Peoria County, Illinois  Genealogy Trails

 

 

Report for the Relief of the Inhabitants of Peoria

Edward Coles

1821

 

This book lists the earliest inhabitants of Peoria

Transcribed by Genealogy Trails Staff

 

Treasury Department,

January 10, 1821.

 

Sir; In conformity with the provisions of the act of the fifteenth of May, 1820, for the relief of the inhabitants of the village of Peoria, in the state of Illinois, I have the honor to submit the report of the Register of the District of Edwardsville, upon the claims exhibited under the said act, with the substance of the evidence in support thereof.

I have the honor to be,

Very respectfully, Sir,

Your obedient servant,

WM. H. CRAWFORD

the Hon. the President of the Senate.

 

LAND OFFICE AT EDWARDSVILLE

November 10, 1820

 

    Sir: In compliance with an act of Congress, entitled "An act for the relief of the inhabitants of the village of Peoria, in the state of Illinois, "I have the honor to transmit to you a report of seventy claims to lots in Peoria, and the substance of the evidence in support thereof, which have been received, and now remain on file in my office: to which I must add my regret at the insurmountable difficulties I have met with, in complying with a provision of this law, which requires me to make out a list of such claims as, in my opinion, ought to be confirmed. The law not having defined the nature of the claims intended to be confirmed, nor prescribed any rule of adjudication, nor referred to any laws or usages by which I was to be governed, in forming an opinion, I have been at a loss to determine upon w hat principles to decide, and have, therefore, been compelled to omit making out a list of such claims as, in my opinion, ought to be confirmed. I have, however, added to the report a tabular statement, shewing, at one view, the character of all and each of the claims; from which, after having decided what date or length of possession shall give a title to the occupant, it will be easy to select the particular claims which should be confirmed.

    Believing that the chief object of Congress in passing the law was to obtain information as to the nature of the claims to lots in Peoria, I have endeavored to collect all the information which could be obtained, and to transcribe it in detail in the report of evidence herewith transmitted. And to guard, as far as possible, against inaccuracies or Francis, and to obtain as full and correct information as practicable, I desired that the testimony should be taken in my presence; except where advanced age. or infirmity, or the remoteness of the witnesses, rendered their attendance at my office inconvenient. With a few exceptions, all the depositions have been thus taken; and the evidence, though sometimes contradictory, and no doubt often inaccurate as to dates, will in general be found as consistent as could reasonably have been expected, considering the length of time which has elapsed, and the illiterate character of most of the deponents.

    The old village of Peoria was situated on the northwest shore of Lake Peoria, about one mile and an hall above the lower extremity or outlet of the lake. This village had been inhabited by the French previous to the recollection of any of the present generation. About the year 1778, or 1770, the first house was built in what was then called La Ville de Maillet, afterwards the New Village of Peoria, and, of late, the place has been known by the name of Fort Clark, situated about one mile and an half below the old village, immediately at the lower point or outlet of Lake Peoria. The situation being preferred in consequence of the water being better, and its being thought more healthy, the inhabitants gradually deserted the old village and, by the year 1796, or 1797, had entirely abandoned it, and removed to the new village.

    The inhabitants of Peoria consisted generally of Indian traders, hunters, and voyagers, and had long formed a link of connection between the French, residing on the waters of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi river. From that happy facility of adapting themselves to their situation and associates, for which the French are so remarkable, the inhabitants of Peoria lived generally in harmony with their savage neighbors. It would seem, however, that, about the year 1781, they were induced to abandon the village from the apprehension of Indian hostility; but, soon after the peace of 1783, they again returned, and continued to reside there until the autumn of the year 1812, when they were forcibly removed from it, and the place destroyed by a captain Craig, of the Illinois militia, on the ground, as it was said, that him, and his company of militia, were fired on in the night while at anchor in their boats before the village by Indians, with whom the inhabitants were suspected by Craig to be too intimate and friendly.

    The inhabitants of Peoria, it would appear from all I can learn, settled there without any grant or permission from the authority of any government; that the only title they had to their land was derived from possession, and the only value attached to it grew out of the improvements placed upon it; that each person took to himself such portion of unoccupied land as he wished to occupy and cultivate, and made it his by incorporation his labor with it; but, as soon as he abandoned it, his title was understood to cease, with his possessions and improvements; and it reverted to its natural state, and was liable again to be improved, and possessed by any one who should think proper. This, together with the itinerant character of the inhabitants, will account for the number of persons who will frequently be found, from the testimony contained in the report, to have occupied the same lot; many of whom, it will be seen, present conflicting claims.   

    As is usual in French villages, the possessions in Peoria consisted generally of village lots, on which they erected their buildings, and made their gardens; and of out-lots, or fields, in which they cultivated grain, &c. The village lots contained, in general, about one half of an arpent of land; the out-lots, or fields, were of various sizes, depending upon the industry or means of the owner to cultivate more
or less land. As neither the old or new village of Peoria were ever formally laid out, nor had defined limits assigned them, it is impossible to have of them an accurate map. I have, however, sketched off one, founded on the testimony received in support of the claims, and from the information obtained from the most intelligent of the former inhabitants of the place; and, though I am aware of its inaccuracy, yet I am induced to forward it along with the report, as it will tend to shew the claims, and elucidate the testimony in support of them. I have not been able to ascertain, with precision, on w hat particular quarter sections of the military survey these claims are situated. It is believed, however, that the greater part of the land covered, both by the old and new villages, are in fractional quarter sections, and
that the out-lots, or fields, are included in quarter sections, which have been granted as bounty lands to the soldiers of the late war.
I am, very respectfully,
EDWARD COLES,
Register of the Land Office at Edwardsville
The Hon. William H. Crawford,
Secretary of the Treasury of the United States.

 

**********

 

    REPORT

 

    In obedience to an act of Congress, entitled "An act for the relief of the inhabitants of the village of Peoria, in the state of Illinois," approved May 13th, 1820, the Register of the Land Office at Edwardsville has the honor of laying before the Secretary of the Treasury the following Report of Claims, and the substance of the evidence in support thereof, which have been received and now remain on file in his office.


No. 1.


Ettienne Bernard claims a lot in the village of Peoria, containing about one arpent of land, situated about 40 or 50 yards south of the lot of Joseph Graveline, and bounded, eastwardly, by a road or street separating it from the lower part of Lake Peoria; south-wardly, by a road separating it from a lot occupied by John Baptiste Maillet; and, westwardly and northwardly, by commons or prairie.
 

PROOF.


    Tousant Soulard and Joseph Graveline testify, on oath, that Ettienne Bernard improved and cultivated a lot of one or two arpents of land in Peoria, which they describe as above, about the year 1778, and continued to cultivate the same for about ten years, when he was driven of the premises by the depredations of the Indians.


REMARK.


    The evidence in this case was not taken in the presence of the Register, the deponents being (it was said) too old and infirm to attend at his office. Judging from its situation, the above lot must have been afterwards built upon and occupied by Francis Wilette and now claimed by Louis Pilette.  See claim No. 11.


No. 2.
    Augustine Roque claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one arpent of land, and bounded, northwardly, by a lot occupied by John Baptiste Maillet; eastwardly, by a road separating it from the Illinois river; and, southwardly and westwardly, by the prairie.

 

PROOF.


