Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents


Cady, Herbert L.
HERBERT L. CADY (Holmes & Cady, hardware, Braidwood); P.O. Wilmington; born in Essex Co., N.Y., July 16, 1834, where he resided until his removal to Illinois in 1861; he first located at Lockport, this county; in 1863, he took charge of the Braceville Coal Shaft, the mining interest then just developing in this part of the State, this shaft being the first operated in that locality; in 1866, he removed to Wilmington, his present home, and the same year Odell & Cady leased land of D. Glenney and opened what was known as the Glenney Shaft, which they sold to A.B. Meeker the following year; in 1871, the firm of Holmes & Cady engaged in the hardware business at Braidwood, and now have, in connection with that line, a harness shop at Wilmington and Braidwood. In 1858, he was married to Miss Lucy, daughter of William L. Wadhams; she was born in Essex Co., N.Y.; had four children by this union - William L., Frederick E., Herbert A. and Frank B. (deceased). Mr. C. is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, and Wilmington Chapter, No. 142.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cagwin, Abijah

ABIJAH CAGWIN, dealer in grain, Joliet; was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., May 19, 1807; in 1824, he removed with his parents to Brockport, Monroe Co., and there began a business as a tanner and currier, owning an extensive tannery which burned down in 1834; he was also engaged in shoe manufacturing. He came to Will Co., in 1835, and settled about two miles from Joliet - then Juliet - where he built a saw-mill, in which he sawed the lumber used in building the first grain warehouse in Will Co., which Mr. Cagwin erected a few years later. Here he was elected Justice of the Peace, serving eight years; in 1839, he was elected County Judge, and moved into the city; at the expiration of his four years' service as County Judge, he engaged in merchandising, afterward associating with him his brother, Francis L. Cagwin; in 1856, he, with others, established the Will County Bank, the firm being Cagwin, Higinbotham & Co.; a few years afterward, he engaged in the grain and produce business, which he has continued to the present time. He has served three terms as City Treasurer; one term on the Board of Supervisors, and four years as Supt. of the Will County Alms-house and Poor Farm. He was married in 1827, to Miss Hannah Scriber, of Brockport, N.Y., but formerly from Rutland Co., Vt., and has eight children - Merritt O., of Elwood, Ill., Helen A. (Mrs. Elvis Harwood, of Joliet), Sarah A. (Mrs. Barritt, of Joliet), Thomas P., of Joliet, Hamden A., of Joliet, Nancy A., of Joliet, Rose L. (Mrs. A.R. Briggs, of Joliet), and Abijah S., of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cagwin, Merritt O.
MERRITT O. CAGWIN, grain dealer, Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Brockport, Monroe Co., N.Y., May 14, 1828; in 1836, he came West with his parents, who settled in Cook Co. (now Will), two and a half miles east of the present city of Joliet, where his father built a saw-mill near the site of the present grist-mill, located on Hickory Creek, known as the Red Mill. The first board sawed at this mill was the occasion of a grand ball. In Joliet, on Sept. 6, 1849, he was married to Miss Mary Jane Wheeler; she was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., March 22, 1829, and died July 19, 1850; his present wife was Miss Ambrosia R. Higinbotham, a cousin of his first wife, and the second wedding was performed in the same houses as the first, Jan. 8, 1852; she was born in Joliet, Cook Co. (now Will) Oct. 1, 1834. He remained at home with his parents until 1844, when he was employed in a dry goods store in Joliet, owned and managed by Messrs. J.T. McDougal and F.L. Cagwin, where he remained until October, 1848, when he went to Chicago, and was engaged as an auctioneer until his return to Joliet in May, 1849, when he again entered the employ of Messrs. McD. & C.; but this time he was engaged in selling goods from a wagon on the road; his route was an extensive one, reaching into the Wabash country in Indiana, and his average sales were $2,000 per month; in April, 1850, he again severed his connection with Messrs. McD. & C., and purchased a stock of dry goods from Geo. H. Woodruff, Esq., which he was then closing out, and disposed of them on the road, mostly in exchange for stock - sheep and horses; the following year he abandoned his wagon, and bought and drove sheep from Southern and Central Illinois and Indiana to Chicago this he continued until May, 1853, when he was taken with the gold fever, and embarked for California, where he remained but one year, engaged in transporting goods by mule pack over the mountains to furnish traders' posts and mining camps; on his return to Joliet, he entered the grain business, and, in the following year, built the Masonic Block, which was destroyed in 1864 by fire; in 1858, he exchanged his Joliet property for a tract of 1,000 acres of land in Wilton Township at the head of the Twelve-Mile Grove, situated about twelve miles southeast of Joliet, and there removed and engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was Supervisor from Wilton for five successive years, and introduced before the Board the resolution creating a fund for the protection of soldiers wives and children. He disposed of his land in Wilton and returned to Joliet in November, 1864, and there again entered the grain trade in copartnership with his father, where he remained until October, 1866, when he removed to Wilmington, Ill., and engaged in same business, and he was the first regular buyer on the railroad at that station. While there he was a member of City Common Council, and was one of the original "Building Committee," who accepted the plans and specifications for the present magnificent public school-building. He also was a charter member with Messrs. Whitten Bros., and to whom he sold his interest, of the firm who built the White Cloud Flouring-Mills, in August, 1869, he came to Elwood, Ill., where he has since resided, and engaged in the grain, lumber and coal business; three months later, in November, his elevator filled with grain, was burned to the ground; he continued his lumber and coal business, although somewhat enlarged, and in copartnership with D.B. Curran, Esq., until January, 1872, when he built a warehouse at Braidwood, and commenced business as the first grain buyer of the city; he purchased and cribbed that winter 45,000 bushels of ear-corn; he continued the business until December, handling over 200,000 bushels of grain, when he sold to Wm. H. Odell, Esq.; in May, 1874, he purchased of Ed. H. Aiken the West Side Elevator in Joliet, which he still operates in copartnership with his father.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Calhoon, Stephen
STEPHEN CALHOON, farmer; P.O. Custer; was born in Wood Co., Ohio, Jan. 23, 1824, and is the son of Abner and Mary (Hoyt) Calhoon; father, from New York; engaged in farming; came to Ohio about 1812; served as teamster in the war of 1812. When Mr. Calhoon was about 3 years old, with his parents, moved to Kalamazoo Co., Mich.; here he remained until he was about 24 years old; in 1848, came to Illinois and settled in Will Co., on the farm he now lives on; he first purchased 120 acres of Government land; when he first came here the country was very wild; plenty of game; he states that he has stood in his door and counted as high as seventy-five deer in sight of his house; Mr. Calhoon, with his family, moved to Benton Co., Ind., in 1875, and remained there three years engaged in farming and schooling his children; returned on the old homestead in 1877. Married in 1848 to Miss Weltha Weller, of New York; four children. Mr. C. has held several offices of public trust. Is a Republican in politics, and United Brethren in religion. His parents both are dead; father died in 1855; mother in 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Calkins, Felix W.
