Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents

Bacon, C.H.
C.H. BACON, M.D., physician and surgeon; Lockport, was born in Albion, Orleans Co., N.Y., Nov. 12, 1834; in 1849, entered the high school at Rochester; he remained three years, completing the full course; at the age of 18, he began the study of medicine with Dr. Moore at Lockport, N.Y.; a year later, entered the New York Medical University and remained two years; at the age of 22, came West and located in Mokena, Will Co., and entered upon the practice of his profession; here he remained two years and then came to Lockport; in the winter of 1860-61, he attended the Chicago Medical College, from which he graduated March 4, 1862; he then returned to Lockport, his present place of residence; in the summer of 1862, he raised a company of volunteers and enlisted in the U.S. Army as Captain of Co. C, 100th Regiment, Ill. V.I.; resigned his position at the end of three months' service, and was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the U.S. Vol. Corps; he was promoted to full Surgeon August, 1863, and served until Nov. 21, 1865; during this period he served most of the time as Post Surgeon at Johnsonville, Tenn.; he was appointed Physician and Surgeon of the State Prison at Joliet, July 1, 1869, which position he held till July 15, 1874. He was married Feb. 14, 1854, to Mary L. Moore, a native of New York; has one daughter - Clara. Owns a fruit farm of eighty acres in New York. In 1876, he erected a fine three-story brick business house at a cost of $7,000. Dec. 15, 1876, opened his drug store, the finest in the city. Republican; Methodist. Lockport Lodge, No. 538, of A.F. & A.M., occupies the third story of his building. Dr. Bacon was the first Master of the Lodge, and held the position a number of years in succession. He and Dr. Daggett do the leading practice of the city and surrounding country.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Backus, John B.
JOHN B. BACKUS, M.D., Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is one of the most prominent physicians of Will Co.; was born in Ontario, Canada, April 29, 1845; his parents are John A. and Sarah M. (Bostwick) Backus. His father was educated for a lawyer, but was a retired gentleman. Mr. Backus received a grammar school education in Canada; he received his medical diploma at McGills Medica University of Montreal, Canada, also received a second diploma from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of Ontario, Can.; he practiced medicine one year in Canada, and in 1871, he came to Braidwood and commenced the practice of medicine here; he has been very successful, having received a very large practice. Dr. Backus has been married twice. Is a member of the Episcopal Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bailey, Daniel
DANIEL BAILEY, farm and stock, Sec. 13; P.O. Elwood; was born in Pennsylvania, and married Miss Rebecca Bordman; they had one child, viz., Alexander, now living in Missouri. His present wife was Mrs. Brown, formerly Miss Susan Zarley; they were married July 14, 1848; they have two children, viz., Calneh and Ella. He left Pennsylvania when 1 year old, and moved to Ohio with his parents; they then moved to Champaign Co., Ill., where his parents died. In 1838, he settled on his present place; he started in poor circumstances, and owns about 500 acres in this county. His son, Calneh, was born on the present place July 18, 1849. He married Miss Ella Cagwin March 18, 1874; she was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., April 4, 1852. In 1869, he began farming on his own account; he has about forty acres in his own name, which he has earned himself. He has been School Director some five years, and Clerk of Board some time.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Baker, Clark
CLARK BAKER, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y., March 3, 1796. He married Miss Lucina Welsh Dec. 20, 1826; she was born in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Aug. 28, 1806; they had five children, two living - Mary E. and John C. He lived in New York until 1850, being engaged in farming and surveying; he then came West and settled upon his present place; while in New York, he served in the militia of that State in the 1812 war; he came West in poor circumstances and at present owns over 1,200 acres, mostly in this township. He has been Supervisor some ten years, and Justice of the Peace for twenty-five years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Baker, James
JAMES BAKER, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Nottinghamshire, Eng., Nov. 2, 1830; May 29, 1858, he immigrated to America and first settled in Lockport, Will Co., Ill., where he engaged in laboring for John Fiddyment; here he remained one year and then moved to Wilmington; after a residence of two years, he returned to Lockport and entered again the employment of Mr. Fiddyment; after three or four years service, he next entered the employ of Norton & Co., for whom he labored five or six years; in 1867, he moved to the farm of S. Wilson, which he cultivated two years; next, to that of James Baker, and remained five years; in 1874, he moved to his present place of residence, three miles south of Lockport. He was married Dec. 27, 1853, to Eliza Baker, a native of England; has eight children - Thomas, Joseph, Mary A., Emeline, Elizabeth, James J., William and George. Possessed of a goodly amount of property, which he has gained by industry and hard toil, and largely deprived, through want of means, of an education himself, he provides as best he can the means for educating his children, and fitting them for useful citizens.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Baker, Leroy A.
LEROY A. BAKER, insurance, Wilmington; born in Cortland Co., N.Y., June 10, 1835, where he resided until 1855; then removed to Illinois, locating at Wilmington; was employed in the dry goods store of R.W. Watterman for several years, and, about one year prior to the rebellion, was engaged at carpenter's work. On the 5th of August, 1861, he enlisted in the 39th (Yates' Phalanx) I.V.I., and, in October, this regiment was ordered to the Army of the Potomac; commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 5, 1861; promoted to First Lieutenant Nov. 17, 1861, and, on the 1st of the following month, received a Captain's commission; at the battle of Deep Run, Va., he was severely wounded, losing his left leg Aug. 16, 1864, and, on the 17th of the following December, at his request, he was mustered out, by order of the War Department. Was appointed Postmaster at Wilmington in June, 1865, and held the office up to the time of his resignation, April 1, 1874; has served as School Inspector, School Trustee and Town Clerk, and is now Deputy Sheriff. Married, in 1857, to Miss Betsey E. Spicer, who was born in Cortland Co., N.Y.; she died in February, 1861; two children - Frank D. and Lizzie B. Was again married, in 1861, to Miss Mary L. Spicer, who was born in Cortland, N.Y.; one child by this union - Minnie C. Mr. Baker is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, and Wilmington Chapter, No. 142. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Baldwin, H.E
., Joliet, of the firm of Nelson, Ferriss & Co., proprietors of the Joliet Morning News, and the Greenback-News, was born Sept. 25, 1853, in Lacon, Marshall Co., Ill., but during the first year of his existence his parents removed to a farm on the bank of the Vermilion River, opposite Streator ; two years afterward they removed to the vicinity, of Ottawa, and, in 1862, made that city their residence; his father engaged in business, and continued until 1869; Horance E. attended the High school, under the management of Professor Thomas H. Clark, until January, 1870, a period of nearly eight years; the following June, he, in company with his mother and three sisters, went to Woodson Co., Kan. where his father had already gone; he farmed there about two years, and, on St. Patrick's Day, 1873, began to learn the printing business at La Cygne, Linn Co., in that state; in May, 1875, he went to Chicago and completed his apprenticeship with the, Metropolitan Printing Company; His parents having removed to Kansas City, Mo., he spent the fall and winter of 1876; with them, taking a six-months course of study in the Kansas City High School ; at the request of friends in the Joliet Phoenix office he became an employe of the firm of McDonald, Ferriss & Co.. Feb. 4,1877, and in July following, became connected with the Morning News , while under the proprietorship of Charles F. Dutcher; on the lst of October, 1877, be became a member of firm of Nelson, Ferriss & Co. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Baltz, John
JOHN BALTZ, farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Minooka; was born in Attandorff, Alsace, France (now Germany), Dec. 28, 1820. He married Miss Thresa Dooszmann Dec. 31, 1855; she was born in Morschwaeller, Alsace, France, Dec. 8, 1830; they had nine children, seven living - John, Joseph, Lena May, Louisa, Caroline, Thresa and Lawrence. He lived in France thirty-five years; was engaged in farm labor, and was seven years in the French army, serving in Africa; he then came to the United States and settled in Buffalo, where he lived about eighteen months; he then came to Joliet; this was in 1855, and, in 1864, he came to his present place, and has lived here since; he came here in poor circumstances; he now owns 140 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bamrick, John
JOHN BAMRICK, saloon, Braidwood; this gentleman was born in Queen's County, Ireland, May 18, 1847, and his parents are John and Ann Bamrick, of Ireland; his father was engaged in the mining business, and when Mr. Bamrick was but 10 years of age, he commenced the mining business, and in 1868, he emigrated to America and landed in New York City, from there he came direct West to Illinois, and settled in Braidwood; here he commenced mining, and engaged in this business until he met with a very unfortunate accident in Sept., 1872, by the steam cars running over and cutting off his left arm; he then entered the saloon business which he has followed ever since. In April, '78, was elected Town Clerk of Reed Township, by the National Greenback party. Mr. B. is a strong National Greenbacker, and has been ever since the Peter Cooper movement originated. Married in 1867 to Miss Sarah Mulligan of Ireland; have had five children, three living. Is a member of the Catholic Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Banyard, Vincent
VINCENT BANYARD, staple and fancy groceries, wooden and willow ware, confectionery and bakery, Wilmington; born in County of Norfolk, England, Sept. 23, 1830; came to this country in 1850, locating in Erie Co., Penn., and, five years later, removed to Union Co., Iowa; came to Wilmington, his present home, in 1859, and engaged in his present line of business in the building formerly occupied by Mr. Mitchell, and known as the Eagle Hotel; he built the store he now occupies in 1865; was a member of the City Council in 1865-66. Married in 1863 to Miss Mary A. Dickson, who was born in Erie Co., Penn., Dec. 12, 1844; three children by this union - Bessie V., born Jan. 16, 1864; Mary J., Dec. 18, 1865, and Vincent W., Oct. 8, 1870. Mr. Banyard is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, and Wilmington Chapter, No. 142.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barber, Franklin E.