Ettienne Bernard testifies, on oath, that Augustine Roque, deceased, did, the year before the conquest of the country by colonel Clark, build an [sic]house on and improve the above described lot in Peoria, which lot contained about one arpent of land; and that the said Roque continued to reside thereon for ten or twelve years, when he was driven from it by the depredations of the Indians; and the [sic]said Bernard further testifies, that the above named Augustine Roque, who claims this lot, is the son of the late Augustine Roque of Peoria. And Tousant Sonliere testifies, on oath, that one Augustine Roque did settle and cultivate (but at what time is not stated) a lot described as above, in Peoria, and continued to reside on the same for at least ten years, when he was forced to remove by the depredations of the savages.


REMARK.


The above described lot must have been afterwards improved and cultivated, and it is probable it covered a part of the land embraced by the lots which arc now claimed by Forsyth and Mette. See claims No. 7 and No. 14.


No. 3.


Gabriel Latreille, as guardian of Charlotte Troge, who has lost her reason, and who was wife to Pierre Troge, deceased, and daughter of the late Antoine Saint Francis, claims a lot containing about two arpents of land, situated about two miles above Fort Clark, and near the old Fort of Peoria, and bounded, eastwardly, by Lake Peoria; northwardly, by a lot of Francis Novell (or Loval); southwardly, by Pascal Chevallier; and, westwardly, by prairie.


PROOF.


Baptiste Graza and Charlotte Lonigo, testify, on oath, that Antoine St. Francis, deceased, did settle and cultivate a lot, containing near two arpents of land, situated and bounded as above described, and, to the best of their recollection, resided on the same above twelve years, when he was driven from the premises by the depredations of the Indians, which, they state, was, to the best of their recollection, about forty years since.


REMARK.

 

The evidence in this case was not taken in the presence of the Register, the deponents being very old and infirm. This lot, like the two preceding ones, must have been covered land, which has since
been improved and occupied by others; but who now claims it it is impossible to say with precision.


No. 4.


The heirs of Gabriel Cerre, by their agent Pascal L. Cerre, claim, under Louis Chatellereau, in the old village of Peoria, a double lot, of one hundred and sixty feet in front by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure,) bounded, on the north, by a street separating it from a lot occupied by Pierre La Vassieur dit Chamberlain; on the east, by a street separating it from a lot of John Baptiste Emelin; on the south, by a street separating it from the lots of Parent and Sibinger; and, west, by the cultivated lands of the old village of Peoria.


PROOF.


Hyacinthe Saint Cyr testifies, on oath, that Louis Chatellereau, in the year 1778, built a house on and cultivated the above described lot in the old village of Peoria, and continued to occupy the same until the year 1781, when he and all the inhabitants of Peoria were induced to leave the place from fear of Indian hostility; but that he (Chatellereau) returned to Peoria soon after the peace of 1783, and continued to reside on the said lot until his death, (the year of his death he (St. Cyr) could not recollect) after which the said lot was occupied by one Chorette and his wife, (Marie Josephe Ticriereau) and he (St. Cyr) well recollects that the said lot was afterwards sold at auction by Chatellereau's administrators, and bought by Gabriel Cerre; and that the said lot contained about one arpent of land. Marie Josephe Tieriereau testifies, on oath, that, in the year 1795, she removed to Peoria, and settled on a lot the property of Louis Chatellereau, in the upper town which she described as above.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Louis Chatellereau, as the son of the late Louis Chatellereau, of Peoria. See claim No. 6.


No. 5.


The heirs of Gabriel Cerre, by their agent, Pascal L. Cerre, claim an out-lot or field, situated immediately in the rear and adjoining to the last described lot.

 

PROOF.

 

Hyacintlic Saint Cyr testifies, on oath, that, previous to the military expedition commanded by captain Montgomery, which colonel Clark sent up to Peoria in the year 1780, he well recollects seeing Louis Chatellereau cultivate an out-lot or field in the rear of, and adjoining to, the lot on which he lived in Peoria, and, to the best of his (St. Cyr's) recollection, the said lot or field contained between thirty or forty arpents of land, which the said Chatellereau continued to cultivate until his death; after which it was occupied for a time by one Chorette and his wile, (Marie Josephe Tieriercau) and then sold by Chatellereau's administrators, and bought by Gabriel Cerre; he (St. Cyr) could not recollect at what time Chatellereau died, or how long Chorette and his wife lived on ihe said lot. Marie Josephe Tieriereau testifies, on oath, that she well recollects that, about the year 1795, Louis Chatellereau had in his possession and cultivated a certain lot or portion of land in a common field, which she describes as lying to the west (in the rear) of his town lot; the size of the lot, or portion of land, is not stated by her.


REMARK.


The quantity of land contained in this out-lot or field is not stated by the claimants.

No. 6.


Louis Chatellereau claims a lot in the old village of Peoria, containing about two arpents of land; and bounded, northwardly, by a street; eastwardly, by a street; southwardly, by a lot of Wilette.; and, westwardly, by a field.


PROOF.


Pascal L. Cerre testifies, on oath, that he well knows that Louis Chatellereau resided on a lot in the old village of Peoria, from the year 1790 to the year 1795, when the said Chatellereau died on the said lot, which was bounded, on the north, by a street which separated it from the lot of Pierre Lavissieur dit Chamberlain; on the east, by a street; and, on the west, by a common field.

 

REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by the heirs of Gabriel Cerre. See claim No. 4.


No. 7.


Thomas Forsyth claims a lot of three huudred feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure) in the village of Peoria; and bounded, eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; northwardly by a cross street; westwardly, by a back street; and, southwardly, by a lot claimed by Jacques Mette.

 

PROOF.


Hypolite Maillet testifies, on oath, that he is now about forty-two or forty-three years of age, and he always understood he had been born in a stockaded fort which stood on the above described lot, in the new village of Peoria; and that his father, John Baptiste Maillet had lived on the said lot for a long time. And Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, in like manner, testifies, that when he went first to live in Peoria, in the year 1790, he found John Baptiste Maillet occupying and cultivating the above described lot. And. further, both Maillet and Chamberlain testily, that the said John Baptiste Maillet continued to live on and cultivate the said lot until he was killed in the year 1801; after which, they understood, the said lot was sold to one John M. Coursoll by whom it was sold to the above named Thomas Forsyth who continued to occupy and cultivate the said lot until the year 1812, when the inhabitants were expelled from Peoria by a captain Craig of the Illinois militia.


REMARK.


A part of this lot must have been embraced by the lot claimed by Augustine Roquc. See claim No. 2.


No. 8.


Thomas Forsyth claims a lot in Peoria, of three hundred feet square, (French measure) and bounded, to the east, by a street separating it from the last described lot; to the north, by a cross street: to the west, by unoccupied land: and. to the south, by a lot claimed by Jacques Mettte.


PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain testifies, on oath, that he went to live in Peoria in the year 1790, when he found John Baptiste Maillet cultivating the above described lot. And Hypolite Maillet testifies, on oath, that he is now about forty-two or forty-three years of age, and that he recollects that his lather, John Baptiste Maillet, cultivated the above described lot for a long time: and both (Chamberlain and Maillet) testify, that the said John Baptiste Maillet continued to cultivate the said lot until he was killed in the year 1801; after which they understood it was sold to one John M. Coursoll, who, they also understood, sold it to Thomas Forsyth, who continued to cultivate the same as a garden, until the inhabitants were expelled from Peoria by captain Craig, in the year 1812.