FELIX W. CALKINS, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 6; P.O. Peotone; born in Burlington, Louisa Co., Iowa, May 4, 1844, and removed with his parents when quite young, to Chicago, living there until 1854; then to Naperville, Du Page Co., until 1860; then to Lockport, Will Co., until July 29, 1862, when he enlisted, at the age of 17, in the 100th Ill. Vol. In. for three years, and in less than one month was with his regiment doing active service at the front; he was in many hard-fought battles, and at Stone River was captured, but escaped during the night, and reaching the Union lines again joined his regiment and was made prisoner at the battle of Chickamauga Sept. 20, 1863, and taken to Atlanta, Ga.; from there to Libby Prison, where he, with others was formed in line, then robbed of all money and valuables; from there he was taken to Pemberton and Belle Island for several months; then to Danville, Ga., where they were placed in large tobacco warehouses and remained during the winter of 1863 and 1864; the winter was one of unusual severity and the prisoners were without clothing and were allowed no fire during the entire winter; during the winter the small-pox raged with fearful fatality, nearly every prisoner being down and receiving no care except such as received from their fellow-prisoners; the fatal cases exceeded upward of 50 per cent of the entire sick-list; in May, 1864, he was removed to Andersonville, where he remained until November following; the cruelty here was inflicted in keeping with its well-known acts of barbarism; from Andersonville he, with 15,000 others, was taken to Charleston, S.C., and placed under the most exposed part of the fire of the Union gunboats during the bombardment of the city; from there they were taken to Florence Prison, S.C.; remaining here until the 21st of February, 1865, when they were placed in box cars with upward of eighty in each car, and such as survived the journey were paroled in Richmond Feb. 28, 1865; Mr. Calkins was in rebel prisons nearly two years, and has his health much impaired and for a period of two years it was feared he would entirely lose his eyesight; he received his discharge for disability in St. Louis June 16, 1865, when he placed himself under medical treatment for one year for physical disability caused by cruel treatment while in rebel prisons. He located upon his present place in 1866; he owns 200 acres of well-improved land, valued at $10,000, which he has accumulated by strict integrity, hard labor and industry. He married Aug. 23, 1865, Rosaline Calkins; she was born in Orleans Co., Vt., April 12, 1842; they have three children by this union - George W., Eolia M. and Ettie L. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cameron, William
WILLIAM CAMERON, Superintendent State Machine Shops, Lockport; was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Jan. 20, 1836; he came with the family in 1848 or 1849 to Hamilton, Canada; here his father remained about twelve years, and then moved to London, Canada, where he died; about the age of 16, William left home, and engaged in learning his trade at Kingston; was an apprentice four years; after acquiring his trade, he worked in the shops of the Great Western R.R. at Hamilton three or four years; he then went to the State of New York, and worked in various places. In 1861, he came West, locating in Ottawa, where he labored for Henry Foy in his machine shops; from there, in 1866, he came to work on the I. & M. Canal, when the work of deepening the canal was begun; in 1875, he came to Lockport, having been appointed to his present position. He was married in March, 1856, to Ann Beattie, a native of Canada; has two children - Andrew and Jane. Owns property in Lockport and some near London, Canada.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Campbell, Barbara
BARBARA CAMPBELL, farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Joliet; widow of Joseph Campbell; her maiden name was Barbara Kelly; she was born in Scotland Dec. 13, 1807. She married Mr. Campbell in Scotland July 12, 1833; Mr. Campbell was born in Scotland Sept. 30, 1807, where he lived until 28 years of age, when he immigrated to America and settled in Joliet Tp., Will Co., Ill., in 1839, and engaged in quarrying; he was for several years in partnership with ex-Gov. Matteson in quarrying and contracting, and had some contracts building the Canal. He died June 23, 1858; his widow, who survives him, continues to live at the old home, which contains 195 acres of well-improved land. They were the parents of five children now living, viz., Joseph, Robert, John, Annie and Barbara.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Campbell, George M.
GEORGE M. CAMPBELL, Secretary and Treasurer of the Joliet Stone Co., Joliet; was born in Unity, Waldo Co., Me., Jan. 5, 1848; in early childhood, he removed with his parents to Springfield, Mass., and lived there and in that vicinity until he was 9 years of age; the family then removed to Linn Co., Iowa, and five years later, in April, 1862, came to Joliet; his parents resided here four years, and then returned to Massachusetts; he was educated in the public schools of Joliet and at the Springfield, Mass., English and Classical Institute; he followed the business of clerking and book-keeping until May, 1875, when the Joliet Stone Co. was organized, he being one of the three equal partners, and on its incorporation, Dec. 1, 1877, he became Secretary and Treasurer of the company. He was married Dec. 25, 1873, to Miss Libbie R. Snapp, daughter of Hon. Henry Snapp, of Joliet, and has two children - Jessie M. and Ida A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Campbell, M.B.