FRANKLIN E. BARBER, farming and dairy; P.O. Lemont; was born in Du Page Tp., Will Co., Ill., Aug. 25, 1835; his father came West to Illinois in the spring of 1832, and laid a claim where his son now resides; here he lived till the date of his decease, which occurred Dec. 19, 1876. Franklin E. was married Sept. 2, 1867, to Mrs. Adelaide Volentine, a native of New York State; he has five children - Emma E., Etta F., Edward F., Jessie A., and an infant daughter; Mrs. Barber has one child by her former husband - Mary J. His father was one of the early pioneers of Du Page Tp., and came to Chicago, or rather old Fort Dearborn, on the boat that brought Gen. Scott's army to do duty in the Sac war; of him mention is made in the body of this work; Mr. Barber owns the old homestead, 211 acres, valued at $14,000. Has held the offices of Constable, Town Clerk and School Director. He is a successful farmer, and supplies a large quantity of milk to the cheese-factory now in successful operation near his residence.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barclay, James
JAMES BARCLAY, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, July 16, 1820, and is the son of Andrew Barclay, a weaver by trade; Mr. Barclay learned the trade of weaver, and was foreman in a weaving department; in 1856, he emigrated to America, and came direct to Will Co., Ill.; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming. He married Miss Rachel McMicken, of Scotland. Member of the United Presbyterian Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barker, Irving
IRVING BARKER, foundry, Braidwood, of the firm of I. Barker & Co., foundry; this popular firm has been established in the city of Braidwood since 1873, and in that time, the superior quality of their work, coupled with their honest transactions, has lifted them to the front, as first-class manufacturers; both are gentlemen of long experience, and thoroughly practical in the knowledge of all its details; Mr. Irving Barker was born June 11, 1847; his father, Jas. M. Barker, with family, settled in Will Co., in 1849; when Mr. Barker was 17 years old, he commenced to learn the blacksmith trade, and worked at this trade for four years; he then entered the foundry business with Wm. McIntosh, at Wilmington, Will Co.; he then entered partnership in company Russell, Barker & Co., of Wilmington; firm changed to I. Barker & Co; his brother, Orsen Barker, forms the company, is a native of Michigan; was born in November, 1844; these gentlemen came to Braidwood in December, 1873, and commenced business by erecting the present foundry; the machine department is 22x30, two stories high; the molding department is 22x50; they make a specialty of manufacturing coal mine supplies and stove castings which they find sales for in the vicinity of Braidwood. Mr. Irving Barker has applied for a patent on a hand lawn mower which eclipses anything of the kind now in the market, is much lighter, cheaper, and can guage it to cut the grass at any height.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barker, W.P.
W.P. BARKER, foundryman, Wilmington; is a brother of I. Barker & Co., foundrymen, and is engaged in working in the molding department; was born in November, 1837. Participated in the late war; enlisted in Co. A, 100th Ill. V.I., for three years or during the war; was taken prisoner at the battle of Chickamauga; was paroled, and finally mustered out in June, 1864.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barnhart, James
JAMES BARNHART, Postmaster, dealer in stationery and notions and musical instruments, Peotone; proprietor of Peotone Eagle; born in Perry Co., Penn., June 15, 1839; his parents dying when he was an infant, he went to live with an uncle, in Franklin Co., where he lived until 1855, when he came West and settled in Pike Co., Ill., living here and working on a farm four years; then to Woodhull, Henry Co., where he lived until 1861, when he enlisted in the 45th Illinois Regiment and served three years; he was engaged in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, siege of Corinth and other severe engagements; was with Grant during the entire siege and capture of Vicksburg, the regiment being actively engaged from the 19th of May until the surrender of Vicksburg, July 4, meeting with heavy loss, Mr. Barnhart being severely wounded by the blowing-up of Fort Hill, June 26, in the rear of Vicksburg. After being mustered out of service, he removed to Peotone, in 1866, where he engaged in farming for three years; then, after selling goods one year, was appointed Postmaster of Peotone, which office he has since held. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barns, Nathaniel
, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 34; P. 0. Joliet; born in Rockland Co., N. Y., June 18, 1818 where he lived until 40 years of age, being engaged in farming and dealing in stock until he emigrated to Joliet Tp., Will Co., Illinois in 185?, ?? his present place, since which he has been extensively engaged in farming and has expended a great deal of time and money making improvements, such as draining, etc; he owns 160 acres under a high state of cultivation, three and one-half miles from Joliet. He married Oct. 1, 1849, to Mary E. Thiell; she was from the same place as Mr. Barnes; she was born June 21, 1829; they are the parents of ten children --- Emily A., Isaac and Edward, deceased; the living are George J., Rosalia, Grace, Nathaniel, Eliza, John Henry and Blanche. Mr. Barnes has held the office of School director for more thatn ten years and has always taken a deep interest in the cause of education in the district where he lives. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Barr, Peter
PETER BARR, merchant, Braidwood; was born in Renfrewshire, Scotland, Oct. 20, 1840, and is the son of Daniel and Margaret (Hercules) Barr, of Scotland. His father was a miner; died February, 1859. Mr. Barr, at 8 years of age commenced working in the coal mines; in 1865, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; came direct to Braidwood, Will Co., Ill., and entered the coal mines; followed mining until 1871; he then entered the saloon business; to-day owns one of the best drug stores in Braidwood, which business he commenced in 1878. Mr. Barr is one of the prominent business men of Braidwood. Is one of the City Aldermen. Is a Republican in politics, and a Presbyterian in religion. Married in 1860, to Miss Jennie Stell, of Ayrshire, Scotland (the home of Robert Burns); six children. Mr. Barr's mother is living in Scotland.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Barthelme, Joseph,
farmer; P.O. Joliet; born in Alsace, Germany, Feb. 17, 1828, where he lived until 18 years of age, and engaged in farming; he emigrated to America at the above age, landing in New York April 12, 1846, going directly to Pennsylvania; he engaged in the canal business until October, 1848. when he emigrated to Joliet and worked in the quarries and lime-kilns for a period of twelve years; in 1860, he engaged in farming, renting sixty acres two miles from Joliet, which he worked for seven years, when he purchased eight acres on Sec. 6, Joliet Tp., which he has since continued to work; he owns besides his farm of eighty acres, which is located one mile from Joliet, his present residence on Bluff Street, which he has owned since 1851. He married June 11, 1851, to Mary Wiles; she was born in Alsace, Germany, March 22, 1833; they have by this union ten children now living, viz., Mary Ann, Helen, Frank , Joseph, Michael, Antonette, Edward C., George, William and Alexander. Mr. B . has held the office of Alderman for two years in the ward in which he lives. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Baskerville, James
JAMES BASKERVILLE, farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Wilmington; owns 290 acres, valued at $40 per acre; born Oct. 12, 1833, in Tipperary, Ireland; emigrated to the United States in 1847, with two sisters and six brothers - nine in all - their parents having died in Ireland in 1845; the whole family located in Oneida Co., N.Y., where James remained three years; thence to this township in 1850. Married Jane Fogarty in February, 1860; she was born in November, 1836, in Tipperary Co., Ireland, and emigrated to this country with her parents in 1846; have seven children - Mary A., Andrew J., Charlotte J., Anna M., George, John and Ella R. His brother Andrew enlisted in 1862, in the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, and died in the service, of typhoid fever, at Louisville, Ky., in 1863.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bates, E.E.
E.E. BATES, blacksmith and wagon-making, Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in Penobscot Co., Maine, Sept. 16, 1830. He married Miss Nancy M. Hutchins (formerly Miss Knapp) Oct. 15, 1854; she was born in Montpelier, Vt. He lived in Maine eighteen years; he then moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., where he engaged in the pork and butter business, remaining there until 1852; he then came to Illinois and settled in Plainfield, engaging in blacksmithing, and remained there until 1856, when he came to Channahon, and engaged in the blacksmithing and wagon business, which he continued until 1866; he then engaged at driving a wholesale notion wagon from Chicago, continuing in same until 1873, when he engaged in his present business in its present location.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bauch, George
GEORGE BAUCH, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; was born in Germany Nov. 6, 1826; came to the United States in 1851, and to Illinois in the same year, when he located on his present farm, in Frankfort, Will Co.; it contains eighty acres, valued at $5,000. He was married to Miss Katie Siepp, who was born in Germany; they have had seven children, all of whom are living, viz., Dan, John, Katie, Mary, George, William and Jacob.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Baugh, George,
farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Franfort Station; was born in Germany Nov. 6, 1826; came to the United States in 1851, and to Illinois in the same year, when he located on his present farm in Frankfort, Will Co.; it contains eighty acres, valued at $5,000. He was married to Miss Katie Siepp, who was born in Germany; they have had seven children, all of whom are living, viz., Dan, John, Katie, Mary, George, William and Jacob. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the Co unty ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Baumgartner, B.
B. BAUMGARTNER, general merchant, Frankfort Station; was born in Switzerland June 6, 1833; came to the United States in 1851, and settled in Illinois; his first permanent residence in the State was in Frankfort Tp., commencing in 1862. He was married to Miss Charlotte Maue, who was born in Germany in 1839; they have had five children, two of whom are living, viz., Emma and Albert; deceased, George, Frankie and Lena. Mr. B. is at present holding the office of Township Trustee; has held office of Collector and several other offices previously.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Becher, Rev. Gerardus,
Pastor of St. John the Baptist's Church and Superior of the Franciscan Fathers, of the Strict Observance, Joliet; was born in Rhineland, Germany, April 27, 1834; he received his preparatory education in the parish school of his native country, and then entered Warendorf College in Westphalia; in 1862, he came to this country, and completed his education in St. Joseph's College, Teutopolis, Ill., where is located the mother-house of the Order in this country; he was ordained a priest of the Franciscan Order about five years later by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Yunker of Alton; remained about a year longer, and was then transferred to Quincy, where he became a Professor in the College of St. Francis Solanus. and at the same time attended the congregation at Warsaw, Ill., and another in Gilman Tp.; from Quincy he returned to Teutopolis; and spent two years as Prefect of St. Joseph's College, and then became Superior of the Convent, of St. Francis, and Pastor of the congregation; after the death of the late Father Nolte, he was sent to Joliet in December, 1876. Father Gerardus' Chief Assistant, Father Symphorinus Forstmann, is one of the many victims of persecution under the present dynasty in Germany, having been expelled by Bismarck, together with eighty-four others of his brethren from Westphalia, in 1875; after completing his studies in the convent in St. Louis, he was assigned to Joliet in 1877. It was a desideratum of the Bishop in calling the Fathers to Joliet, that they might administer to the spiritual wants of the Catholic prisoners in the State Penitentiary, which, through the politeness of Warden McClaughry, they have been enabled to do. This duty is performed by Father Augustine McClory who is a native of Ppittsburgh, Pennsylvania., and came to Joliet in 1877. There are here four fathers and three lay brothers, who, besides attending the congregation, are the spiritual advisors of the Sisters of the Franciscan Convent and Academy and also give religious instruction to the pupils in the Academy. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Beckwith, Guy M.
GUY M. BECKWITH, farmer; P.O. Kankakee; was born in Wesley Tp., Will Co., Ill., Sept. 12, 1840, and is the son of Geo M. and Phoebe S. (Barden) Beckwith; his father was born in Bedford Co., Penn., about the year 1816; when he was 21 years old, his parents moved to Newark, Wayne Co., N.Y.; he and his brother left New York together for the Far West, first stopping on the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Ind., thence to North Ann Prairie, four miles northeast of Paris, Ill., which is thirty-six miles south of Danville, Ill., where they broke land; in 1818 or 1819, they came to the salt-works, four miles west of Danville, where they worked hard for several years. June 22, 1827, George M. Beckwith married Charlotte Gilbert, by whom he had one child - Lucy E.; the wife died Feb. 10, 1831, 26 years old. He was a Captain, and his brother was a Major in the Black Hawk war. He came to Wesley Tp., Will Co., at an early day, being about the first settler here; he engaged in farming; he died respected and honored. Guy M. Beckwith enlisted as private in Co. A, 100th Ill. V.I., in August, 1862; participated in all the battles of this regiment; was mustered out in June, 1865. In 1873, was Supervisor of Wesley Tp. Owns 228 acres of fine improved land. Married in 1868, to Miss Orcelia E. Pain, of Michigan, by whom he has three children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Beedy, N.S.
