Illinois Genealogy Trails

Saline County, IL
Biographies



Jesse Abney

Jesse Abney, farmer, was born in Brushy Precinct in 1832, the son of Joshua and Sarah (Stone) Abney. The father, born in Tennessee in 1807, was the son of William Abney, native of Tennessee, and who removed to Saline County about 1825, where he remained until his death. Joshua came at that time also, and in 1831 married and spent the remainder of his life in Brushy Precinct. He was a farmer, and a member of the Regular Baptist Church. The motherwas born in Virginia in 1812. In November, 1855, he married Mary, daughter of John and Mary Murphy, of Williamson County, and born in Saline County. Seven of their nine children are living: Nancy A., Patsey, wife of George Bonds; Eliza, Sallie, Lewis, Douglas and Joshua. His present farm is the old homestead he entered from the Government after his marriage. He is the owner of 420 acres ; and, besides owning a half interest in the drug store of Abney, Carr & Co., at Galatia, he is running a general store on his farm. His real estate in Galatia is also considerable. He is a Mason, and has been a life-long Democrat, first voting for Buchanan.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

John M. Baker

John M. Baker, president of the Harrisburg Bank, was born in Saline County in 1838, the son of James and Lucinda (Clayton) Baker. The father, German in origin, and born in Princeton, Ky., came to Saline County in 1832, one of the pioneer farmers of southern Illinois. Soon after he became one of the first merchants of Raleigh, and died in 1852. The mother, born in Princeton, Ky., after her husband's death married Dr. V. Rathbone, of Harrisburg, and is now a hale old lady of seventy two years. Our subject, the only child of his parents' family now living, received the pioneer schooling, and also graduated, in 1858, from the Commercial Business College of Cincinnati, Ohio. At fourteen he clerked for L. M. Riley for $50 per year, some of which he saved, and went to McLeansboro to school for a year. After a short time clerking for Wade, May & Co., at $15 a month, he went to Ewing and sold goods for Richeson & Carroll one year. The following year he clerked for H. M. & J. S. Williams, and the next six months for a clothing house in St. Louis. In 1857 he began clerking for Dr. Mitchell, at Harrisburg, and in 1859 started a general store at Whitesville. In 1861, while South, he was caught as a spy, but escaped, and, returning home, enlisted in Company K, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, as private, but was soon made adjutant in the Fifty-sixth Illinois Infantry. He fought at Corinth, and in several skirmishes. In the autumn of 1862 he was injured badly by his horse falling with him, and was honorably discharged at Kossuth, Miss. He at once began merchandising in Harrisburg, with great success. In 1869 he erected a large two-story building, 28x80 feet, at a cost of $3,000, and now has one of the best stocks in the city, employing five clerks. He also owns 1,000 acres of land, and has been president of the Harrisburg Bank ever since it was organized. November 8, 1865, he married Lizzie G. Evertson, born in Caseyville, Ky. Their six children are Nellie, Lulu, Evert C, John H., Willie M. and Mary. In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic order, since his majority; is special muster officer of the Department of Illinois, G. A. R., for sixteen counties, and inspector of nine counties, organizing posts, etc. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Louis Baker

Louis Baker, farmer, was born in 1853 in Perry County, Ohio, one of nine children of Phillip H. and Mary C. E. (Cline) Baker. The father was born about 1810 in Germany near the Rhine, and the mother about 1817. They were married, and about ten years later located near Zanesville, Ohio. The father bought a farm there, then in Jackson, then in Pike County, where he remained until 1866, when he settled on the farm now owned by Henry Baker, of Saline County, and where the father died in 1876 and the mother in 1884. With a common-school education our subject at twenty-three married and bought the farm on which his brother, Charles Baker, is now living, and in 1883 bought his present farm. His wife, Mary M., daughter of James and Jane (McMurrin) McIlrath, was born in 1855 in Saline County. Their four children are Ray, Lillie, Nellie and Pearl. He has acquired a finely improved farm of 280 acres. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Tilden. His father's death was caused by a runaway team on the road home from Harrisburg.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

William C. Baker

William C. Baker, farmer, was born in 1840 in Saline County, Ill., one of five children of George and Cynthia (Elder) Baker. The father, born in 1817 in Kentucky, and a farmer by occupation, was one of the earliest settlers of Saline County, where he bought 160 acres of land in one section, and soon moved to another section, where he bought eighty acres, on which he lived, and died in March, 1851. The mother, born in 1816 in Kentucky, is still living on the old homestead with her son, our subject. William C. was given common-school advantages, and through his life as a farmer he has become owner of 200 acres of a finely improved farm. In 1860 he married Clarinda J., daughter of Jerry and Mary A. Bishop, and born in 1840 in Saline County. She died in 1876. Their children are Adaline, deceased in 1882, aged twenty-one; Emeline, George, Milton, Eveline, Franklin and William. In June, 1876, he married Virginia, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Freeman, and born in 1855 in Kentucky. Their six children are Lemuel, Nellie, Carlin, Henry, Grover and Charles. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Tenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was engaged in the actions at Perryville, Ky., Stone River, Tenn., Atlanta, Resaca, Missionary Ridge and Kennesaw Mountain. In December, 1862, he was appointed sergeant, and June 8, 1865, was honorably discharged. In politics he is a Republican, first voting for Douglas. He is a member of the Baptist Church, of which his first wife was a member.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

John B. Berry

John B. Berry, farmer, was born in White County, Ill,, November 9, 1827. His father, John, Sr., formerly of Kentucky, when a young man settled in White County, and after a few years married Delia E. Bruce, born in South Carolina in June, 1808, and now living with our subject, one of her five children. The father, a shoemaker, but chiefly a farmer, died in White County, near Carmi, about 1831. Our subject, reared on a farm and with an ordinary education, he has been a farmer through life. In November, 1850, he married Rachael, daughter of Marville Hewlett, a farmer and formerly of Kentucky. Their nine children are William A., John M., Laura J., Mary E., Travis R., Alvis M., George F., James H. and Margaret A. Mrs. Berry was born in Saline County, Ill., January 23, 1832. Our subject is an old line Democrat, casting his first vote for Douglas. He has been county commissioner and township treasurer. Most of his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has a fine home of 460 acres east of Harrisburg.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

John M. Berry

John M. Berry, farmer, was born in Gallatin County, Ill., September 23, 1853, the son of John B. Berry.(see above) Reared on a farm, with a good education, our subject has since occasionally taught school, but made farming his chief business. September 23, 1875, he married Elizabeth A., daughter of Thomas D. Carnahan, a prominent farmer of Saline County and a native of Kentucky. She was born in Saline County, Ill., in November, 1855. Their children are Luella, Mary A., Arthur L. and Rosa Florence. Mr. Berry and his wife are members of the Baptist Church and his political views are Democratic. He has 110 acres, in Section 15, Cottage Grove Precinct, Saline County.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Bishop, James M.

James M. Bishop, postmaster, was born in Saline County, April 4, 1842, the son of William and Mary (Davis) Bishop, natives respectively of Tennessee and Virginia, and both in their eighty-fifth year. They have been among the esteemed citizens of Saline County for over a half century.
Reared to manhood on his father's farm, and with a common school training, our subject, in August, 1861, enlisted in Company E, Third Illinois Calvary, serving as bugler until the close of the war. He was wounded at Pea Ridge, and fought at Cotton Plant, Ark., Vicksburg, Jackson, then on to New Orleans, to Shreveport, La., on the Red River expedition under Gen. A. J. Smith at Memphis when Forrest raided there, and finally was mustered out at Springfield, Ill.
He then farmed near Eldorado until 1879 when he came to Ridgway where he has been engaged in selling agricultural implements. He is an un-swerving Democrat in politics, and for two years was constable. February 17, 1887, he was appointed to his present position of postmaster at Ridgway, by President Cleveland, and is giving satisfaction.
November 18, 1864, he married Eliza J. Margrave, a native of Saline County. Mr. Bishop is a Mason and a member of the G. A. R. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and among the best citizens of Ridgway.
[Source: p. 527, "History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson Counties, Illinois" (1887) - Tr. by Liz Spragg]

Bennett L. Blackman

Bennett L. Blackman, farmer, was born near Saline River, in Gallatin (now Saline) County, in 1841, one of two surviving children of John and Margaret (Empson) Blackman, for whose history see the biography of W. S. Blackman. Educated in the common schools of Saline County, our subject left home when seventeen and lived nearly two years with his uncle, Willis Russell. After raising a crop on the farm of G. W. Russell in 1861, he enlisted, in August, in Company B, Thirty-first Illinois Infantry, and served until May, 1862, when he was discharged on account of a relapse from the measles. He then returned to his mother's home and remained until 1863. He was married in the spring of that year, farming the old place, and finally, in October, moved to a sixty-acre tract given them by his wife's father. In 1880 he moved to an adjoining farm previously purchased in Section 25. His wife, Sarah A., daughter of James W. and Minerva J. (Arnold) Russell, was born in 1847 in the same section in which she is now living. Their six children are William A., John M., James M., Mary, Dora and Sarah J. Our subject also bought eighty acres, twenty acres of which he gave to his eldest son, and now has one of the best farms in the county, and is an extensive stock dealer. He is a Democrat, casting his first vote for McClellan. He is a deacon in the United Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Rev. William S. Blackman