M.B. CAMPBELL, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; was born in Williston, Vt., Nov. 29, 1843; he received his preparatory education at the Williston Academy, after which he studied medicine in the office of Dr. E.A. Pond, of Rutland, Vt., who has since became famous as the inventor of the American Sphygmograph, for measuring and tracing the pulsations of the heart; from his office he entered the medical department of Harvard University, where he graduated and received his degree, March 7, 1866; during his course of studies he served one year as medical cadet in the regular army; after graduating, he spent one year in practice with Dr. Pond, in Rutland, and then came West and located in Wilmington, Ill.; he practiced medicine there until 1874, when he removed to Joliet; Dr. Campbell was thoroughly educated as an allopathic physician, but, in 1872, having become fully convinced of the superiority of the law of "Similia similibus curantur," or so-called homeopathy, after thorough preparation he joined the Illinois State Homeopathic Medical Association, and, in 1874, was elected a member of the American Institute of Homeopathy.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Campbell, William
WILLIAM CAMPBELL, farming, Sec. 13; P.O. Joliet; the above gentleman was born in County Down, Ireland, June 5, 1825. He married Miss Catheron A. McMurray Jan. 28, 1862; she was born in the same place July 3, 1841; they have six children - James, William R., Maggie R.F., Alfred, Martha and Louisa. He lived in Ireland until about 1852, when he went to Australia and engaged in mining gold, meeting with fair success; he remained four years, and then returned to Ireland and followed farming until 1876, when he came to the United States, and, in April, 1877, he came to his present place. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cappel, John
JOHN CAPPEL, of the firm of Krapp & Cappel, butchers and dealers in live stock, Mokena; one of our natives of Illinois; was born in Frankfort, Will Co., Ill., May 26, 1846, and is the son of the late Frederick Cappel, deceased, who was one of our first settlers and pioneers. Mr. J. Cappel was married to Miss Elizabeth Werner, who was born in Illinois; they have had five children, all of whom are living, viz., Julia, Emma, John, Willie and George. Mr. C. has held the office of Deputy Sheriff four years; Collector, one year, and Township Clerk six years; his property, which contains eighty-five acres, is situated on Sec. 10, and is valued at $4,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Carlisle, William
WILLIAM CARLISLE, bakery, Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is the oldest baker in Braidwood; born in England; his father, Wm. Carlisle, died when Mr. Carlisle was very young; here he started out in the world a poor boy; learned his trade, baking, in England, and this business he has followed throughout life; in 1862, he emigrated to Canada, and remained there about two years. While in Canada, he was married in 1863 to Miss Mary Gibson, of Canada. In 1864, he came to Illinois and settled at Chicago; from there he came to Will Co., and first stopped in Wilmington, and then went to Braidwood; in 1873, he first commenced business of his own; here he was very successful until May 26, 1877, his bakery was destroyed by fire; he rebuilt, and to-day owns the most complete bakery in Braidwood. Mr. Carlisle is a prominent Odd Fellow, and a member of the Episcopal Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Carpenter, Allen P.,
farming, Sec. 5; P.O. Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in Orleans Co., N.Y. Jan. 27, 1834. He married Miss Ellen Spencer Jan. 10, 1855. They had two children; both died. He lived in New York until 1853, when he came West and settled in Joliet, where he remained on year and then came to this township, and engaged in farming; remained three years; then he went to Troy Tp., and lived there two years. He then went to Minooka, Grundy Co., Ill., and engaged in the grain business; remained two years; then he engaged in same buiness at Minooka Landing; remainded three years; then in 1865 he came to his present place; in 1868, he became partner with Marshall Truby, in the grain business at Joliet and Bird's Bridge; they carried on the business seven years. He came West in poor circumstances, and now owns 178 acres in this township. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Carpenter, Mrs. B.
, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Maryland Jan. 6, 1815; came to Illinois and settled in Will Co. in 1854; she is the widow of the late Daniel F. Carpenter, deceased; they were married Sept. 13, 1835; they have had fifteen children, seven of whom are living, viz., Catharine J., John, Kezia C., Henry, daniel B., Sarah N. and Jemima I.; decesed, Samuell, Daniel, William, Benjamin, Lydia B., Barbara V., Samuel and Kerenhapuch. The farm of Mrs. Carpenter consists of eighty acres, valued at $4,000. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the Co unty ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Carpenter, H. S., of the firm of Carpenter & Marsh, grain merchants and proprietors of the Union Transfer Elevator, Joliet; was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., Nov. 25, 1826; he resided there until he was nearly 20 years of age; he received an academic education in Rochester and Albion, N.Y., and in 1846, came to Joliet; he taught school nine quarters in Troy Tp., and then engaged in speculating, buying and selling property, etc.; about twenty-five years ago, he engaged in the grain business, being now the oldest grain merchant in Joliet; in the spring of 1874, the firm of Carpenter & Marsh was established and the Union Transfer Elevator erected, at a cost, including the mill and dock in connection therewith, of some $15,000; they now do a yearly business of $1,5000,000 and handle about five millions of bushels of grain per annum. Mr. Carpenter was married Jan. 22, 1850, to Miss Henrietta Spencer, of Troy Tp., and has three children -- Charles H., George, and Sarah F. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Carpenter, Norman A.
NORMAN A. CARPENTER, retired, Frankfort Station; was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., Oct. 4, 1818; came to this State in April, 1855, and settled in Frankfort; at that time, Mr. Carpenter says there was but one store in the village; it was at that time owned by Mr. Higley; he built immediately upon his arrival, and opened a store for general merchandise, which he continued until 1866; he was the second merchant in Frankfort; the railroad running through this place had at this time just commenced doing business. Mr. C. was married to Miss Mary E. Stantial, who was born in England Sept. 22, 1822; they have had three children, two of whom are living, viz., Emily and Eva; deceased, Mary E. Mr. C. acted as first Postmaster, under Mr. M. Van Horn, in Frankfort Village; he was the first official in that position in the village.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Carson Bros.
, groceries and provisions, Joliet. Hugh H. Carson, the senior member of the above firm, was born Jan. 1, 1852, in Rhode Island, where he attended school and worked in a cotton-factory until 10 years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to Joliet, locating at this point Aug. 1, 1862; at the above date, his father, James Carson, purchased the grocery and provision business of W.B. Caswell, which business he successfully continued until succeeded by his sons May 10, 1875. Robert Carson, the junior member of the above firm, was born in Rhode Island Sept. 18, 1855; emigrating West with his parents to Joliet; he, with his brother, was employed in the store of their father when not attending school, until they succeeded in the business. The above firm carry a full and complete stock in their line, and have a good trade which is rapidly increasing; their success may be attributed to their thorough knowledge, close personal attention and honest dealing in business.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Carter, Charles E.
