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Putnam County, Illinois History and Genealogy
Biographies
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 Alice Ellen Gaylord

Alice Ellen Gaylord was the first child of Orange and Sarah Elizabeth (Stout) Gaylord. She was born at Magnolia, Putnam County, Illinois, January 7, 1846.

It is well that some of the indelible impressions on the mind of the 7 years of life of the little girl, Alice Ellen Gaylord. in Illinois should be recorded here before giving her remembrances of the five and a half months following her leave-taking of Illinois. She remembers distinctly seeing her great-grandfather, Lemuel G. Gaylord, and her grandmother, Mimi Seeley Gaylord. She tells how some of the rooms looked in the home of her grandmother. Mimi Seeley Gaylord. She tells, too, of her remembrance of the wedding of her uncle, Chauncey Gaylord, and also of seeing the railroad track and telegraph line when on a trip with her relatives to a place near Springfield, Illinois, where they went to look after the affairs following the death of her uncle, Morris Gaylord, from cholera. Nor does the cemetery where he was buried escape her memory. A herd of tame buffaloes made an inerasable impression on her mind on the same trip. The seeing of the Illinois River at Lacon by the little girl was an incident never to be forgotten. The death and burial of her sister, Francelia, and the coming of the baby sister, Leonora, at Lacon, form a sad and a sweet remembrance for Alice Ellen. She was given money by her father to buy the baby. The pulling of a tooth at Magnolia, Illinois, and the remark of Dr. Ashley afterwards, "Now you can ear candy," has never left the mind of the little one now grown to maturity and an elderly age.

As this writing chiefly concerns Alice Ellen (Gaylord) Moore and she was too small a child at the time to remember much of the tedious, long ox-train trip across the plains and mountains into Oregon, here will be ingrafted a copy of Orange Gaylord's notes in his diary of his second trip westward: (not copied)

A Mr. Haines bought the wagon used by Orange Gaylord and family when crossing the plains in 1853, soon after Orange Gaylord reached Oregon, and Haines and his family started therein for Southern Oregon. Somewhere in the Rogue River country the Haines family was murdered by the Indians and the wagon burned.

Now, for Alice Ellen Gaylord's, a child's, impressions on the long journey overland from Illinois to Oregon in 1853.

The travel from day to day was much of sameness to the little one and only the unusual happenings and sights were retained in her memory.

First she talks and tells of the bidding "goodbye" to the relatives remaining in Illinois, the aged Grandmother Gaylord in tears sitting at the window watching them out of sight. Most of the relatives left behind Alice Ellen has never since seen.

She recounts the breaking of the thigh bone of her little sister, Leonora (now Mrs. G. W. Hunt of Portland, Oregon), and subsequent care and attention of the little one, as follows: Before the train had passed out of the settlements and as the team was crossing over a bridge the lady occupants of the wagon alighted and were walking in order to better take in the view of that vicinity. The little Leonora thought she, too, must get out of the wagon as it was moving along and go with the others. In alighting she fell and the wheel of the wagon passed over the limb, breaking the thigh bone. A courier was sent back for a surgeon. He came, set the bone and gave instructions for the making and arrangement of a contrivance, or bed (a little box just large enough to hold the child, the injured limb having previously been encased in a smaller box), to swing from the bows of the wagon top. After this was prepared and the child made as comfortable as possible, the parents were ready to continue their journey. Alice Ellen tells how one lady would sit at the foot of the little bed and one at the head and prevent any swinging jars from the motion of the traveling wagon, day after day for weeks, and at night time, too, to administer to the wants of the child; how the lady watchers told of the lonely sound of the hooting of the owls one night among the wilds, and, finally, the timidity of the child to begin to use the limb after the proper time came for its use.

In the train was a young man by the name of George Coggan. One time he was cutting up and teasing the little Leonora. To him the child said, "Trying yourself, ain't you, dunce?" This was ever afterward a saying among the members of that train.

Alice Ellen tells of the crossing of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers on ferries. Oh, look and see the shrinking into itself of the child at the first sight of the Indians after crossing the Missouri River! Alice vividly recalls the same.

Alice Ellen tells of the frightening looks, to her, of the great, wide river, the South Platte, one and a half miles wide, that loomed in their way and that the teams must ford.