Rev. William S. Blackman, a Baptist minister and farmer, was born in 1840, near Independence, Saline County. He is the elder of two surviving children born to John B. and Margaret (Empson) Blackman. His father was born of English ancestry in North Carolina about 1816, and his mother, also of English parentage, was born about one year later in Robertson County, Tenn, The former came with his parents to Illinois when but a small boy. About 1840 they moved from their original location, near Independence, to a new location near Equality, and about two years later to the Battles Ford farm on Saline River, where the father of our subject died about one year later. In 1852 his widow married W. A. Harris, for many years an officer in Gallatin County and later in Saline County. Mr. Harris, one of the most highly respected and prominent citizens of Saline County, died in 1877 on his farm, about two miles north of Carrier's Mills. Mrs. Harris is still living on the farm, in delicate health, though enjoying a happy religious life. The subject of this sketch received his education in the pioneer log-cabin schoolhouse, attending in all about thirteen months and having almost as many different teachers. Since then he has pursued his studies at home. He commenced the accumulation of property when fifteen years old by raising tobacco in vacant spots and fence corners, with the proceeds of which he bought a calf for $2.30. Soon after he bought a second calf for $4.50 on credit, which he paid by working at odd jobs. By the time he was nineteen he had accumulated property to the extent of one two-year-old colt and three two-year-old steers. With this stock he began farming on land rented from his uncle, Jerome W. Russell, where he remained but one year, when he began a second year's farming with his aunt, Catharine Abney. Soon after he left her farm he commenced working on his own farm of forty acres, which he had purchased for $90, which is a portion of his present farm, and during this year (1861) he pursued his studies in connection with his labors. About September 1, 1861, he began teaching, and taught for about one year, when he enlisted as a private soldier in Company F, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment Illinois Infantry, and served in the Union Army three years. He was in several severe battles, but was never wounded nor taken prisoner, and was discharged September 10, 1865, at Memphis, Tenn., where, February 14, 1865, he became a convert to the Christian religion. Upon returning home he taught a six months' term of school, farmed during the ensuing summer and taught again the next winter. In October, 1867, he married Miss Allie Miller, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Holmes) Miller, and continued farming summers and teaching winters until March, 1877. Just previous to his marriage he was licensed to preach by the New Salem Baptist Church, and June 30, 1872, he was licensed by the same church to the full work of the ministry. From September, 1873, to February, 1885, he continued preaching and during the same time was engaged in superintending his farm, and from the fall of 1877 to the fall of 1881 was county superintendent of schools. His preaching, conducted on the "once-a-month" plan, has resulted in many revivals which have been the means of many conversions. Since 1885 he has been almost continuously engaged in missionary work. Mrs. Blackman was born in 1847, and by her marriage with Mr. Blackman has had four children: John F., who died at the age of two months; Margaret Elizabeth, who died at the age of seventeen years ; William Lee, who died at the age of three years, and Carry Lavina, who died at the age of two months. Mr. Blackman is a good and industrious farmer, and has an excellent farm of 200 acres, one of the best cultivated in Saline County, and he has also been abundantly successful as a minister of the gospel. From September, 1885, to September, 1887, about 250 were converted under his preaching, and he baptized 207. He has organized and built up several churches; he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a Republican in politics, having cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. In 1880, being certain that Garfield would be elected, he cast the only Prohibition vote in the county. Mrs. Blackman is a member of the Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

William W. Bourland

William W. Bourland, farmer, was born in Kentucky January 6, 1824. His father, William, Sr., born in Alabama, when twenty-one, married Rachel, daughter of John Slaten, a farmer, and soon settled in Hopkins County, Ky. In 1828 he went to Gallatin, now Saline, County, Ill., and besides his farming was a brick and stone mason. The father was in the war of 1812, and died in the old homestead in 1861. The mother, born in Alabama, died while on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Moore, near Equality, in 1886. Our subject, one of fourteen children, and reared on a farm with ordinary education, has made farming his chief business. He served in the Mexican war seven months, and was discharged at Monterey, Mexico. In 1850 he married Nancy, daughter of Isaac Rude, a carpenter and a native of Pennsylvania. Their five children are William H., Isaac N., Mary C. (Reed), Martha W. and Mahulda A. Mrs. Bourland was born March 22, 1827, in Kentucky, and in 1847 came with her parents to Illinois. Isaac N. was born in Saline County April 20, 1855, reared and educated at the old home, and has adopted farming as his business in life. August 7, 1881, he married Alice, daughter of Thos. Scudamore, merchant and farmer. She was born August 3, 1856. Their only child is Elmer, born May 17, 1883. Isaac is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist Church. He has forty acres of land, devoted chiefly to cereals. Our subject, "William W., is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. He has a fine home of 120 acres seven miles east of Harrisburg.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Reuben Bramlet

Reuben Bramlet, farmer, was born within two miles of his present home, August 10, 1829. His father, Henry, a native of Virginia, came to Tennessee when a child, then to Kentucky, where he married, and in 1814 moved to Illinois Territory. His wife soon died and was the first buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. He then married Malinda, daughter of William Easley, a farmer formerly of Virginia. The Bramlets were among the early pioneers of the State. The father died in Eldorado, his home, during the war, and was buried at Bramlet Graveyard in Ealeigh Township. The mother died there about 1857. Our subject, one of ten children, reared on the farm with limited education, followed farming and stock dealing. In 1853 he married Mary E., daughter of Daniel McCoy, a farmer and a native of New Hampshire, but formerly of Ohio. She was born in Ohio February 13, 1836. Ten of their eleven children are living. Our subject is a Republican, a Mason and Odd Fellow. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He settled on his present fine farm and home in 1828. It is two miles west of Eldorado.

W. K. Burnett

W. K. Burnett, editor and publisher of the Harrishurg Mercury, is a native of Ealeigh, Saline Co., Ill., and was born in 1858. He is the son of Hon. Charles and Julia A. ( Karnes) Burnett. At the beginning of this century three brothers came from England to the United States One settled in the Eastern, one in the Middle and one in the Western States, and Charles is of the middle branch. He was born in 1835 in Saline County and was a lawyer. In April, 1856, he established the Raleigh Flag, at Raleigh, among one of the first papers published in the county. It was burned a year later. He studied law then under Capt. William H. Parish, now of Harrisburg, with whom he became a partner. September 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Tenth Regiment Illinois Infantry, and March 30, 1863, was made first lieutenant and discharged May 8 of the same year. He was in the battle of Stone Eiver and numerous skirmishes. He resumed his practice in Elizabethtown and in 1867 went to Shawneetown, where he died in March, 1871. His first wife, born in Raleigh, died in 1865. Their three children are Jennie, wife of W. S. Cantrell, State's attorney of Franklin County; Adele, wife of John F. Ammon, Raleigh station agent, and our subject. He afterward married Lizzie Wright, who lives in Shawneetown. Their one child is Charles. Mr. Burnett represented the Third District in the State Legislature of 1808-70. Dependent on himself since fourteen and with a public school education, our subject was, when eighteen, made deputy circuit clerk, and after three years was, in 1882, made deputy clerk in the county court, in which he served nearly four years. In November, 1885, he was made postmaster at Harrisburg, and about the same time he began the publication of his present paper, a live Democratic journal. In January, 1883, he married Emma, daughter of Peter and Mary Robinson, of Harrisburg, and born in Albany, N. Y. Mr. Burnett is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of H. and S. of V. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Joseph M. Butler

Joseph M. Butler, farmer, was born in Crittenden, Ky., November 29, 1844, and came with his parents to Illinois in 1862 and settled on the present homestead. His father, Armsted, born in Culpeper County, Va., January 28, 1815, came to Kentucky when fifteen, and when of age married Margaret, daughter of Geo. Green, a native of Virginia. Six of their eleven children are living. The father, a farmer, served several years as justice in Kentucky, and February 13, 1886, died at the old homestead and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery, near Eldorado. The mother, born in Kentucky, is now living in Saline County, seventy-two years old. A brother, J. J. was born in Crittenden County, Ky., September 3, 1851, and was eleven years old when they came to Illinois. March 26, 1881, he married, in Eldorado, Rena A., daughter of Maj. William Elder, one of the founders of Eldorado, born in Eldorado May 19, 1857.
Our subject raised on a farm and educated in the common schools and at Mount Zion Seminary, Macon Co., Ill., our subject was a teacher for a time before he settled to his permanent business of farming. At Raleigh, October 17, 1872, he married Louisa F., daughter of B. T. M. Pemberton, a merchant and tobacco dealer. She was born in Hamilton County, Ill., January 9, 1853. Their six children are Ida, Carrie, Lizzie, William F., Hallie and Mary K. Mr. Butler is a Republican, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Dr. S. L. Cheaney

Dr. S. Cheaney, physician and surgeon, was born in Henderson County, Ky., in 1836, the son of Henry M. and Martha (Hazelwood) Cheaney. The father, of English stock, was born in Virginia in 1802, and when eighteen went with his parents to Henderson County, Ky., where he remained until his death in 1847. The mother, of English origin, was born in Virginia in 1811, and died in 1840. Two of their children are living: Lucy F., wife of G. W. White, deputy sheriff and revenue collector of Henderson County for the past eighteen years, and our subject. The latter received an ordinary common-school training, and three years of private instruction under Rev. J. J. Pierce, a cousin of Franklin Pierce, and a graduate of Princeton College. When eighteen he began the study of medicine under Dr. Kimbly, of Owensburg, Ky. In 1858 he graduated from the medical department of Louisville University. He at once came to Saline County and located at Independence, where he entered upon his practice. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Third Illinois Cavalry, as private, and was soon examined before the State Board; having passed as No. 1, he became assistant surgeon of the Twenty-ninth Illinois Infantry, March 31, 1862. The following October 31 he became surgeon of the regiment and held the position for three years. He was at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Spanish Fort, Mobile and other places of less moment, and while in the South, in 1863, he met and married Buena Vista, daughter of J. M. McRee, of Jackson, Tenn., a cousin of President Polk. She was born in Eipley, Miss. Their children are Carrie, Jessie, Erichesen and Robert C. In January, 1866, he came to Harrisburg, and resumed his practice, and has for the past twenty years been one of the leading physicians of Saline County, with a most lucrative practice. He has the largest practice of any physician in Saline County, and has especial reputation as a skillful surgeon. He was a Republican at the begining of the war, but in the President Johnson impeachment trouble he became a Democrat, and a very prominent one. In 1876 he was a delegate to the National Convention which nominated S. J. Tilden. In 1878 he was elected to the State Senate, and served in the Thirty-first and Thirty- second Sessions, on the committees on education, finance, public charities, corporations, and others. He is a Master Mason, Odd Fellow, Knight of Honor, and a member of the G. A. R. He is president of the the County Medical Association, and holds the same position in the United States Pension Board.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

A. S. Clark

A. S. Clark, merchant and speculator at Raleigh, was born in Saline County, Ill., in 1854, one of seven children of St. Clair and Nancy (Davis) Clark. The father, born in 1820 in Blount County, Tenn., was a farmer and carpenter, and after his marriage settled in Saline County, III, where he died in 1854. The mother, born in 1826 in Blount County, died at Princeton, Ky., in 1872. After his common school education, our subject, in 1873, began four years of teaching. Since 1880 he has been in the tobacco trade, and since 1886 has been a merchant, carrying a stock of about $3,500, selling the lowest and paying the highest prices for tobacco and produce. Besides these, he carries on one of the finest stock farms in the county, owning 290 acres of fine cultivated land. In 1881 he married Nellie, daughter of T. J. and Elizabeth Hale, born in Saline County, 111., in 1865. Lawrence is one of their two children. In politics he is a Democrat, first voting for Tilden, and is one of the leading citizens. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

