 1870. His father, William S. BERRY, Sr., was born in Virginia in 1807, but was raised in Kentucky. Came to Illinois when a young man, and settled first in this county, afterward in Woodford County, thence to Wisconsin, whence he returned to this place, where he now resides. The maiden name of his wife, the mother of our subject, was Catharine JOHNSON, born in Ohio in 1808; both parents are still living and in good health. They had four sons and three daughters. Our subject studied at Eureka, Ill., taking a classical course at Christian College, though leaving a year before the time for graduation. He followed teaching for seven years, five years being spent at Irving. He was married in this place, May 9, 1876, to Kausie L. KELLY, who was born in this county in 1856. His wife's father was James KELLY, a native of Kentucky, who came to this State when a young man. Mr. BERRY began at his present business of general merchandising in 1876, and now has a fine trade, carrying a large stock of goods for a small town. He has been Treasurer of the town for the past three years. He owns a good two-story frame residence, one of the prettiest in town, recently built, and has a farm two miles south of town, containing 136 acres of good land, with a hedge fence around nearly the whole of it, and has a half-interest in the stock and business of the firm of KELLY & BERRY. He has one daughter, Eunice Ray. Himself and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Republican.

Monroe BOST was born in North Carolina in 1833, and came to Macoupin County, Ill., when twenty-seven years of age, and remained one year; he then moved to Montgomery County and bought the place he now owns, in Irving Township, his first purchase being sixty acres, and has added to that until he now owns 140 acres of good tillable land, on which he has erected a good dwelling and barn, and all necessaryoutbuildings, and was married, in this State, the 20th of December, 1860, to Miss Rebecca LIPE, she being the mother of eight children, and died December 3, 1877; Wilson LIPE, her father, was born in North Carolina; occupation, farmer; and died in 1881; Nancy LIPE, her mother, was also a native of North Carolina, and still living in this county. Levi BOST, his father, was born in North Carolina about 1806 occupation, farmer; Catherine RAYMER BOST, his mother, was also born in the same State, about 1812; she was the mother of ten children, the subject being the third child. His second wife, Elizabeth EASTERLY, was born in this State April 27, 1852; wife is a member of Lutheran Church, and he is a member of Presbyterian Church; he is a Republican.

Athan CANNON was born in North Carolina in the year 1815, and worked on the farm during his minority, following that occupation eight years, when he learned thecarpenter's trade, which he followed in connection with farming, and sold out his lace in North Carolina and moved to Alabama, where he remained a number of years engaged in farming, and moved from there to Arkansas, and was engaged in cottonspeculation and farming; he remained a few years, and came to Hillsboro, Montgomery County, and was a grain and stock dealer, and moved to the town of Butler in 1865, and engaged in lumber and carpenter business, where he remained four years, and was also in mercantile business one year; in 1870, moved to the town of Irving; went into the mercantile, lumber and grain business with his sons; they carried on the business for six years, and has been in [Page 284] the grain and farming business up to the present time, and has bought several tracts, until he has reached the handsome estate of 239 acres, all in Section 15, Irving Township, and has it all in a good state of cultivation. He was married, in North Carolina, in 1834, to Miss Anna M. SLOUGH; she was a native of North Carolina, born in the year 1819; her parents were natives of the same State. William CANNON, the father of subject, was born in North Carolina in 1783; his occupation was farming; died in 1819; Keziah L. CANNON was born in Virginia in 1785, and was the mother of seven children, the subject being the sixth child, and he has a family of eight children, four of whom are dead; those living are as follows: Marquis De L., Robert E., William S., Louisiana. He and family are members of the M. E. Church; he has been Deacon since 1855; politically, conservative; he is a Mason, belonging to Irving Lodge, No. 455; he has always been prominent in the advancement of public improvements and agricultural interests, and has been moderately successful in all of his business transactions.

Julius CARRIKER was born in this county in 1856, August 8, and assisted his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age; was educated in common schools of country, and entered on his business career as a farmer and running a threshing machine; hasalways remained on the old homestead, and is now in full possession, having bought out his father; he has a beautiful home, with all necessary buildings and modernimprovements to make agriculture a success; he has the name of being an energetic and enterprising young farmer; married, in this county, in 1877, to Miss Lizzie MORAINE; she was born in this county in 1858, and is the mother of two children, Pearla and Stella; James MORAINE, her father, was born in Madison County, Ohio, February 24, 1828, and is a farmer by occupation; was brought to this State at ten years of age by his parents, and has been a very successful farmer, accumulating a large tract of land; her mother, Sarah (LIPE) MORAINE, was born in this county January 10, 1832; her parents were natives of North Carolina, and are all largeland-owners. His father, John CARRIKER, was born in North Carolina, and has accumulated a large landed estate, which he has divided among his children, and retired to a comfortable home in the town of Irving, and is doing a small nurserybusiness; his mother is also a native of North Carolina, and is the mother of ninechildren, the subject being the sixth child. They are blessed with a beautiful home and two lovely children; are members of Lutheran Church; he is a Democrat.

Dolphas CARR, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in North Carolina February 9, 1852, and came to this State when fifteen years of age; was partially educated in NorthCarolina; finished in this State, in common school of country, and worked on the farm by day labor until he bought the place on which he now resides, containing 100 acres of well-improved land, with good, comfortable buildings; married, September 19, 1878, to Miss Alice CLINE; she was born in this county September 9, 1862; Nelson CLINE, her father, was born in North Carolina; her mother was also a native of same State, born about 185, still living. John CARR, his father, and also his mother, were born in North Carolina; she ws the mother of the one child, and he has only one child, Charlie CARR; are members of Lutheran Church; politically, Republican.

George H. FILE was born in North Carolina June 12, 1828; was brought to this county when three years old, by his parents, and worked on the farm until he became of age, and bought a piece of land near his father's, containing 190 acres; he made the first payment by raising castor beans, which he sold for $1.25 per bushel, hauled to St. Louis, seventy-five miles, which was the only market at that day; the yield was about eight bushels per acre, the most paying crop at that time - in fact, the only crop at that early day that brought the cash. Mr. FILE was married, in Montgomery County, in 1852, to Miss Susanna L. CRESS, daughter of Absalom CRESS. At the time of his marriage, he had improved aboutthirty acres and built a small frame house, which he occupied the first year withoutplastering; in one year after, he sold that place for $7.50 per acre, and purchased his present home, containing 180 acres of land, with sixty acres improved, and the only building being a log cabin, and afterward added to his first purchase seventy-sixacres, on which he has built all necessary improvements, at considerable cost, and has his place under fine cultivation; he has turned his attention to fine cattle, and is making his preparations to go into the stock business. Jacob FILE was born in NorthCarolina, Cabarrus County; Caroline CRESS, his mother, was also born in same State and county; she was the mother of nine children, our subject being the second child; his wife's father was born in North Carolina; also mother. The subject has had ninechildren, five of whom are living - Mary Frances Drew, Clara M., Lawrence A., William H., Francis L.; members of Lutheran Church, which they joined while quite young; he has always been identified with the Democratic party.

Thomas GRANTHAM, restaurant, born in Montgomery County, Ill., April 12, 1841, son ofEzekiel and Eleanor (WILEY) GRANTHAM, he a native of Kentucky, she the mother of fourteen children, Thomas the twelfth child. Our subject was educated in the commonschools of Montgomery County, and worked on his father's farm till he arrived at the years of manhood, when he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-sixthInfantry, under Capt. J. H. CABRICK; was detailed on the bakery department, and on guard duty; served three years, and was honorably discharged. Returning to Irving, he engaged in the dairy business about thirteen months, and then in the bakery business, and now owns an interest in a restaurant in Irving, doing a good business. In Montgomery County, Ill., October 11, 1866, he married Miss A. L. SAYLOR, born in Ohio in 1847, who has borne him six children, viz.: Jay V., Lola V., Laura J., Alvee C., Theresa M. and Harry V. The parents of Mrs. GRANTHAM were natives of Ohio, and died in Marion County, Ill. Mr. GRANTHAM and wife are members of the M. E. Church; he is a Republican.

I. L. GREGORY, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., April 22, 1851, son of David E. and Rebecca (CRESS) GREGORY, natives of North Carolina, he, afarmer and wheelwright, born December 1, 1809; she, born February 12, 1812; they are now residents of the town of Irving, are hale and hearty, and enjoying the comforts of their snug home, having retired from active life, leaving their son on the farm; of their six children, Irvin, our subject, is the fifth child; he received a rudimentary education in the common schools of the county; afterward attended Carthage College a year, and finished at Hillsboro, Ill.; he assisted his father on the farm until twenty-six years of age, when he began farming on his own account, on the homestead place, where he is doing well. In Montgomery County, he married Helen THUMB, a native of that county, born in 1859, who has borne him five interesting children, viz.: Ethel, Marvin, Iva, Rolland and Rosa. [Page 286] The parents of Mrs. GREGORY were born in New York; her father, Marion THUMB, was a farmer by occupation. Mr. GREGORY is a Democrat; his wife is a member of the Lutheran Church.

Samuel F. KING, farmer and lawyer, Irving, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1825, son of Andrew and Hannah (GUTTIS) KING; he, a farmer by occupation, born in North Carolina, died in 1856; she, born in Orange County, N. C., died in 1853; she was the mother of eleven children, subject being the tenth child. He came to Illinois with his parents when six years old, and settled near Irving; Received a rudimentary education in the common schools of Montgomery County; also attended the high school at Hillsboro, Ill.; after finishing at Hillsboro, he taught school and devoted himself to the study of law; in 1866, he returned to Irving, where he carries on farming in addition to the practice of the legal profession; he was alsoengaged in the produce business, but sold out quite recently. In Shelby County, Ill., in 1851, he married Narcissus E. BIVINS, who died of cholera in 1855; of her two children, one is living. His second wife, Zenobia KERSHNER, has born him sixchildren, of whom one died. Mr. KING served in the Mexican war five months in 1846; he is a Democrat, and a member of the Free M. E. Church.

Isaac LEWEY, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in North Carolina November 5, 1822, and came to Montgomery County in June, 1843, and was in the Mexican war in 1846 and 1847; was discharged on account of ill health; came back to Irving Township, andcommenced farming on land he received for his services in the war, and has added to that until he now owns 400 acres of good tillable land, on which he has erected a very good in dwelling and very fine barn, and everything in proportion. He married Miss BROWN in 1847, in this county, her parents being natives of Tennessee; threechildren were the result of this union; she, the mother, died March 12, 1855, and his second wife, Miss Elizabeth GRIFFITH, was born in this State in 1831; John FRIFFITH, her father, was born in Tennessee in March, 1808; occupation, farming; Harriet (PYATT) GRIFFITH, her mother, was born in 1811, in Tennessee, and she was the mother of ten children. The father of our subject, John LEWEY, was born in North Carolina; occupation, farming; and died about 1863; and his mother was also born in the same State November 5, 1842, and she was the mother of fourteen children, the subject being the eight child. He has a family of four children, and owns a nice home in the town of Irving, where he now resides, and has it handsomely improved; members of the Lutheran Church; politically, a Republican.

George W. LEWEY, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Montgomery County December 23, 1853, son of Isaac LEWEY, a native of North Carolina. Subject received his earlyeducation in the common schools of Montgomery County, and finished at Carthage College; he also took a business course a the commercial College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; from Poughkeepsie he returned home and remained till he was twenty-one years old, assisting his father on the farm; he then began his business career as a merchant in Nokomis, Ill., in partnership with T. H. LANE; at the end of a year, they moved their business to Witt, where they stayed nine months; then removed to Raymond, where they carried on their business successfully for three years; Mr. LEWEY then sold out his share in the business, and bought a livery stable in Raymond; but, after being in the livery business nine months, he sold out and returned to the homestead farm, of which he has full charge and control, his father having retired from active life and moved to the town of Irving; the farm, which is an excellent one, has all the modern improvements. In Montgomery County, in October, 1877, he married Augusta F. LANE, a native of that county, born in March, 1857, daughter of J. B. and Susan (BOST) LANE, natives of North Carolina. Mr. LEWEY is a Republican; his wife is a member of the Old Presbyterian Church.

John T. McDAVID, Sr., farmer, P. O. Irving, born in Montgomery County, Ill., February 8, 1824, son of William McDAVID, a native of Virginia, whose wife's maiden name was JOHNSON, she having been born in Tennessee September 20, 1800. Our subject was raised on a farm; received such an education as was afforded by the common schools of that early day, and began life for himself as a farmer in East Fork Township, his first purchase being eighty acres of land, which he traded for horses, on which he realized such a profit as to enable him to buy 123 acres in the year 1850, on which he resided for seven years; he then sold out and bought an adjoining farm of 155 acres, where he lived several years, also buying sixty acres near Hillsboro, on which he realized a handsome profit in a short time; he next sold his farm and bought 560 acres of good tillable land, and erected a fine dwelling, barn and other buildings; in 1881, he again sold out, and bought, in Shelby county, 475 acres of good farm land, north ofShelbyville, and he also has 266 acres in Irving Township, as well as eighty acres in East Fork; he has also helped all his six sons to start well in life. Mr. McDAVID was married, in Montgomery county, in 1845, to Edna J. KNIGHT, who was born in this county July 26, 1826, daughter of William KNIGHT, of Kentucky, who was born in 1798, and died December 6, 1862; her mother's maiden name was Barsheba BOSTICK, born in Kentucky in 1800, and died February 9, 1860; Mrs. McDAVID became the mother of six children, and died March 6, 1870. On August 6, 1871, he was married to Linda SNELL, who was born and grew up in Macoupin County, Ill., where she received a good education; they have one son by this marriage, Frank Lee, born August 20, 1877. In addition to his other property, Mr. McDAVID owns a house and lot in the town of Irving, where he resides, comfortably situated, and highly esteemed for his social worth and public enterprise; the children by his first marriage were Albin B., William J., John T., Jr., Joel K., Augustus B. and James L. Mr. McDAVID was elected Sheriff in 1868, and served two years; he was also Deputy Sheriff four or five years; also Assessor; his family are members of the Presbyterian Church.