N.S. BEEDY, hardware merchant; of the firm of Harsh & Beedy, Peotone; born in Essex Co., N.Y., Feb. 9, 1835; lived there until 10 years of age, then he went to Canada, where he remained five years, when, in 1850, he emigrated to Illinois and located at Lockport, Will Co., living there one year; he removed to Rockville, Kankakee Co., and, with his father, was amongst the pioneers and organizers of the town of Manteno in 1854; he lived here until 1865, engaged in farming, when he removed to Peotone Tp., and followed farming until 1874, when he sold his farm and went to Indiana, where he remained two and a half years, engaged in running the railroad eating-house in Michigan City; selling out the above business, he returned to Peotone and purchased the interest of C.M. Lewis in the above business, which he has since followed. He married Sept. 22, 1858, Phebe Goodspeed, oldest daughter of Samuel Goodspeed; she was born in Will Co., Ill.; they are the parents of five children by this union - Orrel M., Hettie A., Abbie E., Daniel N. and Carl. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Beggs, Robert H.
ROBERT H. BEGGS, Principal Public Schools, Wilmington; born near Virginia, Ill., Sept. 24, 1844; lived on farm till 1865, teaching at intervals during the last three years of this time; graduated at Illinois College in 1868; taught three years in Virginia, Ill., as Principal; graduated at Illinois Normal University in 1872, returned to Virginia the same year, as Superintendent of Schools and Principal of High School, retaining the position till 1875. Married Gertrude Town, of Bloomington, Ill., Sept. 1, 1875, and removed to Wilmington shortly afterward, to take charge of the public schools, which position he still retains; two children - Helen Orlena, born Sept. 18, 1876, and Dollie Kate, born Jan. 2, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Beggs, (Rev.) Stephen R.
, pioneer Methodist Episcopal preacher, was born in Buckingham County, Va., March 30, 1801. His father, who was opposed to slavery, moved to Kentucky in 1805, but remained there only two years, when he removed to Clark County, Ind. The son enjoyed but poor educational advantages here, obtaining his education chiefly by his own efforts in what he called "Brush College." At the age of 21 he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, during the next ten years traveling different circuits in Indiana. In 1831 he was appointed to Chicago, but the Black Hawk War coming on immediately thereafter, he retired to Plainfield. Later he traveled various circuits in Illinois, until 1868, when he was superannuated, occupying his time thereafter in writing reminiscences of his early history. A volume of this character published by him, was entitled "Pages from the Early History of the West and Northwest." He died at Plainfield, Ill., Sept. 9, 1895, in the 95th year of his age. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by K. T.]

Bennett, George
GEORGE BENNETT, mason and building-move, Plainfield; was born in Detroit, Mich., Sept. 1, 1818. He married Miss Ann Smith; she was born in New York, and died Feb. 14, 1860; his second wife was Miss Nancy H. Langley; she was born in Kentucky, and died April 10, 1865; his present wife was Mrs. Pernelia E. Taylor Woodruff; she was born in Clear Point, N.Y., Sept. 25, 1827, and married Nov. 22, 1866; she had three children by former marriage, viz., Alonzo E., Melissa L. and Clara A. He lived in Michigan three years, when he went to Ohio with his parents; remained there six years; they then went to Monroe Co., N.Y.; then to Michigan; in 1855, he came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Plainfield, and has lived here since, engaged at his trade. He has been Constable four years, and is at present Police Constable.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bennett, Leonard Loomis, Owatonna. Banker. Born Oct 7, 1839 in Plainfield Ill, son of Robert and Sallie Loomis (Kent) Bennett. Married 1863 to Arabella Fidelia Brown. Educated in dist schools Lake county Ill; Wauconda Ill Academy; graduated Rush Medical College Chicago 1862. Practiced medicine until 1873; established Nat Farmers Bank Owatonna and has been pres to date; senior member L L Bennett & Sons. Member Masonic fraternity and Knights Templar. [Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill]

Bentley, Wm. J.
WM. J. BENTLEY, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Lockport; was born in Homer Tp. March 28, 1843; he lived in this county until the age of 17, when he moved to Cook Co., remaining two years. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. F, 100th Ill. V.I., and served as such seven months, and discharged on account of disability. He married Miss Ann M. Dixon, of Lockport, in Homer Tp., Feb. 28, 1867; she was born Aug. 2, 1841. His father, Robert Bentley, was born in Cambridgeshire, Eng., Aug. 13, 1814; he came to America with his parents in 1833, who settled in Lockport, N.Y., remaining there six years; in 1842, he came West and settled in Homer Tp., living there sixteen years, when they went to Palos, Cook Co.; in 1862, they returned to Will Co.; in 1875, he purchased his present farm. Has been School Director and Path Master. Married Catharine Rahill, of Southampton, Eng., in Lockport, N.Y., May 10, 1842; she was born Nov. 21, 1821; they had ten children, seven living - William Joseph, Robert James, Charles Edward, Mary Ann, Martha Ellen, Alice Kate, Asa Lincoln; three dead - Sarah Ann, Frederick Benjamin and Florence Jenette. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler

Bishman, Charles A,
Mankato. Res 616 N 3d st. General contractor. Born June 10, 1863 in Monie Ill, son of Louis and Wilhelmina (Kauler) Bishman. Married in 1888 to Emma Schippel. Educated in the public schools of Mankato. Learned bricklaying trade 1884; engaged in contracting business for self 1892; with his brother formed firm of Bishman Bros gen contrs and builders, composed of Charles A and Herman C Bishman 1903, which firm continues to date. [Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill]

Bishop, Capt. William W.

CAPT. WILLIAM W. BISHOP, of the firm of King & Bishop, dealers in lumber, lath, shingles, etc., Joliet; was born in Ulster Co., N.Y., Feb. 26, 1837; he remained on the farm until 1859, when he came to Chicago, and engaged in the lumber business, in the employ of Reed & Bushnell, with whom he remained until the beginning of the rebellion. In 1862, he entered the Union army as a member of the 103rd Ill. V.I.; was elected First Lieutenant of Co. A, and soon afterward promoted to Captain, serving as such during the war. As showing the character of the services he rendered his country we copy the following:

Headquarters First Div., 16th A.C. La Grange, Tenn., May 25, 1863
General Order No. 87
The General commanding the First Division, takes this means of bringing to the notice of the entire command, the meritorious conduct of a detachment of the 103rd Ill., under command of Capt. Wm. W. Bishop, stationed at Porter's Creek. On the night of the 22nd inst., information reached Capt. Bishop that the notorious guerilla band, under the command of Sol. Street, was encamped within three miles of his station. He started immediately with his little command as a double-quick through the brush, and succeeded in completing surprising the guerillas: killing three, wounding six and capturing six prisoners. Loss on our side, in the captain's language, "Not a scratch." This is to be regarded as an earnest of the glory that awaits the 103rd, and it is held up for imitation by our troops, whenever opportunities like this may present themselves to any of them. A copy of this order will be sent to each officer, non-commissioned officer and private, who participated in the surprise.
By Order of Brig. Gen. Wm. S. Smith, Commanding First Division
W.H. Harland, A.A.A.G.

He was present during the siege of Vicksburg and battle of Mission Ridge; accompanied Sherman from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and on his famous march "from Atlanta to the sea," through the Carolinas to Washington, where with his regiment, he participated in the grand review of the army at the close of the war; he was mustered out of the service in Louisville, Ky., in 1865; returned to Chicago and engaged in the lumber business; in 1869, he came to Joliet and entered into partnership with John P. King in the lumber business. He was married in September, 1865, to Miss Julia A. King, of Chicago, and has two children - Minnie D.L. and Grace.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bliss, Abel
ABEL BLISS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Hampden Co., Mass., Feb. 9, 1810; came to this State in 1837, and settled in New Lenox Tp., Will Co.; the township at that time was called Van Horn's Point, deriving its name from the point or stretch of timber running south from Hickory Creek, and at that time owned by Mr. Van Horn. Mr. Bliss was married May 6, 1840, to Miss Lucinda Blake; she was born in Hampden Co., Mass., Oct. 14, 1816; they have had seven children, three of whom are living - Harriet M., Abel, Jr., and Alice P.; deceased - Ellen J., William S., Mary B. and Josie. Mr. B.'s farm contains 500 acres, valued at $60 per acre.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Blood, H.W.
H.W. BLOOD, manufacturer of soda and mineral water, Braidwood; was born in Erie Co., N.Y., Nov. 27, 1842; came West in 1863; farming for two years; he then entered the bottling house of J.D. Page, of Joliet, Ill., and remained there some two years; he then went to Wilmington; here he purchased a half interest in the manufacture of mineral water, in company with J.D. Page; also engaged in the ice business; he then purchased entire control of the manufactory in 1870; in 1873, he came to Braidwood and started the present manufactory, which to-day is one of the most complete in this vicinity. His many ingenious inventions have rendered the employment of a large number of men unnecessary, and with but few men, Mr. Blood can turn out of his establishment an equal quantity of goods, with firms who employ a far greater number of persons. Thus it will be seen that with the obviation of so much expense in his course of manufacturing, Mr. Blood is enabled to sell his goods cheaper than any other firm, and at the same time give the purchaser as fine a quality of goods as can be found in the country. The building is 25x50, two stories high; capacity of 200 boxes per day; employ three hands; two two-horse wagons find sales for goods in Braidwood and towns in this vicinity. Mr. Blood manufactures soda and mineral water, bottled lager beer, ale, porter, cider and spruce beer. He was married in 1861, to Miss Francis Quackenbush of Illinois; seven children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Blount, Samuel J.
SAMUEL J. BLOUNT, deceased, far., Sec. 11; was born in Richmond, N.Y., on July 6, 1815; he lived there with his parents till he was 21 years of age, engaged in farming, until his coming to this county (1836), when he first worked for William Gooding, on Sec. 3, and resided always in the neighborhood of "Gooding's Grove;" in 1845, he purchased the claim to the farm his widow now resides on, and lived there until his decease, Feb. 28, 1878; has been Postmaster at "Gooding's Grove" many years, Justice of the Peace, School Trustee, Road Commissioner, Collector and Supervisor. Married Mrs. Caroline A. Bliss (daughter of James Gooding, Jr., and widow of Philenzo P. Bliss), in Homer Township, Jan. 3, 1841; Mrs. Blount had one child by Mr. Bliss, Philenzo P., Jr., born June 16, 1839, and eight children by Mr. Blount - Rhoda, born Nov. 12, 1841; James, born in April, 1843, died in Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 11, 1862, from disease contracted in the army; George, born Nov. 17, 1844; Mary M., Dec. 5, 1846; Caroline, June 2, 1849; Elva Lucretia, Dec. 3, 1851; Frank A., July 22, 1854, and Azuba, Oct. 17, 1857. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Board, David J.