John Curtner

John Curtner, a farmer of Saline County, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) in 1835. He is one of seven children, five of whom are living, born to Duncan and Nancy (Harris) Curtner. The former was of Dutch-Scotch descent, and was born in Kentucky about 1806; the latter, who is of Dutch descent, was born a few years later, and both came with their respective parents to Illinois. Duncan Curtner was in the Black Hawk war, and soon after coming home from that war married and settled in Douglas Precinct, where he resided until after the birth of our subject, when he moved to the farm now owned by Newton Harris. Upon this farm he resided until his death in 1850. Mrs. Curtner is still living with her son, the subject of this sketch, who in his youth received a limited education in the common schools. At the age of twenty-five he married and settled on a farm situated in Section 32, Township 9, Range 5, where he is now residing. His wife was Abril Miller, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Holmes) Miller, who was born about 1843 in Gallatin (now Saline) County, and as the result of this marriage there are seven living children : Almira, Charley, Azariah, Lucy, Nancy Jane, William S. and John, Mr. Curtner is a farmer and now owns 300 acres. Our subject is a Prohibitionist in sentiment. He cast his first vote for President for James Buchanan. He is His two eldest children are members of the United Baptist Church..
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Robert H. Davis

Robert H. Davis, farmer, was born in 1824 in Wayne County, N. C, the youngest of ten children (three living) of William and Lavina (Hosey) Davis. The father, of English-Irish descent, born about 1765 in Georgia, left home at twenty-two, and went to North Carolina, where he married. When our subject was three years old they went to Union County, Ill., and engaged in farming, but in 1828 finally settled in Alexander County, where he died two years later. The mother, of English origin, born in North Carolina about 1775, then lived with her daughter, Mrs. Cross, in Union County, until her death about 1840. Our subject was, after his father's death, hired out to squatters to support the family until he was eighteen, when he married Hannah Hileman and settled on eighty acres in Union County. Two of their five children are living—Elizabeth, wife of W. Marshall, and Mary, wife of L. Pettinger. After his wife's death in 1852 he moved to Cape Girardeau County, Mo., where he bought a 100-acre woodland tract on the Mississippi River, near Hamburg Landing, and established a woodyard for furnishing fuel for steamboats. About a year and a quarter later he went to Pope County, Ill, and settled on 110 acres. In 1860 he married Susan, daughter of Howard and Juliet (Pierson) Gaskins, near Harrisburg. Their seven children are Levi; Harriett, wife of George Burnett; Juliet, wife of Augustus Bright; Ardenia, wife of John Smith; Florence, Delia and Warren E., and a boy and girl both deceased. In October, 1873, he traded his Pope County farm for his present farm of 110 acres. Formerly a Democrat, he has since 1860 been a Republican. He is also a Prohibitionist. In 1882 B. & Thomas Garner made him their manager for clearing and buying $7,000 worth of land. He has also loaned money for the Saline County Bank, with the same success in managing as he has shown in his other enterprises.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

A. W. Durham

A. W. Durham, mayor of Harrisburg, was born in Gallatin County (now Saline), Ill., in 1832, the son of Ira and Maria (Carter) Durham. The father, English in origin, was born in Warren County, Tenn., in 1804, and was a farmer, the son of James Durham, who was a native of Virginia, went to Middle Tennessee near the close of the eighteenth century. After his marriage, the father, Ira, came to Illinois in 1828, bringing his father with him, who died in 1835 at the age of seventy six. He settled on 160 acres, part of which is now owned by his son, I. P. Durham, and died there in 1870, one of the pioneers of southern Illinois, and especially of Saline County. The mother was born in 1806 in Tennessee, and died in 1863. Four of their eight children are living: William (a miller in Hardin County), our subject, Isom P. (at the old home), and Paradine (wife of David Lyon, who lived in Benton, Ill., a miller). Educated in the home private schools, and giving the proceeds of his farm labor to his parents until his nineteenth year, he then bought 160 acres of government land near the old home, and prepared himself a home. When twenty-three he began teaching, continuing four terms. In 1851 he married Melvina E., daughter of Rev. Achilles Coffee, born in Saline County, Ill. Their only child was Serilda, deceased wife of Marshall Dean. Mrs. Durham died in 1854, and in 1858 he married Margaret, daughter of Lewis Webb, of Franklin County. Their only child is Medora, wife of J. W. Dorris, merchant, Harrisburg. In 1858 our subject went to Allen County, Kas., entered a claim and resumed farming, but after three years returned to Harrisburg, and in 1862 lost his wife. In 1863 he was elected sheriff to fill a vacancy, and served one term. In 1870 he and J. Q. Norman established the Excelsior Hotel, but July 4, 1878, they removed to what is now Durham's Repose, and here keep a first-class house. Since March, 1886, he has held his present position as mayor. He owns four houses and six lots in the city, and for several years has been a carpenter. He also owns eighty acres of land. He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

EDWARD F. DWYER

Edward F. Dwyer, miller, of Dwyer Bros., dealers in wheat, corn, flour, meal, feed, etc.. was born in 1833 in Tipperary County, Ireland. He is the son of Edward and Hanora (Dwyer) Dwyer, born in Ireland in 1801 and 1802 respectively. The father, a civil engineer, railway and road contractor in connection with farming, went to Brantford, Canada., in 1848, and in 1854 came to Chicago, where he died the same year, and his wife resided there until her death in 1882. Seven children are living, four of whom are in Chicago and have families there. Educated in his native land, our subject worked on the farm, and in Canada in his father's shop, but at Chicago began the wheelwright and carpenter's trade. In 1863 he married Mary A., daughter of Edward Higgins, one of the first settlers of Chicago, where she was born. Their five children are Annie, Mary, Julia, Vincent and Emma. In 1864, with a brother, Thomas, he began merchandising in Cairo, and after fourteen months they moved to Crab Orchard, Ill., and added milling also. In 1873 Edward purchased a grist-mill in Harrisburg for $2,500, and in 1882 remodeled it at a cost of 10,000, with a combination of rollers and buhrs, and a capacity of seventy-five barrels daily. The brothers have been in partnership since 1864, and besides their mill at Crab Orchard, Thomas is one of the largest stock dealers in Williamson County. Edward lost his wife in 1875, and the following year married Emma Kline, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio. Their children are Katie, Edward L. and Grace. Mr. Dwyer is a skillful millwright and a leading business man. He is a Republican, and is a member of the A. 0. U. W. and S. K., also a member of the Catholic Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Gregory Jackson Empson

Gregory Jackson Empson, one of the oldest and most substantial farmers of Saline County, was born in Robertson County, Tenn., in 1828. He is the seventh of ten children—only three of whom are living—born to William and Elizabeth (Morris) Empson. The former was of English extraction, and was born in North Carolina in 1782, and the latter was of Scotch-Irish descent born also in North Carolina about 1784 They came to Tennessee when young, the former with his older brothers and sisters and the latter with her parents. They were married in Robertson County, that State, and when the subject of this sketch was but four years old they moved to what was then Gallatin County, now Saline, Section 9, Township 9, Range 5. Here William Empson was engaged in clearing and improving his farm until his wife's death about 1835, he continuing to live on the farm a few years, after which he lived with his children until his death in 1847. Our subject received most of his education in Tennessee. After his mother's death he returned to that State and attended school two years. After his father's death he soon settled on the farm situated in Section 4, Township 9, Range 5. In 1851 he was married to Julia Boatright, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Gasaway) Boatright. She was born in 1832 in what is now Saline County. She and Mr. Empson are the parents of eight children: William Jasper; Mary Ellen, wife of John Wilkins; M. D. Empson, a promising young physician and surgeon of Saline County; Drusilla, wife of Samuel Cozart; Harmon; Jerusha Ann, wife of Wiley Odum; Isaac Franklin and Margaret Belle. In September, 1861, Mr. Empson enlisted in Company F, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, and served until November 5, 1865. He was in the battles of Dyersburg, Hurricane Creek, Moscow Springs, Coffeeville, Meridian, Union Church, Nashville and many others of smaller note. At Union Church he was thrown from his horse, and this accident was the cause of a life long and burdensome rupture. While on the Griersou raid he was captured by the rebel forces and held in Libby prison until the following October, when he was exchanged. He received final discharge at Springfield, I11., but was mustered out at Selma, Ala., November 5, 1865. He was married the second time in October, 1882, to Roxanna Choat, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Angelina Harriet (Williams) Choat, of Robertson County, Tenn. She was born in that county in 1849. As a result of this marriage there are two children: Thomas Jefferson and Lillie Jackson. In 1880 Mr. Empson was elected sheriff of Saline County, and for two years thereafter resided in Harrisburg, at the close of his term of service declining a renomination. By untiring energy and industry he has converted his farm from a wilderness into one of the best farms in Saline County. It consists of 160 acres with an abundance of good water. He is always busily engaged in labor. Politically he is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Franklin Pierce in 1852. He is a member of Galatia Lodge, No. 354, F. & A. M. and of George Newell Post, No. 484, G. A. R. Mr. Empson, himself, is a professor of religion, and Mary E., Drusilla, Harmon, Jerusha A. and Isaac F. are members of the United Baptist Church. William is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. During the years 1877, 1878 and 1879 the subject of this sketch was assessor of Townships 7 8 and 9, Range 5, and was clerk of the Williamson Association of United Baptists for two years at the time of its organization.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

W. D. EZELL

W. D. Ezell, physician and surgeon, was born in Hamilton County, Ill., in 1860. He is one of nine children of Bailum and Nancy E. (Littlepage) Ezell. The father, born in 1823, in Hopkins County, Ky., and a farmer and stock raiser, moved to Hamilton County, Ill., in 1859, and bought his present old homestead of 120 acres, on which he still resides. His ancestors, as far back as his memory serves him, have been ministers of the Baptist Church, and he has followed in their footsteps for the last thirty years. The mother, born in Hopkins County, Ky., in 1827, is also still living on the old farm home. Our subject had an ordinary education and from 1879 taught school for three years. He then entered the medical college at Evansville, Ind., but after one term he entered and in 1885 graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Keokuk, Iowa. He has since had an extensive practice in Saline and Hamilton Counties. July 20, 1884, he married Orillia, the daughter of L. L. and S. M. Coffee, born in 1863, in Saline County, Ill. She is a granddaughter of Gen. Coffee. Politically our subject is a Democrat; his wife is a member of the Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