James McDOWELL, merchant, Irving, was born in Adair County, Ky., February 14, 1842; came to Illinois in 1860 and settled in Montgomery County; his parents, John and Lucinda (RIPPETOE) McDOWELL, were natives of Adair County, Ky., he, a farmer, was born in 1809, and died about the year 1850; she, born in 1811, died at her son's (subject's) residence in 1878; of their four sons, James is the youngest; he received his education in the common schools of Kentucky, and began life as a teacher, and taught eighteen terms; he followed the trade of a housepainter for a few years, and, in 1873, began mercantile business in Irving; he carries a good stock of goods, does an extensive trade, and is one of the leading merchants of Irving; he was Town Clerk of Irving Township for twelve months. At Beardstown, Cass Co., Ill., April 5, 1865, he married Caroline WUBKER, born at Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Ill., March 20, 1848, who has borne him five children, viz.: Walter H., Lena L., Edward H., Albert L. and Clarence M.; her father, William WUBKER, born in Minden, Prussia, February 10, 1816, came to the United States when but a small boy; her mother, Helena MAAS, still living, was born in Hanover City, Hanover, Germany, August 21, 1818. Mr. McDOWELL owns a residence and business house in Irving; he is a Democrat; his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Alexander B. ROSS, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Center County, Penn., September 4, 1837, and was educated in the common schools of country, and was thrown on his own resources at the early age of fourteen years; his father sold him half-interest in stock and farm, and charged him 6 percent interest on the investment; he went to work energy, and, in the short space of three years, he was sole owner of the stock, and in six years he owned the entire interest. He went into the army in 1862, in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, and was at the battle of Chancellorsville, where he received a flesh wound in the neck, and ws in several battles afterward, and received a wound in the shoulder, which disabled him for a short time; he served in the Commissary Department; greatly to his chagrin, they would not let him go into active service again; he was mustered out, and went to his old home, and married, January 6, 1866, in Pennsylvania, Miss Anna M. RHINEHART; she was born in Pennsylvania February 23, 1841; her father, John RHINEHART, was also a native of Pennsylvania. Robert ROSS was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1813, a farmer by occupation, and died July 6, 1863; Sarah McMITT ROSS was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1820, and was the mother of eleven children, the subject being the eldest; he has a family of eight children, maned as follows: Agnes was born June 10, 1867; Minerva B. was bron July 25, 1868; Sarah J. was born May 2, 1870; Harriet E. was born December 6, 1871; Thomas was born May 27,1873; John Alfred was born June 4, 1875; Robert was born June 18, 18778; Penelope Frank, born December 3, 1881. He came to Montgomery County in 1875 and located in the town of Irving, where he remained only one year; in 1866, he bought his present home, and deserves great credit for the manner in which he has succeededin getting his place in such fine state of cultivation; is a Republican politically; he sold a farm of 175 acres, when he emigrated to this place, at $60 per acre.

A. A. RHINEHART, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Pennsylvania in 1839, April 10; raised in town, and educated at Potter's Bank, Penn.; remained with his father until eighteen years of age, when he commenced business for himself as a carpenter, which trade he followed two years; enlisted, in 1862, in Company D, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; was in several hard-fought battles; was wounded twice at the battle of Chancellorsville, only flesh wounds, however, which disabled him only a short time; at Five Forks he received a wound in the foot which disabled him for several months, and which gives him trouble at the present time if he does much walkin on uneven ground; he went out as Sergeant; was promoted to Second Lieutenant in six months, and afterward to Captain of a company, which rank he held during the remainder of the service. He came to Illinois in 1866, and bought sixty acres of land, to which he has since added sixty acres more, making 120 acres of good farm land. He was married, in Pennsylvania, in 1862, to Miss Penelope McALISTER, who was born in Bellefonte, Penn., in 1838; John McALISTER, her father, was born about the year 1817, and died about the year 1859; Hannah (THOMAS) McALISTER, her mother, was[Page 289]Born in Pennsylvania about the year 1825, and died in 1880. John RHINEHART, the father of subject, was born in Pennsylvania in 1817, and is now residing in Montgomery County; Rebecca (TAYLOR) RHINEHART, subject's mother, was born in Pennsylvania in 1820, also residing in Montgomery County, and is the mother of thirteen children, subject being the eldest of family. He has no children; he has raised a boy form eight years to twenty, and now has two little nieces whom he is raising. He and wife are members of the M. E. Church; he is a Republican, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

J. M. TAULBEE, dealer in provisions, and minister, Irving, born in Wilkes County, N. C., December 23, 1815; son of William H. and Nancy TAULBEE, he, a farmer byoccupation, born in Stokes County, N. C., October 21, 1791, died October 22, 1842; she, born in Rowan County, N. C., May 9, 1789, died August 14, 1837. Subject, the second child of a family of ten, spent his early days in assisting his father on the farm; he received his education in the schools of Kentucky, whither his parents had moved in 1817; in the fall of 1836, he removed to Fayette County, Ill., where he bought a farm, which he sold in 1853; he then came to Irving Township, Montgomery Co., Ill., where he followed farming during 1855 and 1856; he then moved to what is now the town of Irving, he being the first resident of the place. In Perry County, Ky., June 30, 1836, he married Ann DAMRUL, born in Morgan County, Ky., April 9, 1817, died June 28, 1853, in Fayette County, Ill., leaving six children; her father, Joseph DAMRUL, a native of Shenandoah County, Va., died October 15, 1840; her mother, Elizabeth (DYKES) DAMRUL, born in Floyd County, Ky., March 14, 1798, died October 24, 1839. Mr. TAULBEE's second wife, Mrs. Prudence CARRIKER, whose parents were natives of North Carolina, was born in Tennessee in 1817; she is the mother of four children, tow of whom are by her first husband. Mr. TAULBEE was ordained a minister of the Gospel in 1851, since which time he has preached; he has now charge of three churches; he is a Republican; has filled the office of Justice of the Peace for twenty-two years, giving general satisfaction to all; he now owns a produce and feed store in the town of Irving, and does a good business; his children are Joseph E., Mary J., Levi L., William, Sarah A. and James P.; two of his sons were in the army during the war; the elder, who served four years, was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, came home and recruited in health, and returned to do battle for his country; the younger served three years.

William W. WEBER, farmer and miller, Irving, was born in New York August 23, 1835; educated in common school of country; came to Montgomery County with his parents at eight years of age; settled in Butler Township, and worked on the farm until he arrived at his majority; commenced business saw-milling, and still keeps up that, with farming in connection; in 1862, he purchased 120 acres, to which he has added forty; he has built all the improvements, as it was all wild prairie when hesettled; he first located his mill south of Irving two and a half miles, and ran six months, and then moved it to its present location, half a mile west of his present home; was married, in Montgomery County, to Miss Elizabeth Osborn, January 7, 1857; she was born in this county Dec. 30, 1835. The father of subject, Joseph WEBER, was born in New York about 1803; occupation, farmer; died May 3, 1803; Eunice (JOHNSON) WEBER, his mother, was born in New York in 1802, and was the mother of ten children, the subject being the sixth child, and he has a family of three children, one dead - William P., George E., Olive J.; one died in infancy. He was Road Commissioner six years, and was School Director for eight years, and now Trustee; member of M. E. Church; is a Republican; member of Odd Fellows.

Samuel R. WILEY, farmer, P. O. Irving, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., February 13, 1837, son of Zachariah and Elizabeth (MANN) WILEY; Zachariah WILEY, a farmer by occupation, was born in Virginia March 2, 1804; came to Montgomery County, Ill., in 1820, with his father, and took up a farm, where he died in 1842; his wife, who was the mother of six children, subject being the third child, was born January 14, 1806, and died in 1868. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of Montgomery County; after his father's death, he took charge of the homestead farm, and managed it for hismother till he was twenty-eight years of age, when he began business for himself by purchasing a farm of 120 acres of land, to which he has since added 160 acres more, on which, at the time of purchase, was a small house, the farm, with the exception of thirty acres, being unbroken prairie; by industry and perseverance, he now has his farm in a fine state of cultivation, with comfortable dwelling, fine barn, and all necessary outbuildings; he raises quite a number of Short-Horn cattle, as well as horses and mules; has all the latest improved farm machinery. In Montgomery county, Ill., in 1862, he married Sophia A. CARRIKER, born in North Carolina in 1844, daughter of John and Mary L. CARRIKER, he, a farmer, born in North Carolina, is now living in the town of Irving; she, also a native of North Carolina, is the mother of seven children, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. WILEY are members of the M. E. Church; they have six children. Mr. WILEY has been School Director for twenty years, and still holds that position; he is a Democrat.

[East Fork Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 291]

John P. BECK, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., March 6, 1837, to John and Nancy (BLAIR) BECK, he a native of North Carolina, and was one of the first to enter upon pioneer life in Montgomery County, where he engaged in milling, blacksmithing, coopering, distilling and farming at different times. He entered land in Town 7, Fillmore, Range 2, but at the time of his death had land also in Range 3. His death occurred in 1845. His wife, Nancy, was also a native of North Carolina, and died in 1851. She was the mother of ten children, of whom John, our subject, was the youngest child. His early childhood was spent upon the farm and in attending school at the neighboring log schoolhouse, to which his educational privileges were limited. At the death of his mother, which occurred when he was fourteen years of age, he left the homestead and engaged as a farm hand. At the age of twenty-three, he had succeeded in accumulating enough funds to enable him to purchase twenty acres of timber land, and soon after purchased forty acres of prairie, upon which he made all the improvements himself, and to which he has continued to add, and now has in his possession 160 acres of choice farm land, all under a high state of cultivation. He grows all the usual crops, but makes a specialty of grain. He was married in Montgomery County, February 26, 1861, to Miss Nancy J. BROWN, who was born in the same county November 15, 1839. She is the mother of five children, viz., Emma J., Mary C., George M., Nina and Laura L., the two oldest of whom died in infancy. Mrs. BECK was a daughter of Harrison BROWN. Mr. and Mrs. Beck are connected with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically, he was formerly a Democrat, but now is considered independent in politics.

William S. BARRY, farmer, P.O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County September 18, 1841, to John and Elizabeth (ROBINSON) BARRY. He was born in Barren County, Ky., in 1806. In 1834 or 1835 he emigrated to Montgomery County, in Hillsboro Township, where he bought a small tract of improved land. He remained in Montgomery County to the time of his death, which occurred March 15, 1876. He was of Irish descent. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Warren County, Ky., in 1809, and died in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1868. She was the mother of nine children, of whom William S. BARRY was the seventh child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his day afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. At the age of twenty-two, he left home and embarked on his career in life by farming on his own account, on a farm of 140 acres of partially improved land, situated in Section 23, of East Fork Township. Here he has since remained, and by honesty, industry and economy, he has succeeded in accumulating 200 acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultivation. Besides raising all the principal farm crops, he makes wheat a specialty. Mr. BARRY was married in Montgomery County April 2, 1863, to Charity C., daughter of Jabez and Polly Ann (LEWEY) WHEELER. Mrs. BARRY was born in Montgomery County, Ill., August 17, 1843. She is the mother of five children, four of whom are now living, viz., Minnie V., wife of Frederick COFFEEN, of East Fork Township; Robert F., at home; Hattie, died August 28, 1867; Ina M., home; Fred, at home. Wife, of Cumberland PresbyterianChurch. Mr. BARRY has served as Highway Commissioner. Politically, he is independent.

Gustavus F. COFFEEN, farmer, was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co.., N. Y., June 19, 1820, to Frederick and Elcena (HUBBARD) COFFEEN, he born in Schuyler, Oneida Co., N. Y., about 1795, a farmer by occupation, and at one time was a hotel keeper, and dying about 1860. His wife, Elcena, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1798, and died about 1876. She was the mother of six children, four of whom are now living, and of whom Gustavus is the oldest child living. His paternal grandfather, Henry COFFEEN, was the first settler in Watertown, N. Y., having penetrated from Lowville through the woods with his goods and family, drawn by an ox-team. He erected his hut on the ground just west of Iron Block. He was a very prominent merchant and speculator in land. Gustavus, the subject of this sketch, received a common school education in his native town, and spent his early childhood in assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits. At the age of eighteen years, he entered a hotel in Jefferson County with his father, where he remained about fifteen years, at the end of which time he turned his attention to railroading, which occupation he followed about two years in New York, and then came to Illinois, and continued in the same business about two years more, when he turned his attention to farming, and in the spring of 1855, purchased 1,140 acres of wild prairie land. He remained upon the same about eighteen months, and improved about one hundred acres. He then disposed of his property and purchased 160 acres of improved and forty acres of timber land in East Fork Township, where he has since carried on farming more or less extensively. Grows all the usual farm crops, and raising and dealing in stock. His farm now consists of 640 acres of choice farm and timber land. In 1862-63, he served a term in the House of Representatives from Montgomery and Christian Counties; has also served as Supervisor. He was married, November 9, 1846, to Miss Mary Adelia BELL, born in Herkimer County, N. Y., February 2, 1827. She is the mother of three children, viz., Frederick H., Mary, wife of John McLEAN, living in East Fork Township; Clotilda Bell, wife of Dr. J. T. HENDRIX, deceased. (See history.) Mrs. COFFEEN is connected with the Presbyterian Church.

George C. CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Perry County, Mo., August 13, 1824, to Samuel and Margaret (COWAN) CAMPBELL, he born in North Carolina, in Lincoln County, June 17, 1793, was a tanner by trade, but in 1819 emigrated to Missouri, and engaged in farming up to the time of his death, which occurred October 1, 1864. His wife, Margaret, was also a native of North Carolina, born in Rowan County May 25, 1795, and is still living in Kansas, and is the mother of nine children, of whom George, our subject, was the third child; received his education in the common schools of Missouri. He remained upon the homestead until he was twenty-four years of age, and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, in Perry County, Mo. In March, 1864, he removed to Montgomery County, and purchased 100 acres of land, which he disposed of five years later, and removed to his present place of residence, where he has about one [Page 293] hundred and twenty acres of choice farm land under cultivation. He was married in Missouri, October 31, 1849, to Miss Mary E. SMITH, who was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., February 9, 1825. They have four living children, viz.,Margaret J., Catharine E., Lamirah, Amanda M. and two infants deceased. Mrs. CAMPBELL is a daughter of Matthew and Margaret (WALLACE) SMITH, natives of North Carolina, both deceased. Religiously, Mr. and Mrs. CAMPBELL are connected with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically, Mr. C. was formerly aRepublican, but now considers himself independent. Entered the service during the rebellion with Capt. A. C. BISHOP, in Company H, of the Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; remained in service about one year, and was in the engagement at Mobile.

Hardy F. JONES, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in South Carolina April 24, 1813, to James and Elizabeth (TOLES) JONES, he, James, was born in America, but was of English descent. He died in 1816, aged sixty four years. During his life he followed the occupation of a farmer. He served through the war of 1812. His wife the mother of our subject, was born in Georgia in 1804, and died in 1854; she was of Scotch descent. She was the mother of eight children, of whom Hardy JONES was the sixth child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the log schoolhouse of his day afforded, and assisting in tilling the soil of the homestead farm. At the age of three years he was brought to Adair County, Ky., his father having died on the way before reaching their new home. At the age of twenty-one he left home and removed to Greene County, Ind., where he embarked on his career in life as a farm hand, by the moth. In April, 1842, he removed to Montgomery County, Ill., and settled in East Fork Township, two miles east of his present residence; there entered eighty acres of land, forty in timber and forty in prairie. He remained upon this tract of land, making all necessary improvements and raising all usual farm crops, until Mary, 1877, when he bought his present residence and farm, and removed to the same, where he is still engaged in farming. By his honesty, industry and economy he has succeeded in accumulating 360 acres of land, most of which is under a high state of cultivation. In 1832, he married Matilda NICHOLSON, who was born in Kentucky, and died in 1863, aged fifty-two years. She was the mother of eight children, six of whom are now living - William, James, Joseph, Tabitha, Mary Ann and Rebecca. In 1869, he married Mary C. RAGLAND; she was born in Virginia in October, 1832. She is the mother of two children, viz., Wilson S. and Eugenia. Politically, Mr. JONES is identified with the Democratic party. Mr. JONES remembers of hearing the first preacher deliver a sermon; his name was old Jimmie STREET.