No. 9.

 

Thomas Forsyth claims an out-lot or field, containing about twenty arpents of land; situated about two miles southwardly from the village of Peoria, at the river Gatinau, now called Kickapoo creek.
 

PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Felix Fountain testify, on oath, that Thomas Forsyth, in the year 1806, made the above described lot or field, which, to the best of their recollection, contained about fifteen or sixteen arpents of land; and Mette well recollects that Forsyth cultivated the said field at least two years.


No. 10.


Thomas Forsyth claims an out-lot or field, containing about twenty arpents of land; situated in the little Prarie [sic] about two miles from Peoria.
 

PROOF


Jacques Mette and Felix Fountain testify, on oath, that Thomas Forsyth commenced the improvement of the above described lot or field, in the year 1807 or 1808; and that he cultivated it for one year; and  that the said lot or field contained, to the best of their belief, not more than about seven arpents of land.


No. II.


Louis Pilette, in right of his wife Angelica, the daughter of the late Francis Wilette, of the village of Peoria, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land; and hounded, northwardly, by a street; eastwardly, by the lot of Antoine Deschamps; southwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; and, westwardly, by a street.


PROOF


Drezy Blondeau testifies, on oath, that Francis Wilette built an house on and improved the above described lot in Peoria, in the year 1788 or 1780, and lived thereon until his death, in the year 1806 or 1808. Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that he went to live in Peoria about the year 1793, at which time he found Francis Wilette living on the above described lot in Peoria, where he continued to reside until his death; and both Blondeau and Roi testify, that the said lot contained about one-half of an arpent of land; and that Francis Wilette died leaving but one child, who, to their certain knowledge, is now the wife of the above named Louis Pilette.

 

REMARK.


Il is believed there is an unintentional mistake in the boundaries of the above described lot. For it to correspond with the descriptions given of the other lots in Peoria, it should have been, northwardly, by Antoine Deschamps' lot; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; and, to the south and west by streets. This lot is also claimed by Felix Fountain, who contends that Francis Willet sold it, as will be seen by reference to his claim, No. 11.

 

No. 12.


Louis Pilette, in right of his wife Angelica, the daughter of the late Francis Wilette, claims a lot containing one half of an arpent of land in the village of Peoria, immediately in the rear of the last described lot, and separated from it by a street, and adjoining to the east (north.) a lot of Antoine Deschamps, and bounded to the south and west by streets.


PROOF.


Drczy Blondeau, testifies, on oath, that Francis Wilette built stables and other out-houses on the above described lot, in the year 178S or 1789, and continued to use the same until his death, in the year 1806 or 1808. Simon Roi, in like manner, testifies, that, when he went to live in Peoria, about the year 1793, he found Francis Wilette in possession of the above described lot, which he continued to occupy till his death. And, they both testify, that it contained about one half of an arpent of land, and that Francis Wilette and his wife, on their decease, left hut one child, who is now the wife of the above named Louis Pilette.


No. I3.


Louis Pilette, in right of his wife Angelica, the daughter of the late Francis Wilette, claims an out lot or field containing fifteen or twenty arpents of land, situated about three-fourths of a mile northeastwardly (northwestwardly) from the village of Peoria.

 

PROOF.

 

Drezy Blondeau testifies, on oath, that Francis Wilette commenced improving and cultivating an out lot, or field, of from fifteen to twenty arpents of land, situated as above described, about the year 1786, which he continued to cultivate until his death, in the year 1806 or 1808.  And Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1793, he found Francis Wilette in possession of, and cultivating the above described out lot or field, which he supposed to contain about fifteen or twenty arpents—that he (Roi) had often assisted Wilette to harvest his grain, and that he well knows that Wilette continued to cultivate it until his death. And, they both testify that the wife of the above named Louis Pilette was the only child left by the said Wilette and his wife at their death.


No. 14.


Jacques Mette claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet front by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure,) and bounded on the east by a street separating it from the Illinois river, on the north by a lot claimed by Thomas Forsyth, on the west by a back street, and on the south by a lot of Francis Bucke.

 

PROOF

 

Hypolite Maillet testifies, on oath, that he is now about forty-two or forty-three years of age, and, that from his earliest recollection the above described lot was possessed and cultivated by his father, John Baptist Maillet, who continued to cultivate it until his death, in the year 1800 or 1801. And Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, also, testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1700, he found John Baptiste Maillet in possession of, and cultivating the above described lot. And they both testify, that they always understood that the above named Mette had purchased the said lot, (but when, is not stated,) which, they well recollect, he continued to occupy until the spring of the year 1812—and that the said lot was, they thought, about eighty feet in front by about three hundred feet in depth.


REMARK.


The land embraced by this lot must, in part, have been covered by the lot of Augustine Roque. Sec claim. No. 2.


No. 15.


Jacques Mette claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure,) situated immediately in the rear of the last described lot, and separated from it by a street, and  bounded north by a lot of Thomas Forsyth, and to the west and south by unoccupied lands.

 

PROOF


Hypolite Maillet testifies, on oath, that he is now forty-two or forty-three years of age, and that, from his earliest recollection, his father, John Baptiste Maillet had cultivated the above described lot. And Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain testifies, in like manner, that he went to live in Peoria in the year 1790, at which time he found John Baptiste Maillet in possession of and cultivating the above described lot. And both testify that the said Maillet continued :o cultivate the said lot. until his death, in the year 1800 or 1801; and that they had always understood that the above named Mette purchased it, and they well recollect he cultivated it until the spring of the year 1812, and that it was about eighty feet in front by about three hundred in depth.

No. 10.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain claims a lot or square of about two arpents of land, in the old village of Peoria, bounded northwardly by a bill, to the south and east by streets, and to the west by an out-lot, also claimed by him.


PROOF.


Joseph Lapattre and Hypolite Maillet testify, on oath, that Augustine Filteau, iu the year 1789, "established himself on four lots of eighty by three hundred feet each," which lots they describe as being bounded on the north by an hill, south by a cross street, east by a street, and west by an out-lot, then possessed by the said Filteau, and that the said Filteau sold the said lots to the above named Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain iu the year 1794.


REMARK.


The testimony in this case was not taken in the presence of the register. This lot is also claimed by August Fiailteau. See claim, No. 21.


No. 17.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain claims an out-lot or field, containing about twelve arpents of land, near, if not adjoining to, the old village of Peoria, and adjoining to the south and west the field of Louis Chatellereau.


PROOF.


Joseph Lapattre and Hypolite Maillet testify, on oath, that Augustine Filteau "established" the above described lot or field, which contained about twelve arpents of land, in the year 1789, and that he sold it in the year 1794, to the above named Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain.

 

REMARK.


The testimony in this case was not taken in the presence of the the register.


No. 18.

 

Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain claims a lot in Peoria, bounded northwardly and westwardly by unoccupied lands, eastwardly by a street separating it from the lot of Louis Bissou, and southwardly by
a cross street.

 

PROOF

Hypolite Maillet and Michael Laclaire testify, on oath, that Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain fenced in and built an house on the above described lot about the year 1798; but they do not know that he ever occupied the house or cultivated the said lot; they describe the lot l to have been about the usual size, that is, about one half of an arpent of land.