M. M. Fox

M. M. Fox, farmer and teacher, was born in 1858, in Caldwell, Ky., one of eight children of B. S. and Sarah C. (McChesney) Fox. The father, born in 1824, in Hopkins County, Ky., and by occupation a farmer, came to Saline County, Ill., in 1864, where he bought 120 acres of land, on which he now resides. He served as justice while in Kentucky, and in the late war as scout for the Federal Army. In September, 1847, he enlisted in Capt. Kohn's company. Fourth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry serving until near the close of the war, and honorably discharged on account of disability. The mother, born in 1832, in Caldwell County, Ky., is still living. Besides ordinary school advantages, our subject was educated at Ewing College, Franklin County, Ill., and Crescent Commercial College, Evansville, Ind. Since 1872 he has been among the first class teachers of the county. In his summer vacations, however, he is devoted to the cultivation of his farm of eighty acres. In 1880 he married M. M. Jones, the daughter of John and Margaret Jones, born in Saline County, in 1859. Their children are Nell, Edna and Ethel, He is a Eepublican, and he and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

William P. Furlong

William P. Furlong, farmer, was born in 1846 in Williamson County, Ill., one of seven children of Benjamin F. and Mary J. (White) Furlong, both of English origin, and born, the former about 1818 in Tennessee, and the latter about 1824. They came to Illinois when but children, and in 1840 were married in Williamson County. The father, a physician, practiced in Johnson County, then Williamson County, until about 1875, when he settled at his present home in Carrier Mills, Saline County. Our subject was educated in Marion, Williamson County, and at the Bloomington State Normal. At sixteen he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Tenth Illinois Infantry, and served until June, 1865, and was mustered out at Washington. He returned home from Chicago and farmed and began school. In 1870 he married Julia A., daughter of Elias and Melvina (Hampton) Weaver, and settled on a farm near his present home. In 1883 he traded for his present home in Section 24, Saline County. His wife was born in 1854, in Harrisburg Precinct. Their seven children are Franklin, Harvey, Walter, Elias (deceased). Pleasant, Robert and an infant boy. He owns 120 acres of improved land. His health is affected by his war hardships: a case of measles at Nashville, a wound in the calf at Jonesboro, and on the neck at Atlanta. He is a Republican and first voted for Grant in 1868. He is a Mason, Harrisburg Lodge, and a member of the G. A. R., George Newell Post, No. 454.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Thomas F. Gasaway

Thomas F. Gasaway, merchant and farmer, was born near Galatia in 1823, and is a son of Thomas and Nancy (Boatright) Gasaway. The father, born at Petersburg, Va., about 1786, was a son of John Gasaway, a native of Scotland, and who, having come to the United States when a boy, was seven years a soldier of the Revolution under Gen. Morgan, and afterward a resident of Tennessee. Thomas, Sr., was about twelve when they came to Tennessee, and about 1812 he married, and in 1816 became one of the earliest pioneers of what is now Saline County, and of this section of the State. He served about sixteen years as justice, and died in 1843. The mother was a native of Virginia, and died in 1854 at about the age of sixty-three years. Both were members of the Regular Baptist Church. Our subject was reared and educated at home, and in 1843 married Martha, daughter of John and Patsey Karnes, early pioneers of the county. She was born near Galatia in 1826. Four of their five children are living: William F., Americus, Melissa (wife of James M. Pugh, deceased) and Laura (wife of John Biby, of Cartersville, Williamson County). In 1874 our subject left the home farm, and has since been engaged in the grocery business in Galatia, He is a good business man, and before its division among his children he owned 420 acres of land, 100 acres of which he still retains near Galatia. He spent two years with Company E, Twenty-ninth Illinois Infantry, in every engagement from Belmont to Vicksburg. He was discharged on account of, disability in March, 1863. His son, William, was also in service two years, enlisting at sixteen in Company F, Sixth Illinois Cavalry. Formerly a Democrat, and first voting for Polk, our subject has since the war been a firm Republican.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Josiah Gold

Josiah Gold, superintendent of county poor, was born in Smith County, Tenn., in 1827, the son of Josiah, Sr., and Martha (Avery) Gold. The father, born in 1797 in Virginia, where he married, bought a farm in Wilson County, Tenn., where he lived until 1857 with the exception of a few years in Smith County. He then came to Saline County, near Raleigh, where he died about 1862. The mother, born in Virginia in 1796, died in 1876. Only two of their eleven children are living: Martha, wife of John Smith, and our subject, who lived at home until his majority, and was educated in the schools of Wilson County, Tenn. In 1851 he married Martha Tomlinson, born in Wilson County, Tenn. Their one child is Alice, wife of W. W. Woodson. In 1855 he settled near Raleigh as a farmer, and in 1855 bought 120 acres of land near Harrisburg, but sold out in 1875 and bought his present fifty acres. Since 1879 he has had charge of the public poor. He is a Republican, first voting for Taylor, and was for one term a magistrate in Harrisburg Precinct. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. From a poor man, by his careful management Mr. Gold has become owner of 370 acres of land.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Dr. Stephen C. Golden
Born 1811, died 20 Mar 1879. married Cynthia Ann Wollam 10 Sep 1855, Coles Co, Ill.
Children Geo W. and Stephen A.
Dr. golden
Practiced in Saline county in the 1850s- 1879

Contributed by ggg-grandson Robert Golden
ironwolf
at tds.net


J. H. Grace

J. H. Grace, of Gregg & Grace, druggists, was born in 1850, in Pope County, Ill., the son of D. B. and Mary J. (Jayner) Grace. The father, a native of Tennessee, at the age of eighteen came to Illinois and lived a few years in Hardin County, afterward locating near where Stone Fort now is, as a farmer. In 1857 he moved to Marion, Williamson County, and began milling and wool-carding. In 1862 he came to Harrisburg and followed the same business, and during the war speculated extensively in cotton. He died in 1882. The mother, a native of North Carolina, is living in Harrisburg, and is the mother of six children: Our subject, Nelia(wife of W. M. Gregg), Bryant D., Minnie (wife of L. D. Farthing), May and Eennie. Educated in the common schools, our subject began teaching at nineteen and so continued for ten years in Saline County, with the exception of one term in Gallatin. In 1879 he began clerking in W. P. Hallock's drug store, then after three years hired to Dr. Rathboue for whom he worked the following eighteen months, and then the same length of time at Mound City. In 1885 their present firm was formed. In 1871 he married Sarah Organ, a native of Wayne County, 111. Their only child is Paul. In politics he is a Republican, first voting for Grant in 1872. He is a member of the K. of H. and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

William M. Gregg

William M. Gregg, of Gregg & Grace, druggists, was born in Hamilton County in 1849, the son of Hugh and Stacy (Skelton) Gregg. The father, born in South Carolina, went to Hamilton County with his father, Francis, when a lad, pioneers of southern Illinois. Hugh was a farmer; in 1863 moved to Williamson County; in 1869 came to Harrisburg and died the same year. He was influential in his party, serving in both Houses of the Legislature from Hamilton County, and in the Lower House from Williamson County. He was married three times, and was father of thirteen children. His second wife, Stacy (Skelton), was a native of Virginia, and died in 1861, at the age of forty years. Three children lived to maturity. James M., one of the children, was a prominent criminal lawyer in southern Illinois, and died in June 1886. Emily C. is the wife of Mr. Jenkins. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and when nineteen began clerking in a dry goods store for two years. In 1870 he was appointed deputy clerk of circuit court, and six months later he became deputy county clerk and served five years. In 1880 he was appointed master of chancery and served two and a half years. In August, 1882, he was appointed sheriff of Saline County, to fill an unexpired term, and in November was elected, serving four years. In 1885 he and his brotherin- law, J. H. Grace, formed a partnership in the drug business, in which they are succeeding finely. August 22, 1873, he married Nelia, daughter of D. B. Grace, a native of Saline County, Their children are Thomas and Roy. He is a Knight of Honor and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

James Gore

James Gore, farmer, was born in 1838 in Hopkins County, Ky., one of ten children of James, Sr., and Regina (Trayler) Gore. The father, born in 1788, in Virginia, and a farmer by occupation, became one of the earliest settlers of Kentucky. He owned 200 acres where he spent his life and died in 1852. The mother, born in South Carolina in 1798, died in Kentucky in 1875. Our subject was educated in Hopkins County schools in Kentucky, and since 1863 has been a farmer of Saline County. December 14, 1859, he was married to Martha, daughter of John and Cynthia Leech, born in 1838 in Caldwell County, Ky. Their nine children are James A., Ida M., John W., Henry E., Charles H., Elmer, Hattie A., Ada and Lillian. In 1864 he enlisted in Company I, Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry for the war and was honorably discharged in October, 1865. In politics he is a Republican, first voting for Bell. He is a member of the G. A. R. Albert Gore, his son, is a teacher by profession, and was born in 1860, in Hopkins County, Ky. He is one of the foremost teachers of the county, and has been since 1879. He also owns forty acres of fine land. He is a Republican and first voted for Blaine.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

W. H. Hall

W. H. Hall, proprietor of the Galatia Hotel, United States claim and insurance agent, and justice of the peace, was born near Galatia in Saline County in 1835, one of twelve children, of William and Sarah (Currey) Hall. The father, of Irish stock, was born near Raleigh, N. C, in 1792, and when a young man moved to Rutherford County, Tenn. He farmed with his father, and in 1816 moved to Gallatin (now Saline) County, Ill., and entered 200 acres of government land, living there until his death in 1858. The mother, Irish in lineage, born near Richmond, Va., in 1795, moved to Tennessee when she was a child. She died in 1870 in Saline County. Our subject began for himself when he was twenty years old, unable to read or write, but by hard study he secured a good business education. He entered eighty acres of government land and continued farming until 1883, when he moved to Galatia. In 1885 he bought his present hotel, and in 1856 married Elizabeth, daughter of William and Perneacy Blakely. She was born in 1837 in Hardin County, Ill. Three of seven children are living: Nancy A., wife of John Bozarth; Mary J., wife of Chas. H. Lamb, and Randall P., in school. He is a Democrat and has been justice for the precinct of his birth for twenty-seven years. His wife is a member of the Regular Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Otto Heinmann