Henry M. LUDEWICK, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, July 14, 1837, to Daniel F. and Nancy (CRESS) LUDEWICK. He was born in Cobarrus County, N. C., December 2, 1800. He emigrated to the State of Illinois, and settled in East Fork in 1831. During his life, he was engaged in farming, and at the time of his death had succeeded in accumulating eight hundred acres of land, most of which he entered, and made all improvements on the same. His death occurred May 4, 1849. He was of German descent. The mother of our subject was born in Cabarrus County, N. C., October 25, 1806, and died October 12, 1852; was of German descent. She was the mother of thirteen children, ten of whom lived to man and womanhood. Of the thirteen children our subject was the seventh child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his day afforded, and in assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. He left home at the age of twenty-one, and embarked on his career in life as a farmer, upon eighty acres of prairie and forty acres of timber. His farm is located in Section 11, and by his energy and business habits he has succeeded in accumulating 340 acres of land. In 1862, on the 21 st of February, in Montgomery County, he married Cynthia WILLIAMSON. She was born in Montgomery County in 1845. She is the daughter of John D. and Nancy G. (CARD) WILLIAMSON. Mr. and Mrs. LUDEWICK have had five children, three of whom are now living, viz., Ina O., the wife of Henry H. WHITTEN, of Fillmore Township; Lowell W., at home; Olive Maud, at home; Robert Grant and Walter, dead. Member of the order of A., F. & A. M., at Irving, No. 455. Wife is a member of the Lutheran Church. Politically, he is identified with the Republican party.

William C. McDAVID, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., March 1, 1820, to William and Elizabeth (JOHNSON) McDAVID. He was born in Scott County, Va., in September, 1790; when a boy, was taken to Missouri by his brother, and afterward went to Tennessee, where he joined the Seminole war, and also served through the war of 1812, under Jackson. During his life, followed the occupation of a farmer. In 1832, served six months in the Black Hawk war. In January, 1820, he emigrated from Tennessee to Montgomery County, and settled in East Fork Township, on the same farm that Thomas W., his son, is now residing on. His death occurred February 14, 1866. His marriage took place in Tennessee in 1819. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Tennessee September 15, 1800, and is now residing on the same farm where, with her husband, she settled in 1820; she is now enjoying good health. She is mother of nine children, of whom William C. is the oldest child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the log schoolhouses of his day afforded, at that time having to walk four miles to school. He remained with his parents, assisting in tilling the soil of the old homestead farm until he was twenty-one years of age, when he embarked on his career in life as a hired hand upon a farm, and, in fact, doing all kinds of work. He continued in this way until he was about twenty-six years of age, when, with the savings of his meager earnings, he was able to enter forty acres of prairie land; a portion of this same farm he is now residing on, and, by his economy and business habits, he succeeded in accumulating about four hundred acres of land, all of which he placed under a high state of cultivation. His farm now consists of 190 acres, he having divided his land among his children. On September 2, 1847, in Montgomery County, he married Lydia C. WILSON, a native of Harrison County, Ind., born April 11, 1826. She is the daughter of John and Ruth (WILBURN) WILSON, natives of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. McDAVID are the patents of six children, four of whom are living - James S., Thomas J., Emily E. and John L. Mr. McDAVID has held the office of Justice of the Peace in his township for twenty-eight years, and has never had a judgment reversed, and but few cases of appeal to higher courts. He is an active member of the A., F. & A. M. of Hillsboro. In politics, he is identified with the Democratic party. Self and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.James B. McDAVID, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., March 31, 1821, to William and Elizabeth (JOHNSON) McDAVID (see history J. T. McDAVID), and his early childhood was employed in assisting his parents upon the homestead farm, and in attending the neighboring log schoolhouse common at that early day, and to which his educational privileges were limited; but he has, however, by observation, and in contact with the world, succeeded in obtaining a practical education, that is, perhaps, above the average. He remained upon the homestead farm until he was about twenty-seven years of age, when he married and entered upon his own career in life as a farmer, and moved upon the place upon which he has since resided, engaged more or less extensively in farming. His first real estate consisted of eighty acres of land, to which he has continually added, until he now has in his possession about one thousand and twenty-five acres, the greater portion of which is under goodcultivation. Although he grows all the usual farm crops, he has, during the last few yeas, made a specialty of grain, and has also been engaged quite extensively in handling stock. At present, however, he is, to a certain extent, retired from active labor and given place to younger men, who may do well to follow the example Mr. McDAVID's life will afford. Mr. McDAVID has held several of the county offices, having served as County Assessor for a term of ten years, before the township organization. He is the present Township Assessor, the duties of which office he has filled for two terms before the present. He has also served the people as Justice of the Peace about one year, which position he resigned at the end of that time. He was married in Montgomery County February 29, 1848, to Miss Mary A. BURK, who was born in Smith County, Tenn., December 26, 1827, and was brought to Illinois by her parents when she was about two years of age. She is the mother of one child, William A., who was born April 23, 1854, and is now a prominent young farmer living near the homestead. Mrs. McDAVID is a daughter of Andrew and Rachel (BURNETTE) BURK, natives of Tennessee, both deceased. Mr. McDAVID served in the Mexican war about nine months, and was discharged on account of sickness. He has always taken a lively interest in the political issues of the day, and has always been identified with the Democratic party. Himself and wife are connected with the Presbyterian Church. He has also been a member of the A., F. & A. M., at Hillsboro, for a number of years.T. W. McDAVID, preacher and farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., September 6, 1833, to William and Elizabeth (JOHNSON) McDAVID. His early life was spent upon the homestead farm assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm, and receiving such an education as the common schools of his native county afforded, and a few months at the Hillsboro Academy. At the age of twenty-three, he commenced teaching school, following the same in the winter, and during the summer he followed the occupation of a farmer. He followed teaching in the winter season for about six years. He became a candidate for the ministry in 1865, and was ordained in September, 1867, by the Vandalia Presbytery. His first charge was at home and Maple Grove, and held the former for seven and a half years, and the latter for six years. Since, he has served as pastor in the following churches, viz.: Mt. Tabor; Witt Church, four years; Cross Roads; at present, he is pastor Irving Church, C. P., Maple Grove. In connection with his pastoral duties, Mr. McDAVID isextensively engaged in farming upon his [Page 296]Farm of about four hundred acres; with the exception of eighty four of timber, it is all under a high state of cultivation. In June, 1860, in Montgomery County, he married Louisa J., daughter of Richard and Tabitha (VICARS) BLACKBURN. Mrs. McDAVID was born September 19, 1841, in Montgomery County, Ill. She is the mother of thirteen children, eleven of whom are now living - Emma D., Lizzie J., Frank M., Ella, Margaret, Annie, Albert C., James E., Minnie, Lester T. and Hattie. Family are all connected with his church, theCumberland Presbyterian. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Hillsboro Lodge. Politically, is identified with the Democratic party.

William A. McDAVID, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., April 23, 1854, to James B. and Mary A. McDAVID. (See history.) His early childhood was employed in assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits upon the homestead farm, and in attending the common schools of the neighborhood, where he received the foundation of his education. At the age of fifteen he entered the McGee College, at College Mound, Macon Co., Mo., where he remained two years, and then spent two years in Lincoln University, Lincoln, Logan Co., Ill. While at McGee he graduated in book-keeping. At the age of twenty-one years he left the homestead farm, and entered upon his career in life as a farmer, at which occupation he has since continued. In connection with his father he has farm lands numbering about one thousand seven hundred acres, the principal part of which is under cultivation. His residence is located about five miles east of Hillsboro, in East Fork Township, and is surrounded by all improvements necessary for comfort and convenience, and which shows Mr. McDAVID to be a practical farmer. His farmhouse was built after his own design, and does honor to him as an architect, and his residence is spoken of as one of the finest in the township. He was married in Montgomery County, April 29, 1874, to Miss Martha J. WILSON, who was born in Montgomery County March 14, 1857. She is the mother of one child, Joseph C., born February 8, 1875. Mrs. McDAVID is a daughter of Joshua H. and Sarah (HUTCHISON) WILSON, natives of Illinois, both deceased. Mrs. McDAVID is connected with the CumberlandPresbyterian Church. Politically, Mr. McDAVID's sympathies are with the Democratic party.

Hiram SHEPHERD, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., August 18, 1830, to Pleasant and Anna (BROWN) SHEPHERD. He was born in North Carolina in 1803. When quite a young man he emigrated to Kentucky after a period of seven years; there married and removed to Illinois, and settled in Fillmore Township, Montgomery County. During his life he followed the occupation of a farmer. In the fall of 1832, he sold his property in Montgomery County, and returned to Kentucky, Adair County, and in the spring of 1833, returned to Montgomery County and settled in North Litchfield Township. Here he remained to the time of his death, which occurred April 10, 1834; at the time of his death he owned a farm of 120 acres. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Virginia in 1804, and died in 1848. She was the mother of eight children, Hiram SHEPHERD being the fifth child. His early life was spent in receiving such an education as the common schools of his day afforded, and in assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. In his eighteeth year he was left an orphan, and at that age embarked on his career in life as a hired hand, which he followed for one year, when he worked a farm on shares. In 1852, he went to California, and there followed gold mining. In 1854, he returned to Montgomery County, Ill., and embarked in a saw-mill business, near Litchfield. In 1856, he bought eighty acres of land, but soon traded the same for a 100-acre tract of partially improved prairie. He remained upon his farm about three years, when he sold out and bought 100 acres of the same farm he is now residing on. By his energy and business habits, he has succeeded in accumulating 200 acres of well-improved land, upon which he raises all farm products, but makes wheat, corn and oats a specialty, and aims to keep his farm well stocked. On October 21, 1857, in Montgomery County, he married Miss Nancy A., daughter of James and Sarah (BEER) WILLIAMS. Mrs. SHEPHERD was born in Washington County, Ill., December 10, 1832. She is the mother of nine children, viz., Anna E., Sarah E., Martha J., John P., Rosa A., Lillie L., Charles H. Hiram F. and Edward E. Politically, Mr. Shepherd is identified with the Democratic party.

Joel C. TRAYLOR, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Shelby County, Ky., October 6, 1814, to James and Nancy (CARDWELL) TRAYLOR, natives of Virginia. He died about 1850, aged about sixty-five; was a farmer by occupation. She died about 1822, aged about thirty years. She was the mother of four children, two of whom are still living, viz., William and Joel. The subject was educated in the common schools of his native State. When ten years of age, he engaged to learn the trade of harness-making; came to Montgomery County in 1844, and settled upon his present place of residence, and has been engaged in merchandising. His farm consists of about three hundred acres, which are worked by his children under his management. In 1874, he was appointed Postmaster, the office being in his house, and known as Ester Post Office. He was married in Kentucky to Julia GIBBS, a native of Kentucky, who died in 1845. His second marriage occurred April 3, 1846, to Sarah A. OHMART, born in Ohio February 18, 1828. She is the mother of thirteen children, viz., Andrew J., George, Margaret, Joel C., Jr., Harriet, Mahlon, Jacob L., Robert J., Elva A., Bunyan H., Mary F., Clement A., infant son deceased. Seven of these children are now living. Mr. TRAYLOR has served the people as Justice of the Peace about thirty years, and as Township Treasurer about twenty years. Politically, he is a Democrat; religiously, he is a Universalist.

Aaron C. WILLIAMS, music teacher and farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Orange, Essex Co., N. J., August 13, 1830, to Ebenezer and Abigail (CRANE) WILLIAMS. This family is of Welsh descent, and emigrated to America early in the sixteenth century. Matthew WILLIAMS, the first, was born in 1651; supposed to have been born at Branford, Conn.; died in 1732. His wife, Ruth, died July 27, 1724, aged sixty-seven years. Matthew, the second, was born in Newark, N. J., in 1694, and died in 1772. His wife was Abby BROWN, daughter of Thomas BROWN. Isaac WILLIAMS was the oldest son of their six children, born November 6, 1722, and was the paternal great-grandfather of our subject. His wife was Eunice PIERSON; they had eight children; Aaron was the fifth child; he was born July 5, 1759; married Mary DODD, by whom he had five children, three of whom lived to be over eighty years of age. Ebenezer, the father of our subject, was the second son, born January 7, 1792. He was a carpenter by occupation, and served his apprenticeship in the city of New York. He died February 14, 1874. Two brothers and one sister of [Page 298] his were born, and lived to a good old age, and eventually died in the same house. His wife, Abigail B. CRANE, was born in 1795, and is still living. She is the mother of nine children, only four of whom are now living, and of whom Aaron, the subject of this sketch, is next to the youngest child living. His early childhood was employed in attending the public schools of his native county, and in working with his father at his trade. At the age of eighteen he commenced the study of music, and soon after began to teach the same in the city of New York, where he remained until ill health compelled him to give up that occupation. In 1854, he turned his face toward the setting sun, and located in Jacksonville, Ill., where he again began to teach music, at which occupation he continued until 1871, in many of the principal cities of the East and West, Viz., New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Quincy, Springfield and Jacksonville. In the spring of 1871, he went to Montgomery, Ill., where he purchased 160 acres of land, and in connection with the duties of his profession, he engaged in farming. He has now in his possession a farm consisting of 233 acres of choice farm land, located about two miles east of Hillsboro. In the spring of 1882, he erected a large and commodious farm residence, which is an honor to him as an architect, and is spoken of as one of the finest farmhouses in the county. He was married in Hillsboro, November 25, 1864, to Miss Jane Elizabeth BROWN, a native of Montgomery County, born January 8, 1837. They have four children living, viz., Edward E., Margaret A., Mary G., Alfred A. and Elizabeth Jeanette, who died in infancy. Mrs. WILLIAMS was a daughter of Maj. William and Elizabeth (CRAIG) BROWN, natives of North Carolina, both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMS are members of the Presbyterian Church. Politically, Mr. WILLIAMS is identified with the Republican party. He is one of those men who always take part in all progressive movements favoring the improvement of the county, and especially in the advancement of religious and educational privileges, and is a warm advocate of the cause of temperance.