No. 19.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure) and bounded northwardly, by a lot of Michael Le Croix; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly, by a lot of Augustine La Roche; and westwardly, by a street.


PROOF.


Hypolite Maillet, and Michael La Claire, testify, on oath, that Francis Jourdan made an improvement on the above described lot in Peoria, about the year 1800, or 1801, where he resided about one year, when he, (Jourdan) sold the said lot to Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, who resided on it until he was forced from it by captain Craig, who destroyed the village of Peoria in the fall of the year 1812; that the said lot was about eighty feet in front, by about three hundred in depth.


No. 20.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain claims an out-lot or field, containing about seven arpents of land, situated near half a mile to the south west of Peoria, and adjoining on the north the field of Antoine  Lapance.


PROOF.


Hypolite Maillet, and Antoine Lapance, testify, on oath, that Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain did, in in the year 1810, enclose and cultivate the above described lot, or field, and that he continued to cultivate it, until he and all the inhabitants were forced to leave Peoria, by captain Craig, in the year 1812.


No. 21.

 

Gabriel Lattraille, as administrator of August Fiailteau, claims a lot in (be old village of Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded eastwardly by a lot of one Lapierre; southwardly, by a street, separating it from a lot claimed by Louis Chatellereau and to the north and west by unoccupied land.


PROOF.

 

Ettienne Bernard testifies, on oath, that he saw August Fiailteau living on and cultivating the above described lot, in the old village of Peoria, about the year 1791, on which he, Fiailteau, had a blacksmith's shop, and that he continued to reside on the said lot for about five or six years, when he abandoned it. and that the said lot contained about one half of an arpent of land. Tousant Souliere testifies, on oath, that August Fiailteau, deceased, lived on, and cultivated the above described lot, (but when is not stated) and that he continued to reside on it for at least ten years, when he was driven off by savage depredations.


REMARKS.


The testimony of Tousant Souliere was not taken in presence of the register.


This lot is also claimed by Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, who contends that he purchased it in the year 1794 of Fiailteau. See claim No. 16.


No. 22.


Thomas Lusby claims a lot in the old village of Peoria, containing about four arpents of land, and bounded on the cast by a street or road, at the distance of about one hundred and twenty yards from
lake Peoria; on the south, by a street separating it from the lot of Joseph Leframbroise; west by unoccupied lands; and on the north by the lot of one Parent.

 

PROOF.


Joseph Lapatre and Louis Coinoi testify, on oath, that Thomas Lusby purchased, about the year 1795, a lot, which they describe as containing four arpents of land, and situated in the upper town of Peoria, from one Saint John, who they state had resided on the said lot for near fifteen years. Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1794, he found one Saint John living on a lot, which he describes as it is above described by Lusby, and that he had been informed that Saint John sold the said lot to Thomas Lusby. Michael La Croix testifies, in like manner, that, in the year 1797, Thomas Lusby purchased the said lot from one Saint John, who had previously lived thereon, and that the said Lusby lived on the said lot for one or two years, when he abandoned it; and both Rio and Le Croix testify that the lot contained about four arpents of land.

 

No. 23.


Thomas Lusby claims a lot in the old village of Peoria, containing about one half of an ardent of land, and bounded on the east by lake Peoria; south, by a lot of one Bouche; west, by a street, separating it from the lot of Louis Chatellereau; and north, by the lot of one Lapierre.

 

PROOF.


Joseph Lapatre and Louis Coinoi, testify, on oath, that Thomas Lushy purchased of one Laroach a lot, on which he (Laroach) resided seven years, and which they merely describe as being in the upper town of Peoria, and containing about one half of an arpent of land. They do not state when Lusby purchased, or how long he retained possession of the lot.


REMARK.


The above testimony was not taken in the presence of the register.


No. 24.


Thomas Lusby claims a lot in the new village of Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and hounded eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly, by a lot, once occupied by Chorette, afterwards by Louis Defond; westwardly, by a back street; and, northwardly, by a lot of one Champlaine.


PROOF.


Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1794, he found one Urquette living on the above described lot; that he (Roi) does not know whether Urquette sold it or not, but that he well recollects seeing one Castion afterwards living on it, who sold it to Thomas Lusby about the year 1798 or 1799, and that when he (Roi) removed from Peoria, in the year 1802 or 1803, he left the said Lusby living on the said lot Louis Coinoi and Joseph Lapatre testify, on oath, that they knew of Thomas Lusby's purchasing a lot of about one half of an arpent, in the lower town, about the year 1794, from one Castion, and that the said Castion purchased the said lot the year before of one Urquette, who had lived on the said lot, they thought, for near twenty years.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Antoine La Claire, who contends that Thomas Lusby sold it. See claim No. 25.


Coinoi and Lapatre's testimony not taken in the presence of the Register.

 

No. 25.


Antoine La Claire claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth (French measure) and "bounded, eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly, by a  lot of John Baptiste Defond; westwardly, by unoccupied lands; and, northwardly, by a lot, which he (La Claire) purchased of J. B. Champlaine.

 

PROOF.


Francis Racine testifies, on oath, that one La Blond made an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1798 or 1799, and that the said lot was afterwards in possession of several persons, among whom he well recollects Joseph Castion and Thomas Lusby; that Lusby sold the said lot. in the year 1805, to him (Racine) who sold it to Joseph Dejeney, who sold it to the above named Antoine LaClaire in the year 1809, who occupied said lot till the year 1812, when Peoria was destroyed by captain Craig. Jacques Mette testifies, on oath, that Thomas Lusby was in possession of the above described lot in the year 1801, when he (Mette) went to live in Peoria, and that Lusby continued to reside thereon for about two years, after which, he (Mette) saw the said lot in possession of one Joseph Dejeney, who, he understood, sold it to the above named Antoine La Claire, in the year 1809, who continued to occupy the same until the year 1812. Both Racine and Mette testify that the said lot was about eighty feet in front, by about three hundred feet in depth.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by the above named Thomas Lusby.  See claim No. 24.


No. 26.


Antoine Laclaire claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure) and hounded eastwardly by main street, separating it from the Illinois river; northwardly, by a lot of Francis Racine; westwardly, by unoccupied land; and southwardly, by a lot, on which he (Larlaire) lived.


PROOF.


Francis Racine and Jacques Mette testify, on oath, that John Baptiste Champlaine made an improvement on the above described lot, in the year 1801, or 1802; and that he (Champlaine) sold the said lot in the year 1810, to the above named Antoine Leclaire, who cultivated it as a garden until the year 1812.


Both Racine and Mette testify that said lot was about eighty feet in front, by about three hundred feet in depth.

 

No. 27.


Michael La Croix claims a lot in Peoria of eighty feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure,) and bounded, eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly, by a lot occupied by Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain; westwardly, by a back street; and northwardly, by a cross street.

 

PROOF.


Antoine Deschamps testifies, on oath, that Louis La Bossieur had the above described lot in possession, and was living on it in the year 1794, and that La Bossieur sold it to Michael Coursoll; and Jacques Mette testifies, in like manner, that when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1801, or 1802, he found Michael Coursoll living on the above described lot; that Michael Coursoll sold the said lot to John M. Coursoll, who he (Mette) understood sold it about the year 1808, or 1809, to the above named Michael La Croix; Antoine Saint Dennis, as well as the above named Mette, testify, on oath, that Michael La Croix, very soon after he purchased the above described lot, built a large two-story dwelling house, a large store-house, and other out dwellings, and cultivated a garden on the said lot, and continued to occupy the same until the year 1812, when the village of Peoria was destroyed by captain Craig.


