TAZEWELL COUNTY ILLINOIS
GENEALOGY TRAILS
Tazewell County IL




Tazewell County Illinois
Early History, from:

"Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois"
Edited by Newton Bateman, LLD & Paul Selby, AM
& "History of Tazewell County, Volume II"
Edited by C. Allensworth
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, 1905

page 11

TOWNSHIP HISTORY
Hittle Township
    George Hittle, Jonas Hittle his son, and John W. Judy left Ohio in the fall of 1925 and in February 1826, they settled in Hittle Township.  George Hittle was the patriarch of the new community and the grove where they settled and the township has taken his name.  In the following year, William Burt and the Hainline families settled near by.  William Hieronymous settled on the east fork of Sugar Creek in 1828. Jacob Albright came in 1829, Joseph Richmond in 1830.  Martin J Staffer the same year, and Thos. Burt in 1833.
    In 1841 two eastern men, Armington and Hazelton, opened a store and Armington Post Office took its name from the former.
    The wealth of the Hittle township, for many years, was largely confined to the southern half of the township which was mostly timberland.  Now the northern part of Hittle township is one of the most fertile and highly cultivated sections in the county.
    The main stream is Sugar Creek, which enters the township a little east of the center on the north and flows southward, leaving the township at a point a little west of the center on the south.
    The Hittle Grove Christian Church is one of the oldest churches in the county, and was organized about the year 1828 at the house of John W. Judy.  The Judys, Burts, Hittles, Hainlines and others were among the first members.  The present building was erected about 1860 and was removed from its original site to where it now stands. The new building in the near future.  The church has always been a vigorous organization. The membership at the present time numbers 250 and the Sunday school 150.  The church societies are the Y.P.S.C.E. and the Woman's Aid.  Elder W. Deweese is the present pastor.  There is also a church of this denomination at Hieronymous Grove, which was built and paid for by Enoch Hieronymous in 1869.  For many years this church was a prosperous one, but many of the members connected themselves with other congregations, and there has been no regular service for some ten or twelve years.  They have Sunday school, and the house is used for funeral purposes.
    The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized about 65 years ago at Hittle Grove. About 1857 a part of its members organized a separate society, part going to Armington and part to Boynton, according to convenience.  The present church building is located in Armington and its membership is not as large as it was some years ago. Among the earlier members were John Burwell, Isaac Carr, Joseph Kelley, A.E. Forbes and others.
    The following is a list of the Supervisors who have served the township since its organization and the time served by each:

Hezekiah Armington
1850

John Q Darnell
1879-82


David Hainline
1851-3

John H. Burt
1878


R.B. Marley
1854

John Q Darnell
1879-82


David Hainline
1855-7

D.S. Dempsey
1883-4


Ellis Dillon
1858

John Q. Darnell (died in office)
1885-88


S.K. Hatfield
1859

E.E. Darnell
1888


Jonathan Merriam
1861

Jonathan Merriam
1898-97


George N. Bryson
1863-9

J.M. Guy
1898-99


L.M. Stroud
1870-1

S.B. Hainline
1900-02


Peter Paugh
1872-3

Mathias Kampf
1902-05


Lorenzo Hainline
1874





John H Burt
1875-6






LITTLE MACKINAW TOWNSHIP
(23 N., R. 2 W. 3d P. M.)
    Little Mackinaw is mostly prairie land drained by the Little Mackinaw, Sugar Creek and Davis Branch.   It is one of the richest townships in the county in point of agriculture.  The soil is deep and the class of farmers is one of the best found anywhere in Central Illinois. Commodious residences are everywhere to be seen and the people are among the most progressive in the county.
    The exact date of the first settlement is not exactly determined, but it is known that Samuel and John Stout were the first settlers.  Shortly thereafter there came Thomas F. Railsback, Buchanan Haverhill, Alexander B Davis, James Allenworth.  They were soon followed by John Q Adams, Solomon Summers, Jesse and William Samuels, and the Herndon family, all of whom settled at or near the head of Little Mackinaw timber.  The first birth was that of a child of Joseph Stout and the first death was that of an orphan at the house of Samuel Stout.  The first school was taught by Thomas F. Railsback on Section 5.  The first sermon was preached at Mr. Railsbacks house by Elder Ottman, a Christian minister in 1831.
    The first school building was a log cabin erected on Section 8 in 1904.  This house for many years was known as the old log schoolhouse and was used for church purposes as well.  It was near the present site of the Little Mackinaw cemetery.  The school was taught by John Turney.  Among the first pupils were James Lindsay, William P. Allensworth, Sarah E Allensworth, now Aunt Sallie Sargeant of Mackinaw, D.G.H. Railsback, P.G.H. Railsback and sisters Sarah and Amanda, afterward Mrs. Theophilus Ireland and Mrs. John S. Briggs, all of whom are now deceased.  The first frame school house was built about 1851 and was known as the "Four Corners" school house.  It was used for church purposes until 1863.
    Perhaps the most notable event in the history of Little Mackinaw township, was the long continued litigation over payment of bonds issued to aid in constructing the Peoria, Atlanta & Decatur (now the Vandalia) railway.  This road enters the township directly south of Minier and runs almost through he center of the township.  The election to pass on the question of bond issue was held July 01, 1869, the vote being 98 for and 83 against.  The bonds were issued June 01, 1870 bearing a high rate of interest to run for twenty years, and were to be delivered when the engineer of the road should certify to the Supervisor of the township the road was completed.  In 1870 or 71, this certificate was furnished and the bonds delivered, although the road was not completed until 1875. 
    The Board of Town Auditors refused to audit the claims of the bond holders when the interest coupons on bonds began to fall due, and the result was that the township was sued in the United States Court at Springfield. Robert G Ingersoll and S.D. Puterbaugh representing the bondholders.
    At the juncture George Whitman, who was the Town Clerk, vacated the office and moved to Nebraska; consequently there was no legal authority existing whereby a meeting of the Board of Auditors could be called.  The business of the township, however, was not neglected so far as its ordinary affairs were concerned.  The attorneys for the creditors sought to find Whitman but couldn't  Things dragged along in this shape until the 25th day of March 1876 when a peremptory order of mandamus was issued by the United States Court at Springfield, directed to Asa Hicks, Supervisor.  William Buehrig, alleged to be Town Clerk, and J.M. Guy and Henry Freitag, Justices of the Peace, requiring them to perform the duties devolving upon the Board of Town Auditors on or before the second Tuesday in August 1876.  A continued neglect to comply with this order culminated in the arrest of Mr. Beuhrig for contempt of court.