Robert A. WILLIAMSON, farmer, P. O. Hillsboro, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., March 12, 1837. This family are of Irish descent, and emigrated to America at a very early day in this country's history. The paternal grandfather of our subject was born in Virginia, where he carried on farming, and raised a family of nine children, with whom he removed to Montgomery County, Ill., in the year 1835, where he died September 20, 1861, aged about seventy years. His wife, Jane DAVIDSON, is of Welsh descent, and was born March 15, 1797, and is still living, enjoying as good, if not better, health, than persons usually do who have attained her age. Of her once large family six are still living, and of whom John, the father of our subject, was the oldest child, and was born December 15, 1814, and since he came to Montgomery County with his parents has continued in the county, engaged more or less extensively in farming, and was at one time considered one of the leading men of the county, but has, to a certain extent, retired from active labor and given way to younger men, who may never be able to display more energy, enterprise and general activity than has Mr. WILLIAMSON, who, at the present time, is enjoying good health, and bids fair to live still many years, surrounded by his children, and enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life and successful career. His wife, Nancy G. CARD, was born in Kentucky February 14, 1819, is still living, and is also hale and hearty. She is the mother of eleven children, of whom five are still living, viz., [Page 299]Robert A., our subject; Otis M. (see history); Cynthia J., wife of H. M. LUDEWICK; William C., a farmer living in Butler Township; Arra E., wife of W. C. WOODWARD, living on the homestead. Robert A., the oldest child and subject of this sketch, remained upon the homestead farm until he reached the age of twenty years, assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits, and in attending school in the neighboring log schoolhouse, to which his educational privileges were limited. He has, however, by contact with the world, close observation and reading, succeeded in obtaining more than an ordinary practical education. He entered upon his career in life as a house builder, comparatively a poor man; but, having a stout heart and an energetic spirit, he determined to make his own way in the world. He remained engaged in house building in different localities for about twelve years, and then went to Colorado, where he remained two years engaged in mining. He then entered the service during the rebellion in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with Capt. James G. SEWARD; regimentcommanded by Col. D. C. SMITH. He remained in the service until the close of the war, when he returned home, and took upon himself the duties of a farm life, at which he has since remained engaged. He has sixty-nine acres of choice farm and timber land under a high state of cultivation, which shows Mr. WILLIAMSON to be a practical farmer. Although he grows all the usual farm crops, he makes a specialty of grain, and raising stock in a small way. He was married in Montgomery County, September 20, 1866, to Mary E. (CROSS) LUDEWICK, who was born August 18, 1838. She is the mother of two living children, viz., Della HEED and Katy HAYS; four children died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson is a daughter of Absalom C. and Katy (FOGLEMAN) CRESS, natives of North Carolina, deceased. Religiously, Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMSON are connected with the Lutheran Church. He is also a member of the A., F. & A. M. at Irving. Politically, he is identified with the Republican part. He is an energetic and enterprising man, and socially enjoys the highest esteem of the entire community. He is a public-spirited man, always interested in any county or public enterprise, and for the advancement of religious andeducational privileges.

[Fillmore Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 300]

Joseph T. ALEXANDER, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in this county September 17, 1834, and was raised to a life of farming; was educated in the common schools of the county, and commenced business for himself as a farmer, and inherited sixty acres of land, unimproved, on which he built all necessary improvements, and remained there sixteen years, and added to that forty acres, making one hundred acres in the tract; sold, and bought the place on which he now resides, and has erected a very elegant dwelling with all the necessary out-buildings, and has a beautifullocation, the land being rolling enough to drain well, which makes it valuable, and was married in Fayette, May 3, 1850, to Miss Irene WRIGHT. She was born in this State July 23, 1839, to Joseph WRIGHT. Her father was born in Kentucky in 1813; was a farmer by occupation, and died November 27, 1873. Rebecca KIRK, her mother, was born in Tennessee in the year 1810, and died in the year 1876. They reared a family of six children, all living. Richard Alexander, the father of subject, was born in Tennessee January 10, 1810, and was a farmer by occupation. He came to this State when quite a boy, and enlisted in company of rangers against the Indians, and lived and died on the place now owned by subject. His death occurred about May 12, 1874. Sarah WHITTEN was the mother of six children, the subject being the oldest child, and he has a family of four children, whose names are as follows: Eveline C., Easton W., Sarah R. and Homer L.; was elected Assessor and served one year, and has beenCommissioner six years, and filled other offices of township. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is identified with the Democratic party.

Lyman C. ALLEN, Fillmore, was born in New Hampshire in the year 1836; worked with his parent until twenty-one year of age, and entered on his business career as a school teacher, and followed that profession for several years. He went to Minnesota in 1860, and pre-empted 160 acres of land, improved it, and remained there five years, at the expiration of which time he came back to Montgomery County, Ill., and settled on the farm on which he now resides, on which he has erected a good dwelling and barn, with all other buildings necessary for comfort andconvenience. His farm contains 330 acres of good, tillable land; he also owns 400 acres of good farming and stock land in Minnesota. He married in Montgomery County in 1864, Miss Alice D. BLISS. She was born in this State in March, 1843, and was the mother of four children; she died in June, 1879. Her father, a native of Vermont, her mother born in New Hampshire, are now living in this State. His second wife, Emeline RUSSELL, was born in this State in February, 1846; was married in January, 1881. Her father, William RUSSELL, was a farmer by occupation; her mother is still living in Montgomery County. Winslow ALLEN, the father of subject, was born in New Hampshire in the year 1800; was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1859. His wife, Nancy (GROUTY) ALLEN, was also born in New Hampshire in the year 1803, and died in 1856. She was [Page 301]The mother of eleven children, the subject being the sixth child, and he has a family of three children (one deceased), named as follows: Ned B., Jesse A. and Carlos E. Mr. ALLEN has been Supervisor for two years; he is a Democrat. His wife is a member of the Lutheran Church.

Aaron G. BUTLER, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Tennessee January 1, 1838; was raised on a farm; educated in the common schools of the country, and remained with his father until twenty-one years of age. He began business for himself as a farmer, in this State, in 1860, with an uncle in Fayette County, with whom he remained about two years; then came to Montgomery County, and settled on the farm on which he now lives, which contains about six hundred and forty acres of land, four hundred of which are under cultivation, and has all necessary improvements. He also owns seventy acres of land in Fayette County, alsoimproved. He married in Montgomery County in 1863, Miss Jane CASEY, born in that county in the year 1847. Her father, John CASEY, born in KentuckyNovember 26, 1825, a farmer by occupation, died August 5, 1863. His wife, Louisa McCASLIN, was born in Tennessee November 29, 1825, and died in September, 1868. Calvin J. BUTLER, the father of subject, a farmer, born in Tennessee, died about 1872. Martha J. HIX, subject's mother, also a native of Tennessee, died about the year 1868. She was the mother of eight children, the subject being the second child, and he has a family of three children, viz., Charlie L, Ora and J. L. S. Mr. BUTLER was elected Sheriff in 1878, and served one term; has also been Supervisor two terms. He is a hospitable, genial and accommodating gentleman, and has a high social standing in his community. He is a Democrat, and a member of the A., F. & A. M. His wife is a Methodist.

Levi HILL, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in this county and State in the year 1825, and commenced life as a farmer. His father gave him 100 acres of land, and he has added to that until he has reached the handsome estate of 290 acres, on which he has erected a good and comfortable dwelling and barn, with all necessary improvements, and was married in this county in the year 1848, to Miss Wilmoth (LANDERS) HILL. She was born in this State in the year 1831. Henry LANDERS, her father, was born in Kentucky, and died in 1842. Elizabeth HINTON, her mother, was born in North Carolina, and died about 1868. She was the mother of six children, one deceased. Henry HILL emigrated to this State from Kentucky in 1816; he was a farmer by occupation; he entered quite a large tract of land; died April 5, 1855. Mary PRATER, his mother, was born November 6, 1803; she died April 16, 1842. She was the mother of twelve children, the subject being the third of the family, and he has a family of sevenchildren, three deceased; names as follows: Mary HILL, December 8, 1849; Henry E. HILL, July 11, 1851; Simeon M., December 15, 1852; Martha, January 22, 1857; Sarah, June 23, 1858; Orlena, February 10, 1860; Illinois, November 17, 1861; Layfayette, August 21, 1863; Celeste, July 9, 1868; Theodore HILL, born August 13, 1869.

Squire HILL, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., January 17, 1844, and inherited 160 acres of land, located in Fillmore Township, on which were no improvements. This he sold and bought a place containing 160 acres of unimproved land, which he improved and lived upon about four years; sold out and bought the place on which he now resides, which contains 160 acres of good, fertile land, on which he has erected a fine dwelling and barn, with all necessary outbuildings. The farm is lo- [Page 302] cated on Section 33, Town 8, Range 2, about twelve miles east and south of Hillsboro. He was married in Fayette County October 22, 1868, to Miss Mary L. BOST, born in Fayette County in 1849. Her father, Henry BOST, was born in North Carolina about 1826; was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1876. Her mother, Elizabeth (HARRIS) BOST, was born in Illinois. Henry HILL, the father of subject, was born in Kentucky; his wife was born in North Carolina. She was the mother of six children, the subject being the youngest child. He has a family of three children, one deceased, named as follows: Ollie O., born September 5, 1869; Henry C., born October 29, 1873; Anna E., deceased, born February 28, 1876, died August 26, 1876; Mary E. was born April 19, 1878. He has been Supervisor of this township for two terms. He enlisted in Company E, First Illinois Cavalry, in 1862, Capt. Paul WALTERS; principally on escort duty, and served a short time. He has been always identified with the Democratic party; has taken greatinterest in public improvements, and the advancement of agricultural interests.

Dr. John T. HENDRIX, Fillmore, was born in Tennessee in 1845. Harrison HENDREIX, his father, a merchant, was born in Tennessee. Editha TAYLOR, his mother, was a descendant of President TAYLOR, and was the mother of four children, the subject being the second child. He was raised nearElizabethton, Tenn., and remained with his father until sixteen years of age. He then entered the Confederate army, in Company C, First RegimentTennessee Artillery; was taken prisoner at the siege of Vicksburg; had taken part in several previous engagements; was sent to St. Louis prison, but, through the influence of President Johnson, was released in a short time. He remained in St. Louis six months after being released from prison; then came to Montgomery County, and settled in East Fork Township. He was married in 1865 t Miss Clotilda B. COFFEEN, born in Jeffereson County, N. Y., in the year 1850. She was the mother of five children, all living. She died March 9, 1875. His second wife, Dorcas F. BOST, was born in Illinois in the year 1857. Her father, Martin BOST, born in NorthCarolina, died about the year 1872. Hannah J. BOST, her mother, born in New Hampshire, is still living. Subject commenced the study of medicine in 1873, with Drs. HANES & WASHBURN, of Hillsboro; remained with them three years; then attended Medical College in St. Louis, Mo., in 1877, and graduated in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1878. He first settled at Fairview, in June, 1879, and remained there until October; then removed to the place where he now resides, and bought fifteen acres of land, and has it well improved with all conveniences necessary. He is highly esteemed as a man, as well as a physician; has a good practice.

G. W. ISBELL, farmer, P. O. Hurricane, was born in Fayette County, in the year 1833, and has a good practical education. He commenced business as afarmer, and took charge of his father's farm at the age of fifteen years (his father being an invalid), and remained in charge until twenty-three years of age. He then married and moved to Montgomery County, where he now resides. His first purchase of land was sixty acres, which were partially improved, to which he has added until he has reached the handsome estate of 235 acres of good, tillable land, on which he has erected a fine house, barn and outbuildings. It is considered one among the best improved places in the vicinity. He also owns, in Fayette County, 440 acres of land, the most of which is in good state of cultivation. He was married in [Page 303] Fayette County, in 1856, to Miss Mahala HILL. She was born in Kentucky; is the mother of six children, four of whom are living. She died in May, 1873. Her mother, a native of Kentucky, is still living in Fayette County, Ill. His second wife, Theresa (ELAM) (MASON) ISABELL, was born in Bond County, Ill., in 1848; married in bond County in 1873. Her parents were natives of North Carolina, and both are now living in Bond County. James ELAM, her father, is a minister of teh Gospel. Pasehal ISBELL, the father of subject, was born in Kentucky in 1807, a farmer by occupation, and emigrated to this State in 1828 or 1829 settled in Fayette County, Ill., and died there in April, 1879. Clarissa (SEERS) ELAM, the mother of subject, was born in Kentucky in 1809, and is the mother of fourteen children, this subject being the fourth child. He has a family of sevenchildren, five living, viz.: Diana, Melvina, William Jackson, Lewis, Jasper (deceased), Jennie; one died in infancy. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church; he is a Democrat. He has always been an advocate in favor of public improvements and agricultural interests. He started out to battle with the world without anything, but, being possessed of a stout heart and an indomitable energy, he has accumulated quite a fortune.

John H. KNOWLES, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, born in Piermont, Grafton co., N. H., March 16, 1822; raised on the farm. His boyhood days were spent in assisting his father; educated in the common schools of the country; entered on his business career as a farmer; brought to this county by his parents in 1838; settled near Fillmore Township, his father having bought land there, when subject commenced farming; stayed about three years; sold out and went to Vera; bought a half-interest in a mill, and operated that four years; sold out and bought a farm about a mile from the mill, containing 280 acres of land; remained there two years; and bought the place where he now lives, containing 260 cares of land. He has all necessary improvements on the farm, and which is in a good state ofcultivation. Subject was married at Vandalia, Ill., December 27, 1843, to Miss Sarah A. CASEBEER, born in new Philadelphia, Ohio, March 1, 1827. Her father, Christian CASEBEER, a farmer and millwright, born in SomersetCounty, Penn., February 1, 1803, and died October 8, 1849. His wife, Rosanna (WILLSON) CASEBEER, still living, was born near Pittsburgh, Penn., May 17, 1807. The father of subject, Joseph KNOWLES, born in New Hampshire April 1, 1783, a farmer by occupation, died February 15, 1860. His mother,Hannah (HAINES) KNOWLES, also a native of New Hampshire, born July 12, 1787,died October 31, 1845; was the mother of eight children, the subject being the fifth child. He has a family of four children, Dianna J., Lillie G. and Adel G., and one child deceased. He has been Deputy Sheriff and Constable for five years; also School Trustee for a number of years; is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a Mason and a Democrat; grandfather was in the Revolutionary war.

Albert LIVINGSTONE, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Amsterdam, Nomtgomery Co., N. Y., April 16, 1821; assisted his father in the tanning and coloring business in his boyhood days; was educated in the common schools of the country; commenced business for himself as a farmer, in this State, at twenty-two years of age; bought 100 acres of land, his first purchase, which was slightly improved, a log cabin being the onlydwelling, and four or five acres of land broken. He has added to his first purchase until he now has 355 acres of good, tillable land, on which he has all necessary buildings. [Page 304]He gave his children 200 acres, north of the home tract, 160 of which is improved. He was married in Fayette County February 26, 1846, to Ann Elizabeth BARRINGER, born June 17, 1824, in Cabarrus County, N.C., and died August 2, 1862, leaving nine children. She was the daughter of John M. and Crissey M. (PITTS) BARRINGER, he born in 1803, and died August 4, 1854; she born in 1805, and died in February, 1849. Jane GATEWOOD, his second wife, was born in Ohio, in the year 1832, and is the mother of four children. Her father, a native of Ohio, died in January, 1879. Her mother, a native of Virginia, is still living. Timothy LINVINGSTONE, the father of subject, was born in Massachusetts October 19, 1777, and died in 1861. His wife, Mary (GURAN) LIVINGSTONE, born April 29, 1786, in Massachusetts, and died April 5, 1821, leaving nine children, of whom subject is the youngest. He has been Highway Commissioner for several years; also School Director for a number of years; has done all he could toward public improvements and agriculturalinterests; has always been identified with the Republican party. His children are Mary, born December 14, 1846; Joseph P., born June 9, 1848; Adeline, born February 25, 1850; Timothy A. born May 21, 1851; Catharine E., born February 4, 1853; Charles E., born April 2, 1855; George Albert, born September 3, 1857, and Alfred W., born February 22, 1861.