No. 28.


Simon Roi claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land; and bounded on the cast by a lot of John Coursoll; on the west, by a lot of Louis Bisson, on the south and north, by streets.


PROOF.


Drezy Blondeau, and John Baptiste Blondeau, testify, on oath, that Simon Roi, went to Peoria sometime during the year 1793, soon after which he made an improvement, and built an house on the above described lot, in which he lived near two years, when he abandoned it.

 

REMARK.


The above boundaries are presumed not correct. To correspond with the points of the compass, as stated in the other descriptions in Peoria, it should have been stated, northwardly, by the lot of John Coursoll; and southwardly, by the lot of Louis Bisson.


No. 29.

 

Simon Roi, in right of his wife, who was the wife of Charles Le Doux, of Peoria, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land; and bounded on the south by a lot of Antoine Roi; on the north, by the lot of Francis Dupre; and on the east and west, by streets.


PROOF.


Drezy Blondeau, and John Baptiste Blondeau, testify, on oath, that Charles Le Doux made an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1793, and continued to reside on, and cultivate the same until his death; that the above named Simon Roi married the widow of the said Charles Le Doux, about the year 1799, and that they, the said Simon Roi and wife, continued to reside on, and cultivate the said lot, until about the year 1808, or 1809, when they removed from Peoria.


No. 30.


Simon Roi, in right or his wife, the late widow of Charles Le Doux, deceased, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land; and situated immediately in the rear of the last described lot, and separated from it by a street.

 

PROOF.


Drezy Blondeau, and John Baptiste Blondeau, testify, on oath, that Charles Le Doux commenced an improvement on the above described lot, during the year 1795, by building a stable and other out-houses on it, and that he continued to occupy the said lot until his death; that the above named Simon Roi married his widow about the year 1799, and that they (Roi and wife) continued to use the same until they left Peoria, which was about the year 1808 or 1809.

 

No. 31


Simon Roi, in right of his wife, the late widow of Charles Le Doux, deceased, claims an out-lot, immediately in the rear of, and adjoining to the last described lot, containing about six arpents of land.


PROOF.


Drezy Blondeau, and John Baptiste Blondeau, testify, on oath, that Charles Le Doux made an improvement on the above described out-lot or field, in the year 1793, and that he continued to cultivate it until his death; that the widow of the said Charles Le Doux married the above named Simon Roi, about the year 1799, and that they (Roi and wife) continued to cultivate the same until about the year 1808 or 1809, when they left Peoria.

 

No. 32.

 

Simon Roi claims one third of an out-lot, or field, containing about thirty arpents of land, improved and cultivated by himself, his brother Antoine Roi, and Francis Racine; situated on the east bank of the river Gatinau, near one league south-westwardly from the village of Peoria.

 

PROOF.


Antoine Cicare, and Antoine Roi, testily, on oath, that, in the year 1802, Simon Roi, with his brother Antoine Roi, and Francis Racine, improved and cultivated an out-lot, or field, at the river Gatinau; containing about thirty arpents of land, which they continued to cultivate for many years.


No. 33.


Antoine Roi claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land; and bounded, northwardly, by a hit of Charles Le Doux; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly by unoccupied land; and, westwardly, by a street.

 

PROOF.


Michael Le Claire and Simon Roi testify, on oath, that Antoine Roi, in the year 1793 or 1794, built a house on, and cultivated as a garden, the above described lot, which contained about one half of an arpent of land, and on which he continued to reside and cultivate for five or six years, when he abandoned it, and removed from Peoria.


No. 34.


Antoine Roi claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and situated immediately in the rear of the last described lot, and from which it was separated by a street; and, to the north, it adjoined the lot of Charles Le Doux; and, to the south and west it was bounded by commons or prairie.

 

PROOF.


Michael LE Claire and Simon Roi testify, on oath, that Antoine Roi, in the year 1793 or 1794, made an improvement by building stables, and other out-houses, on the above described lot, which lot and buildings he continued to use for five or six years, when he abandoned them, and removed from Peoria; that the said lot contained about one half of an arpent of land.


No. 35.


Antoine Roi claims one third of an out-lot or field, containing about thirty arpents of land, improved and cultivated by himself, his brother, Simon Roi, and Francis Racine; situated on the east bank of the river Gatinau, near one league, southwestwardly, from the village of Peoria.

 

PROOF.


Antoine Cicare and Simon Roi testify, on oath, that, in the year 1802, Antoine Roi had in possession and cultivated an out-lot or field at the river Gatinau, in partnership with Simon Roi and Francis Racine, which field they cultivated many years; that the said field contained about thirty arpents of land.


No. 36.


Francis Racine, senior, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land: bounded, northwardly, by a cross street; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly by a lot occupied by one Champlaine; and, westwardly, by a back street.

 

PROOF.


Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria in the year 1794, the above described lot constituted a part of a field, then possessed and cultivated by John Baptiste Maillet; that he (Roi) understood Maillet afterwards gave it to Francis Racine, senior, who, in the year 1790, built an house on it, and continued to reside on the said lot until the village was destroyed by captain Craig in the year 1812. Antoine Burbonne testifies, on oath, that, when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1803, he found Francis Racine, senior, living on the above described lot, where he continued to reside until the year 1812. Francis Racine, junior, testifies, on oath, that he is now twenty-six years of age, and that, from his earliest recollection, his father, Francis Racine, senior, lived upon the above described lot, and that he continued to live on it until the year 1812; all three of them state that the said lot contained about one half of an arpent of land.


No. 37.


Francis Racine, senior, claims an out-lot or field, containing about twenty arpents of land; situated nearly adjoining the village of Peoria, and between the fields of Simon Roi and Antoine Burbonne.

PROOF.

 

Antoine Burbonne and Francis Racine, junior, testify that Francis Racine, senior, improved the above described out lot or field, about the year 1807, and continued to cultivate it until the year 1812; and that it contained about twenty arpents.

 

No. 38.


Francis Racine, senior, claims an out-lot or field, containing about eighteen arpents of land, and situated about two miles below the village of Peoria; and bounded, to the north, by the out-lot of Simon Roi; to the south and west by the river Gatinau; and, to the cast, by the prairie

 

PROOF.


Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, in the year 1802 or 1803, that lie (Simon Roi) his brother, Antoine Roi, and Francis Racine, senior, enclosed and cultivated a field on the bank of the Gatinau river, about two or three miles below the village of Peoria; that the said field contained about thirty arpents of land, and that it was divided equally between the above named three persons; that they continued to cultivate the said field, each one his own separate portion, of about ten arpents, for two or three years, when be (Roi) removed from Peoria. Hypolite Maillet and Antoine Roi testify, on oath, that, about the
year 1803, Francis Racine, senior, made a field on the bank of the river Gatinau, about two miles from Fort Clark, (Peoria) which they think contained about eighteen arpents.


REMARK.


The above testimony of Hypolite Maillet and Antoine Roi was not taken in the presence of the Register; and it is quite certain, from the evidence received in claims No. 32 and No. 35, that this claim does  not exceed about ten arpents of land.