DAVID J. BOARD, druggist and farmer, Peotone; born in Passaic Co., N.J., April 28, 1820, living there until 11 years of age, when he attended the Crane Boarding School, at Caldwell, N.J., for four years; then to New York City; employed in jobbing dry goods until the panic of 1837, when he retired to his studies at Bellville; then to Morristown, where he finished his studies, preparatory to the study of law, which he commenced in 1840, with J.J. Scofield, at the above place, where he remained four years, being admitted to the bar in 1844, when he removed to Paterson, N.J., and commenced practice, which he followed until 1852, when, on account of ill health, he abandoned his profession and made an overland trip to California, where he engaged as Treasurer of a mining company; also run hotel, ferry, dairy and ranch; selling out his interest, he returned to New Jersey in 1854; remaining there a short time, he came to Jackson Co., Ill., and contracted to supply the I.C. R.R. with supplies for building the road, which business he followed until the completion of the road in that section; coming to Will Co. in 1857, he located in Will Tp., farming, and in 1858, he again contracted with the I.C. R.R. to supply ties and fuel at different points on the line of the road, which he continued until 1861, in connection with running stores at different points upon the line of the road; he then engaged for about two years in the manufacture of staves, at Ashley, Ill., which he followed until the tax being placed upon whisky, he sold his interest to the Ashley Woolen-Mill; removing his family to Monee, Will Co., he went to Huntsville, Ala., where he engaged in running the Huntsville House and speculating in Government vouchers, cotton, etc., remaining until the following season, when, selling out his interest, he came North and attended his stock of upward of 700 head of cattle, which he had carried over the previous winter; in 1865, he located upon his farm and gave his attention to farming and raising blooded stock, until 1877, a period of twelve years, when he purchased an interest in the drug business, which business he now follows, under the firm name of Board & Shumway. He was married in November, 1844, to Miss Susan P. Lewis; she was born in New Jersey; they have five children by this union, viz., James L., Mary E., Ellsworth M., William and Nathaniel. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boardman, Franklin
FRANKLIN BOARDMAN, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; this gentleman is one of the best known farmers in Wheatland Tp.; was born in Colchester, Vt., March 15, 1818, and is the son of Amos and Harriett (Ames) Boardman; father was born in Burlington, Vt., October, 1789; was a farmer, and also engaged in the lumber business; was a soldier of the war of 1812; he died March 17, 1877; mother was born in Vermont July 22, 1791; died July 29, 1846. Mr. Boardman was raised on his father's farm; in 1844, he emigrated West, via canal and lake to Chicago; thence by wagon and team to Will Co.; he first lived with his uncle two years; then to the present homestead; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming. Mr. Boardman has held several offices of public trust; was Supervisor in 1854, 1855 and 1856; has held office as Township School Treasurer since 1852; was appointed Postmaster at East Wheatland in about 1870. Mr. Boardman is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Baptist Church of Plainfield. He was married Sept. 2, 1842, to Mina Bates, of Colchester, Vt., daughter of George Bates, who was born in Thomson, Conn., 1786, died about 1875, and Mary (Hine) Bates, born in Colchester, Vt., March 1, 1788; died in the fall of 1874. Mr. Boardman came West and landed in Chicago, having but $33 in money; with hard labor and good management, to-day owns a fine improved farm.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boardman, Horace
HORACE BOARDMAN, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., July 25, 1819; in August, 1831, he came West with the family, his father settling on the farm where his son now lives; of his father, was one of the early pioneers of this section, much appears in the body of this work; he died May 30, 1877, at the advanced age of 83 years, and his ashes rest peacefully in the beautiful little cemetery on the homestead; Horace remained at home till 28 years of age, when he moved to Grand Traverse Bay, Mich., for the purpose of engaging in lumbering; here he remained six years, and, in 1853, returned to Illinois; in the spring of 1864, he moved to Wisconsin, and remained three years; in March, 1867, he returned to Illinois, and has since resided at the old homestead. He was married May 25, 1843, to Laura A. Farr, a native of New York; she died April 16, 1846; his second marriage, to Emily Cowles, a native of New York, occurred Sept. 3, 1849; she died May 2, 1862; his third marriage, to Mrs. Isabella Lewis (Emerson), widow of Chauncey Lewis, was celebrated April 28, 1863; from first marriage, two children were born - Ellen A., Maria A.; from second, three - James C., Abby M., Walker B.; from third, six - George E., Fannie E., Frank H., Harry G., Edith L., Charles Roy. Owns 248 acres in Du Page Tp.; in addition to his farming, he also keeps a large number of cows for dairying purposes; on his farm, in 1846, was operated the first McCormick reaper ever used in the limits of Will Co.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bobzien, John F.
JOHN F. BOBZIEN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; was born in Germany, A.D., 1844; came to the United States in 1855, and to this State in the same year; he has been a resident of Will Co. for the past four years; his farm consists of eighty-five acres, valued at $3,000. He was married to Miss Sophia Wishhoer, who was born in Germany, A.D., 1849; they have two children - John and Frederick.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boeken, B.B.
B.B. BOEKEN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany April 16, 1811; came to the United States in 1852, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his pursuit from his settlement in the county until 1854 was that of a boot and shoemaker; his farm consists of 122 acres, valued at $6,000. He was married to Miss Caroline Lehman, who was born in Germany Feb. 24, 1824; they have three children, viz., Charles, Theodore and Carolina. Since Mr. Boeken's residence in the township he has held the office of School Director twenty years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bogardus
Byron Bogardus Pension File - Civil War 30 SEP 1861 IL
19th IL, Musician Band 19th IL Volunteer Infantry
CW Pension Application #1083366
Pension Certification # 871947
Discharged March 1862 NY.
He married before the Civil War to Mary Louise Sherman on 1 Jan 1857 in Lockport, Will, IL. Mary was only about 14 when they married according to the 1860 census of Will, IL, having been born in either NY or PA. Two daughters were born to them, Emma and Sarah or "Sadie" as well as a son, Byron Frank. Byron was called into service for the Union, serving in the 19th IL as a musician in the band. He served from 30 Sep 1861 and was discharged March 1862 whereupon he returned home. He and Mary enlarged their family adding Minerva or "Minnie" - the family moved to Van Buren, MI where his parents, Joseph and Sarah moved as well. Once settled in Van Buren, Byron and Frank had another daughter, which they named Mary May Clara, who was born in 1868. Tragedy was to strike the young family when, in 1869 Mary Louise died in Van Buren County leaving Byron with four young children. The children are found living with a Fannie Bogardus who is living with a John Ball , wife Ann Bentley Sherman Ball, who has been discovered to be the mother of Mary L. Sherman. We have no idea where Byron was in 1870 but in 1877 Byron married Kitty Yetterin in MO.
Bryan and Kittie as well as Frank and May Clara moved to Seattle Washinton between 1877 and 1885 Seattle was destroyed in a fire in 1889. They left Seattle and moved to California. [Submitted by Norita Shepherd Moss]

Bohlander, Mrs. J.P.
MRS. J.P. BOHLANDER, proprietress of American Hotel, Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in New Jersey Dec. 20, 1829, and is the widow of the late J.P. Bohlander, deceased, who was born in Germany Sept. 9, 1829, and who died Sept. 16, 1877; he was one of our early settlers in Will Co. They were married April 23, 1853; they have had seven children, viz., Alice V., Alda A., J. Frank, Rhoda, George W., Kate L. and Carrie M. The farm of Mrs. B. consists of thirty-three acres; farm and village property valued at $6,000.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boughton, Warren W.
WARREN W. BOUGHTON, deceased, Wheatland Tp.; the subject of this sketch was among the first settlers of Wheatland Tp.; was born in Genesee Co., N.Y., Feb. 10, 1817, and was the son of Orris and Sibyl Ann (Newel) Boughton, who emigrated West, with six children, to Illinois, and settled in Wheatland Tp., Will Co., May, 1842; here they set out in farming. Orris Boughton died in August, 1843, at 61 years of age; his wife, Sibyl Ann, died in February, 1860. Mr. Warren W. Boughton married Mary Scott, born in Geauga Co., Ohio, Jan. 9, 1822. Mr. Boughton, in 1850, started for the gold-field of California, and died on his way, leaving a wife and two children - Newel J., who was a soldier in the late war; enlisted (1861) in Co. L, Boulton's Battery, and served until the close of the war; was honorably discharged; he died in 1876. William D. is working on the old homestead, engaged in farming; was born in Wheatland Tp., Will Co., Ill., Feb. 28, 1846. Married Miss Emma J. Boardman, daughter of Franklin and Mina (Bates) Boardman, who settled in Will Co. in 1844.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bovee, John
JOHN BOVEE, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Wilmington; born in Wyoming Co., N.Y., Feb. 19, 1831; removed to Cattaraugus Co., of that State, in 1836; thence to Crawford Co., Penn., in 1841; came to Illinois in July, 1854, locating in Rockville Tp., Kankakee Co. Owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000. Served as School Trustee one term. Married in 1861 to Miss Sarah A. Frazer, who was born in Wesley Tp., this county; two children - Frank and Mary.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bowen, Albert W.
ALBERT W. BOWEN, retired, Wilmington; born in Berkshire Co., Mass., Feb. 6, 1803, but removed in early childhood with his father's family to Oneida Co., N.Y., this and Herkimer Co. being his home for many years; in 1827, he graduated at the Western College of Physicians and Surgeons at Fairfield, N.Y., and, six years later, removed to Illinois, locating in Joliet in the spring of 1834, where he engaged in the practice of his profession; in December of the following year, he went to Vandalia, then the State Capital, at his own expense, for the purpose of having Will County set off and the county seat located in Joliet; in 1836, he partially gave up the practice of medicine, and engaged in mercantile business, under the firm name of A.W. Bowen & Co., and the following year purchased a half-interest of Thomas and Joseph Cox in the present city of Wilmington (then called Winchester); in 1838-39, he built the Wilmington Mill, which was the first flouring-mill built here, and, the same season, sold his store to Gov. Matteson, giving his special attention for several years thereafter to the practice of medicine; in 1849, it became necessary for him to devote a greater share of his time to his business interests at Wilmington, and, in the fall of that year, he removed his family. He served as the Treasurer of the Board of School Trustees for several terms; also served as member of the Town Board and City Council. Married in March, 1831, to Miss Mary C. Shoemaker, who was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y.; four children by this union - Rodney S., Major of the 100th Ill. V.I.; was wounded at the battle of Franklin Dec. 1, 1864, and died of wounds on the 3rd. As the Doctor was among the first settlers of the county, much more will be found concerning him in the general history of the county; also the separate histories of the cities of Joliet and Wilmington given in this work.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bowen, H.F.