    In response to the summons of the court at Springfield in Mr. Buchrig's case, Supervisor Hicks and others, with messrs. Roberts and Green, attorneys for the township, appeared before Judge Treat of the United States Court for the Southern District of Illinois.  Judge Green prepared a clear and forcible presentation for the defense.  A jury trial was waived, and the case laid before the court with attorneys Thomas Cratty and Gen John M Palmer, with the United States District Attorney for the prosecution. 
    The issue was hotly contested by the opposing attorneys and the town officers were informed by Judge Treat, that if he thought there was any conspiracy to evade payment of the township's just obligations, he would have Sheriff lock up the whole crowd.  General Palmer, in the goodness of his heart told the court that it was a pretty close case but after all he was not sure that there was any intention on the part of the accused to evade or disobey the orders of the court.  Cratty, however, lost his temper and angrily demanded to know where the town of Little Mackinaw had kept George Whitman all these years; declaring that the town officers could find him whenever they wanted to know where he was, everybody as dumb as an oyster.
    Judgements continued to pile up against the township, and the people saw that the best thing to do was to settle with the company upon the best possible terms.  A committee consisting of N.P. Williams, P.G.H. Railsback, R.J. Mitchell, Frank Rowell and B.C. Allensworth, was appointed to advise with the Supervisor in all matters touching the trouble in which the township and its officers were involved.  Upon looking over the ground carefully, it was thought best to issue $49,000 in 20-year bonds, bearing seven per cent interest, to which the voters gave their consent at the spring election in 1882.   
    The outstanding bonded indebtedness of the township, while originally $30,000, had been so increased by interest, court costs, and interest on interest, that the township found itself owing something over $60,000 on this account.  Most of the indebtedness was held in the city of Peoria.  The active work of effecting settlement fell to Supervisor Hicks and B.C. Allensworth, the latter a member of the advisory committee, who went to Peoria with $49,000 in cash and succeeded in effecting a satisfactory settlement with the creditors in that city.  Upon this basis of settlement the township was the gainer to the extent of about $12,000.
    The last of the $49,000 bond issue was paid in 1902 and the event was celebrated in Minier by the citizens of the township at a harvest festival on the 20th day of August, at which there were present at least 5,000 people.  The day's program comprised an array of addresses, music and sports, which kept the visitors entertained from early morning until night.  Most of the events occurred in the park.  It was an occasion long to be remembered by the citizens of Little Mackinaw Township.  
    In the year 1883, the first Christian Church north of the Sangamon River, was organized at the home of Thos. F. Railsback, which was afterwards known as the Little Mackinaw Christian Church.  The original members were Thomas F. Railsback, Louisa his wife, A.B. Davis, Catherine Allensworth, Benjamin Herndon and Nancy his wife, Elijah Howell and Maria his wife.  In accordance with the teachings of that church, known in many places as the Disciples of Christ, they chose the Bible and the Bible alone as their rule of faith and practice.  Where the Bible spoke they spoke; where the Bible was silent, they were silent.