CHARLES E. CARTER, editor and proprietor of the Crete Enterprise, Crete; was born in Waukesha Co., Wis., April 9, 1856, and is the son of Hyram and Amanda (Annis) Carter; father, from New York; Mr. Carter commenced to learn type-setting in Omro, Wis., in the Omro Journal office; here he remained about three years, then to Oshkosh, Wis., in the Independent office; then to Wausau, Wis., in the Wisconsin Central and Wisconsin River Pilot offices; was also engaged on the State Journal, of Madison, Wis.; this will show that Mr. Carter has had a large experience in the newspaper world, and any one who has perused the columns of the Crete Enterprise can see that Mr. Carter is thoroughly master of the pen; the first issue of the Crete Enterprise was Dec. 25, 1875, with a subscription-list of about one hundred and fifty; to-day it has 300 subscribers, and ranks among the leading papers of Will Co.; Independent in politics; to all who may want anything in the job-printing line, call in at the Crete Enterprise office. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Casey, John R.
JOHN R. CASEY, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; has been a resident and practicing physician of Joliet, since 1858; he is a native of Illinois, and was born in Jefferson Co. Jan. 28, 1835; at 16 years of age, he entered McKendree College, Lebanon, Ill., where he remained three years; leaving College, he entered upon the study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. Charles A. Pope, at that time one of the most prominent surgeons in the West. He attended medical lectures in the St. Louis Medical College where he graduated and received his degree in 1857. After practicing medicine one year in Olney, Richland Co., Ill., he located in Joliet, as above stated. In May of the same year (1858), he was appointed physician in charge of the State Penitentiary Hospital in this city, occupying that position ten years. He is at present President of the Will County Medical Society, and also holds the office of City and County Physician, to which he was elected several years ago; he has also served one year on the Board of Aldermen. He was married in June, 1863, to Miss Ada Vanderpool, of Joliet; a native of New York City, and has four children - Florida, Willis W., Dwight and Laura.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Casseday, George W.
GEORGE W. CASSEDAY, deceased, formerly of Joliet, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Bedford Co., Va., Dec. 1, 1803. His father dying when he was 6 months old, his mother moved to St. Anne, Ky., where they lived until he was 14 years of age, when they moved to Troy, Ohio; at this place he learned the trade of carpenter. On January 13, 1824, he married Miss Delilah Murphy, and in the fall of 1825 moved to Vermilion Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming up to the spring of 1827, when he moved to Edgar Co., Ill., working at his trade of carpenter, and also farming; in 1829, he moved to Paris, of the same county, and remained there up to 1834, when he returned to Vermilion county; in 1851, he came to Joliet, where he lived up to his decease, July 23, 1863. When he came to Joliet, having purchased a large tract of land, he laid out an addition to the city known as "Casseday's Addition." He had five children; three living - Maria L. (now Mrs. Joseph G. English, of Danville, Ill.), Mary C. (now Mrs. John Durham, of Danville, Ill.), and Henry Clay; two deceased - David and Harriet M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Castle, Homer C.
HOMER C. CASTLE, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Wilmington; born in Ontario Co., N.Y., May 22, 1834, where he resided till 1854, when he removed to Illinois, locating in Wesley Tp., this county; he also resided in Homer and Wilton Tps., and in 1867, removed to his present location; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000. Married, in 1856, to Miss Adaline Gooding, who was born in Ontario Co., N.Y.; nine children by this union. Mr. Castle is extensively engaged in breeding and shipping Poland-China hogs.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Caswell, Wallace B.

WALLACE B. CASWELL, proprietor St. Nicholas Hotel, Joliet; was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., in 1831; his father was a farmer of moderate circumstances, possessing a small piece of land which he tilled with his own hands; he recognized the value of an education and made every effort to secure for his children that mental culture which is imperishable; but Wallace was not a studious youth; the glorious fun of fishing, hunting, "I spy," "two-old-eat," and other athletic sports, had for him a far greater charm than the problems of his arithmetic, the puzzling intricacies of his grammar, the comprehensive knowledge contained within the pasteboard lids of his geography, or even the polysyllables of his spelling-book; all told, his schooling amounted to less than three years of constant attendance; to this day he acknowledges, that it was his own fault that not even a common-school education accompanied him when he embarked for himself in the struggles of life; it was in the vocation of an apple-peddler that pennies first poured into the capacious pockets of his "flap" trousers; with a basket well-laden with pippins, greenings, Spitzenbergs, gillyflowers and rusty-coats, gathered from his father's orchard, he daily plodded to the village of Albion for several years and returned at night jubilant with success, or dejected by failure, according as good or ill luck had attained his labors among the fruit-loving denizens of the village; in those days (a matter which will be a surprise to the fruit-venders of this generation) a "square meal" could be obtained for 3 cents, and to indulge in the extras of the season 5 cents was considered an exorbitant demand; in 1844, his father came West, purchased a small farm and grist-mill at Plainfield, nine miles northwest of Joliet; from that date till the present, the subject of this sketch has been a resident of this State; in 1845, he entered the village store as a clerk, owned by a Mr. Goddard, at the munificent salary of $4 per month, without board; Mr. G. also operated stores in Elgin and St. Charles; he continued with him at intervals, until 1858, vibrating from one point to another, as occasion and the interests of his employer might require; in 1849, he was employed in the dry goods and carpet store of H.W. Bigelow, of Chicago; his positions and employments have been various, and fortune and mis-fortune have not been strangers to him. He was married in 1854, to Esther J. Eurn, of Plainfield. At one time we find him a prosperous business man, amassing wealth rapidly; again we see him penniless, with a great debt upon his shoulders; at the breaking-out of the war, he was doing a thriving grocery trade in Joliet. He entered the army as sutler, and, at first, money "rolled in by the bushel," and indicated that his fortune was made; but these were uncertain days; when about thirty-five miles south of Louisville, on his way to Bardstown, John Morgan, the daring, dashing cavalryman of Southern fame, despoiled his train of six loads of sutler's goods, "cabbaged" his horses and left him with a whole skin, but not money enough to get back to Joliet; again he replenished his stock and the same result followed; after having once more purchased a full stock, he sold out, took notes in payment, never realized a cent from them, and returned to Joliet as poor as he was five years before. In 1864, he began operating the old National Hotel on the west side of the city; here he remained almost ten years accumulating money as if by magic; in 1873, he furnished the Robertson House at an expense of $20,000; in one year he lost half of the amount accumulated in the preceding ten years; he next purchased one-half interest in the Galt House, Chicago, and in one year shelved the balance; he opened the St. Nicholas as a hotel June 17, 1875.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Caton, William P.