H.F. BOWEN, farmer, Sec. 16; P.O. Lockport; was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., April 10, 1812; he lived there until the age of 20, when he went to Plymouth, Mich., and remained there ten years, carrying on mercantile business and school teaching; in 1850, he came to Chicago, remaining there nearly a year, and then returned to Plymouth, Mich.; about a year after, he returned to Chicago, and went from there to Marengo, McHenry Co., and taught school; in the fall of 1852, having moved to this county, he purchased the farm upon which he now resides. Has been Town Clerk four years. Married first wife, Miss Mary T. Bennett, from near Rochester, N.Y., in Plymouth, Mich., in April, 1835; she died in June, 1850; they had three children - Lowell M., John M. and Charles H., all dead. He married his second wife (widow of Alonzo Ingersoll) Feb. 20, 1852; she died Oct. 5, 1861; he married his present wife (widow of David E. Davis) April 17, 1862; they have one child (adopted) - Mary E., daughter of David E. Peck, brother of Mrs. H.F. Bowen, born Feb. 9, 1863, in Des Moines, Iowa. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boyd, James
JAMES BOYD, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in the Isle of Man Feb. 3, 1813, and is the son of James and Ann (Neen) Boyd; his father was a tailor by trade, but was engaged in farming. Mr. Boyd was engaged in working on a farm owned by a Bishop of the Episcopal Church, and in May, 1851, with his wife, Ann Kennaugh, born in the Isle of Man in May, 1813, emigrated to America and landed in New York City; thence to Fairport, Painesville and Cleveland, Ohio; in May, 1855, came to Illinois and settled in Lake Co.; here engaged in farming until 1859; then to Will Co., and settled on a farm owned by William Trainor; lived there one year; he then purchased forty acres of the present farm he now owns at $25 per acre; Mr. Boyd has made all the improvements on his farm, it being very wild when he first settled here; when he first came to America he was worth about $7; with hard labor, he is to-day one of the successful farmers of Custer Tp. Five children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boyer, Charles E.
CHARLES E. BOYER, contractor, Lockport; Mr. Boyer was born June 5, 1813, in Reading, Penn.; in 1837, he came West, and located in Chicago, engaging at once in mercantile life; in 1839, he came to Lockport and commenced business in connection with Messrs. Ayers & Iliff, under the firm name of Ayers, Iliff & Co.; he soon withdrew from the firm, and took a contract on the I. & M. Canal; in the Fall of 1844, he went to Galva, and engaged in a similar work; in 1850, he went to California and remained two years; during his stay, he took a contract on the Bear River Canal, and later, on the levee at Sacramento City; returning to Lockport in the summer of 1852, he was appointed Assistant Superintendent of the I. & M. Canal, and had charge of the Eastern Division; this position he held some ten or twelve years; the last years of his life were devoted mostly to dealing in real estate; the Jacksonville Division of the A. & St. Louis R.R., extending from Bloomington to Jacksonville, was built under his immediate supervision. He was married April 14, 1840, to Elizabeth Runyon, a native of Ohio; has had five children, three living - Erurna B., Julius A. and Florence G. Owns 263 acres. Mr. Boyer was a staunch Democrat, though he took but little active interest in politics. He was chosen a member of the Legislature in 1863, and at the time of his decease, which occurred Sept. 21, 1868, he was a candidate for a seat in the State Senate. His accomplished wife and family reside in one of the most eligible properties in the city.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Boyer, J.A.
J.A. BOYER, proprietor Lemont stone quarries, Lockport; was born in Lockport, Will Co., Ill., Oct. 30, 1850; on leaving the schools of his native village at the age of 12, he attended a select school at Chicago for some time, and also was a member of Bryant & Stratton's Business College two winters; the last school he attended was kept by Dr. Parks, of Chicago, located near Graceland Cemetery; at the age of 16, he left off attending school, and his father having a contract on the deepening of the I. & M. Canal, young J.A. acted in the capacity of clerk for him; his father having died in 1868, he finished his contract and then engaged in opening up a stone quarry; in the spring of 1869, he opened a quarry just north of Lockport, but finding it would not pay, he abandoned it; in the spring of 1871, he began operations at Lemont; he operates three quarries with a large force, and finds ready sale for all his material. He was married Nov. 25, 1874, to Helen C. Cook, a native of Chicago, Ill.; has two children - Julius A. and Charles E. The Catholic Church, the finest and most costly of any in the town, is constructed out of material from his quarries.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bradley, William
WILLIAM BRADLEY, M.D., physician and surgeon, Lockport; was born in West Greece, Monroe Co., N.Y., Sept. 17, 1837; in 1860, he matriculated in the Geneva Medical College, from which he graduated in 1864, having completed a full course of study; he then returned home, and, in connection with his father, practiced his profession one year; in 1865, he came West and located in Lockport, his present place of residence, entering the employ of W.H. Kezler as clerk in his drug store; he also served Probert and Dr. Daggett, successive owners of the store, in the same capacity; in 1868, he opened a drug store for himself. Was married May 11, 1876, to Julia Parker, a native of New York; has two children - Gertrude and William. Republican; Congregationalist. He has practiced ever since he located in the town, but much of his practice has been confined to the office. He is a gentleman of fine social qualities, of a genial disposition, such as is calculated to draw upon him a host of friends, and is deservedly popular.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Braidwood, James
JAMES BRAIDWOOD, proprietor of the Braidwood coal mines, Braidwood. The subject of this sketch is the founder of the city of Braidwood, which was named by Mr. John H. Daniel, Braidwood in honor of Mr. James Braidwood, who claims that he built the first house in Braidwood, had the first house to burn, sunk the first coal shaft in Braidwood, his wife had the first child born and the first child to die in Braidwood. Mr. Braidwood was born in Scotland March 1, 1831, and is the son of James and Ellen (Hercules) Braidwood, of Scotland; his father was engaged in the mining business, and when Mr. Braidwood was but 9 years of age he commenced coal mining; he then worked at machinery and boiler making; was four years engineer on a steamship; shipwrecked twice; two years with the East India Company; in Oct., 1863, he landed in America, at New York City; went to Middlesex, Penn.; here but a short time; he then came West, to Illinois and settled in Belleville; then to Danville, and in Aug., 1865, came to Braidwood; here he set out in coal mining, in working for the Chicago & Wilmington Coal Co.; was in the company that sunk the Eagle Shaft, near the depot, in 1869; he went to Champaign Co., Ill., and was engaged there in sinking a shaft for coal; after working for six months, abandoned without finding any coal; he lost $6,000 cash; he returned to Braidwood and commenced the coal business on the present shaft he now runs, which he has been very successful in; when Mr. Braidwood came to America, he was financially very poor, but with hard labor and good management, to-day he ranks as one of the successful miners of Braidwood. Married in 1854, to Miss Ellen Ralston, by whom he has had twelve children, eight living; his oldest son, James, at 17 years of age, July 16, 1871, was struck by lightning and instantly killed. Mr. B. is a Republican in politics and a Presbyterian in religion. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Braidwood, John R.
JOHN R. BRAIDWOOD, Secretary and Manager Braidwood Coal Co., Braidwood; was born in Elderslie, Scotland, March 29, 1855, and is the son of James and Ellen Braidwood. Mr. Braidwood at 10 years of age, entered the coal mines and has been engaged in the coal business ever since; in August, 1865, he emigrated to America and settled in Braidwood; here he has remained ever since. Married in 1877 to Miss Hamilton, of Scotland.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brase, C.H.
C.H. BRASE, Principal of the German School, Crete. The subject of this sketch is a self-made man; was born in Hanover, Germany, Sept. 14, 1834, and is the son of Henry Brase, a tailor by trade. Mr. Brase attended the schools of Germany, and received a high-school education; he taught school in Germany in the winters of 1849 and 1850, this being his first experience in the teaching of school. In 1851, he emigrated to America, and his first school was taught in Morgan Co., Mo.; here he remained until 1865, then to La Fayette Co., Mo., engaged in teaching until 1873; he then came to Crete; here he has been engaged in teaching ever since; the Crete school is very popular and well patronized, and reflects great credit upon Mr. Brase in his excellent manner of teaching. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Braun, Joseph
, proprietor of the Apollo Hall, Joliet; was born in Erbach, Wurtember, Germany, May 27, 1837; when he was 14 years old, he was apprenticed to a tailor to learn the business; in April, 1855, he came to this country; spent a short time in Buffalo and in Canada West, coming to Joliet the same year, and starting in his present business, in which he has been successful; in 1856, he went to Minnesota and remained till 1859, with the exception of a short time spent in St. Louis and Quincy; he then went to Naperville, Ill., and remained till 1861 as clerk in Stenger's Brewery; in 1865, in company with Joseph Braun (another gentleman of the same name, since deceased) he built the Columbia brewery, and followed the brewery business till February, 1868, when he diposed of his interest to Mr. F. Sehring, the present proprietor; in 1874, he revisited his native country in company with Mr. John Reicherdt, and spent about four months in travel in all parts of Germany. He was married march 2, 1862, to Miss Frances C. Braun, of Joliet; she is a native of Soulnt, France, and came to this country at the same time with Mr. Braun; they have two children --- Mary M. and Willie K. Mr. Braun served as Street Commissioner in 1872. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Brauns, Gustavus
GUSTAVUS BRAUNS, merchant, Crete; is one of the best-known and highly respected business men of Crete; was born in Hanover, Germany, Sept. 24, 1832, and is the son of John A.F. and Henrietta (Bartels) Brauns, of Germany; father was a minister of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Brauns commenced his first experience in business life as a clerk in a dry goods store; here he served as an apprentice for five years; then in a wholesale notion house, specialty of silk ribbons; here he remained until 1855; he then started for America, landed in New York City Aug. 1, 1855; here he first found employment as agent for artists' outfits; then in a very large house-fitting establishment, and remained there until 1856; he then started West for Illinois; arrived in Chicago; here he remained about four months out of employment; he formed the acquaintance of a minister located in Crete, who advised him to go to Crete; he arrived in Crete in 1856, and accepted a clerkship with Charles A. Miller in a general store at $10 per month and board; here was his first start, and from then up to the present date he has been very successful in business; he first entered business in Crete with his brother Leopold, known as L. & G. Brauns; these gentlemen also owned a branch house in Chicago, and did a very large business, but the panic of 1857 drove them to an assignment in 1858, but they, with hard work and good management, paid every dollar of their indebtedness; to-day Mr. Brauns owns one of the largest stores of dry goods, drugs and groceries to be found in Crete; also is owner of a large hay-press; has handled in two years 4,500 tons of hay; Postmaster; was appointed in 1860. A Republican in politics. Married Miss Sophia Deersen, of Germany; five children - four boys and one girl. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brayton, J.H.