No. 39.
Francis Racine, junior, in right of his wife, the late widow of John Baptiste Defond, deceased, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded, northwardly, by a lot, occupied formerly by Thomas Lusby, afterwards by Antoine Le Claire; eastwardly, by a street, separating it from the Illinois river; and, to the south and west, by streets.

 

PROOF.

 

Antoine Burbonne and Francis Racine, senior, testify, on oath, that, about the year 1800, one Chorette made an improvement on the above described lot, which contained about one half of an arpent; and that, soon afterwards, he (Chorette) sold the said lot to John Baptiste Defond, who resided on it until the village was destroyed by captain Craig in the year 1812; that since then the said Defond has died, and his widow has roamed the above named Francis Racine, junior.


No. 40.


Francis Racine, junior, in right of his wife, the late widow of John Baptiste Defond, deceased, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about three or four arpents of land, and bounded, eastwardly, by a street separating it from the lot last described; southwardly, by a cross street and, to the north and west, by unoccupied lands.

 

PROOF.


Antoine Burbonne and Francis Racine, senior, testify, on oath, that John Baptiste Defond made an improvement on the above described lot about the year 1805 or 1806, and continued to cultivate it as a garden and field till the year 1812; and that the said lot contained three or four arpents of land.


No. 41.


Felix Fontaine claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front, by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure) and bounded eastwardly by a street, separating it from Lake Peoria; northwardly, by a lot formerly occupied by Antoine Deschamps. but now claimed by him (Fontaine) and to the south and west by streets.


PROOF.

 

Antoine Deschamps testifies on oath that he saw the above described lot in possession of, and cultivated by, John Baptiste Maillet, in the year 1792, and that Maillet gave it to Francis Wilette, who remained in the possession of it until his death, in the year 1804.  Hypolite Maillet and Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, testify, in like manner, that Francis Wilette made an improvement, and built an house on the above described lot, about the year 1797 or 1798, where he continued to reside until his death, in the year 1804 or 1805; and all three of the deponents testify that his widow continued to occupy the said house and lot until her death, which happened about two years after the death of her husband: and the said Deschamps further testifies, that, after the death of Wilette and his wife, he (Deschamps) purchased from Wilette's administrators the said lot, and occupied it until the year 1811, when he sold it to Felix Fontaine; and the said Maillet and Chamberlain further testify that the said Fontaine continued to occupy the said lot until the village of Peoria was destroyed, and the inhabitants driven off by Captain Craig, in the year 1812; and that the lot was about eighty feet in front, by about three hundred in depth.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Louis Pilette, in right of his wife, who was the daughter of the above named Francis Wilette, as will be seen by reference to claim No. 11.

 

No. 42.


Felix Fontaine, in right of his wife, Josette Carsereau dit Fontaine, claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front by three hundred feet in depth, (French measure) and bounded eastwardly by a street separating it from Lake Peoria; northwardly by a lot claimed by the heirs of Le Boushier; westwardly by a street; and southwardly by a lot on which he (Fontaine) lived.

 

PROOF.
Hypolite Maillet and Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, testify, on oath, that Francis Wilette enclosed and cultivated the above described lot in Peoria, about the, year 1707 or 1798, and that the said lot was about eighty feet in front, by about three hundred feet in depth; that they had understood that the said Wilette, about two years after he made the improvements, gave the said lot to one Josette Carsereau, who afterwards married the above named Felix Fontaine; and that, soon after the lot was given, it was built upon, and that they (Fontaine and his wife) continued either to live upon the said lot, or to cultivate it, until they were driven from Peoria by Captain Craig, in the year 1812.


No. 43.


Felix Fontaine claims an out-lot, or field, containing about nine arpents of land, situated about one half of a mile to the southwest of the village of Peoria, and bounded on the south by the out-lot of Antoine Lapance, and to the north by the out-lot of Francis Racine.

 

PROOF.

 

Pierre Lavassieur (lit Chamberlain and Hypolite Maillet testify, on oath, that Antoine Deschamps enclosed and cultivated the above described field, in the year 1807; that he cultivated it for three years, when he sold it to the above named Felix Fontaine, who continued to cultivate it until the autumn of the year 1812; and that the said lot or field contained about nine arpents of land.


No. 44.

 

Felix Fontaine claims an out-lot, containing about two and a half arpents of land, situated about one fourth of a mile to the west of the village of Peoria.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Antoine La Claire testify on oath, that Felix Fontaine made an improvement in the spring of the year 1810, on the above described out-lot, and continued to cultivate it until the village of Peoria was destroyed by Captain Craig, in the autumn of the year 1812.


No. 45.


Baptiste Raboin claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded eastwardly by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly by a lot claimed by Antoine Lapance; westwardly by a street, and northwardly by across street.


PROOF.


Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1794, he found the above described lot occupied by Louis Acare, who sold it to one Jourdan, who sold it to Pierre Lavassieur
dit Chamberlain, who sold it to him, (Roi) who sold it to Baptiste Raboin, whom he (Roi) left in possession of it when he left Peoria, which was about the year 1803 or 1804. Jacques Mette testifies, on oath, that he saw Baptiste Raboin living on the above described lot, in the year 1807 or 1808, and that he well recollects he continued to live on it until about the year 1809 or 1810, when he abandoned it, and that it remained unoccupied for about one year, when one Louis Binet went to live on it, which he continued to do until the village of Peoria was destroyed by Captain Craig, in the year 1812.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Louis Pencenneau, as assignee of the above named Louis Dinette. See claim 69.


No. 46.


Joseph Coudier, for himself and the other heirs of the late Joseph Coudier, claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front by three hundred feet in depth, and bounded northwardly by a lot claimed by Charles La Belle; eastwardly by a street separating it from a lot claimed by Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain; southwardly by a lot claimed by Hypolite Maillet; and westwardly by an out-lot claimed by Charles La Belle.

 

PROOF.


Simon Roi, Pierre Lavassieur and Hypolite Maillet, testify, on oath, that Joseph Coudier, deceased, improved and built an house on the above described lot, in the year 1790, and that the said lot was about eighty in front, by about three hundred feet in depth; and the said Roi further testifies that Joseph Coudier resided on the said lot one or two years, when he abandoned it and removed from Peoria.

 

No; 47.

 

Hypolite Maillet, in right of his wife, Josette Demouchelle, the late widow of Louis Ie Boushier, deceased, claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land; and bounded northwardly by a lot occupied by Louis Binet; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly by a lot occupied by Francis Wilette; and westwardly by a street.

 

PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, and Michael Le Claire, testify on oath, that the late Louis le Boushier improved and built an house on the above described lot in Peoria, in the year 1796 or 1797, and that the said lot contained about one-half of an arpent of land, on which he (Le Boushier) resided until his death, which happened in the year 1802 or 1303; after which, his widow lived about one year on the said lot, when she abandoned it; and that the said widow of Louis le Boushier has since married, and is now the wife of the above named Hypolite Maillet.


No. 48.


Hypolite Maillet, in right of his wife, Josette Demouchelle, the late widow of Louis Le Boushier, deceased, claims an out-lot or field containing about four arpents of land, situated about one-half of a
mile to the west of the village of Peoria.


PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, and Michael Le Claire, testify, on oath, that Louis le Boushier improved and cultivated, about the year 1796or 1797, the above described lot as a garden, and which they think contained about four arpents or land, and that he continued to cultivate it until his death in the year 1802 or 1803, and that his widow cultivated it for one year after the death of her husband, when she abandoned it; and that she has since married, and is now the wife of the above named Hypolite Maillet.