J. Bowers LANE, farmer and merchant, Fillmore, born in Cheshire County, N.H., September 10, 1826. His father, Timothy L. LANE, was born in Marlboro, N. H., September 1, 1800; was educated at Groton, Mass.; afterward attended Medical College at Hanover, N. H., where he graduated in 1824; commenced the practice of his profession at Sullivan, N. H.; moved to Lunenburg, Vt., in 1832, and remained there two years, at theexpiration of which time he located at Gilsum, N. H., where he remained until 1838; thence to Daysville, Ill., practicing his profession there until 1840; then removed to Fillmore Township, and continued his practice until his death, which occurred September 1, 2849. Roxana (HARVEY) LANE, the mother of subject, was born in Marlboro, N. H., August 2, 1802, and died January 1, 1849; was the mother of four children, two of whom are living. The subject, the eldest of the family, was raised in town; was educated in the common schools of the country; entered on his business career as a farmer, his first purchase being ninety acres of land, to which he has added from time to time, until he has now a handsome estate of 650 acres of fine farming land. He has given his children 200 acres from that tract, and now has 450 acres on his home place, on which he has all necessary buildings conducive to the health and comfort of man and beast. He has also had a store on his farm since 1861, and is doing a good business; has been Postmaster for a number of years. His place was mostly raw prairie, and he has made all the improvements; was elected Associate Judge in 1869, and served four years, acquitting himself with honor. He is a stanch Republican. He married, February 3, 1852, Rachel G. BOST, born in North Carolina march 22, 18830, daughter of Jacob and Margaret (CRESS) BOST, he born in Pennsylvania April 4, 1794; she born in North Carolina February 26, 1797, and died in May, 1853. From this union eight children have been born to them - Timothy L., Margaret R., Torrance H., Augusta F., Ora E., Carrie M., Elsie V. and Ella L.

Asa PRATER, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Bond County December 10, 1829. Alexander PRATER, his father, was born in Tennessee October 17, 1807. He was [Page 305] brought to this State by his father in 1818. Halloway PRATER, the grandfather of subject, was born in North Carolina in 1777, of Scotch descent; was a farmer and wheelwright by occupation, and died in November, 1846. His grandmother, Anna ADAIR, was born in North Carolina about 1779. She was the mother of eight children; the father of subject was the fifth child, and married Mary SEARS, the mother of subject. She was born in Kentucky about 1809, and was the mother of four children, one deceased, our subject being the second child; was educated in the common schools of the country, but has, by observation and application, a good practical education. He entered 120 acres of Government land which was slightly improved, paying $100 for the improved part, and has added to his first purchase 120 acres more, making 240 acres of good, tillable land, on which he has erected a fine house and barn, with all necessary improvements, and also owns about forty-three acres of timber. He married in this county Artemisia BROWN PRATER, who was born in this county November 10, 1830. She died June 9, 1857. As his second wife he married, in 1861, Sarah H. BROWN, born December 1, 1836, and she is the mother of four children, all living; the names as follows: Horatio L., born February 13, 1862; Flora B., born August 13, 1864; Lillie May, born May 7, 1868; John H., born April 21, 1871. He was Town Clerk one year, in 1873. Members of Primitive Baptist Church; he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity; is identified with the Democratic party, and extremely liberal in his views. His grandfather was in the war of 1812; his father was in the Black Hawk war; has always been an advocate of public improvements, taking great interest in agriculture.

Gideon RICHMOND, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, born in Licking County, Ohio, September 14, 1820; raised on a farm and assisted his father until twenty years of age; was educated in the common schools of the country, and began his business career as a farmer, his first purchase of land being fifty acres, partially improved, on which he remained only two years; sold out and moved to Montgomery County, Ill., and bought 100 acres of land; has increased his property to 500 acres of good farming land. He has given his son eighty acres recently; has erected a fine dwelling and barn, with all necessary outbuildings, and his farm is in a high state of cultivation He was married first in Ohio, to Miss Lois AMES, who died, and then married Miss Cynthia DOTA, also of Ohio, who died, leaving one child; her parents were natives of New Jersey. His third wife, Harriet A. KNOWLES, whom he married March 14, 1847, was born in New Hampshire August 11, 1830; her father, Joseph KNOWLES, was born in New Hampshire April 1, 1784; was a farmer by occupation, and died February 16, 1860. Her mother, Hannah (HAINES) KNOWLES, was also born in New Hampshire June 29, 1788, and died October 31, 1845. Mrs. RICHMOND is the mother of four children. The father of subject, Henrey W. RICHMOND, was born in Adams County, Mass., December 5, 1798; was a farmer by occupation, and died May 4, 1874. His wife, Eliza CUBBERLY, was born near Trenton, N. J., April 11, 1800, and is still living. She is the mother of three children, the subject being the eldest child. Mr. RICHMOND has by energy and economy accumulated a handsome property, and he and wife seem to be enjoying the fruits of their labor in their old age; is a good citizen and useful to the community in which he resides. His children are Henry F., Hiram F., George A., Dora I. and Ernest H.

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G. A. RICHMOND, Fillmore, was born in Fillmore, Montgomery County, October 8, 1851; worked on the farm with his father until of age, and was educated in the common schools of the country. He commenced life as a farmer, and settled on the old home place of his father's, beginning on eighty acres of land that his father had given him, to which he has added forty acres of good land, and has erected a good dwelling and barn, and all necessary outbuildings. He was married, September 18, 1877, at Irving, Ill., to Miss Addie BOST, born in Fillmore August 8, 1859, daughter of John J. and Rebecca M. (SANDERS) BOST, he a farmer by occupation, born in Cabarrus County, N. C., January 4, 1836, and is still living; she, also living, born in Montgomery County, Ill., January 16, 1839. Gideon RICHMOND, subject's father, was born in Ohio in 1820, a farmer by occupation. His wife, Harriet KNOWLES, was born in New Hampshire in August, 1830, and is the mother of four children, the subject being the oldest of the family, and he has but one child, Nellie V., two and one-half years of age. Is a Democrat.

Hiram S. SHORT, physician, Fillmore, was born in Randolph County, N. C., May 4, 1840. The main part of his early childhood was spent in attending the common schools, where he received the foundation of his subsequent learning. In January, 1854, he was removed by his parents to Fayette County, Ill., where they remained three years, and then removed to Shelby County. Lemuel SHORT, the father of our subject, a native of Guiford County, N. C., was born February 24, 1814, and from the time he reached maturity followed teaching until the time of his death, which occurred May 6, 1858. His wife, Mary HASKETT, was also a native of North Carolina, born November 21, 1816, and is still living, the wife of John H. BUCKMASTER, residing five miles north of Vandalia. By her first husband she gave birth to eleven children, nine of whom are still living, and of whom Hiram S. was the second child. After reaching Illinois with his parents, he continued to attend the common schools for a short time, and then entered the Quaker High School of Westfield, Ind., where he remained one year and then returned home and taught school a large portion of the following four years, and a portion of which time, in connection with his other duties each year, he read medicine with Dr. J. C. JONES, of Ramsey, with whom he continued from 1865 to 1869, at the end of which time he entered upon the practice of his profession, and, after attending the Cincinnati Medical College two terms, he successfully passed the rigid examination necessary to become an M.D.; received his diploma May 19, 1873, and continued in his practice at Fillmore, where he first located. He removed to Ramsey in September, 1875, and remained until October, 1878, when he returned to Fillmore. His farm consists of eighty acres of choice farm land, which he now rents out and devotes his time to his calling. By his prompt attention to and thorough knowledge of his profession, he succeeded in building up a large and steadily increasing practice, the duties of which would fall heavy upon the shoulders of a man many years his senior, and is the result of a good education, energy and business ability, and qualifications necessary to gain the esteem of all. July 3, 1861, he entered the service in Company C, Thirty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with Capt. James WILLIAMS, regiment commanded by Col. G. A. SMITH. He received his discharge September 27, 1864. While in the service, he took part in several notable engagements, among which are Pea Ridge, Ark., Perryville, Ky., Stone River, Tenn.; was also upon duty at the evacuation of Corinth, Miss.; also at the battle of Chickamauga, and in Sherman's campaign in Georgia. He was married, October 31, 1871, at Ramsey, Fayette Co., Ill, to Miss Sarah M. STOKES, who was born October 25, 1851. She is the mother of five children, viz., William T., born July 27, 1872; Mary L., born March 12, 1874; Emma E., born October 31, 1876; Ulysses S., born February 25, 1878; Walter C., born March 30, 1880. Mrs. SHORT is a daughter of Bird and Margaret J. (CASEY) STOKES, he a native of Tennessee, born December 25, 1817, and died November 16, 1877; she of Fayette County, Ill., born July 16, 1832, and still living. Although a man not very much interested in politics, his sympathies are with the Republican party. He is an active member of the order of A., F. & A. M., of Fillmore Lodge; has been a member of the Montgomery County Eclectic Society since its organization in May, 1870; has also been a member of the State Society since June, 1880.

S. P. TROUTMAN, Fillmore, was born in Cabarrus County, N. C., October 3, 1822, and has a good, practical education. He commenced business for himself as a farmer; coming to Montgomery County at eighteen years of age, stayed there two and a half years, working on the farm, and then returned to North Carolina, where he remained until 1847. He served about eighteen months in the Mexican war, having enlisted under Gen. Zachary TAYLOR; went back to North Carolina; remained there until August, 1849, when he returned to Montgomery County, Ill., and worked on the farm one month, and at different other occupations until 1852, when he entered 120 acres of raw prairie land on which there were no improvements of any kind. He has since added eighty acres, making 200 acres of good, tillable land, on which he has erected a good and substantial dwelling, with all necessary outbuildings. He also owns ninety-two acres of land one and a half miles west of his home lace, Section 30. He was married in Montgomery County in the year 1852, to Miss Sarah HILL, a native of that county, who died in 1853. She was the mother of one child, dead. His second wife, Mary A. SHEPPARD, a native of Illinois; died in 1865. She was the mother of eight children, only five of whom are living. Christina L. CRUSE, his third wife, was born in Union County, Ill., in 1822. Henry CRUSE, her father, was born in North Carolina, and was a farmer by occupation. Her mother was also a native of North Carolina. Jacob TROUTMAN, subject's father, was born in North Carolina; served in the war of 1812; was a farmer by occupation, and died about 1829. Christina WALKER, subject's mother, was born in North Carolina, and died in 1850; was the mother of eight children, the subject being the third child. He has an elder brother living in North Carolina. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. He is independent in regard to the political issues of the day; has always done his utmost in aid of public improvements, and the advancement of agricultural interests.

Jaret WRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Montgomery County in the year 1819, and was raised on the farm and assisted his father in his boyhood days; was educated in the common schools of the country, and entered on his business career as a farmer; went into the Mexican war in 1846, under Capt. McADAMS, Company C, Infantry; was at the battle of Cerro Gordo, at the taking of Vera Cruz; was in the service a year, at the expiration of which he came back to Montgomery County, and settled on the land he received for his services in the war, [Page 308]Which was 160 acres of slightly improved land, and remained on it for several years, and sold that and moved to the place on which he now resides, consisting of 530 acres, the most of which is good, tillable land, and has it well improved with a good, comfortable house and barn, with all necessary outbuildings, and was married in this county November 8, 1849, to Miss Mary WHITTEN. She was born in this county in 1821. Easton WHITTEN, her father, was born in Sough Carolina; was a farmer by occupation, and died in this State in 1855. Her mother was born in South Carolina, and died in this county in 1851, and was the mother of eight children, wife of subject being next youngest. Joseph WRIGHT, the father of subject, was born in South Carolina, and his mother, Sarah REVIS, was born also in the same State; she died in 1855, and was the mother of ten children, the subject being the fifth child, and he has a family of five children living. The names are as follows: Araminda, born July 17, 1851; Emora, born May 8, 1853; Ezra, born July 17, 1855; Esta, born November 17, 1858; Elbert, born October 8, 1861. John Ambler JOHNSON, the grandfather of subject's wife, was in the Revolutionary war; Democrat all his life. He being one of the old settlers, has done as much as any man, according to means, to ward the advancement of agricultural and public improvements.

Elijah WRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Hurricane, was born in Fillmore Precinct, Montgomery County, November 24, 1824. Joseph WRIGHT, his father, was born in Kentucky, April 20, 1780. He emigrated to this State in 1814, and entered a large tract of land besides what he purchased; was one among the prominent men of the day; was a farmer and blacksmith by occupation, and died October 1, 1844, after having raised a large and useful family of children, who are among the best citizens of the county at the present day. He married in Kentucky about 1802, Miss Sarah REVIS, who was the mother of eleven children, four of whom are living, our subject being the eighth child; was educated in the common schools of the country, and commenced business for himself as a farmer, his first purchase being a tract of eighty acres, and he has added to it until he has reached the handsome estate of 500 acres, 300 of which he has given to his children, and has erected on his home place a fine dwelling and barn, with all necessary outbuildings, and has his farm in a high state of cultivation. He married in Montgomery Co., Nov. 13, 1851, to Miss Drucilla LYNN, born in Kentucky December 1, 1833. Her father, Jefferson LYNN, was born in Kentucky; Elizabeth CASEY, her mother, was also a native of Kentucky; her father was a farmer; they both died in this county. Her mother had seven children, all living except one. She is the oldest of the family, and is the mother of seven children, two deceased. Camallia, born in 1853; Celestina, born in 1855; Joseph Jefferson, born in 1858; Sarah E., born in 1861; Emmerson, born December 14, 1870, Mary Rosetta, born in 1860, and died in 1864, and two infants died without name. He is identified with the Democratic party, and has always been instrumental in helping on the agricultural interests and public improvements - a man who stands high where he is known.

Easton WHITTEN, farmer, P. O. Bost Hill, was born in Warren County, Ky., May 22, 1827, and when four years of age was brought to Montgomery County, Ill., by his parents, where his early childhood was employed upon the homestead farm assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits. When he reached the age of twenty-two, he [Page 309] left the paternal roof, purchased eighty acres of wild prairie land which he improved and eventually sold, with the intention of trying his fortune in the gold region of California, where he remained about two years, and succeeded in laying up enough money to enable him to make a start in the world with a good footing. Upon his return home, he again took upon himself the duties of a farm life, at which he has since remained engaged, and has, by his energy, industry and economy,accumulated 580 acres of land near the line between Fillmore and East Fork, the greater portion of which he has under a state of cultivation which shows Mr. WHITTEN to be a practical farmer. He grows all the usual farm crops, and is also a breeder of stock having now in his stable as fine a stallion as can be found in the county, and which is of Black Hawk Morgan and Arabian stock. Mr. WHITTEN was married February 6, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth SANDERS, who was born in Montgomery County March 7, 1831. The have two living children, Thomas T. and Henry H. Mrs. WHITTEN is a daughter of John and Elizabeth (POWELL) SANDERS, natives of Kentucky, he born in the year 1799, and died February 12, 1864; she living, born November 19, 1802. Austin WHITTEN, the father of our subject, was born in South Carolina, November 29, 1802, a farmer by occupation; located in East Fork Township, Montgomery County, in 1831, where his death occurred May 12, 1869. His wife, Keziah CASEY, also a native of South Carolina, born March 15, 1800, and died October 1, 1856. She was the mother of twelve children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, and of whom Easton was the fourth child. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Church. Politically, Mr. WHITTEN was identified with the Democratic party, but of late years has been a stanch Republican. Being a progressive man himself, he is always in favor of any enterprise that will in any way tend to the advantage of the county, and especially for the advancement of religious and educational privileges.