WILLIAM P. CATON, retired, Joliet; one of the pioneers of Will Co.; was born in Orange Co., N.Y., March 28, 1815; he lived in Oneida Co., N.Y., until 18 years of age, being engaged in mercantile pursuits and attending school; at the above age, he removed to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he remained three years, clerking in a general store; he then came to Chicago in 1836, clerking for a short time; then to Milwaukee, clerking until the following year; he then returned to Illinois and took up 2,000 acres of Government land in Cook Co., sixteen miles northwest of Chicago; here he lived until 1848, when he removed to Chicago, being engaged in mercantile pursuits and inspector of canal-boats until 1856, when he removed to Plainfield, Will Co., and engaged in farming until 1871, when on account of ill health he was obliged to give up farming, since which time he has lived in Joliet, but not engaged in active business. He owns his residence and the one adjoining on Oneida st., Joliet. He married Nov. 28, 1844, to Elizabeth Steele; they are the parents of five children now living - William E., Hannah E., Charles A., Albert R. and Minnie E.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cavender, William H.
WILLIAM H. CAVENDER, farming, Sec. 3; P.O. Bird's Bridge; the subject of this sketch was born in Greenfield, N.H., Feb. 22, 1828. He married Miss P.A. Steel April 27, 1856; she was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., Nov. 11, 1841; they have seven children, viz., Francis E., Dora E., Libbie M., Mary A., Emma C., Sinclair S. and Anna Belle. He lived in New Hampshire seven years, when his parents moved to Michigan, where he lived until 1849; he then went to California, where he engaged in the mining and stock business, meeting with good success, having accumulated over $12,000 during four years; in 1854, he returned to Michigan, and remained until 1865; he then went to Texas, and bought a drove of cattle, his family coming to Joliet at the same time; he returned from Texas the same year, and marketed his stock in Chicago, and then came to Will Co. and settled in Troy Tp., and engaged in the grain business at Bird's Bridge; in 1868, he came to his present place. He started in poor circumstances, and now owns 165 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Chamberlain, Harvey W.
HARVEY W. CHAMBERLAIN, blacksmith, Lockport; was born in Essex, Essex Co., N.Y., Feb. 22, 1843; in the latter part of the same year, the family came West and settled in Dupage Township, Will Co. In 1853, his father, a carpenter by trade, moved to Lockport and worked for Norton & Co., in erecting their mill. At the age of 14, H.W. went to work at his trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years; he followed his trade until 1862, when he enlisted in Co. C, 100th Regiment I.V.I.; he participated in the battles of Stone Ridge, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Dalton, Lookout Mountain, New Hope Church, Franklin, Nashville and others; in the battle of Peach Tree Creek, fought July 22, 1864, he was wounded in the left shoulder and disabled for six months; on returning from the army he again went to his trade in Lockport. He was married May 7, 1868, to Asenath Johnson, of Lockport; has four children - Fred, Willie, Flora and Jessie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Chamberlain, S.S.
S.S. CHAMBERLAIN, furniture and undertaker, Lockport; was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., Aug. 19, 1817; his father was among the earliest settlers in what is now Will Co.; he left New York in January, 1833, and on the 27th of February, arrived at the head of Hickory Creek, now in New Lenox Tp., Will Co.; Mr. S.S. Chamberlain, a boy of 15 Summers, rode the entire distance on an Indian pony; a detailed account of their journey will be found in the body of the history; in 1837, his father sold his farm and moved to Peoria Co., not far from the present site of Peoria City; in 1844, S.S. returned to Lockport and engaged in house carpentering; in 1857, he opened his furniture store and undertaker's business. He was married in 1841 to Elizabeth Gray, a native of New York, sister of Charles M. and Capt. George M. Gray, the latter connected with the Pullman Palace Car Line, and the former for many years general freight agent of the M.S. R.R.; has two sons - George M., Charles G. In connection with his son George M., has the only undertaker's establishment in Joliet, operated by an American or Protestant.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Chamberlin, George N.
GEORGE N. CHAMBERLIN, of the firm of S.S. Chamberlin & Son, undertakers and dealers in furniture, Joliet; was born in Lockport, Will Co., Ill., Dec. 20, 1851; is a son of S.S. Chamberlin, who came to Will Co. at an early day, frequent reference to whom will be found in other parts of this work. Mr. Chamberlin was educated in the High School in his native town, and when about 20 years of age, entered the employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern R.R. Co., in Chicago, in the telegraph department, remaining with them two years; he then spent some three years in the office of Norton & Co., of Lockport, and in 1876, engaged in his present business with his father, who is the oldest undertaker and furniture dealer in Will Co. He was married Dec. 5, 1876, to Miss Ella E. Munger, daughter of Charles E. Munger, of Chicago, for twenty-five years a resident of Joliet; they have one child - Fred M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Chittenden, G.N.
G.N. CHITTENDEN, general merchandise, Plainfield. The subject of this sketch was born in Middlebury, Portage (now Summit) Co., Ohio, April 15, 1818. He married Miss Elizabeth Cauffman July 23, 1845; she was born in the same place Sept. 14, 1824; they had six children, four living, viz., William H., Henry K., Mary and Granville I. He lived in Ohio until the spring of 1847; his early days were spent in clerking in the general merchandise business; in 1838, he began reading medicine with Dr. Wm. Bowen, and began the practice in 1843; in 1847, he went to Michigan and engaged in farming, remaining two years; he then went to South Bend, Ind., and engaged as superintendent of a woolen-mill; in 1851, he moved to Lockport, Will Co., and engaged in general merchandising; remaining one year; he then came to Plainfield and engaged in his present business, which, excepting one year, he has followed since. Though being at the head of the firm, he has placed the principal management of the business in the hands of his son, William H., and Alfred T. Corbin, who are the junior members of the firm. He takes but a passing interest in politics, and has held the offices of Justice of the Peace, Township Treasurer and Collector; he has been a Delegate to County Conventions, to two State Conventions and to the National Convention of 1876, at Cincinnati; he has been identified with the M.E. Church for the past twenty years, and actively assisted in the building of the present elegant edifice of that denomination in this village. He has been more or less interested in real estate, both here and in Joliet, having laid out extensive additions to both places.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clark, B.B.