No. 49.

 

Hypolite Maillet claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land, and bounded northwardly by a lot of Charles le Belle; eastwardly by a street; southwardly by a lot claimed by him (Maillet;) and westwardly by an out-lot claimed also by him.

 

PROOF.


Jacques Mette, and Antoine Lapance, testify, on oath, that Hypolitc Maillet commenced an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1809, and that he continued to reside on the said lot until the year 1812, when the village was destroyed by captain Craig; and that the lot contained about one-half of an arpent of land.

 

No. 50.


Hypolite Maillet claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land, and bounded northwardly by the last described lot; eastwardly and southwardly bystreets; and westwardly by an out- lot claimed by him, (Maillet.)


PROOF.


Jacques Mette, and Antoine Lapance, testify, on oath, that Hypolite Maillet commenced an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1809, and continued to occupy and cultivate the said lot, which contained about one-half of an arpent of land, as a garden, until the year 1812, when he was driven from Peoria by captain Craig.

 

No. 51.


Hypolite Maillet claims an out-lot immediately in the rear of, and adjoining to, the two last described lots in the village of Peoria, containing about six arpents of land, and bounded northwardly by an out-lot of Charles le Belle; and southwardly by an out-lot of John Baptiste Defond.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette, and Antoine Lapance, testify, on oath, that Hypolite Maillet improved the above described lot, which contained about six arpents of land, in the year 1809, and continued to cultivate it as a field, until he was forced by Captain Craig to abandon it, and the village of Peoria, in the year 1812.


No. 52.

 

Hypolite Maillet claims an out-lot or field, containing; about fifteen arpents of land, situated about one mile and an half to the north of the village of Peoria, and bounded on the north by the out-lot of one Wilette; westwardly by the bluff; and to the south and cast by the prairie.


PROOF.


Francis Racine, sen. Francis Jourdan, and Antoine Burbonne, testify, on oath, that the above described field was " established" in the year 1797, by John Baptiste Maillet, the father of Hypolite Maillet,
and that it contained, to the best of their recollection, about fifteen arpents of land.

 

REMARK.


The evidence in favor of this and the following claim was not taken in the presence of the Register.


No. 53.


Hypolite Maillet claims an out-lot or field, containing about fifteen arpents of land, situated about two miles below the village of Peoria, on the eastern bank of the river Gatinau, and adjoining, to the south, the field of Francis Montplaiser. 


PROOF.


Francis Racine, sen. Francis Jourdan, and Antoine Burbonne, testify, on oath, that Hypolite Maillet had the above described out-lot or field in his possession in the year 1806, and that he continued to cultivate it until the year 1812, when he and all the inhabitants were forced by Captain Craig to leave Peoria; and that the said field, or out-lot, to the best of their recollection,-contained about fifteen arpents of land.


No. 54.


The heirs of the late Antoine Grand Bois, by their agent, Antoine Lapance, claim a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front by three hundred in depth, (French measure,) and bounded northwardly by a lot of Raphael Belonge; eastwardly by a street, separating it from Lake Peoria; southwardly by a cross street; and westwardly by unoccupied land.

 

 

PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, and Hypolite Maillet, testify, on oath, that the late Antoine Grand Bois improved the above described lot, and built an house on it about the year 1801, and resided on it until his death in the year 1806 or 1807, after which his widow resided on the said lot for one or two years, when she abandoned it; after which she died, leaving several children; that the said lot was about eighty feet in front by about three hundred in depth.


No. 55.


Michael Le Claire claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land, and bounded eastwardly by a back street; southwardly by the lot of one Gunoille; westwardly by unoccupied land; and northwardly by a cross street.

 

PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, and Hypolite Maillet, testify, on oath, that one Whitby built an house on the above described lot, in the year 1801; that the lot contained about one-half of an arpent of land; that he (Whitby) sold the said lot to one Racine, who sold it to the above named Le Claire in the spring of the year 1803, and that he, the said Le Claire, occupied the said lot until the year 1806, when he abandoned it and left Peoria.


No. 56.


Francis Buche claims an out-lot or field containing about ten arpents of land, situated at the foot of the bluff, about half a mile west of the village of Peoria.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Felix Fontaine testify, on oath, that Francis Buche made an improvement on the above described out-lot or field in the year 1809, and that he continued to cultivate it until the fall of the year 1812, when he and the other inhabitants were driven from Peoria by captain Craig, of the Illinois militia; and that the said lot or field contained about ten arpents of land.


No. 57.


Joseph Boucher claims a lot in the old village of Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded northwardly by a lot of Francis Belhumer, eastwardly by lake Peoria, southwardly by a lot of Joseph Laframboise, and westwardly by a street.

 

PROOF.


Joseph Lapottue and Pierre La Vassieur testify, on oath, that Francis Boucher, deceased, had in his possession, in the year 1795, the above described lot, on which there was an house, which they afterwards well recollect seeing in a state of decay and ruin.

 

REMARK.


The evidence in this case was not taken in the presence of the register.


No. 58.


Joseph Boucher claims an out-lot, containing about six or seven arpents of land, situated near the old village of Peoria.

 

PROOF


Joseph Lapottue and Pierre Lavassieur testify, on oath, that Francis Boucher, deceased, had in his possession, iu the year 1795, an out-lot or field, at the hill near the old village of Peoria, containing about six or seven arpents.


REMARK.


This testimony was not taken in the presence of the register.


No. 59.


John Baptiste Blondeau claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded northwardly by a street, eastwardly by a lot of John Demouchelle, southwardly by a lot of Francis
Dupre.


PROOF.


Drezy Blondeau and Simon Roi testify, on oath, that John Baptiste Blondeau made an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1799, and resided on the same for more than five years, and that the said lot contained about one half of an arpent.


REMARK.


The boundaries of the above lot do not correspond with those generally given of the other lots in Peoria. It should have been—eastwardly by a street separating it from the Illinois river, northwardly by a lot of John Demouchelle, southwardly by a lot of Francis Dupre, and westwardly by a street.

 

No. 60.


The heirs of Charles La Belle, by their agent Antoine Le Claire, claim a lot in Peoria, containing about one half of an arpent of land, and bounded northwardly by a cross street, separating it from a lot of Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain, eastwardly by a street, southwardly by a lot of Joseph Coudier, and westwardly by an out-lot claimed by them.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Antoine Burbonne testify, on oath, that Charles La Belle, deceased, built an house on the above described lot in the year 1809 or 1810, and continued to reside on it until the village of
Peoria was destroyed by captain Craig, in the year 1812; and that the said lot contained about one half of an arpent.

 

No. 61.


The heirs of Charles La Belle, by their agent, Antoine Le Claire, claim an out-lot or field, containing about ten arpents of land, situated immediately in the rear of, and adjoining to, the last described lot, and adjoining, on the south, an out-lot of Hypolite Maillet.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Antoine Burbonne testify, on oath, that Charles La Belle, enclosed and cultivated the above described lot or field in the year 1809 or 1810, and that he continued to cultivate it until he  was forced by captain Craig to leave it, in the fall of the year 1812, and that the said lot or field contained about ten arpents of land.