Otis M. WILLIAMSON, farmer, P. O. Bost Hill, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., November 19, 1840, to John and Nancy G. (CARD) WILLIAMSON (see history), and passed his early childhood in the manner common with the children of that day, in attending the common schools, and in assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits. Owing to the limited school privileges, his education was necessarily limited to such as could be obtained in the common schools at that early day. He has, however, continued to add to the foundation laid in the log schoolhouse, and now considers his education to be one, if not above the average, a practical education, and realizing from his own meager opportunities the value education gives one at the present time, he has spared no means to provide such a one for his children, and in return they have taken advangtage of the privileges allowed them, and bear a reputation as scholars of which they, as well as their parents, may well feel justly proud. At the age of twenty-one years, Mr. WILLIAMSON left his paternal roof with nothing but his hands with which to enter upon the battle of life, but possessed with all the energy and enterprise of a man who considers that the world owes him a living and sets out fully determined to make his own way. Upon leaving home, he engaged in the carpenter and joiner's business, at which occupation he remained engaged about three or four years, at the end of which time he took upon himself the duties of a farm life. In 1866, he purchased his first real estate, upon which he has since resided engaged in farming and handling stock, more or less exten- [Page 310]sively. During the years of 1862-63, he was in Colorado engaged in mining, and, in connection with the duties of his farm, he has traveled in several of the States where his stock dealing may have called him. He was married in Montgomery County, Ill., February 28, 1864, to Melvina Jane CRESS, who was born September 12, 1843. She is the mother of four children, viz., Peter P., born May 12, 1868; Hattie A., born January 27, 1871; Walter A., born February 5, 1875; Torney, born December 16, 1865, and died March 27, 1867. Mrs. WILLIAMSON is a daughter of Peter and Katy (NUSMAN) CRESS; he living, she deceased. Mr. WILLIAMSON is an active member of the order of A., F. & A. M., Fillmore Lodge, No. 670. He served as Assessor during the first term after township organization, and is the present Supervisor. He is a man that takes a deep interest in all the political issues of the day, and also in all progressive movements favoring the growth and prosperity of the county, and especially in the advancement of religious and educational privileges.

George O. WOLCOTT, farmer, P. O. Fillmore, was born in Worcester County, Mass., October 26, 1831. William WOLCOTT, subject's father, was born inMassachusetts in the year 1801; is a farmer by occupation, and a resident of Montgomery County. His wife, Lucy FAIRBANK, was born in New Hampshire about 1813; she is also a resident of Montgomery County. She is the mother of six children, the subject being the second child. He was educated in the common schools of the country, and entered on his business career as afarmer. He married in Montgomery County May 11, 1857, Miss Jane MACK, born in New Hampshire in 1835. He is the father of seven children, viz., William O., Alice J., George E., Charles W., Illinois, James F. and Frederick. Mr.WOLCOTT has 240 acres of good farming land, with all necessary improvements, in Fillmore Township, where he now resides, and also twenty acres in FayetteCounty. He commenced with eighty acres of land, and has by his economy and enrgy amassed a large and handsome property. He has always been identified with the Democratic party.

[Witt Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 311]

P. C. ABELL, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Sangamon County, Ill., May 15, 1834, son of James H. and Adeline (DURLEY) ABELL; the former, a farmer by occupation, was born in Adair County, Ky., February 12, 1801, and died in Bond County, Ill., April 25, 1863; the latter, born in Tennessee, died in Bond County, Ill, in 1880. The subject of this sketch is the second of a family of fourteen children, and received his education in Bond County, Ill.; he removed from Bond County to Montgomery County in 1867, where he now owns a fine farm of 360 acres; he has filled the offices of Justice of the Peace and Supervisor; has been School Trustee for thirteen years, and is at present candidate for County Treasurer, subject to the action of the Democratic party; during the war, he served in Company D, Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry. In MontgomeryCounty, June 14, 1855, he married Penny M. LYNN, born in Fayette County, Ill., May 31, 1839, daughter of Jefferson and Elizabeth (CASEY) LYNN, and there have been born to them three children - Albert J., Zedic McClelland and Mary R. B. Politically, Mr. ABELL is a Democrat; he is a member of the Christian Union Church, and of the A., F. & A. M.

J. T. ARMENTROUT, farmer, P. O. Witt, born in Montgomery County May 9, 1849, son ofChristopher H. and Elizabeth (BORROR) ARMENTROUT, natives of Hardy County, Va.; Christopher H., who was a farmer, was born September 5, 1797, and died in Montgomery County April 2, 1856, where his wife, who was born October 20, 1813, now resides. J. T., who is the fifth of a family of six children, was educated in the county schools, and engaged in farming, which occupation he still follows; has filled the offices of Town Clerk, Tax Collector and Supervisor of Witt Township. He married, September 14, 1871, in Witt Township, Rebecca VERMILLION, born in Edgar County, Ill., September 14, 1852,daughter of James S. and Elizabeth (CURNETT) VERMILLION; their children are Clarence L., Elvira V., Augusta M., Ida G. and Lee; Howard E. died August 13, 1881. Mr. ARMENTROUT is a Methodist, and a Republican.

George W. ARMENTROUT, farmer, P. O. Witt, born in Montgomery County August 8, 1855, son of Christopher H. and Elizabeth (BORROR) ARMENTROUT, natives of Hardy County, VA., he, a farmer by occupation, born September 5, 1797, died in Montgomery County, April 2, 1856, where his wife, who was born October 20, 1813, now resides. Subject, who is theyoungest of a family of six children, received his education in the county schools, and engaged in farming, which occupation he has always followed; was Tax Collector of Witt Township in 1880 and 1881. He married, in Witt Township, January 1, 1880, Ella TUCKER, born in Walworth County, Wis., February 28, 1858, daughter of James and Eliza (TRATT) TUCKER. Mr. ARMENTROUT is a member of the Methodist Church, and a supporter of the Republican party.

T. S. BATTLES, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Philadelphia, Penn., January 19, 1803, only child of Nathaniel and Ellen (STEPHENSON) BATTLES; he, a sea Captain, born in NewEngland, was lost at sea about the year [Page 312] 1802; his wife, born in Aberdeen, Scotland, died in Philadelphia, Penn. Subject was educated in his native city, and began life as a farmer, which occupation he has alwaysfollowed. He has been twice married, his first wife, whom he married in Philadelphia, was Susan SNOWDEN, a native of that city; she died in Wayne County, Ohio, leaving fourchildren - Rachel, William S., Johnson G. and Thomas. In Wayne County, Ohio, March 10, 1842, he married his second wife, Ann E. BRIGHT, born in Perry County, Penn., May 20, 1815, daughter of George E. and Barbara (BRUNER) BRIGHT; the children born from the second marriage are Philip M., Susan, Barbara E., Ursula, Hannah O. and Anna. Mr. BATTLES is a republican, and a member of the Methodist Church.

James R. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Witt Township Montgomery County, January 28, 1832, son of David D. and Catharine (CRESS) BROWN, both of whom died in Montgomerycounty; David D., a farmer by occupation, born in Tennessee about the year 1805, died in 1847; his wife, born in North Carolina about the year 1805, died about the year 1862.James R. is the eldest of a family of ten children; was educated in the schools of Montgomery County; has always been a farmer; has filled the offices of School Director and Road Commissioner. In Fillmore Township, Montgomery county, May 10, 1855, he married Nancy J. SANDERS, born in that county February 5, 1835, daughter of John andElizabeth (POWELL) SANDERS, and there have been born to them eleven children - Clara A., John F., Melvin L., Laura C., Metta A., Irene E., Charles, Edda E., Eva L., Myrta and Idila J. Mr. BROWN is a supporter of the Democratic party.

Thomas J. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Montgomery county June 7, 1843, son of James and Mahala (HOPPER) BROWN, he, a farmer, born in Tennessee January 8, 1802, died in Montgomery County July 30, 1846; she, also a native of Tennessee, born December 8, 1809, now a resident of Irving Township. Thomas J., the tenth of a family of eleven children, received his education in Montgomery County, and has always been engaged infarming. He has been twice married, in Montgomery County; his first wife, whom he married November 11, 1866, was Virginia E. McCAMANT, born in Brooke County, W. Va., about the year 1846, daughter of John J. McCAMANT; she died February 3, 1872, leaving three children - Charles Lee, Carrie J. and Clara. He married, April 2, 1872, his second wife, Rhoda C. LIPE, born in Montgomery County July 23, 1852, daughter of Allen and Leah (NUSMAN) LIPE; from this second union five children have been born to them - James W., Wade Hampton, Tora G., Eva M. and Thomas H. Mr. BROWN is a stanch Democrat, and has been elected a delegate to the Democratic Congressional Convention of this district.

William BERRY, farmer, P. O. Witt, born in Montgomery county, Ill., March 10, 1856, son of David and Margaret (MARTIN) BERRY, natives of Hamilton County, Ohio, and at the present time residents of Butler Township, Montgomery county; the former was bornDecember 15, 1827, and follows the occupation of a farmer; the latter, born July 11, 1832. Our subject, the eldest of eight children, received his education in the commonschools, finishing at Butler, Montgomery County, and has been a farmer all his days. In the town of Butler, Montgomery County, March 16, 1882, he married Mary WOOD, a native of Montgomery County, born January 11, 1860, daughter of William and Rebecca R. (SMITH) WOOD. Mr. BERRY and his wife are members of the M. E. Church; [Page 313] In politics, he is a Republican; he is a member of the I. O. O. F.

E. H. DONALDSON, farmer, was born in Fayette County, Ill., November 10, 1836; his parents were natives of Carroll County, Tenn.; his father - who had at one time been engaged in mercantile business, but who was engaged in farming at his death - was born February 27, 1816, and died in Fayette County, Ill., October 4, 1872; his wife whose maiden name was Elvina HICKS, was born December 7, 1816, and is now residing in Fayette County, Ill. Our subject, who was the eldest of a family of eight, received his education in Fayette and Montgomery Counties; first engaged in business as a merchant in Fayette County, Ill.; in 1861, he moved to Montgomery County and located on his present property of 200 acres, and, by devoting all his energies to its improvement, he has now one of the finest improved farms in the township. In Fayette County, Ill., January 3, 1856, he married Mary A. RHODES, born in Fayette County, Ill., October 4, 1837, daughter of Thomas RHODES, from which union five children have been born - William A., Mary E., Aaron B., James McC. And Selena J. Mr. DONALDSON is a member of the Christian Union Church, and of the A., F. & A. M.; politically, he is a Democrat.

Robert DIXON, grain-dealer and miller, Witt, was born in Coles County, Ill., in 1844; his father, William DIXON, was a farmer, and native of Illinois, and died in Coles County, Ill., about the year 1848. Our subject, the eldest of three children, began life as a farmer, and, on the opening of the war, enlisted in Company B, Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry, participating in the engagements at Shiloh, Tenn., April 6 and 7, 1862, Arkansas Post, Corinth, Vicksburg, and Jackson, Miss. At the close of the war, he resumed farming till the year 1881, then entered the grain and milling business as a partner in the firm of Dixon & Houck, operating a mill and grain elevator at Witt,Montgomery County. He married, in Montgomery County, April 23, 1870, Lucinda HOUCK, born in Michigan in 1846, daughter of Daniel HOUCK, from which union there has been born to them one child, Lula M. In politics, Mr. DIXON is a Republican.

Daniel GRANTHAM, farmer, P. O. Irving, son of James and Franey (SIGHTS) GRANTHAM, both born in North Carolina about the year 1800. Our subject is the eighth child of a family of twelve, and was born in Montgomery county December 3, 1832; he received a fair education in Irving Township, Montgomery County; has followed the occupation of a farmer all his life, and has held the office of School Trustee for twenty years. In Irving Township, Montgomery County, October 21, 1858, he married Malinda IRVIN, born in CaseyCounty, Ky., November 15, 1836, daughter of Perry and Mary (OSBORN) IRVIN; from this union there have been born six children: Mary H., Henry H., Theodora L., Maggie J., Urilla M. and Rosa M. A. Mr. GRANTHAM is politically a Republican; his wife is a member of the M. E. Church.

Joseph HAND, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Staffordshire, England, December 23, 1820, son of Joseph and Sarah (SHIPTON) HAND, natives of Devonshire, England; he, a farmer by occupation, born in 1787, died in Macoupin County, Ill., August 19, 1860; she, born about the year 1789, died on the voyage to the United States, February 23, 1845. Subject, the third of a family of seven children, received his education in his native shire, and began the business of life as a farmer. In 1845, he emigrated with his parents toAmerica, landed at New Orleans, [Page 314]And proceeded to Paddock Grove, Madison Co., Ill., where he remained six years, thence moved to Macoupin County, where he lived twenty years, and finally removed to MontgomeryCounty, bought a tract of land in its native state, which he has cultivated and improved, and now has 670 acres of fine farming land. In Staffordshire, England, July 8, 1842, hemarried Mary WILSON, born in Newboro, England, July 21, 1822, daughter of George and Sarah (HADKINS) WILSON, and there have been born to them ten children - George W., Jane E., William, Ann, Sarah, John, Irene M., Libbie L., Joseph W. and Emma J. Mr. HAND is a member of the Episcopal Church, and a Republican.

William HOLMES, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, was born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, April 30, 1815, son of John and Teresa (PARVIN) HOLMES; the former, born in Lancashire, England, died in Yorkshire, England, about the year 1819; the latter, born in Skipton, England, about the year 1875, died in Yorkshire, England, in 1817, leaving four children, William being the third. The subject of this sketch began life as a clerk in a dry goods store. He emigrated to America and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he learned the trade of coach painting; worked at that trade in Cincinnati fourteen years, when he moved to Indiana, and thence to Illinois. Mr. HOLMES has been twice married; his first wife was Ann RICHARDSON, born in Yorkshire, England, in 1819, daughter of Joseph RICHARDSON, a native of England; they were married in Dearborn County, Ind., where Mrs. HOLMES died August 5, 1849, leaving five children - Ellen, Emma, Sarah E., Mary B. and William L. In Dearborn County, Ind., December 24, 1850, Mr. HOLMES married his second wife, Amanda RAWLING, born in Dearborn County, Ind., December 20, 1819, daughter of William and Laura (LEWIS) RAWLING; by her he has had six children - John R., Thomas P., Laura B., Richard, Louis E. and James F. Mr. HOLMES is a member of te I. O. O. F.; in politics, he is a Republican.

F. J. HOLMES, Witt, was born in Hillsboro, Montgomery County, January 1, 1850, son of Joel D. and Marandis D. (BENNETT) HOLMES, he, a native of Alfred, York Co., Me., who died April 5, 1870; she, still living, the wife of Francis ROOT. Subject has been twice married; first, in Hillsboro, March 28, 1872, to Lucinda J. ATTERBURY, daughter of George M. ATTERBURY, of Kentucky; Mrs. HOLMES dying, Mr. HOLMES, September 2, 1877,married Florence May HUBBARD, of Colusa, Ill., daughter of Martin M. HUBBARD, a native of Tennessee. Mr. HOLMES has tow children - Stella Marandis, born September 2, 1878; and Myrtle Keneston, born November 20, 1880.