    The congregation for many years held its meetings in the little log school house about one half mile south of old Railsback home, and for many years known as the "Old Log School House."  This old building has long since disappeared.  At the former site there is now one of the best cared for cemeteries to be found anywhere in the county, and there for many years, have reposed the remains of the eight founders of this mother church.  Elder James Lindsay was the first minister of this congregation. The church grew and prospered for many years and held its meetings in a frame school house known as the "Four Corners School House" from about 1853 until 1863, when a new church building was erected on Section 3 on the township line.  This building was 36 by 40 feet and cost $2,100.  The first sermon was preached therein by Elder George W Minier in September of that year.  Attached thereto is a cemetery in which many of the early settlers lie buried.  It is known as "Greenwood Cemetery," and recently, through the efforts of some of the ladies in the neighborhood, a Ladies' Cemetery Association has been formed and, through the organization, much commendable work is being done to keep this cemetery in order.  The church building here was the place of worship for all members of this denomination until about 1870, the ever varying conditions of life and business finally taking away a large part of its membership; some identifying themselves with the church organization in the village of Minier, while others are worshiping with the church at Concord near the northeast corner of Hopedale Township. There was occasional preaching at the old house until about 1900, when the congregation was practically dissolved and in 1903 the old house was sold, torn down and moved away.  The Little Mackinaw Christian Church has been spoken of above because of the fact that it was the parent of four other churches of that name, viz.: the Christian Church of Minier and those of Mackinaw, Concord and Lilly.
    The Minier Christian church was erected in 1874.  Additions have been made to the building since, bringing its cost to about $4,000.  Some of the original members of the congregation were R.J. Mitchell, N.P. Williams, J.E. Railsback, J.F. Quigg, J.M. Edmiston, Asa Hicks, Mrs. Louisa Railsback, wife of Thomas F. Railsback and one of the original members of the Little Mackinaw Christian Church., who had lived to see all the notable changes which time had brought to the present church.  She had remained faithful to it through all of its vicissitudes and, at the age of nearly fourscore years, when she entered into that rest provided for the faithful, she was honored as the patriarch of the Minier Christian Church.   
    The present membership is 125 with seventy five pupils in the Sunday School. There is a Y.P.S.C.E. connected with the church, which has 20 members.  Elder John C Lappin is the retiring pastor. His successor is Elder J.E. Couch, who came from West Salem IL and took charge September 01, 1904.   
    St. John's German Evangelical Church is located in Minier, and the church building was erected in 1870 at a cost of $2,000.  In the same year the congregation was organized by Rev. Witte, who preached the first sermon.  There is a parsonage belonging to the congregation and the total value of church property is about $4,000.  The present membership is made up of sixty families with a Sunday school with fifty pupils.  There is a Ladies' Aid Society with thirty members, and it does very effective work for the church.  Some of the most prominent citizens of the township are members of this organization. The present pastor is Rev. F. Bosold.
    The Methodist Episcopal Church was organize din Minier in January 1870.  John Burwell, T.J. Brown, William Goldfelter, William Morris, and others were among the original members. The first pastor was Rev. M. Pilcher.  The church edifice was erected in 1869 and is a frame building.  The original cost was $3,000 but improvements to the amount of about $2,000 have recently been made.  The present membership is fifty five.  Sixty young people are enrolled in the Sunday school, and about 45 are connected with the Epworth League Society of the church. 
    The following is a list of the Supervisors who have served Little Mackinaw Township since its organization and the time which each served:

B.F. Orendorf
1850

F.O. Kilby
1880


A.B. Davis
1851-2

Asa Hicks
1881-2


D.W.C. Orendorff
1853-4

Wm. Lilly
1883


L.J. Summers
1855-61

P.N. Ewing
1884-6


Zerah Munsell
1863

Wm. Bennett
1887-9


John S. Briggs
1864-67

Henry Imig (resigned)
1890-92


Rodney J. Mitchell
1868-9

B.N. Ewing (died in office)
1896-01


Wm. Bennett
1870-1

Chris Hannig (to fill vacancy)
1901-06


Asa Hicks
1872-79




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MACKINAW TOWNSHIP
(24 N. R. 2W. 3d P. M.)
    This township takes its name from the Mackinaw River which passes through it, entering the township one and a half miles west of the northeast corner, and leaving it nearly three miles south of the northeast corner.  Sargent's Slough and the branches of the Little Mackinaw Creek form the natural drainage of the southern portion of the township.  The north half of it is somewhat broken, and was at one time covered with a growth of excellent timber, which has almost disappeared, being used for fuel and for building purposes.  In the southern part the surface is a fine rolling prairie and this section contains some of the best farming land in the State.  In the year 1827 Abner Smith erected the first house in the township on Section 23.  Samuel Judy, Mordecai Mobley, Elijah Sargent, Jonas Hittle and Michael Hittle were among the first settlers.  The first birth as that of William Hittle in 1828 and the first death was that of Abner Smith, the same year.  The first marriage occurred in 1830 when Conway Rhodes and Miss Harmon were the contracting parties.  Rev. Mr. Mitchell a Methodist Minister, preached the first sermon in the township in 1829.  Jonas Hittle was elected the first Justice of the Peace and is credited with having performed the first marriage ceremony in Deer Creek township, uniting as man and wife Samuel Watson and Elvira Perry.
    Mordecai Mobley was a man of considerable official importance as shown by his having served in the capacity of what is now County Judge; also as County and Circuit Clerk, Recorder and Postmaster.  So unimportant were these offices in those early days, that the fees from all of them were scarcely sufficient to support his family.
    The Village of Mackinaw has a very interesting history.  It was laid out on the 20th day of May 1827 as the Town of Mackinaw by County Surveyor William Hodge.  It was the county seat from that date until February 16, 1831.  A more extended notice of it is given in a former chapter.  This quiet little village is situated about one half mile south of the Mackinaw River, on a prominence overlooking the river valley.  As an indication of the business done, we note that it has two drug stores, five general merchandise stores, two restaurants, one furniture store, one clothing and shoe store, two shoe stores, two butcher shops, two barber shops, two newspaper offices, one harness shop, one bank, one fence factory, one feed mill, one electric light plant, two grain merchants and two coal dealers. There are two hotels and several private boarding houses.  A handsome brick school house has taken the place of the old frame structure and is furnished with the modern appliances usually found in all well regulated schools.  There are two neat, modern church edifices.  Mordecai Mobley was the first postmaster, and his last successor is Mrs. Leona E Hill.  The fraternal orders are represented by the Masons, Odd-Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen, Grand Army of the Republic and their Corresponding Ladies' Societies.  The present officers of the village are the following: H.J. Puterbaugh, President; G.W. Speece, J.F. Barton, J.D. Smith, F.O. Kilby, Michael Cook and James Wills.  L.F. Houser is Clerk, J.E. Hill, Treasurer, Philip J. Davis, Marshall.
Religious History of Mackinaw Township
    As early in the settlement of Mackinaw Township as 1826, there were occasional religious meetings held in private houses, and subsequently in school-houses.  Methodists, Cumberland Presbyterians, United Brethren, and now and then a New Light, a Baptist, living in other settlements for traveling through, would stop with the friendly pioneer and preach to those who would gather in.  These meetings were not without some good effect.  In 1824, Elder James A Lindsey came from Kentucky and settled in the eastern part of the township.  He as a minister of the Disciple of Christian Church and was perhaps the first resident preacher of the township.  He was a man of sterling worth and integrity, kind and genial in disposition and ardently devotional. He began at once to proclaim the gospel as taught by his people.  Having a large family and realizing the importance   of regular church influence, he soon made it a special feature of his work to establish the cause in his own neighborhood.  He was successful in harmonizing some of the other religious views and in baptizing others who had made no previous confession of faith.  These efforts resulted in a meeting for consolidation, which was held at his house on September 1837, and on the 5th day of October, at what was known as Mt. Pleasant School House, the first Christian church of the township was organized.   