No. 62.
Simon Bertrand, in right of his wife Mary, the late widow of John Demouchelle, deceased, claims a lot in Peoria containing about one half of an arpent of land, and hounded northwardly by a lot formerly occupied by Jourdan, afterwards by Raboin, eastwardly by a street separating it from the Illinois river, southwardly by a lot of John B. Bloudeau, and westwardly by a street.


PROOF.

 

Simon Roi testifies, on oath, that, in the year 1799 or 1800, Francis Dupre built an house on the above described Jot, and lived in the same tor two or three years—that the said Dupre sold the said lot to John Demouchelle, who also lived on it for two or three years, when he abandoned it and left Peoria. Jacques Mette, also, testifies that, in the year 1803 or 1804, he saw one John Demouchelle living on the above described lot, who continued to live on it for one or two years when he abandoned it, and the house and improvements went to ruin; that the said lot was again improved and built upon in the year 1810, by Antoine Lapance.  Both Roi and Mette state that the lot contained about one half of an arpent.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by the above named Antoine Lapance.  See claim No. 63.


No. 63.


Antoine Lapance claims a lot in Peoria, of eighty feet in front by about three hundred feet iu depth, (French measure.) and bounded northwardly by a lot occupied by Louis Binet, eastwardly by a street separating it from the Illinois river, southwardly by unoccupied land, and westwardly by a street.

 

PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain and Hypolite Maillet, testify, on oath, that Antoine Lapance built an house on, and cultivated as a garden, the above described lot, in the year 1810; and continued to reside on, and cultivate the same, until the fall of the year 1812; and that the said lot was about eighty feet in front by about three hundred feet in depth.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Simon Bertrand. Sec claim No. 62.


No. 64.


Antoine Lapance claims an out-lot or field, containing about nine arpents of land; situated about one fourth of a mile from Peoria, and hounded, on the north, by an out-lot or field of Felix Fontaine; and, on the south, by the field of Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain.


PROOF.


Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain and Hypolite Maillet testify, on oath, that Antoine Lapance enclosed and cultivated the above described lot or field, in the spring of 1811, and cultivated it until the autumn of 1812; and that the said field contained about nine arpents.

 

No. 65.


Antoine Burbonne claims a lot in Peoria, bounded, eastwardly, by a street separating it from Lake Peoria; southwardly, by a lot of Louis Le Boushier; westwardly, by a street, and, northwardly, by a cross street.

 

PROOF.


Jacques Mette and Francis Racine, senior, testily, on oath, that Louis Binet made an improvement on the above described lot in the year 1801 or 1802; that he (Binet) sold said lot to one Parquette, who sold it to the above named Antoine Burbonne, who lived on the said lot until he was driven therefrom, and the village of Peoria destroyed by captain Craig in the year 1812; and that the said lot contained about one-half of an arpent of land.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by Louis Penceneau as assignee of the above named Louis Binet. Sec claim No. 68.


No. 66.


Antoine Burbonne claims a lot in Peoria, bounded, northwardly, by a street; southwardly, by a lot occupied by Louis La Boushier; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the last described lot; and, westwardly, by a street.


PROOF. 


Antoine Le Claire and Jacques Mette testify, on oath, that they well recollect to have seen, in the year 1809 or 1810, Antoine Burbonne have in his possession, and occupy as an out-lot for stables, the above described lot, which contained about one-fourth of an arpent of land; and which lot he continued to occupy until the year 1812, when captain Craig compelled him to leave Peoria.


No. 67.


Antoine Burbonne claims an out-lot or field, containing four or five arpents of land; situated near Peoria, and adjoining, on the north, the field of Francis Racine.


PROOF.


Francis Racine, senior, and Francis Racine, junior, testify, on oath, that Antoine Burbonne enclosed and cultivated the above described out-lot or field, one year prior to his being driven away from it and the destruction of Peoria, by a captain Craig of the Illinois militia, in the year 1812; and that the lot contained about four or five arpents of land.


No. 68

 

Louis Penceneau claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land, and bounded, eastwardly. by a street separating it from Lake Peoria; southwardly, by a lot claimed by Louis La Boushier; and, northwardly and westwardly, by streets.


PROOF.


Simon Roi testifies, on oath that Louis Binet improved the above described lot, and built an house on it in the year 1796 or 1797; and that he continued to reside on the said lot when he (Roi) removed from Peoria in the year 1802 or 1803. Jacques Mette, in like manner, testifies, that when he went to live in Peoria in the year 1801 or 1802, he found Louis Binet living on and cultivating the above described lot; and that he (Binet) continued to do so until about the year 1806 or 1807, when he (Mette) understood Binet sold the said lot to one Parquette, who afterwards sold it, as he (Mette) understood, to Antoine Burbonne, who resided on it until the year 1812. Both Roi and Mette state that the lot contained about one-half of an arpent.

 

REMARKS.


This lot is also claimed by Antoine Burbonne. See claim No. 65.


No. 69.


Louis Penceneau claims a lot in Peoria, containing about one-half of an arpent of land; and bounded, northwardly, by a cross street separating it from a lot of Louis Defend; southwardly, by a lot claimed by Antoine Lapance; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; and, westwardly, by a street.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette testifies, on oath, that, in the year 1801 or 1802, when he went to live in Peoria, he found one Jourdan living on the above described lot; that, afterwards, he (Mette) saw residing on the said lot one Raboin, who, to the best of his recollection, abandoned it about the year 1807 or 1808, after which the house being old and decayed was pulled down, and all the improvements of the lot went to ruin; in which vacant or unoccupied state the lot remained until the autumn of the year 1810, when Antoine St. Dennis and Jacques Mette testify, that the said lot was again improved and built upon by Louis Binet, who continued to reside on the said lot until the autumn of the year 1812, when captain Craig forced the inhabitants to leave Peoria. Both Mette and St. Dennis describe the lot as containing about one-half of an arpent of land.


REMARK.


This lot is also claimed by the above named Raboin. See claim No. 45.

 

No. 70.


Louis Penceneau claims a lot in Peoria, bounded, northwardly, by a lot of Pierre Lavassieur dit Chamberlain; eastwardly, by a street separating it from the Illinois river; southwardly, by a cross street; and, westwardly, by a back street.


PROOF.


Jacques Mette testifies, on oath, that when he went to live in Peoria in the year 1801 or 1802, he found Augustine Laroche residing on and cultivating the above described lot; where he continued to reside until sometime in the year 1812. Antoine St. Dennis, in like manner, testifies, that when he went to live in Peoria, in the year 1810, he found Augustine Laroche living on the above described lot, where he continued to live until sometime towards the close of the year 1811, and that the house was destroyed by captain Craig in the year following. Louis Penceneau, jun. testifies, that he had always understood that Augustine Laroche gave the above described lot to his father, the above named Louis Penceneau. And Antoine St. Dennis and Louis Penceneau, jun. testify, that soon after the peace in 1815, the above named Louis Penceneau built an house on the above described lot, and that he continued to occupy the same until the autumn of the year 1817. And all three describe the lot as containing about one- half of an arpent of land.


All which is respectfully submitted.


EDWARD COLES,
Register of the Land Office at Edwardsville.


November 10, 1820.
William H. Crawford, Esq.
Secretary of the Treasury.

 

 

Home  |  History


Peoria County, IL Genealogy Trails
© 2006 - 2011 by Genealogy Trails

All data on this website is © Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.