Otto Heinmann, butcher and ice dealer of Harrisburg, was born in Prussia, July 4, 1842, the son of Henry and Catherine Heinmann, natives of Prussia and both deceased. The father was a cooper by trade. Six of their nine children are living. Our subject, the seventh, attended his home schools until fifteen, when he was taken into military service, serving two years in infantry and four years in cavalry. In 1868 he came to the United States and located at Belleville, Ill., where he established a butcher shop. In 1871 he married Lizzie Weisenboern, a native of Belleville. Their children are Mollie, Earnest, Minnie, Tillie and Lillie. In 1872 he came to Harrisburg and resumed butchering. He averages about 150 cattle, the same number of hogs and about fifteen sheep annually. In 1881 he began dealing in ice, and in 1884 became agent for keg and bottle beer and soda water of all kinds. He now owns seven acres of land in Harrisburg, and eight houses and lots. He is a Republican, a member of the A. O. U. W. and Select Knights, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Prof. N. B. Hodsdon

Prof. N. B. Hodsdon, of the Galatia schools, was born in Bethel, Me., in 1883, one of eight children of James and Esther (Bartlett) Hodsdon. The father, of English origin, and born in Oxford County, Me., was a farmer, and a soldier in the war of 1812 about two years. In 1854 he died in Greenwood, Me., and the mother, likewise of English origin and born in Bethel, died in Grey, Me., in 1856. Our subject was educated in the State Normal School near Boston, and at twenty had engaged with a railroad for four years. He also attended an academic school about one year before his normal course, which occupied two years. In 1858 he took charge of the Carmi (Ill.) schools, and in four years resigned to enlist in Company F, Eighty -seventh Illinois Infantry. After a year as second lieutenant, he was made first lieutenant, and so continued through the war. He was in the siege and capture of Vicksburg, and on the Red River expedition. After his return to Maine to regain his health, he continued teaching, and in 1874 resumed charge of the Carmi schools. After four years he became principal of the Metropolis (Ill.) schools, and was then principal of the Metropolis Collegiate Institute. After four years he became superintendent of the Efiingham schools for two years. He was principal of the Harrisburg schools for two years before he took his present position. In 1861 he married Mary F., daughter of Daniel and Harriett Choplin, and born in Waterford, Me. She died in 1874, and in 1876 he married Flora, daughter of Dr. Pollard, and born in Evansville, Ind. Their only child is Mary Daisy, born at Metropolis, January 9, 1881. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Republican, a Mason, and a comrade of the G. A. R.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

D. N. S. Hudson

D. N. S. Hudson, physician and surgeon, was born in Corydon, Ind., in 1844. He is the son of James E. and Margaret (Reynolds) Hudson. The father, of Scotch-Irish origin, was born in 1807, in Kentucky. He was a blacksmith, and at the time of his marriage lived at Corydon, where his life was spent from his fourth year. The mother, of German origin, and born in Norfolk, Va., died in 1870. Seven of their nine children are living. Our subject, just from the Corydon High School enlisted, in April, 1861, in Company C, Seventeenth Eegiment Volunteer Infantry, for three months, but was mustered in for three years. His was the first company organized in the county. He fought at Greenbrier, Corinth, Hover's Gap (Tenn. ), Chickamauga, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Stone Mountain, Jonesboro, Selma (Ala.), Macon, Shiloh, and numerous severe skirmishes. He was captured at Silver Springs,Tenn., but was retained but three days, and paroled. He remained in service until peace was declared, in September, 1865. He began attending school at home, and also commenced the study of medicine. He began teaching in 1866, continuing for three years. In 1868 he entered the medical department of Louisville University, and graduated in 1886, in the meantime practicing at Marion, Ill, from 1870, and in Harrisburg from 1879, where he is one of the leading physicians. In 1879 he became secretary of the United States Pension Examining Board. In July, 1870, he married Mary T. Sherertz, a native of East Tennessee. Their five children are Hortense L., Eva L., James S., Maud L. and Eubie. His wife died in February, 1885. Dr. Hudson is secretary of the Saline County Medical Association. He is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F. (in all degrees), A. O. U. W. and K. of H., and is politically a Republican. He married his second wife on the 25th of May, 1887. She was the widow of Almus Damron,.late State's attorney of Johnson County, and the daughter of Hon. A. J. Kuykendall, ex-member of Congress, who also served four terms in the State Senate since his service in Congress.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Prof. James E. Jobe

Prof. James E. Jobe, county superintendent of Saline County schools, was born in Boone County, Ind., February 19, 1856, the son of Lafayette J. and Martha E. (Blake) Jobe. The father, of English ancestry, and born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1829, was a carpenter by trade. The grandfather, William, a native of Virginia, in 1824 settled in Putnam County, Ind., afterward in Hendricks County, and in 1875 moved to Nebraska, where he died in his eighty-ninth year. The father, Lafayette, was living in Putnam County, where he married. Afterward he was in Hendricks and Boone Counties, and in 1872 moved to Indianapolis, Ind. He came to Harrisburg Township in 1873, where he was accidentally killed, in 1877, by a falling timber at the erection of a saw mill. He enlisted in Company F, Tenth Regular Indiana Volunteers, and afterward was transferred to the Fifty-sixth Regiment. He was at Lookout Mountain, and Atlanta, where an injury from a fall off a high bluff necessitated the use of crutches three years. The mother, born in Salem County, N. C., lived in Boone County, Ind., after three years of age, and is yet living. Her four children are William T., a carpenter; James E. ; Belle, wife of James Lyon, and Albert. Our subject graduated from Zionsville Academy, in Boone County, Ind., in 1871. In 1873 he came to Saline County with his parents, and at nineteen began teaching, and since 1875 has been teaching continuously in Saline County in 1878 at Galatia. In 1886 the Republican party elected him to his present position—a four years' term. September 30, 1875, he married Mollie, daughter of Rev. W. C. Bickers, of Saline County, and born there in 1856. Their two children are Claude and Carl. He is a member of the F. & A. M., L O. O. F., A. O. U. W. and S. of V. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

George Johnson

[My great, great grandfather by ? Brown - Submitted by Bob Walden]