    The organization consisted of twenty three members and chose as Elders George Hittle and Samuel Flesher; Deacons; Michael Hittle and Nehemiah Hill; Evangelist, James A Lindsey, and R.F. Houston as Clerk. From the very first the congregation prospered and steadily increased, seldom failing to meet on the first day of every week. As her circle of influence and boundaries enlarged, the school house and private homes were soon too small to contain the anxious congregation.  The groves, "God's first temples," were the frequent resorts of these early worshipers.  This book may fall into the hands of some who will remember with emotions of supreme delight many of these grove meetings, where were heard the clarion voice of a Davenport, a Palmer or a Bowles; or the milder teachings of a Young, a Major, or a Lindsey, all of whom have gone to their reward.  They brought scores to the cross and delighted the souls of the devoted throngs.  When in the year 1849, the congregation perceived the necessity of a house of worship, a majority of the members favored building in Mackinaw Town; and accordingly in the next few years they erected a large and comfortable house.  For more than a quarter of a century, they occupied it, seldom failing to hold their meetings in accordance with their faith, on the first day of the week.  During these years they enjoyed the pastoral and evangelistic services of many of the most able speakers of Central Illinois.  Besides those already named, we mention William Ryan, James Robinson, the Johnsons, the Allens, S.T. Jones, Howe, Mitchell, R. Williams, J.B. Chaplin, William Pointer, Peter Shick, Samuel Lowe, John Lindsey, W. Houston and a host of others. In 1875 the congregation disposed of the house they had used so long and erected another work of more modern appearance at a cost of $3,300.  On the 22nd day of August in that year it was formally opened to the public by Elder Joseph Lowe, who preached the dedicatory sermon.  Since that time H.A. Palister has labored with the congregation as have also the following: T.A. Boyer, J.T. Ogle, Thomas Edwards, J.Fred Jones, Oliver W. Stewart and H.G. Harward.  Rev. O.L. Peters is serving the church at this writing. The venerable George W. Minier, now deceased, was a frequent speaker for the congregation for many years.  Professor James Kirk served the church a number of years.  The officers are: Elders--J.H. Myers, George Patterson, F.A. Puterbaugh, M.H. Boucher, Samuel S Smith, and Calvin B. Amsberry; Deacons--H.J. Puterbaugh, E.H. Roberts, Thomas Viemont, G.W. Speece, Jacob Smith and Solomon Puterbaugh; Clerk--George Patterson; Treasurer--Solomon Puterbaugh.  More than 3,000 persons have had membership with this congregation.  Several who began their religious life here have become acceptable and distinguished preachers.  Some have been instrumental in building up the cause in other places.  Thus the history of the small beginning in the little log school-house.  In 1837, can never fully be told until the Millennial Dawn, when the gathering hosts shall meet before the grand assize and strike glad hands in receiving the recompense of their reward.
    The Methodist Conference had established a station at Mackinaw Town in an early day, and maintained monthly preaching.  This had continued to be a point in their Conference. The church edifice of this congregation was erected in 1850 at the cost of $1,000.  The first pastor was Rev. William Beadle.  The church was organized with the following members: J. Tucker and wife, Dr. Sailor and wife, James Mathewson and wife, and Asa S. Smith and wife.  The several pastors have been Revs. George Miller, Samuel Smith, John Calhoun, William McKay, Mr. Pinkerton, George Milsap, John Smith, William Wiley, O.A.H. De La Garle, W.H. North, Ellsworth, Conrad and O.L. Lyon.  The membership is not large but the members are earnest in the work they have in hand.  In 1892 the old building was replaced with a neat modern structure which cost nearly $2,500.  The present membership is fifty and there are fifty in the Sunday School.  The present pastor is Rev. Charles Wesley Hammond.
    The Seventh Day Adventists do not how have an organization. But few members live here and their meetings are held in private houses.  All the members take part in the exercises. They have no discipline but the Bible; they construe baptism as immersion and observe the seventh day instead of the first day of the week, as the Lord's day.  No person is admitted into the church who uses whiskey, tobacco or opium in any form.  They believe that Christ is soon to come to the earth and set up His kingdom; that the souls of the dead sleep in the grave until the final judgement day.
    The following is a list of the Supervisors who have served the township since its organization and the time served by each:

Lyman Porter
1850

Solomon Puterbaugh
1868


Jones H. Hittle
1851-2

George Miller
1869-74


David Judy
1853-6

J.H. Porter
1875-92


J.W. Brook
1857-8

H.J. Puterbaugh
1893-4


George Miller
1859-65

J.C. Haybarger
1895-6


Dan'l W Puterbaugh
1866

H.J. Puterbaugh
1897-8


George Miller
1867

S.S. Smith
1899-05

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DEER CREEK TOWNSHIP
(25 N. R. 2 W. 3d P. M.)

    This township was named by Major R.N. Cullom from the creek that runs through it.  The first settler in the township was James Allaway, and the second was Major Colum.  Next came James Harvey, James Perry, John Small, Eli Swerins and others.  January 22 1832 marks the birth of Juliet B., daughter of R.N. and Betsey Cullom, who was the first white child born in that township.  James, the infant son of Major of Major Cullom, and the twin brother of United States Senator Shelby Cullom, died in November 1830.  This was the first death in the township.  Nancy Parker taught the first school in 1835.  The first sermon was delivered by Rev. William Brown, a Methodist Episcopal preacher, at the residence of James Perry in 1833.
    The streams in the township are Deer Creek, Mackinaw River and Allaway's Branch.  Near these streams have been found curious remains of Indian Burying grounds.  Skeletons of human beings have been found in various stages of preservation.   A grave of three different sections- one above the other, and seperated by layers of clay- was found in a mound on Section 35.  In the top grave was one skeleton and in the second and third were two each. Flint darts made of red flint 10 to 12 inches long, a solid stone hatchet weighing six or seven pounds, also a grindstone about a foot in diameter of the same material, were exhumed about 1865 by Mr. Joseph Dean.
Deer Creek Presbyterian Church
    The Presbyterian Church of Deer Creek was organized by the Rev. W.T. Adams in pursuance of an order of the Presbytery of Peoria on the 16th of December 1854.  The church had then eleven members. J.T. McClintock and S.W. Ogden were runing Elders.  A house of worship was erected in 1855 at a cost of $1,150.  Rev W.T. Adams was installed as the first pastor in 1856 and served until 1864.  The ministers succeeding Mr. Adams were: Reverends B.T. Ward, six months; John Wilson, 1865-70; Mr. Frey and Mr. D.B. Fleming, supplies 1870-1; Reverends C.B. Palmer, 1872-4; M.V. Ormsby and I.A. Cornelison, as supplies during the summer of 1876; THomas Watson, 1876-81; Wm. Keiry, 1881-7; McVey, 1889, then in succession were Reverends Martin, Beach, Love, Milne, Oswald, McMacken, Irwin and Harris to 1900.
    Since its organization the church has enrolled 300 members.  The highest number at any one time was in 1863, when there were 80 enrolled.  There seems to be no service at the present time. The officers are now Peter Bogardus, Elder, and Eugene Stumbaugh and Fred Chaffer, Trustees.
Deer Creek Baptist Church
    Deer Creek Baptist congregation was organized January 22, 1860 with the following members, C. Chaffer, W. Huxtable, W. Lockwood, B.C. Adams, Joseph Green, W. Ammerman, with their families and others to the number of 35.  A good frame building was erected on William Huxtable's farm, Section 4.  The construction of the Lake Erie & Western throuh the township was followed by the location of the village of Deer Creek on the line of railway on the northeast line of the township, in which this denomination shortly after erected a commodious church building.  The old house of worship is not used any more for church purposes, and the members of the congregation formerly worshipping there are all identified with the church at Deer Creek. THis church is in a prosperous condition.  It has 190 member and 150 Sunday school scholars.  The auxiliary societies are the B.Y.P.U. and Women's Missionary and Aid Societies.  These societies have sixty active members.  The present pastor is Rev. Granger W. Smith.                                                                                           submitted for use by GenealogyTrails.com by dlbr 10/30/11
    The following is a list of the Supervisors who have served in the Township since its organization, and the time which each served.
Richard N. Cullom
1850-51
Geo. H. Small
1877-8
E.H. Durham
1852
James Mitchell
1879
E. Bogardus
1853
Eri Bogardus
1880-2
Edwin H. Durham
1854-5
T.C. Stout
1883-4
James Mitchell
1856-7
James Mitchell
1885
John Q Adams
1858
T.C. Stout
1886-8
Alex. Small
1859-63
G.H. Small
1889
Eri Borgardus
1864
A.L. Smith
1890
James Mitchell
1865
G.W. Smith
1891-2
R.N. Cullom
1866
Frank Field
1893-4
Abraham Chaffer
1867-8
J.M. Butler
1895-1900
Alex. Small
1869
W.H. Green
1901-2
Eri Bogardus
1870-6
Geo. H. Small
1902-6


BOYNTON TOWNSHIP
(22 N. R. 3 W. 3d P. M.)
    This township was first settled by Joseph Grant on Section 9, in 1839.  The first birth was in 1842, born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Houston, a son.  The settlers prior to 1852 were John Blair, Andrew Kerr, Samuel Falor and in 1850, William Eller, John T. Skates, the Holdens, William and Payton Alexander, John Jacobs and others.  In 1854 at a meeting of the citizens at the residence of James Houston, the township was first organized and the name of Boynton was given after the man who lived in the east.                                                                                                                                                                                                  submitted by dlbr 10/30/11 for use by GenealogyTrails.com
    The following is a list of the Supervisors who have served the Township since its organization and time which each served.
Philo Baldwin
1854
John Reardon
1868
R.B. Marley
1855-6
Wm. Slaughter
1870-2
Andrew Kerr (resigned)

John F. Beezely
1873
Stephen K. Hatfield
1857
Wm.Morehead
1874
Ellis Dillon
1859
John F. Beezely
1875-8
Wm Lafever
1860-1
Jacob Brenneman
1879-86
Ellis Dillon
1863
J.J. Unzicker
1887-92
R.B. Marley
1864
E.C. Brenneman
1893-4
John Shurts
1865
John Steiger
1895-8
John N. Snedeker
1866
Henry Curtis
1899-1903
Wm. Slaughter
1867
R.O. Brawner
1903-5


HOPEDALE TOWNSHIP
(23 N. R. 3 W. 3d P. M.)