Andrew HOEHN, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Germany July 3, 1834, son of Ambrose and Agatha (RIEDER) HOEHN, he a farmer by occupation, born in Germany in April, 1805, died in Clinton County, Ill., March 8, 1856; she, also a native of Germany, born December 25, 1806, is now residing in Montgomery County. Subject emigrated to America with his parents in 1847; landed in New Orleans, thence moved to St. Louis, where he remained a few months, then moved to Clinton County, Ill., where he lived twenty-nine years, after which he removed to his presnt place; he received a fair education in the schools of Germany and of Clinton County, Ill., and began life as a farmer, in which occupation he is still engaged; has been Tax Collector of Witt Township. In Clinton County, Ill., November 12, 1860, he married Bettie OBERLE, born in Germany in 1843, daughter of Andon and Elizabeth [Page 315] (BLAESE) OBERLE; from this union there have been born to them eight children - Charles,Catharine, Henry, Isabel, John A., Emma M., Ambrose and Elizabeth B. Mr. HOEHN is a member of the Catholic Church, and is a Republican.

Wilson M. MAXEY, farmer, P. O. Witt, born in Barren County, Ky., February 15, 1829, son of Edward and Nancy (BARRY) MAXEY. Edward MAXEY, who was a cooper by trade, but in latter life a farmer, was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1883; died in Montgomery County November 7, 1859, where his wife, also a native of Virginia, born in 1789, diedOctober 20, 1843. Subject, the eighth child of a family of nine, received a fair education in Montgomery County; has always been a farmer; has been School Trustee for fifteen years. He has been twice married; his first wife, whom he married January 1, 1852, was Louisa J. NEWCOMB, died in Montgomery county September 27, 1864, leaving seven children - Mary V., Alice I., William A., James H., Flora F., Sarah A. and Louisa J. In Litchfield, Montgomery County, November 30, 1865, he married his second wife, Mrs. Sarah A. GREINER, born in Augusta County, Va., September 5, 1836, daughter of Jonathan and Nancy (GRAY) BALSLEY; their children are Cora D., Charles W., John S. and Jessie M. Mr. MAXEY is one of the old settlers of Montgomery County; he is a stanch Democrat; is Chairman of the Democratic Committee of Witt Township, and a delegate to the State convention of that party; he is a member of the Methodist Church.

John M. NEISLER, farmer, P. O. Irving, son of Henry M. and Elizabeth (LIPE) NEISLER, natives of North Carolina; Henry M., a farmer and stock dealer, born November 19, 1816 died in Irving Township, Montgomery County, in 1881; his wife, born January 10, 1823, is now a resident of that township, in which, also, subject, the second child of a family of fifteen, was born December 4, 1841; he received a fair education in the schools of Montgomery County, and began kife as a farmer; when twenty-two years of age, his father gave him the farm on which he now lives; previous to that time, however, he worked a farm, which he had rented, for two years; has filled the office of Clerk of Witt Township for four years. In Montgomery County, November 14, 1861, he married Esther BARRINGER, born in that county April 14, 1838, daughter of Daniel and Polly (CRESS) BARRINGER, and from this union the following children have been born to them - Melvern E., Ethlen V., Helen E., Florence D., Arthur A. and Herbert F. Mr. NEISLER is a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

W. L. OPDYCKE, farmer, P. O. Witt, son of Andrew S. and Judith A. (LANNING) OPDYCKE; the former, born in Bucks County, Penn., July 3, 1803, died in Witt Township, Montgomery County, August 11, 1874; the latter, born in Hunterdon County, N. J., about the year 1810, died at Milford, in that State, in July, 1831. Our subject, the elder of two children, was born in Milford, N. J., April 7, 1830; he received a fair education in Macoupin County, Ill., and began the business of life as a farmer, which occupation he has ever since followed. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry, at Alton, Ill., and was discharged in September, 1865. He was married, at Woodboro, Ill., March 28, 1854 to Julia E. WOOD, born in Montgomery County July 19, 1834, daughter of William and Rebecca (McWILLIAMS) WOOD; the former, born in Darlington District, S. C., Oc-[Page 316] tober 21, 1805, died May 29, 1873; the latter, born near Lexington, Ky., December 18, 1815, died February 14, 1857. Mr. and Mrs. OPDYCKE are the parents of nine children - Delia A., H. Eugene, James M., Emma F. R., William D., Carrie J., Ethelbert Lanning, Clinton W. and Hettie H. In politics, Mr. OPDYCKE is a Republican; he is a member of the Presbyterian and his wife of the Methodist Church.

John STURGEON, farmer, P. O. Irving, is a son of David and Mary (MCCARTY) STURGEON; the former, a farmer, was born in Indiana, and died in Montgomery County in 1851; the latter, born in Indiana, and died in Jasper County, Ill., in 1840. Our subject, the eldest of six children, received his education in Montgomery County, and began life as a farmer, which occupation he has followed ever since. He married, in Montgomery County, April 16, 1846, Charity CINDOFF, born in Kentucky, who died in Montgomery County February 14, 1851. In Montgomery County, April 2, 1854, he married his second wife, Sarah J. DAVIS, born in Montgomery County Feb. 27, 1831, daughter of Thomas and Nancy (MARTIN) DAVIS. Mr. STURGEON has eleven children - Austin W., John H., E. H., David B., M. F., Robert Lee, William M., W. R., Mary E., Charles E., Savilla F. and his step-son William T. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Frederick F. TATCH, farmer, P. O. Witt, son of John N. and Emeline (SWEET) TATCH; the former, who was Captain of a whaling vessel, was born in Germany October 22, 1813, and died in Macoupin County, Ill., September 14, 1859; the latter was born in Vermont November 22, 1820, and died in Macoupin County, Ill., June 20, 1871. Our subject, who is the third of a family of seven children, was born in Fair Haven, Mass., November 7, 1846; he received a fair education in Macoupin County, Ill.; has been a farmer all his life. He was married, in Hillsboro, Montgomery County, November 13, 1873, to Miss L. F. MAY, born in Roane County, Tenn., July 31, 1857, daughter of Robert C. and Alvira (HALL) MAY; from this union six children have been born - William H., Bertie, Vira Estella, Myra Lucilla, Charles M. and Hervey O. Mr. TATCH served in Company I, One Hundred andTwenty-seventh Illinois Infantry, during the war, participating in the engagements atNashville, Tenn. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and of the A., F. & A. M.; in politics, he is a Republican.

John TRATT, farmer, P. O. Witt, was born in Somersetshire, England, March 3, 1830; his parents, Thomas and Betsy (WATTS) TRATT, were natives of England; the former, born in Somersetshire in 1796, was a farmer; emigrated to America, and died at Palmyra, Jefferson Co., Wis., January 30, 1874; the latter died at the same place in March, 1876; they were the parents of five children, John being the third. He follows the business of farming and trading in stock. In Jefferson County, Wis., February 23, 1851, he married Sarah HOOPER, born in Cornwall, England, September 2, 1830, daughter of John HOOPER; from this union six children have been born to them - Joseph, Rosepha J., Lillie M., Thomas H., Jennie and Stella B. Mr. TRATT is politically a Democrat; his wife is a member of the Methodist Church.

Henry WUBKER, merchant, Witt, was born in Jacksonville, Ill., August 21, 1844, son of William and Lena (MAAS) WUBKER; the former, born near Minden, Prussia, February 10, 1816; the later, in Hanover City, Hanover, Germany, August 21, 1818. Our subject, the eldest of six children, received the foundation of his education at Jackson-[Page 317] ville, Ill.; he also attended school near Virginia, in Cass County, Ill., and, in 1871 and 1872, attended Chicago University, Chicago, Ill., where he finished his education. Mr. WUBKER was engaged in farming and in teaching school till the year 1873; in that year, he removed to Irving, Montgomery County, and engaged in the mercantile business there until 1878, when he removed to Witt, and there carries on an extensive business in dry goods, drugs and agricultural implements. At Irving, Montgomery County, May 3, 1876, he married Lucy A COWELL, born in Staunton, Macoupin Co., Ill., September 27, 1854, daughter of John and Caroline (TRUITT) COWELL; there have been born to them twochildren - Hubert L., who died July 5, 1881; and Henry T. Mr. WUBKER is a man of finebusiness abilities; in politics, he is a Democrat; he is a member of the A., F. & A. M., and Knights of Honor.

[Nokomis Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 319]

D. P. BROPHY, Postmaster, Nokomis, son of Dennis and Julia (GALVIN) BROPHY, was born in New York City March 3, 1832; he lived in the city till about fourteen years of age, receiving, during this time, the rudiments of a common course of education; upon the death of his mother, in 1846, he went to the city of Philadelphia and engaged in the type-foundry business; after about eighteen months, he went to the city of Baltimore and engaged in the same occupation with Edwin STARR, of the Sun building; in about nine months, he engaged on the Pittsburgh & Baltimore Railroad as assistant baggagemaster; this position he held about nine months, when he went back to New York City and engaged in the type-foundry business for a number of years; his health failing, he abandoned this business and engaged in market gardening near the city of Boston, for James YOUNG. In the fall of 1856, he came West, and first stopped at Litchfield and worked for Galvin HOWE some six months, and then came to Nokomis. At the beginning of the late rebellion, he responded to the call for troops; volunteered in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry, Company F, during this time acting as Postmaster till the close of the war, after which he came back to Nokomis, and was appointed Postmaster, which position he still holds, having been in the employ of the Government for twenty years. September 17, 1868, he married Miss Susan, daughter of Thomas S. and Ann (OLDROYD) BATTLES, by whom he has had two children - Nathaniel B. and Julia A., both dead. Mr. BROPHY traces his ancestry back to an Irish origin through both his father and mother; his great-grandfather settled in New York in an early day, and the BROPHYs are scattered over the States; Mr. BROPHY's father raised two children - our subject, and Hannah, who died in New York City at the age of twenty-three; Mr. BROPHY's father died before he was born, and many years after, his widow, and mother of our subject, married John ROBERTS and raised two children, a son and a daughter, the daughter marrying James JACKSON, a custom house officer in New York City. Mr. and Mrs. BROPHY are members of the Baptist Church, and are respected by all who know them.

William M. BLUE, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. Nokomis, born in Franklin County, Ohio, April 26, 1826, son of Peter BLUE, a farmer, who was born in Virginia in 1792, married in Ohio in 1823, and died there in 1855, from the effects of a rattlesnake bite, in eight days after being bitten; subject's mother, Nancy (CRABB) BLUE, born in Virginia in 1797, is now living at Nokomis, in the eighty-fifth year of her age; they had six children - Letitia, wife of Thomas F. WILSON; William M., our subject; Thomas C., who died at the age of twenty-five; Nancy C., wife of the late N. BRONS; Peter, who died at the age of thirty-three; and Susan E., who died at the age of thirty. Subject was married, in Franklin County, Ohio, in 1844, to Rachel E. MARSHALL, born in that county in 1828, died in Montgomery County April 4, 1869, and a daughter of John and Hannah (CAIN) MARSHALL; by this union, subject had a family of nine - Rebecca J., Alice [Page 319] A., Francis P. (deceased), Augusta M., William P. (attending law school at Bloomington, Ill.), Ella, Ada, and twins, both dead. Mr. BLUE began farming at the age of twenty, and has followed his vocation successfully; besides farming, he is a well-known stock-raiser; owns 320 acres of land in this county, and 320 acres in Madison County, Neb.; he began life with a limited capital, but, by hard work and close attention to business, he now ranks among the wealthy men of Nokomis. Mr. BLUE is a Democrat; is well and favorably known in his district, and has made, in his busy life, a host of friends.

George CULP, furniture, Nokomis, born in Jefferson County, Ohio, November 28, 1821, son of Adam and Nancy (WRIGHT) CULP, he, a farmer, born in Pennsylvania July 5, 1795, moved to Ohio about 1812, where he raised fourteen children by two wives, and died there October 20, 1865; she, born in Jefferson County, Ohio, September 20, 1795, died there March 15, 1837. Subject received a common school education; worked at the carpenter's trade and furniture business; has continued to manufacture furniture since his arrival in Nokomis in 1855, and keeps in stock a full line of superior goods. He was married, in Jefferson County, Ohio, September 12, 1844, to Elizabeth EASTERDAY, born in Jefferson County, Ohio, April 27, 1823, daughter of Christian and Ann Marie (STEMPLE) EASTERDAY, he, born October 18, 1789, in Frederick County, Md., died September 29, 1875; she, born in Morgan County, Va., March 7, 1791, died July 6, 1875. Subject had nine children, seven now living - Benjamin F., Barbara (now wife of C. F. TINDALL), Loretta K. (deceased), Adam C., Amos L., James A., Leora F., Lillie M. and Martin William (deceased). Mr. CULP is a member of the Lutheran Church; a Democrat, and is a strong advocate of temperance. The name CULP was of German origin, and was originally spelled Kalb, then changed to Kolp, and afterward to Culp. Baron De KALB, of Revolutionary notoriety, was of the same genealogy. Baltza CULP, grandfather of subject came to the United States from Germany about the close of the Revolutionary war.

Martin HARKEY, farmer, P. O. Nokomis, who came with his parents from North Carolina and settled at Hillsboro, Montgomery Co., Ill., when there were only eight log cabins (1830); he was born in North Carolina in 1813, and is the son of Martin andChristina (MESINGER) HARKEY, who were natives of Pennsylvania, from where they emigrated to North Carolina in an early day; they both died in this county at a ripe old age, and were both respected, and working on a farm; he received a common school education, and began life for himself at the age of twenty-two, by farming, which occupation has ever been his vocation. In 1835, he married Mary, daughter of Jacob and Catharine (BOST) CRESS; she was born in North Carolina in 1815, and came with her parents to this county in 1818; they settled close to Hillsboro, and followed farming; father was born in 1779, and died in this county in 1865; his wife was born in 1786, and died in 1859; they were both members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. HARKEY, by hard work and economy, has secured a good farm of 300 acres, and a good property in Nokomis. To Mr. and Mrs. HARKEY have been born nine children - six sons and three Daughters - Sophia C., dead; Harriet R., dead; Henry L., inCalifornia; Jane E., wife of E. BRIGHTMAN, in California; George W., dead; Jacob M., Thomas P., James M., and one dying in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. HARKEY are members of the Presbyterian Church, and strong advocates of the [Page 320]temperance cause, and, in fact, everything that pertains to good and the promotion of society.

Thomas G. HOBSON, miller, Nokomis, born in Yorkshire, England, May 10, 1840, son of Robert and Elizabeth (LEAMING) HOBSON. Robert HOBSON, subject‘s father, a native of England and miller by trade, came to America in 1843; followed his trade in different parts of the United States, and died in Litchfield, Ill., January 25, 1877, aged seventy-three years; his wife, also a native of England, is still living; they had ten children, of whom our subject is the eighth; he received a common school education; at the age of seventeen, learned the miller's trade, and, in 1873, formed a partnership with L. M.HARTSOCK, at Nokomis, where he has since resided. At Staunton, Ill., December 8, 1867, he married Elizabeth COWELL, born at or near Staunton, Ill., September 20, 1847, daughter of James R. and Lucinda (CAMP) COWELL; she died May 18, 1870. He was married the second time, at Lincoln, Logan Co., Ill., January 23, 1879, to Matilda E. SNELL, born in Staunton, Macoupin Co., Ill., December 4, 1851, daughter of Selby and Sarah Jane (DEES) SNELL, he, born May 8, 1811, died February 17, 1872; she, born at Staunton, Macoupin Co., Ill., April 11, 1831, still living. Mr. HOBSON is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. Messrs. HOBSON & HARTSOCK have a mill, 60x40, engine room 30x16, and boiler room 30x16; the four run of stones are run by a sixty-horse-power engine; the mill was built by RHOADER in 1866; the shipments of flour annually average 15,000 barrels; the shipments in 1881 were 20,000 barrels.