Dan and my dad told many stories about the Johnsons. George Johnson was born in Holland. He came over as a "bound" boy with his master. That means his master paid his fare from Holland and that George would repay him, either in cash or in years of labor. It was a common way for someone without funds to get to the new world. Dan and my dad always referred to George as "a real Dutchman from Holland". George Johnson is said to have lived for 110 years.
He fought with the Swamp Fox (General Francis Marion) in the War for Independence. In 1782, shortly before the end of the Revolutionary War, he married. He gave his wife a wedding present of a grease lamp that is still in our family.
George probably received his land in Illinois through the Second or 1807 Land Lottery of Georgia. Since the government had no funds to pay soldiers for their service, lotteries were held to give title to land in the west. His son, Emanuel, was born in Illinois in 1811, so George left Alabama soon after the lottery.
Dan and Dad said that George raised his family near Harrisburg, Illinois. He had many sons and three daughters, all of whom lived to be over 65 years of age, except for one who died of "brain fever". George had 320 acres on wheat land in one place and 160 acres on Hogs Creek,. When the family left Harrisburg, he sold the 160 acres for $125 and , "thought he really skinned the buyer."
The first official record we find of George Johnson in Illinois is the 1820 Federal Census for Gallatin County, Saline Township Illinois. That same year, George signed a replevy bond on November 29, 1820. His sons' names and possibly his brothers' names are found on numerous official documents.
George had 24 persons living on his property who were "engaged in manufacture". The township was called Saline because of the salt wells in the area, and it is probable that he was engaged in the manufacture of salt. The 24 persons who were living on his property could have been leased slaves. It was illegal for anyone to own a slave in Illinois, however it was not illegal to lease them.
Twenty years later, in the 1840 Federal census, George Johnson and his wife were the only people listed for this household. They were still living in Saline Township. It is interesting to note that they were living next door to George Waggoner. This is important to us because Emanuel Johnson (my great grandfather) married Manerva Waggoner. Family history tell us that he was from Germany, that he married and divorced and never remarried. Whenever his name came up, Dan would say, "He was a mean old man." The families of both the Waggoners and the Johnsons were gone by this time. Manerva Waggoner and Emanuel Johnson were already married.
We know that Emanuel and Manerva lived in Saline County, Raleigh township from at least 1850 through 1865 because they are listed in census reports for those years. They had 11 children, the youngest being Emily McQueen (my grandmother).
Manerva told her grandchildren many stories about the years in Illinois. One of the stories was about when she and Emanuel were just married and they had set out to "prove up" on some land.
Building a cabin was hard work. They built a one-room cabin with a fireplace made of mud and sticks. Manerva mixed mud to use as "chinking" between the logs so the wind wouldn't blow through. Emanuel heated and bent some iron to make a long hook for the iron kettle and fixed it so it could be swung over the fire or out into the room. Their bed was a pallet stuffed with straw laid on the floor against the wall opposite the fireplace. Emanuel made a hand-hewn wooden table for their meals. Initially, upturned log sections were their chairs.
Planting crops for food and for money was as important as getting a roof over their heads. If they were to survive, they had to do both jobs at the same time. This meant that they worked outside from "can to can't", meaning they worked from the time they could see in the morning until they couldn't see that night. Then they worked inside by lantern light until they couldn't stay awake any longer.
One night Emanuel came in to the cabin at dusk. He had been getting a field ready to plant. He hung his rifle on the pegs over the door only to turn and find Manerva in tears. He finally calmed her enough so that she could tell him that she was crying because she was hungry for meat. It had been weeks since they had eaten meat. "I'm so sorry, she cried.
Emanuel turned on his heel, took his rifle off its pegs, and started out into the woods. He hadn't gone a hundred steps before Manerva heard a shot fired. Emanuel always laughed at this story because he said, "I had just cut its throat and started to gut it and looked up and there was Manerva with a bowl in her hand, ready for the liver." Manerva said, "nothing I've ever eaten has tasted so good!"
She told another story about a time when Emanuel built a pigpen a little way downhill from the cabin. He used a big oak tree to serve as one of the four corners to the pen because it would provide shade from the hot summer sun. The Lord had blessed them with about ten shoats-young pigs. It looked like they were going to be able to have meat for this coming winter and enough extras to sell for cash money.
It was about the middle of the morning and Manerva was working in the kitchen. Emanuel was plowing a field on the other side of the ridge from the house and the pigpen. Suddenly, the pigs began to squeal. Manerva ran down to the pigpen to see what had happened to them. When she arrived, the shoats all quieted down and went back to eating. She looked over the pen. She thought it might have been a snake, but remembered that pigs would kill and eat any snake that got into their pen. After waiting a while and looking all around the pen, she was satisfied that whatever it had been was now gone. She took one last look around and went back up to the cabin.
Just as she closed the door, the pigs started squealing again, just as bad as before. Puzzled, she retraced her steps, taking time to look all around inside the pen as she walked. Just as they had done before, the pigs settled down when she arrived at the pen. It didn't make any sense at all. Manerva leaned over the top rail of the pen just to be sure she hadn't missed seeing something inside the pen.
This time she slowly backed up the hill toward the house, keeping the pen in view. Everything was quiet. She stopped walking and watched. Nothing happened. She turned to walk on and one of the pigs started to squeal. Mystified, she started to walk slowly back down toward the pen. She took five steps and the pig stopped squealing. There was nothing in the pen and nothing around the pen.
Then she saw it! First she thought it was a snake hanging down from the limb over the pen, just hanging there. Then she saw it move, or twitch. It moved slowly back and forth, back and forth. When she moved to get a better view, she saw the whole thing; the "snake" was the tip of the tail for a cougar, crouched on the branch of the tree. It was watching every move she made and eyeing the pigs hungrily. She had been within five feet of the big cat when she was standing at the rail a few minutes ago! The hair stood straight up on the back of her neck. Not only had she been in great danger, she knew it would kill every one of those ten shoats!
The panther was focused upon her now, seemingly calculating its chances of killing her. He was a big cat, probably 200 pounds and she was just as helpless as the little pigs. She stooped down and picked up a big stick and waved it at him, yelling and making a noise just as Emanuel had told her to do if a big cat ever threatened her. The cat began to inch out a little farther on the big limb in her direction.
Alarmed, she began to wave the stick more violently and screamed at the top of her lungs, "Emanuel! Help! Emanuel!" as she slowly backed up toward the crest of the hill that separated her from her husband. She knew that if Emanuel hadn't heard the screaming pigs., he could not possibly hear her. Her heart sank.
She knew she mustn't turn and run; that was the worst thing she could do. To run away from a panther or a bear was an open invitation for them to chase and kill you. Then the cat crouched down on the limb, ready to jump and chase her. She prayed that the Lord would help her. "Lord, please bring Emanuel," she prayed. "Emanuel!" she screamed again.
Just then she heard the sound of running footsteps, beating the ground as they came nearer. The cat looked beyond her toward the top of the hill. As the footsteps drew near, the big cat jumped lightly from the limb to the ground and disappeared into the trees just as Emanuel ran to her side with his rifle in his hands.
She pointed to where the panther had disappeared into the woods. "I saw him," Emanuel panted. "I got here just as fast as I could." She grabbed him around the neck and hung on to him. Then she began to shake. She was shaking like a leaf.
"You heard me calling?" she asked.
"Well, yes, in a way. I was plowing almost down at the bottom of the field and something made me stop and listen. It wasn't that I heard something and then stopped and listened; something made me stop and listen and then I heard you call my name."
Manerva smiled even while she was shaking. "I asked the Lord to bring you," she said. "I guess He's got a louder yell than me." Emanuel gave her his rifle, then picked her up in his arms and carried her to the house, and sat her on the step to the new porch he was building.
Emanuel rubbed his chin. "I reckon that it was the rifle he was afraid of. He knew that if I'd gotten a few yards closer with old Bessie, he'd have been a goner."
Emanuel and Manerva probably moved from Illinois to Bakersfield, Missouri in 1871. Emanuel started selling parcels of his land in 1869. In 1870 he sold another parcel, and finally, in May of 1871 he sold the last parcel.
Manerva told one story about crossing the Mississippi River en route to Missouri. They crossed on a barge. One of the other passengers had a wagon with a catfish in it. The nose of the catfish touched the rear of the wagon and the tail of the catfish curled up under the seat of the wagon, almost touching it.
In Bakersfield, the Johnson's were strong supporters of the Baptist Church. Emanuel's was the first burial in Baptist Hill Cemetery (called Bridges Creek Baptist Church). His gravestone shows that he was born November 12, 1810 and died July 20, 1887. Manerva lived four more years. Her headstone shows, born September 24, 1816 and died June 22, 1901. Her stone shows a hand with the first finger pointing to Heavin and the words, "Gone Home" above the finger.


John J. Jones

John J. Jones, farmer, was born in Williamson County, Ill., July 21, 1836. His father, William C, formerly of Alabama, came to Saline County about 1824, where in 1826 he married Eliza J., daughter of William Burnett, a blacksmith and farmer. She was born in Tennessee June 16, 1807, and died February 7, 1880, in Hamilton County, Ill., buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Raleigh. The youngest of their children, and losing his father when but a child, our subject received but a limited education, and has made farming his chief business. In 1862 he became deputy sheriff at Harrisburg, and afterward served two terms as sheriff, elected in 1864 and 1874, For three years he was also police magistrate, and although defeated as a candidate for the Legislature by Jas. Macklin, he ran ahead of his ticket. Since 1877 he has lived at his present home. November 6, 1860 he married Emeline S. Burkhart at Kaleigh. Their four children are Annetta M., Richard, Grant and May. His wife was born January 31, 1842, in Saline County, and died May 24, 1869, at Harrisburg. November 28, 1872, he married Louisa E., daughter of Armsted Butler, a farmer. Three of four children are living: Maud, John J. and Garfield. His wife was born in Kentucky, January 4, 1849, and died at his present home October 22, 1884. Our subject is a Republican, a Mason and an Odd Fellow. In his religious views he is liberal. He has a fine cereal farm of 135 acres just west of Eldorado.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Thomas A. Jones

Thomas A. Jones was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1825, the son of Wiley and Polly W. (Johnson) Jones. The father, Welsh and English in origin, was born in 1799 in Davidson County, Tenn., and came with his father to his beautiful tract of land near Lebanon, in Wilson County, when he was a boy. He married in 1822 and afterward bought part of the old place; then, in 1831, with one horse and a small yoke of steers he brought his family to Saline County, Ill., and bought 120 acres of good land unimproved, and afterward eighty acres more near Raleigh, of one of the earliest settlers. He was constable for about three years and for twelve years justice of the peace. He died in 1883. The mother, of Scotch and English origin, was born in 1806, in North Carolina, and went to Tennessee when but four years old. She died in 1860. Thirteen of their sixteen children are living. Our subject had some pioneer school education, but the most he secured himself by a brush fire at night after working hard all day. The last school he attended was of the puncheon-floor and slab-seat order. When twenty he became a teacher and taught eight terms in Saline and Hamilton Counties, during which time he was deputy surveyor of Saline County for two years. In 1859 he was appointed deputy circuit clerk, serving two years, and in 1860 elected circuit clerk and served four years. In 1865, after he took the State census of Saline County, he was elected county clerk and re-elected in 1869. For several years he was drainage commissioner of Saline County. At the close of his official life his health gave way and he has been engaged chiefly in looking after his business and real estate interests and trading. In 1864 he married Julia E. Clayton, native of Morgan County, Ill. Their seven children are James W., Mollie E., Lionia, Laura B., Lula, Edward E. and Florence. Mr. Jones owns 200 acres and three houses and lots in Harrisburg. He is a Democrat, first voting for Lewis Cass, and is a member of the F. & A. M. and United Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

A. Karnes

A. Karnes, farmer, was born in Saline County, Ill., in 1839, one of twelve children of George and Mary A. Karnes. The father, born in Tennessee in 1807, and one of the earliest settlers of Saline County, was the owner of 320 acres of land there on which he died in 1883. The mother, born in 1819 in Saline County, died in 1864. Our subject was reared and educated in the Saline County schools, and has become the owner of a farm of 110 acres. In 1866 he married Harriett, daughter of Joshua and Emily Pemberton, born in 1844: in Wilson County, Tenn. Their children are Tina, Julia A., Josephine, Thos. F., Leuce, Jeffie, Effie and Martha. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and a Holly Springs, Miss., where he was captured in 1863. After this he went on the gunboat "Tyler," and two months later was sent to Cairo, where he remained until the close of his enlistment. He is a Republican.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

J. G. Karnes

J. G. Karnes, farmer and stock dealer, was born two miles west of Galatia, Ill., in Missouri in 1837. He is one of twelve children of John and Delila (McElyea) Karnes. The father, of Dutch descent, born in Saline County about 1812, was a farmer, and a soldier in the Mexican war. He died in Arkansas in 1857. The mother, also of Dutch origin, was born in Franklin County, Ill., about 1811, and is now living with her daughter in Saline County. Our subject, with but little education, received in Arkansas, began business at fifteen years of age, at farm work. He located near Raleigh where he worked ten years and in 1861 joined Company E, Third Illinois Cavalry, and was at the battle of Pea Ridge, Ark. After three years' service he resumed farming in Saline County. In 1861 he married Margaret, daughter of Squire and Sarah Chenault, born in Saline County, Ill., in 1845. Their nine children are Hannah L. (wife of S. Bond), Mary F., Robert, David (deceased), Willie (deceased), Joseph P., Thomas, Alice V. and Annie G. Mr. Karnes is a Republican. His wife and eldest daughter, Hannah, are members of the Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Rev. M. B. Kelly