    Hopedale township has an early history almost contemporaneous with that of other townships in this county. The first settler was Aaron Orendorff who settled here about 1827 and his son D.W. was the first white child born in the township.  On the first Tuesday in April 1850 a meeting was held at the home of Mrs. Purviance for the purpose of township organization.  Charles W. Holden was elected Supervisor; Richard H Holden, Town Clerk; William H. Briggs, Assessor; Andrew Kerr, Collector; Geo. W. Bryan, Nathaniel Bennet and Enoch T. Orendorff were elected Highway Commissioners.  Jesse Fisher and G.W. Bryan were elected Justices of the Peace.  John Bennet and John Davis were elected Constables.
    The township was named at a meeting of the County Court in 1850 by Moses Meeker.  The township was orignally largely woodland but the increasing price of farm property has led to the cutting off of much of the timber and the greater part of the township is now producing good crops.  The surfae is quite hilly, however.  The mackinaw River, the Little Mackinaw and Indian Creek run through ti.
    In 1939 a church was organized principally by the Methodists and Presbyterians, the latter having the controlling interest.  It was named Shilow by John E Davis and the church edifice was sued as a school house for a number of years until about 1857, when a new Shiloh was built by the Methodists on the same site, and it too is a church of the past.  
    The Cumberland Presbyterian Church was erected in the village of Hopedale in 1854.  It was burned down some time about 1876 and has been replaced by a commodious house.  The church is in a prosperous condition and is a power for good in that vicinity.  There are eighty members and 104 in the Sunday school.  The C.E. Society has a membership of twenty four.  Rev. A.N. Moore is the present pastor.
    The Methodist Episcopal Church of the village was erected in 1874.  The original cost was about $2,500.  It was dedicated by Hiram Buck in September of that year.  The first baptismal ceremony occurred August 19, 1877 when John Bright and twelve others were immersed.  The evening of the dedication witnessed the first wedding, P.W. Harlan and Miss P.H. Coggins were the contracting parties.  The present membership is 100. T he Sunday School has 110 members.  The Epworth League and Church Aid Societies are connected with the church.  The present pastor is Rev. Joseph L. Settles.
    There is a Christian Church in Hopedale Township located on Section 2.  The meetings of this society were first held in the "Black Jack" school-house, the congregation being largely made up of those who had formerly held their membership with the Little Mackinaw church.  Some years ago, however, a new building was erected near the school-house, and its name has been changed to the Concord Christian Church.  For a country church it has a large and devoted working membership.  Rev. Cantrell is the pastor in charge at the present time.   submitted by dlbr 10/30/11 for use by GenealogyTrails.com
    The following is a list of the Supervisors, who have served Hopedale Township since its organization, and the time which each has served:
Charles Holder
1850-2
P.E. Davis
1872
Ed. Bird
1854
G.P. Orendorff
1873-5
Thos. Orendorff
1855
P.E. Davis
1876
Jesse Fisher
1856
G.P. Orendorff
1877-8
Eleasar Hodson
1857-60
P.E. Davis
1876
P.C. Davis
1861
G.P. Orendorff
1877-8
Thos. Orendorff
1863
E.T. Orendorff
1879
D.W. Britton
1864
J.A. Roach
1880-1
Levi Orendorff
1865
E.T. Orendorff
1882-5
Wm. E. Pomfret
1866
N.F. Smith (died in office)
1886-8
Adolphus Russell
1867
C.S. Smith (to fill vacancy)
1888-9
James R. Campbell
1868
E.T. Orendorff
1890-2
P.E. Davis
1869-70
B.S. Ford
1893-4
Michael E Pomfret
1871
Jolen Nutty
1896-8


J.F. Schneider
1899-1905


submitted by dlbr 10/30/11 for use by GenealogyTrails.com



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