J.H. BRAYTON, merchant, Peotone; dealer in clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps and gents' furnishing goods; born in New York State, where he lived until 7 years of age, when he removed with his parents to Manteno, Kankakee Co., Ill., living there until 21 years of age, when he removed to Joliet, Will Co., where he lived one year, when he came to Peotone and engaged in the above business, with Robert Wells, for six months, when he purchased the interest of his partner, enlarged the stock, and now keeps the only exclusive stock of the kind in Peotone. He married, Dec. 10, 1873, Ella Christian; she was born Feb. 27, 1854, in Du Page Co., Ill. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Breidert, John
JOHN BREIDERT, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Bremen; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany June 24, 1812; came to the United States in 1846, and this State and settled in Frankfort in the same year; his farm consists of 100 acres, valued at $6,000. He was married to Miss Christina Press, who was born in Germany; they have had seven children, six of whom are living, viz., Elizabeth, Christina, Gottlieb, John, Margaret and George; deceased, Peter. The farm of Mr. B. is situated on Secs. 12 and 11.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brinckerhoff, John
JOHN BRINCKERHOFF, far., Sec. 31; P.O. Lockport; was born in Watervliet, N.Y., May 15, 1836; he moved to this county with his parents in 1838, and worked upon the farm until the age of 22; in 1860, he crossed the plains to Pike's Peak, returning the same fall; in 1866, he went to Chicago and carried on the grocery business two years; he returned to this township; in 1869, he purchased from his father the homestead upon which he now resides, containing 160 acres. Has been School Director three terms, and is such at present. He married Rebecca Breckenridge, of Canada in New Lenox Township, Aug. 19, 1858; she was born in Canada Dec. 7, 1839; they have six children - Clarence Eugene, born Nov. 9, 1859; George Erwin, March 8, 1862; Martin Schuyler, Jan. 29, 1866; John Jerome, Jan. 18, 1869; Howard Horace, Aug. 19, 1872, and Gertrude Rebecca, Oct. 14, 1875. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brinckerhoff, Martin B.
MARTIN B. BRINCKERHOFF, retired farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Lockport; was born in Albany, N.Y., July 11, 1806; he attended school to the age of 14, when his father sent him to the country to learn farming, receiving only his board; at the age of 20, he worked his own farm in Albany Co., and remained on it up to 1837; he came West in 1838 and settled on farm Sec. 31, and continued such up to 1869, when his son purchased the farm, with whom he has since resided. Has been School Director and Road Commissioner. He married Eliza Van Duser, of Madison Co., N.Y., in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Dec. 24, 1827; she was born in Madison Co., N.Y., in 1808, and died in Homer Tp., Jan. 4, 1873; they had seven children, three living - Gertrude (now Mrs. Mellen), born April 5, 1829; John, born May 15, 1836; Mary (now Mrs. Harris), Feb. 4, 1834, and four dead - John, died Feb. 5, 1832; James, March 7, 1833; Martin, died at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 8, 1863, from disease contracted in the army, and Emma Cecilia, in September, 1870. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Broadbent, John
JOHN BROADBENT, hotel, Braidwood; was born in Yorkshire, England, Dec. 12, 1833, and is the son of William and Sarah Broadbent. Mr. Broadbent emigrated to America in 1856. He married Miss Jane Crepps of England; after marriage, made his residence in Morris, Grundy Co., Ill.; from there he came to Braidwood in 1870. In 1871, erected the present hotel; this business he has been engaged in ever since. The Braidwood House, very conveniently located, being adjacent to the depot, is a first-class hotel.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Broadie, Ann
MRS. ANN BROADIE, farmer; P.O. New Lenox; one of the earliest settlers; was born in Brown Co., Ohio, Feb. 28, 1832; came to this State with her father's family when she was 3 years old, and settled in New Lenox, Will Co., where she has since made her home. She was married May 11, 1854, to the late Robert J. Broadie, deceased, who was born in Ohio Feb. 5, 1829, and who died Dec. 21, 1873; they have had five children, three of whom are living - Esther Ann, John C. and Sarah A.; deceased - Lydia and Anna. The farm of Mrs. Broadie consists of 735 acres, valued at $40,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brockman, Sophia
MRS. SOPHIA BROCKMAN, farmer; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany, A.D., 1828; came to the United States in 1851, and to this State, and settled in Greengarden, Will Co., in the same year. She is the widow of the late Henry Brockman, deceased; they have had six children - Karl, Lena, Henry, Mena, Lizzie and Etta. The farm of Mrs. Brockman contains 200 acres, valued at $10,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bronk, Peter A.
PETER A. BRONK, farming, Sec. 3; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Albany Co., N.Y., July 18, 1836. He married Miss Harriet Storrs Oct. 8, 1858; she was born in Clinton Co., N.Y., Sept. 21, 1839; they had eight children, six living - Eugene J., Ephron, Edward C., Rossie, Prentice S. and Emmit. He lived in New York about eighteen months; he then moved to Illinois with his parents, who settled in Kendall Co., where he lived until 1865; he then moved to Manhattan Tp., Will Co., and engaged in farming, remaining there twelve years; in the spring of 1878, he came to his present place; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 240 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor and management. His parents, Ephron Bronk and Mrs. Charlotte Van Dolfston-Bronk, were natives of New York; they settled in Kendall Co. in 1838, and died Sept. 22, 1865, and Sept. 22, 1869, respectively. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brooks, A.B.
A.B. BROOKS, farmer, Sec. 10, P.O. Lockport; was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., Feb. 14, 1809; his parents moved to Delaware County when he was 10 years old, and remained there until 1826, when they moved to Erie Co., N.Y.; in 1837, he moved to this county, his parents following. His father, Benjamin, died on the farm his son Alonzo now resides on, in 1864, and his mother, Annie, in 1836; in 1839, Alonzo moved to his present farm, where he has ever since resided. Has been Justice of the Peace nearly twenty years, Assessor, Highway Commissioner, School Director, President Homer Mutual Insurance Co. Married first wife, Annie Edmonds, of Delaware Co., N.Y., in October, 1831; she died October 14, 1837; they had one child - Joseph E., born October, 1833. He married second wife, Jane Weaver, in Homer Township, Aug. 29, 1838; she was born Jan. 20, 1807; they had five children, one living - Sterling A., born Jan. 21, 1848; four dead - William Harrison, Harrison and two who died at birth. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brooks, Joseph E.
JOSEPH E. BROOKS, farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Erie Co., N.Y., Oct. 12, 1833; he lived there until he was 4 years of age, and then came with his mother, in 1837, to this county, and after the death of his mother in October of same year, he went to live with Holder Sisson until the spring of 1838, when he lived with Wm. Frazer up to August, from which time until he was 21 he remained with his father, Alonzo; in 1867, he moved to the farm upon which he now resides. In 1869, he went to Cass Co., Mo., remaining four years, and then returned to this township, and has since lived on his farm. Has been School Director. Married Eunice Z. Coon, of Mokena, Will Co., Nov. 28, 1855; she was born Jan. 25, 1834; have three children - Louis D., born Oct. 5, 1856; William H., born Dec. 18, 1858, and Annis I., born Aug. 13, 1862. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, Ara
ARA BROWN deceased; was born in New York, near Syracuse, Feb. 19, 1820. He married Miss Martha Hougham Oct. 11, 1846; she was born in Butler Co., Ohio, April 6, 1824; they had thirteen children, seven living, viz., Sarah, Elias, Ara, Nancy Jane, Mary, Frank and Martha May. He lived in New York fourteen years, when, with his parents, he came to Will Co., Ill. (then Cook); this was in 1835; he settled in this township; his father, Peter Brown, was from New York; he died March 7, 1841, aged 59 years 10 months and 4 days; his mother was Miss Mary Teeple; she died Sept. 17, 1840, aged 55 years 9 months and 2 days; he lived with his parents until their death; he died on the old homestead Sept. 8, 1865.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, A.S.
A.S. BROWN, salesman, with Norton & Co., Lockport; was born in Lancaster, Lancaster Co., Penn., May 18, 1831; when 6 years of age, he came with the family to Ohio, his father settling near Canton, in Stark Co.; here he engaged in the coopering business, and his son under his tuition also learned the cooper's trade; after abandoning the trade, they engaged in farming; in 1849, the family came West, and settled in Wheatland Tp., Will Co., Ill.; at the age of 22, the subject of this sketch left home and began farming for himself; this he followed about twelve years; he then sold his farm and came to Lockport and opened a grocery store; this he operated four years; July 13, 1868, he entered the employ of Norton & Co. as salesman, which position he still occupies. He was married Oct. 27, 1853, to Susan Snyder, a native of Ohio; has four children living - Franklin, Eda, William and Carrie; six deceased. Mr. Brown is courteous and accommodating, and is justly popular as a business man.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, Edgar L.
EDGAR L. BROWN, farmer; P.O. Braidwood; was born in Genesee Co., N.Y., Aug. 20, 1837, and is the son of Miner M. and Mary M. Brown; his father was a farmer; was born in New York about 1811; he remained in New York until 1855; this year, with his family, they emigrated to Illinois and settled in Reed Tp., what is now known as Custer Tp.; here he purchased 320 acres of land at $4 per acre; was among the first settlers of Reed Tp.; made the improvements on his land and engaged in farming; then to Wilmington, where he was engaged in keeping a hotel; he died in 1864, with the consumption, leaving a wife and four children; his wife, Mary M. Brown, died in 1866. Mr. Edgar L. Brown emigrated West to Illinois with his parents; here he has been engaged in farming ever since. He married in 1864 to Miss Abbie C. Marshall, of Pennsylvania, by whom he has had six children, three living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, George S.