Rev. M. B. Kelly was born in Clark County, Ind., April 18, 1817, one of nine children of Abraham and Hanorah (Bartley) Kelly natives of Pennsylvania. The former was born May 22, 1777, and the latter May 21, 1782. The father, a farmer, was in the war of 1812, the mother was a sister to Gov. Mordecai Bartley, of Ohio. They both died in Ohio, the father in 1822 and the mother in 1831. Our subject, receiving a common school education in his youth, came to Illinois in 1836. On the 9th of August, 1838, he was united in marriage to Miss Nancy L., daughter of Joshua and Mary Joyner, of Gallatin County, Ill. In 1846 he was ordained to the work of the gospel ministry, and spent many years as a Pioneer Baptist Missionary, traveling extensively over more than twenty counties of southern Illinois ; was settled two years as missionary pastor in Chester, under appointment of the American Baptist Home Missionary Society, also labored in 1855-56 as a missionary in Cairo. In 1869, having changed his views in regard to the Sabbath, he identified himself with the Seventh Day Baptists, organizing a church of that faith in the vicinity of Villa Ridge, Ill., where he then resided. He still continues, though now in his seventy-first year, to perform the duties of his office. He and his wife have had ten children, the eldest of whom died in the service of his country in the late war. The next to the youngest, M. B., is preparing for the ministry at Alfred University in New York. At the commencement of the war of the Rebellion, Mr. Kelly responded to the first call for volunteers, and was mustered into the Eighteenth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, May 19, 1861, at Anna, Union Co., Ill., by Capt. (afterward Gen.) U. S. Grant, he having been sent down by Gov. Yates for purpose of mustering said regiment. Mr. Kelly was mustered in as second lieutenant. Ten days later the regiment was mustered into the three years' service, at which time he was promoted to first lieutenant. In the battle of Fort Donelson and Shilob his regiment was in the thickest of the fight, in the latter of which he had command of his company. After being thus engaged for eight hours, he was carried from the field, severely wounded in the abdomen and hand. Four mouths later, feeling physically unable to resume his place with his company, he felt it his duty to resign, when the officers of his regiment with great unanimity elected him chaplain, which office he continued to hold till the close of the service. In politics Mr. Kelly has always been a Republican, having been one of eleven who, in the face of threatenings and hisses, voted in Cairo in 1856 for Fremont and Dayton; he is also an uncompromising Prohibitionist, and abhors the use of tobacco in all of its forms.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

WiLLIAM M. KITTINGER

William M. Kittinger, farmer, was born in Virginia, in 1843, one of eight children of Abraham and Mary C. (Shaver) Kittinger. The father, born in 1817 in Virginia, came in 1853 to Saline County, Ill., and bought eighty acres of land on which he lived and died in 1873. The mother, born in 1818 in Virginia, died in Saline County, Ill., in 1874 Our subject was reared at home and had common-school advantages, and since his manhood has become owner of 120 acres of land. In 1863 he married Susan C, daughter of Jason and Susanna Martin, born in 1844 in Hamilton County, Ill. Their eight children are Emma G., Mary C, Charles, William V., Elnora, Gertrude, Melvina and Sarah F. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, First Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, and was actively engaged at Lexington, Mo. , where he was taken prisoner, and then paroled and sent home, being honorably discharged July 20, 1862. In politics he is a Democrat. He and his wife are members of the Social Brethren Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Henry Van Dyke

Henry Van Dyke
Henry Van Dyke, brick molder born in 1840 in Jefferson Co., Ohio. His father was Joseph Van Dyke, mother unknown. He served in the 2nd and 3rd Ohio Infantry and was wounded at the battle of Reseca. On July 10, 1864, in New Albany, Indiana he married Isabelle Russell; they moved to Saline or Williamson county about 1884. Their 7 children who survived to adulthood were; Thomas Henry Van Dyke, b. March 31, 1865; Charles Bird Van Dyke, b. Jan 12, 1871; Ella May Van Dyke, b. May 1, 1874; Viola Belle Van Dyke, b. April 30, 1876; Twins, Clarence Joseph and Clara Jane Van Dyke, b. April 4, 1881; and Daisy Catherine Van Dyke, b. Jan 5, 1883. His wife, Isabelle died about 1887; his second wife was Mrs. Serena Evetts of Saline County. He died in St. Louis on Feb. 11, 1931 at the home of his daughter, Ella, and is buried in Stonefort, Illinois. He was 90 years, 11 months old.
submitted by Sharon Bradshaw Hampton
Source: National Archives

J. S. Lewis

J. S. Lewis, M. D., an office practicing physician and surgeon, and prominent farmer of Douglas Precinct, of Saline County, was born in 1851 in Crittenden County, Ky. He is the eldest of five children, three of whom are living, born to George L. and Amy E. (Weldon) Lewis. The former is of German descent and was born in Pope County, Ill., in 1829, and the latter of English origin, and was born in Coit County, Ky., in 1830. They were married in Crittenden County, Ky., and resided there a number of years, when they removed to Illinois and settled on a farm in Pope County, where they still reside. The subject of this sketch received a literary education in the schools of Pope County and the Northern Normal. When eighteen years of age be began teaching school, and continued in that profession until 1876, studying medicine at intervals while teaching, with his present father-in-law, C. S. Rush, of the celebrated Rush family, of Philadelphia. In 1877 and 1878 he attended medical lectures at the Missouri Medical Academy situated at St. Louis. At the close of the spring term of 1878 he graduated and received a diploma. Previous to graduation he was examined at Duqaoin, where he received a certificate. In the summer of 1878 he located at his present home buying a small tract of land. In November of the same year he married Agnes E. Rush, daughter of C. S. and Harriet E. (Vance) Rush, in Massac County, 111., where she was born in 1852, and by her he has three children: Myrtle, Roscoe and Mable. From 1878 to 1886 he carried on a heavy practice in connection with stock raising. During the latter year he abandoned all but his office practice which is near home. Dr. Lewis commenced life a poor boy, educated himself by working hard, and by careful economy has collected a considerable competence, now owning a farm of 440 acres, a good store building and a stock of merchandise worth about $2,000. He has also been very successful in raising live stock and now has on his farm about thirty head of horses and as many of cattle, though this is a small number in comparison with what he generally handles. His farm is one of the best stock farms in Saline County, and it is well improved. Upon it are good fences, a fine residence, several tenant houses and three two-story barns. Dr. Lewis is postmaster at South America, and has been since July 4, 1879. For the past two years he has been a notary public, and has been unusually successful in all the lines of business in which he has engaged. He is one of the most prominent stock, and business men in Saline County. He is a stanch Republican and a Prohibitionist. In religious conviction he is a Universalist, and his wife is a member of the United Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

George Limerick

George Limerick, farmer, was born in 1833 in Tennessee, one of seven children of Oliver and Ann (Kile) Limerick, natives of Ireland. The father, born in 1798, came to Tennessee after his marriage; then about 1840 went to Saline County, Ill., where he bought 200 acres, but soon sold and bought where his son George now resides, and where the father died in 1867. The mother, born in 1827, died in Saline County, Ill., in 1862. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Saline County, and owns a farm of 129 acres. In 1863 he married Elizabeth, daughter of George W. and Lucy Glasscock, born in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1849. Their children are Grant, Washington, Lorenzo, Lucy, Lilly, Willie, James and Burt. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was at Fort Donelson and Shiloh, but in 1862, on account of deafness, was honorably discharged. In politics he is a Republican, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

John M. Lockwood

John M. Lockwood, farmer, was born in 1838 in McLeansboro, Ill., the only child of Samuel D. and Susan M. (Garner) Lockwood. The father, of English origin, born about 1817 in McLeansboro, died at that place when our subject was only four years old. The mother, German in origin, born about 1820 in Kentucky. Our subject was educated in Hamilton, Wayne and Hardin Counties. From twenty-one until twenty-four, he enlisted in Company A, Twenty ninth Illinois Infantry, and served as lieutenant until April, 1804, when he was discharged at Natchez of ill health and was confined to his bed with rheumatism four years. He then married and settled on his present farm in Section 19, Somerset Precinct. His wife, Alice, daughter of William and Elizabeth (McFarland) Matthews, formerly of Pennsylvania, was born in 1849 in Elizabethtown, Ill, Their eight children are Fanny, William, Daniel, Maggie, James, Emma, Gertrude and Kelly. Our subject now owns a farm of 200 acres. He is a Republican, and first voted for Douglas. He is a demitted member of Xenia Lodge, No. 191, F. & A. M.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

T. W. Lusk

T. W. Lusk, tobacco speculator, was born in 1845 in Spencer County, Ind., one of seven children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bowlen) Lusk. The father was born in 1802 in Ohio. In 1832 he moved from Cincinnati to Spencer County, Ind., where he bought himself a home of 160 acres of land, on which his death occurred in 1867. The mother, born in 1813 in Virginia, died at the old homestead in 1885. After his youth at home and in the home schools in Spencer County, our subject in 1871 engaged with G. P. Hudspeth & Co., of Evansville, Ind., in the tobacco trade. After two years he was with them at Raleigh, Ill., then one year at McLeansboro. After a year then in Evansville again, he went in partnership with H. Webber & Son, in Galatia, Ill., and then soon after he and his brother became partners in trade in Raleigh. After a year here he again returned and spent four years in Galatia, since that he has been with his brother in their present business at Raleigh. In October, 1866, he married Mary E. Idlehart, daughter of James and Elizabeth Idlehart, born in 1847 in Spencer County, Ind. Their one child was Leptus G. Mrs. Lusk died in 1868. In 1875 he married Josephine, daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Musgrave, born in 1850 at Raleigh, Ill. Their two children are Bertha and William J. Politically he is a Republican, first voting for Grant. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which his first wife also belonged.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

G. R. Mace

G. R. Mace, physician and surgeon, was born in Saline County, Ill., in 1854, one of a family of eight children of George W. and Mahulda A. (Oglesby) Mace. The father, born about 1819 in Virginia, moved with his parents to Alabama, and from there to Saline County, Ill., where he entered 320 acres of land, on which he remained until 1885. He then sold out and went to Missouri. The mother, born about 1823 in Hopkins County, Ky., is still living at their home in Missouri. After his education in Ewing College, Franklin County, Ill., he entered, and in 1886 graduated from, the Medical College of Missouri, and since that time has been in constant practice. In 1878 he married Ann V., daughter of B. S. and Sarah Fox, born in 1858 in Hopkins County, Ky. Their four children are Birt R., Roy, Everett and Ella. In politics he is a Republican, first voting for Hayes. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and also of the Saline County Medical Association. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Hon. James Macklin