B.B. CLARK, merchant, Lockport; Mr. Clark, who is one among the earliest settlers of Will County, was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, Feb. 9, 1814; in 1820, his father moved to Illinois and settled about midway between Vincennes, Ind., and Mt. Carmel, Ill; a sketch of the family's removals and locations will be found in detail in the body of the work; in 1835, B.B. purchased a portion of the home place, northeast of Plainfield, and went to work for himself; that land he owns to-day; in 1850, he went to California; five months were occupied in crossing the plains; during the trip they ran short of provisions, and lived on bran-bread three days; on arriving at Sacramento City he engaged to furnish and superintend teams on the levee; this employment gave him the handsome income of $55 per day; afterward, purchasing a stock of provisions, he went back into the mining districts and engaged in trade; in 1852, he returned to Illinois, being considerably ahead in a pecuniary point of view; he continued actively engaged in farming until 1868, when he moved into Lockport and engaged in the dry goods and clothing business early in 1869. He was married Dec. 16, 1848, to Harriet M. Bartlett, a native of Massachusetts; has had six children, three living and three dead. Owns 315 acres in Dupage Township, valued at $74 per acre.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clarkson, John
JOHN CLARKSON, retired millwright, Joliet; born in Lancashire, England, Oct. 25, 1809, where he learned and worked at the millwright trade until 28 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York July 3, 1837; remaining there three months, then to Rochester four months; then to Black Rock Dam during the winter of 1837-38, returning to Rochester for the summer following; then to Rome, Mich., for eighteen months; from there to Chicago, and to Joliet by stage, where he located May 20, 1840; he first engaged here in building Jones' Steam Flour-Mill, the first of the kind in Joliet; upon its completion, he with Thomas Keegan, went to Marseilles and built the first flour mill at that place; from there he went to Chicago and built the first elevator erected in that city. His reputation as a workman of superior skill at his trade having been generally established, he has been extensively employed in building mills and elevators in all the neighboring towns around Joliet up to the time of his retiring from active labor. He owns a fine residence on the west side of the river, where he resides. He married in England April 12, 1837, to Alice Hodson; she was born in Lancashire, England, May 1, 1816; they are the parents of three children now living, viz., Ellen J., Margaret A. and Mary Ann. Mr. C.'s mother emigrated to America and Joliet in 1844, being then upward of 80 years of age, where she lived until her death in 1848. Mr. C. has filled different offices of trust, among them School Trustee for eight years and School Director for three years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Claus, Joseph S.
JOSEPH S. CLAUS, of the firm of Claus Brothers, general merchants, Frankfort Station; was born in Cook Co., Ill., Dec. 29, 1844; came to Frankfort in 1868, where he has since resided. He was married May 22, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Carpenter, who was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., June 18, 1845, and who died Sept. 9, 1875. Mr. Claus is at present holding the office of Justice of the Peace, which position he has maintained nearly two years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clayes, Charles
CHARLES CLAYES, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., July 4, 1819; came to Illinois and settled in Will Co. in 1835; and in Frankfort Tp. in 1837; his present farm contains 295 acres, is situated on Secs. 21 and 16, and is valued at $18,000. He was married to Miss Eliza A. Williams; they have had seven children, six of whom are living, viz., Amelia L., Emma S., Mary J., Charles W., Mattie H. and Addie E.; deceased, an infant. Mr. C. was the first Township Clerk in the township after its organization.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cleghorn, Charles W.
CHARLES W. CLEGHORN, proprietor Joliet Soap Works, Joliet; was born in the Province of Ontario Aug. 16, 1853. He is a son of Rev. Thomas, a Methodist clergyman, and who was a brother of Edward Cleghorn, of this city. His father was a native of New York State, but lived in Canada from the age of 5 years until 1870, when he removed to Michigan, and resided there until his death, which occurred in February, 1878. After his father's death, his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth (Williams) Cleghorn, removed with her family to Joliet, where they now reside. Charles W. came to Joliet in 1870, and learned the tanner's trade with Messrs. Mack, Cleghorn & Co., and continued till July, 1876, when he engaged in his present business. He manufactures three brands of soap; the "Granite," he considers his finest soap; is of his own invention, and unexcelled for either toilet or laundry purposes; his two other brands, the "Standard" and "Boss," are both excellent articles, and are furnished at prices which should induce the people of Will Co. to patronize home industries, and ask their grocers for Cleghorn's soaps.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clement, Charles
CHARLES CLEMENT, retired, Joliet; has been a permanent resident of Joliet since 1834, and is the oldest living inhabitant of the city; he was born in Windsor, Vt., Jan. 13, 1810; after receiving a common-school education, he spent some time in an academy at Atkinson, N.H.; in 1833, he came West, and passed through Joliet (then containing but two log cabins), on his way to Peoria; the following spring, he returned and made his home here, where he has continued to reside ever since; he soon afterward engaged in mercantile business, which he continued most of the time until his retirement from active business, about 1865; in the spring of 1839, he, with others, established the first newspaper in Will Co., the Joliet Courier, which afterward became the Joliet Signal; he has served three years as a member of the Board of Supervisors, being the first Supervisor upon the organization of the township; he has held the offices of Alderman, School Inspector, etc. He was married Aug. 5, 1844, to Miss Cordelia Wilcox, of Elbridge, N.Y., and has two children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cleveland, W.B.