L. M. HARTSOCK, miller, Nokomis, born near Johnsville, Frederick Co., Md., November 9, 1841, son of Nicholas and Sarah HARTSOCK, he, a stone and brick mason, died when our subject was thirteen years old; she died when subject was but four years old; they had two children - L. M. and Maggie E. Subject was raised among strangers, andreceived a common-school education; at the age of eighteen, he began learning themiller's trade at Little Pipe Creek, near Middleburg, Md., and has followed his trade ever since. At Waterloo, Ill., January 9, 1969, he married Frances A. Cooley, a native of Indiana, born September 6, 1844, her father, Lorin COOLEY, dying when she was quite young; her mother, Mary BOWERS, is now Mrs. J. D. JONES. Mr. HARTSOCK has a family of four - Maggie E., Arthur L., Robert L. and Ethel. In 1873, subject went in partnership with Thomas G. HOBSON in the milling business, owning a half interest in the Nokomis large mill, a description of which is given in Mr. HOBSON'sbiography, published in this book. Subject is a Republican, a Freemason, and a member of the Knights of Honor. Mr. HARTSOCK is a fine example of American pluck;starting out in life without a cent, he has, by patience, perseverance and indomitable will, made a name for himself which the ravages of time cannot efface.

Charles L. HENKEL, druggist, Nokomis, was born in Virginia, son of Rev. D. M. and Susan (EGER) HENKEL, his father being a Lutheran clergyman, as his forefathers were of nine generations back; both parents were natives of Virginia, his mother being a sister of HAVEMEYER, the great sugar refiner of New York. Our subject received a good classical education; made chemistry a study, and, early in life, engaged in his present vocation as clerk in a drug store at Richmond, Va., and elsewhere; he began in the drug business in Nokomis in 1876, and is considered an excellent pharmacist, having spent the greater part of his early life in familiarizing himself with[Page 321] the details of his profession. He was married, in 1870, to Belle LEAS, born in Jefferson County, Ohio, daughter of Leonard LEAS, Esq., a native of Adams County, Penn., where he was born March 20, 1811, being now a resident of Nokomis.

F. O. PADDOCK, lumber-dealer, Nokomis, was born in Argyle, Wis., December 16, 1853, son of Oscar H. and Ann (THREADGOLD) PADDOCK, he, born in Woodstock, Vt., June 12, 1830, came to Illinois at an early day, and is now in the lumber business at Pana, Ill., and with his son (subject) at Nokomis; she, a native of Yorkshire, England, was born December 12, 1836. Subject received a good business education, and engaged in business at Pana, Ill., where he dealt in lumber and building material; thence he moved to Nokomis, where he carries on the same business; he has the largest stock of any dealer in his line in Montgomery County, and does an extensive trade. At St.Joseph, Mo., August 28, 1877, he married Ada PLATT, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 8, 1855, daughter of Rudolphus T. and Mary (NARES) PLATT, he born in Clifton Park, N. Y., August 1, 1832, died in May, 1876; she, a native of Geneva, N. Y., born November 8, 1834; from this union, one child, Jessie F., now three years old, has been born. Mr. Paddock is of old Revolutionary stock; his great-grandfather andgrand-uncles were Revolutionary soldiers, and he is an honor to the stock from whence he springs.

M. P. PUFELES, merchant, Nokomis, born in Austria in 1852, and came to America in 1868; he was the son of Sigmund and Rosa (HIRSCHSTIN) PUFELES. Our subject received a good common-school education. In 1879, he married Dora WEINSTEIN, who was also born in Austria; they have three children - Sigmund, Lena and Jessie. Mr.PUFELES commenced business by clerking and traveling in New Your City; came to Nokomis in 1879, and joined in partnership with Lessel & Bro. for one year; after that, in 1880, went in business for himself, and now does a first-class business in dry goods and general merchandise; sells for cash, and pays cash for his goods, which enables him to sell cheap. Mr. PUFELES is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a credit to the business community at Nokomis.

H. F. ROOD, banker, Nokomis, President of the Nokomis National Bank, and one of the first settlers of Nokomis, was born in Massachusetts in 1818; he is the third son of Ashael and Asenath (FULLER) ROOD, who were also of Massachusetts; father born in 1772, and by occupation was a farmer in his native State, where he died in 1852; his wife was born in 1789, and died in 1828. Our subject spent his boyhood days on a farm, and received a common-school education. In 1843, he married Nancy LOUDEN, a lady of rare attainments, and daughter of Joshua and Nancy HINES LOUDEN. Mrs. ROOD has been to her husband ever an efficient co-worker,sharing with him all his trials and sustaining him by earnest co-operation in all his plans; she is an active member of the M. E. Church. Mr. ROOD began life by engaging in the hotel business in his native State, and then followed the same business both in Connecticut and New York. In 1850, he removed to Crawford County, Penn., and in 1857, by the solicitation of friends, he removed to Montgomery County, where he embarked in the mercantile business, occupying for his store the first plastered house in Nokomis; by a close attention to business and honest dealings with his customers, he soon gained the confidence of the community; inconnection with his merchandising, he was Postmaster, express agent and railroad agent. In 1877, he became President of the National Bank [Page 322] of Nokomis, which position he still retains. To Mr. and Mrs. ROOD were born four children - Florence A., dying in infancy; Clarence E., express agent at St. Louis; Horace E., with his brother; and Maude, a promising young lady, and beloved by all who knew her, died in the nineteenth year of her age.

J. W. RUSSELL, merchant, Nokomis, was born in Montgomery County, Ill., in 1839; he is the oldest of a family of eight children that were born to William H. and Catharine (TODD) RUSSELL. William RUSSELL was born in Kentucky in 1818, and came to Montgomery County, Ill., with his father, John RUSSELL, a native of North Carolina, in or about 1823, settling on land entered by them; they followed agricultural pursuits till their death, which occurred in the year 1880. William RUSSELL, the father of ur subject, married in this county, about the year 1838; his wife, daughter of Benjamin and Mary TODD, ws born in about 1816; is still a resident of Montgomery County. Our subject spent his early days on his father's farm, and received such a common-school education as the advantages permitted in those days. In 1860, he began life for himself by engaging at farming, and in 1871 he embarked in the general mercantile business at Nokomis, and, by honest dealing and a close attention to business, he has not only been successful financially, but has gained the confidence of his many customers. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, Masonic fraternity and Knights of Honor. In 1863, he married Miss Mattie D. STRADER, daughter of John and Elizabeth (AVIS) STRADER; she was born in Jefferson County, Va., in 1842, and died in 1880, leaving one child, Charlie D. In 1881, Mr. RUSSELL married again - Annie STRADER.

H. S. STRAIN, physician, Nokomis, born in Highland County, Ohio, June 13, 1837, son of Andrew Miller and Rebecca A. (PATTON) STRAIN; he, a farmer, born near Abingdon, S. C., March 23, 1800, died July 3, 1859; she, born near Lexington, Bourbon Co., Ky., March 29, 1808, died July 31, 1872; their family consisted of seven sons and three daughters. Dr. STRAIN received a rudimentary education in the common schools of Highland County, Ohio, but afterward attended and graduated at the Worcester University, Cleveland, Ohio. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-first Regiment Ohio Infantry, and was detailed as Assistant Surgeon of the regiment, filling that position until 1862. On September 13, 1866, near Greenfield, Highland Co., Ohio, the Doctor was married to Miss Mary A. WALKER, by the Rev. McKnight WILLIAMSON; she was born March 22, 1840, near Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio, and is a daughter of John H. and Margaret B. (ELLIOTT) WALKER, he born in Rockbridge County, Va., in January, 1809, is still living in Hillsboro, Ohio. The Doctor has five children living - Maggie H., born February 23, 1869; Annie Kate, born June 22, 1872; John W., Born March 13, 1875; Stanley M., born March 24, 1877; and Andrew N. ("Scottie"), born July 22, 1867, died June 26, 1872. In 1865, the Doctor was appointed Surgeon of the One Hundred and Ninety-fifth Regiment of Ohio Infantry, and served until the end of the war. Dr. and Mrs. STRAIN are Presbyterians; in politics, he is a Republican, and known in his district as an able physician. Samuel STRAIN, the Doctor's grandfather, was an Irishman; came to America before the Revolutionary war; was a soldier for seven years, and fought under Gen. GREEN; in one battle, another soldier and himself were the only two who escaped; he had been married four times, raised twenty-[Page 323] two children, and died at the age of eighty-five.

William STEINRAUF, M. D., Nokomis, born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, September 18, 1850, son of John and Catharine (STENGEL) STEINRAUF, he, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, born in 1827, died at St. Louis, Mo., in September, 1872; was a stone mason, and served two years in the United States Army; she, still living in St. Louis, was born in Kurkessen, Germany, November 8, 1822. Subject received a good classical education at St. Louis and Washington, Mo., and graduated, in 1876, from the St. Louis College, Missouri. He was married, at Belvidere, Ill., in March, 1878, to Miss Carolina KUPPLER, born at Rock Island, Ill., June 19, 1860, and a daughter of John and Anna Maria (LEPLA) KUPPLER; he, born in Wurtemberg, Germany, died in 1877, and she, born in Bavaria, Germany. The result of his union is one son, Albert, now four years old. Subject practiced medicine in Jefferson City, Mo., and moved to Nokomis in 1880, where he soon gained a host of friends and an enviable reputation. He is a strict member of the Lutheran Church, and is always on hand when duty calls.

George M. STEVENS, attorney, Nokomis, born in Canada in 1846, son of John M. and Sibyl (GODDARD) STEVENS, he, a farmer, born in St. John, New Brunswick, now of Shelby County, Ill.; she, also a native of Canada, is still living. Subject received a rudimentary education at the public schools in Canada; afterward attended the high school at Springfield, Ill., graduated at the law school of Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1872, and began the practice of law in Nokomis in 1873. Mr. STEVENS was married, at Nokomis, in 1875, to Jennie BLUE, a daughter of William M. BLUE (a biographical sketch of this family will be found in this work). The subject is a Royal Arch Mason, and a Democrat, has been Attorney for Nokomis for six years and is temperate in all things.

Thomas TWOHEY, railroad, Nokomis, was born in Ireland in 1832, is the son of Thomas and Ann TWOHEY. Mr. TWOHEY came to America in 1848, with the intention of making for himself a home; he located in Massachusetts, where followed farming for four years; then in Putman County, Ind., and at St. Mary's, Vigo County; then he attended the water tank at Tower Hill for the railroad company for six years, and, after spending one year in Missouri in the employ of a railroad company there, he came to Nokomis and took charge of a section for the Indianapolis & St. Louis Railroad, and has held that position for eighteen years. He married, in 1852, Sarah BOLTON, a native of Ireland; five children have been born to them - Mary, wife of N. SINGER; John M., Train Dispatcher at Mattoon, Ill.,; Patrick, also an operator; Tomas and Michael. Mr. TWOHEY and family are members of the Catholic Church.

Thomas J. WHITTEN, M. D., Nokomis, was born in Montgomery County, Ill, February 21, 1844, son of Austin and Keziah (CASEY) WHITTEN, he, born in Newberry District, S. C., November 29, 1802, came to Illinois at an early day, where he followed farming until his death, which occurred May 12, 1869; she, also a native of South Carolina, born March 15, 1799, died in Montgomery County, Ill., October 1, 1856. Subject began the study of medicine in 1856, and graduated at the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Penn., in 1867; he began the practice of his profession at Hillsboro in 1867, remaining there till 1880, when he came to Nokomis; he now ranks as one of the leading physicians of Montgomery County. He served as Hospital Steward at Fort Prickren [Page 324] from 1862 till the close of the war. At Hillsboro, Ill., January 2, 1868, he married Sophia C. HARKEY, born in Montgomery County February 3, 1843, daughter of George and Martha S. (MASTERS) HARKEY, natives of North Carolina, he, born April 5, 1804, died October 29, 1856; she, born June 7, 1803, died August 13, 1852. From this marriage four children have been born, viz: Harry Hood, George Ernest, Lelia Grace and Lester Cook. The Doctor is a member of the LutheranChurch, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and an Odd Fellow; is Secretary of the County Medical Society, and has officiated as President of the Central Illinois District Society.

D. H. ZEPP, attorney, Nokomis, born in Carroll County, Md., in 1845, the son of Samuel and Caroline C. (ZIMMERMAN) ZEPP; he, a farmer, born in Maryland in 1822, was married in 1843, and is still living there; she, born in Maryland, is still living; they had nine children - five sons and four daughters - of whom our subject is the oldest; he received a good common-school education, and, by working on a farm for $6 per month, he was enabled to continue his studies; at the age of eighteen, he began teaching school, and, after having taught school in the county for one year, he became Principal of the Westminster, in Maryland. He was married, in 1874, to Ella Beaver, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (HAMMETT) BEAVER. Mr. ZEPP was elected to the Thirtieth General Assembly,and received the second largest majority of any member in the House. He began reading law with Judge John E. SMITH, of Maryland, in 1866; admitted to the bar in 1868, and came West in 1869; he was Principal of the Public School at Hillsboro one year, and at Nokomis two years. Mr. ZEPP is a Republican, a Knight Templar, and a self-made man; not only has he been successful as an educator, but also as a financier, now owning 400 acres of land near Tower Hill, as well as property in Nokomis.

[Audubon Township, Montgomery County, IL]

[Page 325]

Capt. M. OHLMAN, farmer, P. O. Ohlman, was born near Strasbourg, Germany; his father, Michael OHLMAN, was born in France; emigrated to America in 1832; worked on the White House, Washington, where he earned sufficient money to carry him to St. Louis, Mo., where he removed in 1833; his wife,Gertrude ZAHN, was born in France, and died in St. Louis in 1853, leaving six children, of whom our subject was the eldest. Our subject first worked on a Mississippi River flat-boat; at the age of seventeen, was promoted to the post of pilot, which position he held for ten years, when he became Captain and owner of the Star of the West, formerly known as the Polar Star; hi was also Master of the D. A. January. In 1861, he gave up steamboating, and became a farmer, and has now a fine farm of 660 acres, together with other land and property, all of which he has accumulated by his own thrift and industry; he has realized as high as $12,000 on his stock at a single sale. In 1851, he married Miss BURBAND, born inCincinnati, Ohio, daughter of Benedick and Elizabeth (STRAUB) BURBANK; there have been born to them an interesting family of six children, all of whom have been given a good education. Capt. OHLMAN is a member of the Roman Catholic Church; in politics, he recognizes no party, but polls his vot for the man whom he thinks will best advance the interests of his country; in him all measures for the advancement of education, and all public enterprises, find a liberal supporter. His father, who was a wagon-maker by trade, died in California in 1851.



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