Hon. James Macklin, attorney at law, was born in Liverpool, England, in 1832, the son of James and Ellen (Dowan) Macklin, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of Ireland. The father, a bookkeeper, was a soldier at Waterloo, and lived in Liverpool the latter part of his life. Both parents died there. Our subject received a collegiate education, and at the age of fourteen he entered the Liverpool Telegraph printing office as an apprentice, continuing there five or six years. In 1851 he came directly to Benton, Franklin Co., Ill., and bought a half interest in the Benion Standard with John G. Goessman. In 1852 he began the study of law in connection with his paper under Hon. W. A. Denning. After his admission to the bar at Mount Vernon in 1853, he abandoned journalism and began practice at Elizabethtown, where, in his four years' stay there, he and " Bob " Ingersoll practiced in many cases together. Since 1861 he has practiced in Harrisburg, which work he has been compelled to forego on account of ill health for the past few years. While at Elizabethtown he was surveyor of Hardin County. In 1867 he was elected to the Legislature, in which body he represented Saline and Hardin Counties, and served on the committee on elections, claims, and swamp and overflowed lands. Of all the various phases of the law he has preferred the practice in the chancery court, in which he has shown himself to be an able lawyer and speaker. January 27, 1853, he married Minerva, daughter of William Wilburn, of Benton, Ill., born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1832. Their six children are W. C, a farmer; John ; Josephine, wife of James Coleman, of Alton, Ill. ; Sarah, James, Jr., and Robert F. A Democrat, he cast his first vote for Pierce. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge, and he and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

R. S. Marsh

R. S. Marsh, attorney at law, of the firm of Marsh & Scott, dealers in real estate, was born in 1850 in White County, Tenn., the son of William and Tabitha (Glenn) Marsh. The father, of Scotch origin, born in 1825 in North Carolina, was married in White County, Tenn., and in 1851 came to Hamilton County, Ill. In a short time he went to Missouri, but returned in 1862, and still lives in Hamilton County. His wife, of Irish ancestry, was born in White County, and is fifty-eight years old. Our subject, the eldest of eight children living, was educated in the common schools, and at Enfield High School. He was for eleven years a teacher; in 1873-74 principal of Enfield High School; in 1876 elected principal of Harrisburg Public Schools, where he continued four years, and in the spring of 1880 taught in the high school of Carmi. He began the study of law in 1879 under Hon. H. H. Harris, of Harrisburg, and in August, 1881, was admitted to the bar. Their present firm was formed in April, 1884. In 1877 he married Ella, daughter of Alfred Harris, of White County, where she was born. He is a member of the Royal Arch Masons, A. O. U. W., and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican, first voting for Grant in 1872.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Dr. John C. Matthews

Dr. John C. Matthews was born January 19, 1841, in Sumner County, Tenn., one of six children of William and Permelia (Currey) Matthews. The father, born in Virginia in 1806, and a farmer by occupation, went to Tennessee about 1810, in childhood, and while on a visit to Raleigh, died January 3, 1885, several months after his arrival. The mother was born in Sumner County, Tenn., and died in 1866. Our subject, educated in Sumner County, Tenn., went to Saline County in December, 1864, and began the study of medicine at Raleigh with F. F. Johnson, and after a year with him took a course of lectures at St. Louis Medical College. In 1866, he was first associated with Dr. Johnson, and afterward with Dr. A. J. Neal, with whom he continued two years; then, after practicing independently until 1870, he took a course of lectures in the medical department of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, and received his diploma. He has been most successful ever since, and is now one of the Pension Board of Examining Surgeons, In August, 1866, he married Martha J., daughter of Henry F. and Mary Johnson, born in June, 1845, in Wilson County, Tenn., coming to Saline County as a child. Their seven children are William, Mary B,, Kobert (deceased), George, John C, Charles, Emma and Olive. Politically he is a Democrat, first voting for Seymour. In 1876 he declined the nomination for the Legislature tendered him by his party, because he had no aspirations for ofiice. He is secretary of the two lodges to which he belongs, the F. & A. M. and I. O. O, F. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Robert John McIlrath

Robert John McIlrath was born in Ireland in 1844, and is the son of Jas. H. and Jane (McMurren) McIlrath, natives of Ireland also, born in 1812 and 1820 respectively. The father, a farmer, in 1850 settled in Saline County on the place now owned by G. B. Wier, and in 1858 sold out and bought 160 acres now owned by J. H. and R. J., his two elder sons. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and February 15, 1862, was shot in the breast at Fort Donelson where he died. His remains were buried on the old farm. In 1868 the mother married Saml. Glass. Six of her seven children by her first husband are now living: James H., Robert J., Isaac, Mary, wife of Louis Baker; Sarah, wife of R. Hawkins, and William D. Our subject was six years old when he came to America, and in November, 1861, enlisted with his father, and was by his side when he fell. He was in service sixteen months and discharged at Memphis. In 1867 he married India, daughter of Saml. Glass, born in Peru, Ind., in 1847. He now bought forty acres near the old home, but in 1873 he bought eighty acres where he now resides, with a finely improved farm of 200 acres and a fine house, one of the best in the county. He is a Republican in politics, first voting for Lincoln. He is a Mason of the R. A. & C, a member of the K. of H. and G. A. R. He and his wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church of Harrisburg.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Robert Mick

Robert Mick, president of Saline County Bank, was born in 1819 in Saline, then Gallatin, County. He is the son of Charles and Susan (Simmons) Mick. The father, a farmer of German origin, born in Maryland in 1772, when a youth went to Wilson County, Tenn., and was married. After living near Golconda, Ill., he went to Gallatin, now Saline, County, about 1815, and entered eighty acres, also 160 for his son Robert; and where he died in 1856, one of the earliest pioneers of the section. The mother, a native of Wilmington, N. C., died two years before, at the age of sixty-five. Two of their five children are living : Margaret, wife of Jas. C. Ward, in Red River County, Tex., and our subject, who, with few pioneer school advantages, still obtained a good business education. He remained in care of and caring for his parents until his twenty fourth year. In 1844 he married Martha Jane, daughter of Jos. Strickland, born in Saline County. Owing to ill health, he left the farm for merchandising in Whitesville, and shipping produce to New Orleans by water. From August, 1851, until 1862, he and Dr. Mitchell were partners as is described in the biography of the latter. From 1859 until January, 1887, when he sold his stock, he was engaged in merchandising, one of the largest in Harrisburg. He has been devoted to his bank since it was organized in 1876. C. E. Lewis was the first cashier, and for the past eight years J. W. Bradshaw occupied the place. Mr. Mick has a controlling interest in a Harrisburg woolen-mill; owns about 3,000 acres of fine land, and 1,000 of that amount is under cultivation. His wife died in 1868, and the next year he married Mrs. Hardenia Nyberg, nee Spencer, who was born in Gallatin County in 1836. Originally a Whig, he has become a Republican, first voting for Harrison. He is a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. In 1885, he erected the First Baptist Church of Harrisburg, a structure of the latest design, heated with furnace, with seating capacity of 800, and furnished the entire capital.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Dr. John W. Mitchell

Dr. John W. Mitchell was born in 1825 in Madison, Ind., the son of William and Mary (Bassett) Mitchell. The father was born in Massachusetts, and in his youth went to Madison, Ind., in 1814, and became a farmer and miller. In 1829 he was killed by the running away of his team. The mother was a French-Canadian, born near Toronto, and died in 1859. Two of three children were Lucinda and our subject. The latter was educated at Madison, and when thirteen began for himself, as a clerk. A few years later he began flat-boating, and at eighteen began the study of medicine, graduating in 1845 from the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. He at once established- a store boat on the Ohio Eiver, and landed in Polk County, Ill., where he remained until 1850, when he came to Saline County. At Independence he began merchandising in connection with his practice, buying produce and shipping it via the Saline, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. In 1856 he came to Harrisburg, became the first general merchant here and built the first store room. He and Robert Mick became partners and continued three years from 1859, erecting the present courthouse and jail. In 1861 he bought a saw mill and converted it into a grist-mill, and in 1868 erected a new one with a saw and planing-mill attached. It has a capacity of 100 barrels per day. Since 1868 he and J. W. Towle have been in partnership in a general store. In 1864 he married Julia Jackson, a native of Hardin County, Ill. She died in 1866, and in 1869 he married Emma S. Mayville, born in Bangor, Me. Their children are Charles and John W. (deceased in July 1886, aged twelve years). Dr. Mitchell is the oldest practicing physician in Saline County, and one of the most skillful in southern Illinois. His practice extends, in cases of consultation especially, at great distances. He is a skillful financier, once owned nearly all the site of Harrisburg, and still possesses a large number of houses and lots. He also owns about 10,000 acres of tillable land, and is the originator of the Cairo Vincennes & Chicago Railway, one of the four directors, with the duty of looking after the construction of the road from Vincennes to Johnson County. He also built nineteen miles of the road. He now contemplates building a railroad from Harrisburg to the Ohio River, for the purpose of developing the iron and spar mines of Hardin County. He owns two valuable coal mines of 600 acres each, one at Leadford, and the other at Bald Knob, both in fine running order. He was a strong Union man during the war, organizing companies, etc., and is a Republican. He is a Mason and Knight of Honor.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)

Lucius Donald Nolen

Lucius Donald Nolen, one of the leading farmers of Saline County, was born in 1847, in Wilson County, Tenn. He is the third of eight children, born to David and Clarissa (Cosley) Nolen. The father, who was of Irish descent, was born about 1826 in North Carolina, and the mother in Virginia about 1825. When yet children they came with their respective parents to Tennessee. They were married in Wilson County where they resided until our subject was about nine years old, when they moved to Illinois, settling in Brushy Creek Precinct, Saline County. The father died about one year afterward, and the mother immediately gave up housekeeping and commenced living with her children. She died in 1886, in Pope County. The subject of this sketch was educated principally in the common schools of Saline County. December 28, 1863, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment Illinois Infantry, and served until the close of the war. During 1864 he served on a gunboat apart from ihe regiment. In September, 1865, he was mustered out of the service at Memphis, but did not receive his discharge until arriving at Springfield, Ill. About one year later he married, and bought a farm four miles southwest of Harrisburg, remaining on the same until about 1881, when he sold that farm and bought the one on which he now resides, situated in Sections 22 and 27, Township 9, Range 5. His wife, formerly Mary C, daughter of Wilson and Martha Jane (Milliford) Huddleston, was born in 1853 in Illinois, She and her husband are the parents of seven children. Mr. Nolen has been a hard working and enterprising farmer, but on account of rheumatism contracted during the war he is not so stroug and healthy as formerly. He owns a good farm of 240 acres. He has also been very successful in trading in live stock. In politics he is a Kepublican, and cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant in 1868. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Harrisburg Lodge, No. 325, and both himself and wife are members of the United Baptist Church.
History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson counties, Illinois (1887)
(Transcribed by J M Kell)


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