W.B. CLEVELAND, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in New York Sept. 21, 1820; came to this State and settled in Frankfort, Will Co., in 1844; his farm consists of 125 acres, situated on Secs. 19 and 20, and is valued at $7,000. He was married May 22, 1865, to Miss Stella M. Martin, who was born in Vermont Aug. 6, 1846; they have had six children, five of whom are living, viz., Lillian E., Willie J., Clarence M., Mabel S. and Eva M.; deceased, Emily L. Mr. C. has held the offices of Justice of the Peace eight years, Supervisor two years and School Trustee several years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clinton, Chancey
CHANCEY CLINTON, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Wallingford; owns 230 acres. Born in Genesee Co., N.Y., Sept. 2, 1825; at an early age, his parents removed to Pennsylvania; resided there until 1865; he then emigrated to this place, and has lived here ever since. Has been married twice; first to Mary W. Ostrom; she died in January, 1854; left one child - Emily; she is married, and at present resides in Indiana. His second marriage was with Harriet A. Hullar Jan. 21, 1858, in Pennsylvania; have two children by this union - Ella May and Milo E. Has held the office of Road Commissioner and Postmaster, the former six and a half years, and the latter four years.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Clow, James
JAMES CLOW, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; came to Will Co., in 1844; was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Collins, Frederic
FREDERIC COLLINS, farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Lockport; was born in Berkshire, Tioga Co., N.Y., June 29, 1812; he was engaged in farming with his parents until the year 1833, when he came to this county and first settled on Secs. 27 and 28, and obtained a pre-emption upon the land, where he resided forty-one years, and in the winter of 1874, moved to where he now resides; Mr. Collins was among the first settlers, when a fence was a novelty and the red men were their neighbors. He married Miss Nancy Mason White, daughter of Jonah White, of Spencer, Mass., in Lockport Tp., March 13, 1839; she was born in Skaneateles, N.Y., July 23, 1814; they had four children, three living - Horatio, born Feb. 3, 1840; Adeline Eliza (now Mrs. Hatch), born Sept. 19, 1841, and Ellen Samantha (now Mrs. Bird, of Michigan), born Aug. 13, 1850, and Emma Adella, born Sept. 5, 1856, and died July 26, 1857. Mr. Collins has passed through the many struggles and incidents and dangers so common to the pioneer of the Great West, and is to-day hardy and robust at the ripe old age of 66. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Collins, Michael
MICHAEL COLLINS, merchant and grain dealer, Peotone; born in County Clare, Ireland, Oct. 15, 1845; he emigrated to America when 3 years of age, living two years in Vermont; then six years in Canada, when he removed with his parents to Fayette Co., Ill., where he lived until 18 years of age, when, learning telegraphy, he worked as operator at Gilman awhile, then at Makanda as agent and operator for the I.C. R.R. one year, when, on account of ill health, he was transferred to Peotone, where he filled the different positions of agent and operator for the I.C. R.R., and agent for the American Express Co. for a period of ten years when he resigned and engaged in the grain and hay trade; and now, in connection with F. Schroeder, is largely engaged in buying and shipping grain to Chicago and Eastern markets; he is also engaged in general merchandise of the firm of Schroeder, Smith & Collins. He married Dec. 2, 1869, Carrie Folke, daughter of Dr. Henry Folke; she was born in Will Co., Ill., May 22, 1852; they have, by this union, three children - Kittie, Grace and Paul. Mr. Collins has held the offices of School Director and Justice of the Peace; is now serving his third term as Supervisor. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Conant, A.E.
A.E. CONANT, farming, Sec. 25; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in York Co., Me., Dec. 9, 1818. He married Miss Elizabeth Philbrook June 8, 1853; she was born in Kennebec Co., Me., July 22, 1827; they have had five children, four living, viz., Addie E., Joe E., Lewis P. and Otis K. He lived in Maine until 1854; was engaged in farming and manufacturing woolen cloths in Dexter; in 1854, he came West and settled on his present place; he owns 285 acres in this township, which he has earned principally by his own labor and management.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Conley, Edward C.
EDWARD C. CONLEY, Wilmington; born in Toronto, Canada, in 1844, and soon afterward came to the United States, settling in Buffalo, N.Y.; removed to Wilmington, Ill., in May, 1849. At 19, enlisted as a private in the 39th I.V.I., and served about two years; participated in Grant's last campaign, and was present at Lee's surrender at Appomattox; on his regiment's muster-out, he returned home and resumed going to school. In 1867, engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, in which he had already served an apprenticeship; afterward, became a drug store clerk, and also dabbled some in writing newspaper locals and verse; purchased a half interest in the People's Advocate newspaper in February, 1871, and became sole editor and proprietor in 1872. Was repeatedly elected to the town and city clerkships. On Dec. 28, 1874, was married to Miss Mary A. O'Connell. Is still publisher of the Wilmington Advocate, up to the date of this publication.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Connor, Thomas
THOMAS CONNOR, butcher, Braidwood; was born in Ireland May 8, 1838, and is the son of Thomas and Bridget (Walder) Connor of Ireland; his father was a farmer, died when Mr. Connor was young; his mother then married Patrick Carroll. In 1847, emigrated to Quebec, Canada, then to Vermont; here Mr. Connor was engaged in working on a railroad, and in 1848, came West to Illinois, and settled in Joliet; here he was engaged in working in a woolen factory, then as a driver on a canal boat six years, then station agent for the canal company three years; from here he went to coal digging in different parts of Will and Grundy Counties; in 1866, he settled down, and commenced farming and butchering, known as the Connor Brothers, who are the oldest butchers at the business in Braidwood; his mother is still living on the old homestead. Mr. Connor has held several offices of public trust. Is liberal in his politics, and is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. He came to America a poor boy, and with hard labor, good management, is one of the successful men of Braidwood; owns 800 acres of land. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Conrad, John
JOHN CONRAD, hardware dealer and Police Magistrate, Peotone; born in Odenbach, Rheinfels, Bavaria, Germany, April 15, 1830, where he worked at shoemaking until he emigrated to America; he landed in Philadelphia July 19, 1850, going to New York, where he lived until 1854, when he came to Illinois and located at Elmhurst, Du Page Co., where he worked at his trade until April 15, 1865, when he run a saloon for nine months; then opened a general country store, following this business until 1869, when he removed to Peotone and opened the New York House, which he run for eighteen months, then selling out, he opened a general store, which business he followed for two years, when, being elected Police Magistrate, he sold his store and devoted his whole time to the duties of his office and collections for a period of six years; Mr. Conrad engaged in 1875 in partnership with his son-in-law, August Schugman, in the general hardware and stove business, which business has run quite successfully under the firm name of Conrad & Schugman, Mr. Conrad still retaining the office of Police Magistrate and collection agent. He married July 19, 1855, to Caroline Schaubel; she was born in Baden, Germany, Jan. 23, 1837; they have by this union nine children living - Charlotte M., Caroline K. (now Mrs. A. Schugman), John P., Frank H., Harry F., Freddie P., Hattie, Jennie and Charlie. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Conrad, Peter
PETER CONRAD, manufacturer and shipper of butter and cheese, Peotone; born in Odenbach Rheinphalz, Bavaria, Germany, May 29, 1825, where he lived until 32 years of age, when he learned and worked at the trade of shoemaking until he emigrated to America, where he arrived May 29, 1857, landing in New York; coming directly West, he located in Elmhurst, Du Page Co., living there two years and worked at his trade; from there he went to Proviso, Cook Co., where he lived seven years and followed shoemaking; he then came to Greengarden Tp., Will Co., and settled upon a farm for one year, when he removed to his present place in 1866, and again followed shoemaking for a period of five years, since which time he has been engaged in mercantile pursuits. He was married in Germany June 11, 1849, to Katharina Gross, who was born in the Earldom of Hesse-Homburg; they are the parents of seven children now living - Peter H., Katarina, Dora, Maggie, Elizabeth, Bertha and Clara. Mr. Conrad has held the office of Police Constable, and is now serving his third term as School Treasurer of Peotone Township. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cook, George B.