GEORGE S. BROWN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Tolland Co., Conn., May 18, 1825; came to this State in 1850, and settled in Mokena, where he remained two years; he removed from there to Lockport in 1852, and from there to New Lenox in 1876, where he now resides; his farm consists of eighty acres, valued at $5,000. Was married in New York Dec. 5, 1848, to Miss Martha A. Petteys, who was born in Wayne Co., N.Y., Dec. 23, 1830; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - Ida E., G.W., Rose Belle, Edward C.L. and Lillie May; deceased - Millard P. and Frankie. Mr. Brown was a participant in the Mexican war of 1846. In his boyhood, he had a curiosity to see the world, and travel; he, therefore, left his home at the age of 16, and set out for New London, where he shipped on board the ship Mystic, bound for the northwestern coast of North America; she left her port Sept. 14, 1844; he was discharged at the Sandwich Islands, and there shipped aboard the sloop Portsmouth, a man-of-war, for the Mexican service; he served two years, and was discharged at the close of the war at Boston, Mass., in May, 1848.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, Israel
ISRAEL BROWN, deceased, farmer, Sec. 11; was born in New Jersey, June 15, 1799; he first went to the State of New York, when quite a boy, and remained there until he was 21 years of age; he then went to Black Rock, N.Y., remaining there ten years, working as a wagon-maker; in 1822, he went to Canada, where he lived for thirty-six years carrying on the business of wagon-maker; in 1858, he came to this county and settled upon his farm where he resided up to the day of his decease, Sept. 7, 1873; his widow still lives upon the farm. He held the office of bailiff, seven or eight years, in Canada. Married Miss Jane B. Clark, of Black Rock, N.Y., Jan. 2, 1823; she was born in New Hampshire, Dec. 29, 1804; had eight children, Rodney A., born Oct. 25, 1823; Sarah Ann, in Sept. 20, 1825; Thomas W., April 7, 1828; Caroline, Dec. 7, 1831, died July 23, 1832; Mary Jane, born June 23, 1833, died March 11, 1868; Robert C., Sept. 23, 1836, died April 18, 1863, at Murfreesboro, Tenn., from disease contracted in army; Nancy S.W., Oct. 31, 1840, and Daniel C., born June 7, 1842. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, John,
of the firm of Houck & Brown, tanners and curriers, wholesale and retail dealers in sole leather, shoe findings, etc., Joliet; has for twenty-three years been a citizen of Will County , he is a native of the Isle of Man; was born on the 25th of November, 1826; served his apprenticeship at the tanner's trade in Douglas, Isle of Man, and followed the business there for ten years; he came to the United States in 1853; spent two years in New York City, and in 1855, came to Lockport, Will Co.; the following year he came to Joliet, and entered, upon his present business, which be has continued through the several changes in the firm that have taken place since that time; in 1863, the Joliet Tannery was built by Mack, Cleghorn & Co., of which firm Mr. Brown was a partner; he has attended strictly to his business, never taking any active part in political affairs, nor seeking office of any kind. He was married in the Spring of 1850, to Miss Catharine Kissack, of Douglas, Isle of Man; they have had ten children, six of whom are living-Richard J. (now in business in Chicago), Frank E., Eliza J., Charles H., George W., and William H. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Brown, J.D.
, druggist and chemist, Joliet; born in Raymertown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y., March 12, 1826; he received his academical education in Lyman Cross Academy, Troy, N.Y., completing the course in 1842 at the age of 16; he then engaged in the drug business with his uncle at Lansingburg, N.Y., where he remained three years. He emigrated West and located in the drug trade in Joliet in 1846, since which time he has been successfully engaged in the above business during a period of upward of thirty-two years; he is the senior member of the firm of J.H. Brown & Co., his brother, J.H., being the junior partner for the past nine years. He married in New York Sept. 10, 1846, to Adelia Brown; four children were the fruit of this union, two of whom are now living, viz., George and Mary M. Mrs. Brown died in September, 1855. His second marriage, to Emily G. Bartle, was celebrated in September 1858; three children have been born to them --- Eugene, Helen, and Horace. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Brown, Lewis
LEWIS BROWN, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Joliet; born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., June 2, 1827, where he attended school in winter and worked upon his father's farm in summer until 13 years of age, when in 1840, he removed with his father's family to Will Co., Ill.; he settled upon his present farm in 1863; owns 160 acres of well-improved land, valued at $60 per acre. He married Miss Christy Smithley, Oct. 19, 1871; she was born Oct. 13, 1839, in Westmoreland Co., Penn.; they are the parents of three children - Jennie Luella, born Oct. 21, 1872; Lydia May, born Feb. 17, 1875, died Feb. 19, 1876; Katie Bell, born June 2, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brown, R.S
., of the firm of Zarley & Co., publishers of the Joliet Signal, Is a native of Joliet; be was born Aug,-. 30, 1845 ; he is the son of R. D. Brown, who who came to Joliet from Rensselaer Co.. N. Y., in 1845, and still resides here; Mr. Brown was educated in the public schools of the city, and at the age of 17 entered the Signal office as an apprentice ; this was in 1862 ; he became familiar with every branch of the business, afterward becoming foreman, and in 1873, became a partner in the firm. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Brown, W.Z.
W.Z. BROWN, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Elwood; was born on his present place May 11, 1843. He married Miss Susan Gonter March 13, 1867; she was born near Joliet April 18, 1845; they had four children, three living, viz., Daniel N., George R. and Willis G. He began farming on his own account when 17 years old and has always lived on his present place. His father, John Brown (deceased), was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., Nov. 14, 1814, and died Dec. 15, 1848. He married Miss Susan Zarley; she was born in Scioto Co., Ohio, Jan. 2, 1820; but three of their children are living, viz., Sarah M., Mary E. and W.Z.; he was among the first settlers of this township, having settled here in 1834. Mr. W.Z. Brown's wife's father, Michael Gonter, was born in France Aug. 2, 1812, and died Nov. 11, 1873; he married Miss Catheron Arnholt Aug. 28, 1833; she was born in France May 3, 1808; they had four children, three living, viz., Catheron, Michael and Susan; they came to the United States in 1839, and settled near Joliet; in 1851, they came to this township. Mrs. Gonter lives here with her daughter.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bruce, James
JAMES BRUCE, quarryman; P.O. Joliet; born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Oct. 11, 1823, where he lived until 20 years of age, and followed the millwright business until he emigrated to America, in 1844, and settled in Will Co., Ill., and engaged as foreman on the Illinois & Michigan Canal until its completion, when he engaged with Norton & Co., at Lockport, as millwright, following this business two years, when he engaged in the quarry business, which he has since followed. He owns one-half of what is known as Bruce & Co.'s quarry, situated just east of the Illinois Penitentiary in Joliet. He was married July 12, 1852, to Jane Stephen; she was born in Scotland, Oct. 8, 1833; they are the parents of nine children; the living are Bella G., William, Margaret, Ebenezer, James and Harry; the deceased are Georgiana, Frank and Jennie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Brumund, D.
D. BRUMUND, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Mokena; was born in Germany Jan. 23, 1815; came to the United States in 1849, and settled in Will Co., Ill.; he has been a resident of Frankfort Tp. since 1850; his farm consists of 300 acres, valued at $18,000. He was married to Miss Lena Folkers; they have seven children, viz., J.H., Peter, Delia, Lena, Julia, Helen and Eliza.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Buchholz, Frederick
FREDERICK BUCHHOLZ, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Jan. 24, 1820; came to the United States in 1850, and to this State in the same year, and settled in Du Page Co., where he remained three years, when he removed to Will; his farm consists of 240 acres, valued at $10,000. He was married to Miss Henrietta Hakk, who was born in Germany, and was previously married to Miss Caroline Sonnimaker, now deceased. They have had seven children, viz., Henry, Sophia, Mary, Tina, Charley, Minne and Lena. Since Mr. B.'s residence in the township he has held the offices of Road Commissioner and School Director fifteen years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Buck, George A.
GEORGE A. BUCK, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Berkshire Co., Mass., Sept. 10, 1829. He married Miss Helen C. Wolcott May 12, 1856; she was born in same place, and died April 16, 1857. His present wife was Miss Sarah H. Baker, married March 22, 1859; she was born in Rensselaer Co., N.Y., Oct. 20, 1836; they had ten children, six living, viz., Helen C., Laura C., Werden, Jennie T., Kate F. and Fred A. He lived in Massachusetts until 1856, being engaged in farming and general merchandise, also teaching; he then came West and settled in Lake Co., Ill., where he remained about six months, and then came to Will Co., and settled on his present place, part of which he bought in 1854, while here on a visit; he owns 640 acres in this township, and has improved over 3,000 acres. He has been Town Clerk, Supervisor and Town Treasurer.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bump, Jefferson
JEFFERSON BUMP, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Lockport; was born in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., Jan. 31, 1826, and remained there until he was 8 years of age; in the fall of 1834, he came West with his parents and settled in Will Co.; in 1852, he crossed the plains to California, and prospected in the mines and tended pack-trains of mules across the mountains until 1859, when he returned to this county and purchased the farm in 1860 upon which he resides, containing eighty acres, being one-half the land originally preempted by his parents. Has been School Director three years. Married Miss Fannie Mariah Rockafellow (daughter of James and Nancy Rockafellow, of Chautauqua Co., N.Y.) in Plainfield Dec. 20, 1860; she was born April 20, 1844; they have six children - Sarah Angelina, born Nov. 4, 1861; Nelson James, May 7, 1864; Clarence Josiah, Oct. 25, 1863; Nancy Helen, Sept. 20, 1867; Frank Gile, July 20, 1869, and Lucy Loretta, born June 28, 1873. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bump, Leander
LEANDER BUMP, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Lockport; was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., May 7, 1809; his parents moved to Crawford Co., Penn., when he was 6 years of age, and after remaining there some four years, went to Chautauqua Co., N.Y., and after remaining twelve or fourteen years, moved West in the fall of 1834, and settled in Will Co., in this township, on the farm he and his brother Jefferson now reside on. His father, Jacob, died Aug. 12, 1849, and his mother, Lydia, April 16, 1852; they were among the first settlers in this county, and with their families passed through the many hardships and trials of a pioneer's life. He married Miss Elizabeth Lucy Dixon, of Milton, Mowbray, Leicestershire, Eng., in Homer Tp., April 13, 1859; she was born Sept. 1, 1839; they have four children - Walter James, born Sept. 4, 1860; Florence Ann, born Dec. 16, 1863, and died May 15, 1876; Lydia Jane, born Sept. 25, 1867, and George Jacob, born July 17, 1869. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bump, Thomas
THOMAS BUMP, deceased, farmer, Sec. 24; was born in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., June 7, 1819; he came to this county in 1834 with his parents, who were among the pioneers of this county, and who laid claim to the land he afterward purchased from them, and upon which he lived up to the day of his death, Aug. 25, 1877. He married Miss Mary Fagen, of N.Y. State, in 1840; she died June 5, 1869; they had ten children, six living - Lucinda, born Jan. 11, 1841; Jacob, Jan. 30, '43; Albert, Nov. 6, 1845; Alonzo, June 20, 1847; Lydia A., Jan. 25, 1849; Leonard, Dec. 5, 1855, and Oscar R., Dec. 23, 1861; four dead, Albert, born Nov. 6, 1845, and died April 26, 1864, in Washington, from disease contracted in the army; Henry J., born April 4, 1858, died Nov. 24, 1861; Alfred J., born Oct. 25, 1863, and died Aug. 24, 1864, and one born Aug. 19, 1854, and died Aug. 21, 1854, in infancy. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Burden, Alexander