No more can Alice forget the first sight of the wild buffalo.

She recalls a remark made by Ped Raymond, one of the bright kids of the train, when the elders went buffalo hunting, "Now, there they come with a great big bag of buffalo for us to pick the feathers from," picking the feathers from the game evidently having been the task allotted to the children. Alice remembers seeing Chimney Rock and other natural rock monuments on the way, but her remembrance is so dim that she cannot give descriptions.

She recounts the ferrying of streams in their own wagon bed, the wagon bed having been made watertight for that purpose. She speaks of the descent of the steep mountains and tells of the tying of trees to drag back of the wagons to lessen the speed downward, but is unable to say whether this means was or was not followed by her father.

Alice remembers the train reaching Harlow Gate. And. at Foster's, Alice was pleasantly and life-long impressed with the beauties of a home, the house, the barn, the fences, the cows, the chickens, etc. The many weary months of camp life had prepared her to enjoy civilization once more.

Out toward the eastern part of Clackamas County, where the Willamette Valley proper begins to merge into the western foothills of the Cascade Range, is the little hamlet of Eagle Creek. It is located in a small prairie and is situated immediately where the old Barlow road finally left its tortuous course as it wound its way down the mountain and struck the lower levels of the promised land, toward which the weary immigrants of the 40's and 50's had been looking longingly for the full period of half a year.

Then came the life, for a short time, at Oregon City. While living at Oregon City, Alice frequently saw Dr. McLoughlin. The home of Dr. McLoughlin and the home of her parents in Oregon City were not separated by more than half a block. Alice also tells of Dr. McLoughlin's parrot. The parrot would hop from its perch and slide down the post, loudly screaming, "Oh, lordy, lordy, lordy!" as if in great distress.

After that followed the short period of life on Orange Gaylord's donation claim in the Fern Hills east of Oregon City and, in the midst of the homes of the relatives, Grandfather and Grandmother Stout and uncles and aunts.

From here the view of Mount Hood was an unceasing wonder to Alice Ellen. She talks and talks of its beauties and the cool wind always coming from its perpetual snows.

In Clackamas County, Oregon, Alice Ellen found another baby inmate of the home, her brother Clarence.

It seems that Orange Gaylord made up his mind, in the year 1855, to go southward to California and really did make a start. The three notes, as follows:

"October 28, 1855. Started to the forks of the Santiam. "November 4. Arrived at Peter Smith's. Stayed one night.

"November 5, 1855. Drove to E. Grimes' and moved into a log cabin near Mr. Randall's on Thomas Creek." -added to his diary of 1853, seems to tell that the Santiam marked a change in his ideas, for that was the end of the California trip.

The period among the relatives in and around Clackamas County was all too brief for Alice Ellen and her mind was soon to be carried farther along another pioneer trip, for her parents decided to go to and settle in the country near The Dalles, Oregon.

Her mode of traveling was by wagon as far as Portland. From Portland the Steamer Carrie Ladd carried her, her parents and sister and brother and the team to the Cascades. After leaving the Steamer Carrie Ladd at the Cascades, she and some of the members of the family crossed the portage by walking, while Orange Gaylord drove around the road with his team. A two night's camp was then made near the fort. Alice Ellen tells of the sweet bugle notes of the fort at daybreak. From here to The Dalles the passage was taken on the Steamer Hassalo.

Thus the little girl was given an opportunity of viewing some of nature's grandest scenery, the magnificent Columbia River, "America's greatest highway" of the present.

Now for the wagon again, just for a short ride, for the destination is to be, first, a camp at Three-Mile Creek, then a permanent stop for a while at Eight-mile Creek.

What an attraction, at Eight-Mile Creek, the beautiful hills covered with tall, waving grass were to Alice Ellen. But the pleasure of the attractive scenery on the mind of the child was marred somewhat by the appearance of the Indians in that vicinity. She was living among something that always caused a feeling of fear each time an Indian came near.

A brief period of time, two or two and a half years, passed on Eight-Mile Creek for Alice Ellen. Here she found another infant brother. Edwin.

It was while on Eight-Mile Creek that Alice Ellen's parents bought the Peter Williams farm in Southern Oregon and had decided to go thither on horseback. Alice Ellen must go, too, for there her life's destiny must be solved. This trip was of no little importance, for the Cascade Mountains must again be traveled across and also the 200 or more miles of road southward from Oregon City into the beautiful Looking Glass Valley of Douglas County, Oregon.

Years have passed, years that have seen Alice Ellen Gaylord grow from a little tot of seven summers, when crossing the plains, into the years of pioneer womanhood, and, now, in Looking Glass Valley, Douglas County, Oregon, on April 2, 1861, she becomes the wife of Edwin Marshall Moore and enters the 1858-built Moore home on the corner of Washington and Rose Streets, Roseburg, Oregon.

At this home, January 1, 1916, Alice Ellen (Gaylord) Moore, her husband and daughter are living.
[Source: Transactions of the Oregon Pioneer Association - Page 426, Oregon Pioneer Association - 1914]



Charles Greiner
Mr. Greiner is proud of the fact that he is one of the native born sons of Illinois, and that in him two nationalities are united, as his father, Charles Greiner, was born under the French flag, while his mother, Sophia (Ehmler) Greiner, was a native of Prussia. His paternal grandfather lived and died in France, and reared twelve children. The maternal grandfather of our subject emigrated to the United States many years ago, settling in Putnam county, Illinois, where he lived until his death, at the age of about threescore and ten years. Charles Greiner came to America to seek his fortune when he was a young man, and locating in Hennepin, engaged in the bakery and grocery business during most of his active life. He died in that section of the state in 1889, when in his seventieth year, and is survived by his widow, who is a resident of Hennepin. Of their eight children six are living, and all dwell in Putnam County save George W. They are named as follows: Anna, Charles, Jennie, Ida and Charlotte. Anna is the wife of W. E. Eddy; Jennie of John Markley; Ida of W. C. Patterson; and Charlotte of H. B. Zenor.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]



George W. Greiner

One of the young, energetic business men of Tonica, LaSalle County, is George W. Greiner, who is well along on the highway leading to fortune. A truly wide-awake, enterprising citizen, he is heart and soul alive to the progress and advancement of this place, and for that reason, if for no other, he would be highly esteemed by the residents of this thriving village

Mr. Greiner is proud of the fact that he is one of the native born sons of Illinois, and that in him two nationalities are united, as his father, Charles Greiner, was born under the French flag, while his mother, Sophia (Ehmler) Greiner, was a native of Prussia. His paternal grandfather lived and died in France, and reared twelve children. The maternal grandfather of our subject emigrated to the United States many years ago, settling in Putnam county, Illinois, where he lived until his death, at the age of about threescore and ten years. Charles Greiner came to America to seek his fortune when he was a young man, and locating in Hennepin, engaged in the bakery and grocery business during most of his active life. He died in that section of the state in 1889, when in his seventieth year, and is survived by his widow, who is a resident of Hennepin. Of their eight children six are living, and all dwell in Putnam County save George W. They are named as follows: Anna, Charles, Jennie, Ida and Charlotte. Anna is the wife of W. E. Eddy; Jennie of John Markley; Ida of W. C. Patterson; and Charlotte of H. B. Zenor.

The birth of George W. Greiner took place in Putnam county, July 18, 1869. The benefits of an excellent public school education were his, and after completing his studies he began clerking in a store. Thus occupied for several years, he gained a practical idea of business methods, and at the same time carefully accumulated a snug little capital, with which to embark in an enterprise of his own when the proper time came. In 1895 he came to Tonica and purchased the general store owned by the Miller estate, adding a meat market. He keeps a high grade of goods and transacts his business in a thoroughly enterprising manner, his store being neat and attractive.

Fraternally Mr. Greiner is a highly esteemed member of Tonica Lodge, No. 364, F. & A. M., at the present time enjoying the honor of being master of the lodge. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he is independent, preferring to use his franchise for the nominees and principles which he deems worthy of support, regardless of party lines. His fellow citizens, respecting his financial ability and excellent judgment, honored him with the position which he still holds, that of village treasurer.

The marriage of Mr. Greiner and Miss Irma Boyle took place November 28, 1890. She is a daughter of Albert and Frances (Hartenbower) Boyle. Three children bless the home of our subject and wife, their names being, respectively, Earl, Frances and Veryne.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]

 

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