, merchant tailor, Joliet; born in Comrie, Perthshire, Scotland, on the 8th day of April, 1832; he learned the trade of a tailor in his native country, and, when about 17 years of age, left Scotland and came to America; the first five years he worked at his trade in Lowell, Mass., Oneida Co., N. Y., Ottawa, Can. and Cincinnati, Ohio; in March, 1853, he came to Joliet and has continued in the merchant tailoring business here ever since. He was married March 3, 1863, to Miss Elizabeth Jamieson of New York Mills, Oneida Co., N. Y,; she was a native of Loch Winnock, Scotland, and came to this country in 1849; she died Aug. 29, 1877, leaving four children; David, Jennie, Maggie and Willie. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Burdick, Harrison
HARRISON BURDICK, farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Plainfield. Methodist; Republican. Owns seventy-nine acres of land, valued at $65 per acre; is a son of Lorin Burdick (deceased); Mr. Burdick was born in Westford, Vt., March 31, 1833; he came to this State with his parents in 1836, and resided with his parents until he was 21 years of age, during which time he assisted his father on the farm. Married Harriet Paul; she was born in England in 1834, and died Sept. 21, 1870, leaving eight children - three boys and five girls - Henry, Alson, Seraph, Iantha, Mary, Charlotte, Alma and James Riley. Mr. Burdick settled where he now resides in 1865. Has not married since the death of his wife.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Burdick, Lorin
LORIN BURDICK, deceased, farmer; was born in Westford, Chittenden Co., Vt., April 30, 1797; was the second white child born in that town; he resided there until his 33rd year, and then went to New York State, where he remained three years. Married Esther, a daughter of the Rev. Samuel Bixby, now deceased; she was born in Essex, Vt., Aug. 12, 1796. Mr. B. came to this county in 1836; remained about nine months, and returned for his family; he immediately engaged in farming; he raised his first crop on the farm of the late Reuben Flagg, Esq.; he then farmed on some land belonging to Squire Matthews, after which he pre-empted 160 acres of land (what is now known as the McNeff farm); he resided on that until about the year 1858; he then settled at the place of his late residence, and continued to reside there until the day of his death, which occurred Aug. 3, 1878; his death was caused by taking Paris green, by mistake, for sulphur. Mr. Burdick was a volunteer in the war of 1812, and was in the battle of Plattsburg. He had one son in the Mexican war; he died in Mexico; he also had three sons in the late war. The names of his children are - Maria (deceased), Betsy, Samuel (served in an Iowa regiment during the late war), Charity (deceased), Mary, Joalma, Amarilla, Timothy, Lorin (deceased), Harrison, Seraph, Lewis and Josiah (served in the 100th I.V.I. during the late war), and Susan. Mr. Burdick hauled the first timber for the Court House in Joliet; he hauled it from Chicago, his team consisting of six yokes of oxen; he hewed the first timber for the first bridge, first mill, first hotel, first church (Methodist), in Plainfield; he burned the first coal-pit in Plainfield; he, with Mr. Bump and Brunson, laid out the first grave-yard (now the Plainfield Cemetery); Mr. Brunson was the first person buried there. Mr. Burdick's descendants number over one hundred; his widow is still living, and resides on the homestead. Mr. Burdick united with the Church in 1834; he died with Christian hope.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Burke, Rev. Maurice Francis,
Pastor of the St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Joliet; was born in County Limerick, Ireland, May 5, 1845, when but a child, he accompanied his parents to this country ; they came directly to Chicago when about 18 years old, he entered the old University of St. Mary's of the Lake in Chicago; previously to this, he had taken a commercial course at Bryant & Stratton's Business College in Chicago; in 1866, he went to Rome and spent nine years as a student in the American College; he was ordained a priest on the 22d of May, 1875, by Cardinal Patrizi, Vicar General of Rome, under Pope Pius IX, after which he returned to Chicago, previously, however, spending a few months in traveling in Italy, Switzerland, Germany, England and Ireland; soon after his return, he was appointed Assistant Pastor of St. Mary's Church in Chicago, and remained as such until his appointment as Pastor of St. Mary's Church, Joliet, April 27, 1878. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the Co unty ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Burke, T.
livery, feed and sale stable, Joliet; born in Lowell, Mass., May 11, 1840, removing when quite young to Joliet, Ill., where he has since lived, being engaged in various pursuits in his youth when not attending school; his first business eenterprise was in trucking to which he has added the livery, feed and sale stable, carrying on the only business of this kind west of the river, and keeping a good stock of horses and carriages for rent which receive his personal attention, and are always found in first-class order. He married July 11, 1856, in Joliet to Mary Hennesy; she w as a native of Ireland, they have by this union eleven children now living; viz., Mary A., John R., Bernard, Helen, Katie, Anna, Thomas F., William, Sarah, Hattie, and Alice. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the Co unty ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Burkhart, John D
. - Supervisor of DuPage Township, occupies a pleasant home on section 36. He is a well-informed and enterprising man, has been engaged in some form of agricultural work since boyhood and commands the respect of his fellow-men. He was born in Cook County, October 24, 1858, was educated in the publick schools and finished the High School studies at Lemont. Subsequently he attended a business college in Chicago, thus fitting himself for a practical spere of life.
In 1869, our subject removed with his parents to Will County, here growing to manhood and beginning his personal career which has not yet taken him from the paternal fireside. He is a Republican and has been called upon by his associates to fill several official stations. For two terms he was Justice of the Peace, one year Assessor, and in the spring of 1890 was elected Township Supervisor.
Henry Burkhart, father of our subject, was born in Saxony, Germany, January 26, 1819, to George and Susan C. Burkhart, also native of that kingdom. He was reared to manhood, receiving a fair education in his native tongue, to which since coming to America he has by personal effort added a knowledge of English reading and writing. In 1845 he emigrated, sailing from Bremen to New York in forty-two days, and going at once to Erie County, N.Y., where he worked as a farm hand for seveal years. There he was married, October 31, 1848, to Miss Fredericka Dorre, a German lady of fine character and useful knowledge. She bore her part in the cares and shared in the joys that he encountered until February 4, 1886, when she entered into rest, leaving a wealth of affectionate remembrances.
The family of Henry and Susan Burkhart consisted of seven children, five of whom survive their mother. Emma is the wife of Peter Williams, living in California, John H. is at home; Charles A. lives in Stockton, Cal.; Louisa is the wife of George A. Hills, of Chicago; Amelia is at home. In 1849, the father removed from the Empire State to Cook County, Ill., where he remained un-1869. He then took up his abode in DuPage Township, this county, on the farm that is the home of our subject. It comprises eighty acres, devoted principally of gardening, in which line of agriculture Mr. Burkhart is meeting with deserved success. He began life poor, and by economy and industry has gained all that he has of woldly goods. His political views are like those of his son, in whose public life he rejoices as a fond father will, as a field suited to his talents and indicating the reputation he bears." [Contributed by chitwood@surfree.com from the "Portrait and Biographical Album of Will County, Illinois" Chapman Bros., Chicago, 1890, page 271 who adds "In the first line of the last paragraph I believe the name "Susan" should be that of Fredericka, also in the line beginning with "In 1849, the father..." at the end it reads "un-1869", I believe should be until 1869; there's also the word "woldly" in the nex t to last sentence, I believe should be worldly"]

Burnet, Thomas
THOMAS BURNET, farmer; P.O. Tamarack; was born in Scotland in 1811, and is the son of James Burnet, a weaver by trade; Mr. Burnet, at the age of 12, commenced to learn his trade - weaver; this business he followed while in Scotland; in 1834, he emigrated to America; he first stopped in Saratoga Co., N.Y.; here he remained about one and a half years, then West to Michigan and thence to Connecticut; from Connecticut he returned to New York, and, in 1852, he came West and settled in Will Co., Ill.; here he has remained ever since. Mr. Burnet is one of the deacons in the Union Scotch Church in Wheatland. Married Miss M. Willie, of Ayrshire, Scotland, by whom they have three children. Mr. Burnet owns 105 acres of improved land. He was the cause of the naming Tamarack, as, when he came West, he brought some tamarack trees with him; these were planted, and the present post office Tamarack derived its names from these trees. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Burt, Robert
ROBERT BURT, saloon, Braidwood; was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, Nov. 15, 1833; son of Peter and Christina (Hay) Burt, of Scotland; father was a miner; Mr. Burt, at the age of 9 years, commenced working in the mines, and followed this business for over twenty-seven years; in 1858, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; thence to the coal fields of Pennsylvania, and engaged in mining until 1860; on account of his health, he returned to Scotland; returned to America in 1866; in Pennsylvania nine weeks; thence to Braidwood; here he commenced mining, and followed this until 1870; he entered the restaurant business and followed this for two years; then in the saloon business; to-day owns one of the best and most orderly sample rooms in this vicinity. Married in 1860, to Miss Sarah Carrigan, of Scotland, by whom he has three children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Bush, J. E.
, dealer in grain, Joliet; is a son of Stephen N. Bush, who came to Joliet from Washington Co., N.Y., in 1861; he was born in Washington Co., N.Y., Nov. 5, 1835; he prepared for college at Whitehall Academy in his native county, and in 1856, entered Williams College, Mass., graduating in 1860; he came to Joliet the same year; spent two years in a grocery store; one year as teller of the First National Bank, and, in 1864, purchased the elevator built by Abijah Cagwin (which was the first elevator built in Will Co.), and engaged in the grain business; this elevator has a capacity of 30,000 bushels; in 1872, he erected the elevator near the Michigan Central Depot with a capacity of 20,000 bushels; he handles upward of half a million bushels of grain per annum. He was married in 1863 to Miss Marian C. Woodruff, daughter of George Woodruff, of Joliet; she died in 1876, leaving two children --- George W. and Jennie C. Mr. Bush was married again in 1877 to Miss Bella G. Kenyon, daughter of John Kenyon, of Wheatland, Ill.; they have one child --- John K. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Bush, Joshua
JOSHUA BUSH, farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Chenango Co., N.Y., Sept. 12, 1845. He married Miss Margaret R. Grant Jan. 1, 1867; she was born in this township Oct. 30, 1847; her father, John Grant, was born in Scotland March 12, 1816. He married Miss Rosanna Lamping March 10, 1839; she was born in New York Feb. 18, 1821, and died April 16, 1843; one child living - William C.; he married his second wife, Mrs. Kelly, formerly Miss Adaline Frazer, March 13, 1844; she was born in Virginia Dec. 18, 1815; they have three children living - Margarette R., John A. and James M. He settled on this farm about 1839, and died Sept. 12, 1854. Mrs. Grant came to this county in 1834, and settled in Wesley Tp. Mr. Bush had a family of five children, three living - Mary Ella, Eva May and Harry E. He came to this county with his parents when 2 years old; in 1869, he came to his present place. In 1862, he enlisted in the 100th Ill. Inf.; was in the service till the close of the war; was in the battles of Chickamauga, Stone River, Chattanooga, Atlanta, etc.; he was wounded at Franklin.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]




 

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