GEORGE B. COOK, salesman for Gaylord & Co., Lockport; was born in Jefferson Co., N.Y., July 13, 1838; in 1845, the family left New York State and settled near London, Can.; his father was traveling salesman for the wholesale firm of Murray & Anderson; in July, 1851, his father came to Illinois and settled near Morris, on the Au Sable; in March, 1852, he moved to Chicago and took charge of the lock at the head of the I. & M. Canal; on the 9th of June following he died of cholera; George B. remained with the family, and in the Spring of 1854, they moved to Lockport; here, in connection with an older brother, he attended the lock and provided for the family; in 1861, he went to Channahon and followed various pursuits; in August, 1869, he took charge of a force of men engaged in the improvement of the Kankakee River, and afterward was engaged in the construction of the feeder to the I. & M. Canal on the same river; in 1871, in connection with C.E. Fowler, he opened a general merchandise store at the village of Shermanville, on the Kankakee River; at the end of eight months, they closed out their stock, and he returned to Lockport; his family remained here, and he went to Chicago as foreman in the packing-house of Col. Hancock; here he remained until May, 1873, when he entered the employ of J.A. Boyer as foreman in his quarries at Lemont; in the Fall of 1873, he was employed as salesman by James E. Casey, of Lockport; then in the grocery trade; December, 1875, he took the position he now occupies. He was married March 3, 1859, to Eliza Killeen, a native of Ireland; has two children - James R., born Dec. 3, 1859; George B., born Dec. 9, 1864.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cook, Moses H.
MOSES H. COOK, retired farmer; P.O. Crete; the subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, is one of the old settlers; was born in Lenox, Oneida Co., N.Y., Aug. 25, 1801, and is the son of Moses Harper and Polly (Pyson) Cook. Mr. Cook was the oldest child of nine children; was raised on his father's farm; in 1834, he started West and stopped in Ohio. Here he married Hannah C. Pixley, who was born in Stockbridge, Mass., March 30, 1817, and is the daughter of Phineas and Hannah (Curtis) Pixley, of Massachusetts; her father was a blacksmith by trade and was a soldier of the war of 1812; he is now living in Lake Co., Ohio, at 89 years of age, being one of the oldest settlers of that county. Her mother died when Mrs. Cook was but a few days old. In 1838, with wife and one child, Mr. Cook moved to Illinois, and settled in Will Co.; here he first purchased forty acres of land at $1.25, and farmed until 1865; he then moved to Crete; here he has retired from farming. Two sons in the late war, Myron H. and Joseph W., enlisted in the 8th Ill. Cav.; Myron H. was taken sick at Hope Landing, Va., and died March 20, 1863; Joseph W. participated in some of the prominent battles, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cope, H.W.
H.W. COPE, horse-collar manufacturer, Joliet; born in Newark, N.J., Dec. 13, 1843, where he lived and attended school until 14 years of age, when he immigrated with his parents to Joliet, where he lived two years; in 1859, he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived two years and commenced to learn his trade; from there he removed to Newark, N.J., where he lived two years, when he returned to Joliet and finished his trade; he purchased the interest of his father in July, 1868; he confines business exclusively to the manufacture and jobbing of horse collars, supplying the wholesale trade largely in Illinois, Iowa, Michigan and Indiana; he employs four hands and such machinery as can be made practical. He married in Joliet July 6, 1865, to Lottie V. Cook; she was born Nov. 23, 1843, in New York; they are the parents of two children now living, viz., Lottie A. and Henry L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corbett, Rufus
RUFUS CORBETT, farmer, Sec. 29; P.O. Wilmington; owns 101 acres, valued at $50 per acre; held the offices of Highway Commissioner and School Director eleven years; born Feb. 26, 1811, in Kennebec Co., Me. Married Mary A. Currier Nov. 13, 1844; they emigrated to Illinois that fall, locating near Joliet, this county; there Mr. Corbett rented what is known as the Kinsey Farm, in partnership with Dr. Hoffman, for one year; thence to the farm where he now resides in 1846,  his family staying at the residence of A. Hill until he built the house in which he resides at present, which residence they had covered and occupied as soon as Aug. 31, 1846; have three children living - Frank M., Helen A. and Emily C.; one died in infancy. Frank M. enlisted in the war of the rebellion, in Co. E, 39th Ill. V.I., Feb. 24, 1864, to serve three years, or during the war; was discharged Dec. 6, 1865. He married Ellaer Meede Aug. 24, 1875; she was born in Louisville, Ky., in 1858. Helen A. married Thomas McQueen and Emily C. married Archibald McQueen, both of Scotland.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corbin, Elihu
ELIHU CORBIN, Justice of the Peace, Plainfield. The subject of this sketch was born in Rutland Co., Vt., May 28, 1813. He married Miss Eliza A. Fish April 16, 1837; she was born in Connecticut; they have six children, viz., Alfred T., Edward W., Lewis D., Hannah J., Emily M. and Mary E. He lived in Vermont twenty-two years, when he moved to Chicago, and, the following winter, he went to Cleveland, Ohio, and engaged in tanning and shoemaking, remaining until 1852, when he came to his present place. He has held the office of Commissioner for the schools and roads, and has been Justice for the past twenty years; he has been largely interested in real estate in this village, having divided about one hundred acres into village lots. His parents are not living; his wife's parents were among the first settlers of Cleveland, Ohio.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corbin, Peter W.
PETER W. CORBIN, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Vermont Aug. 29, 1831. He married Miss Sarah Hill Feb. 19, 1861; she was born in Vermont Jan. 12, 1834; the had six children, five living, viz., Hellen I., Julia M., Carrie E., Warren H. and Aug. E. He lived in Vermont until he was 21 years of age; he then went to California, his object being mining; but not meeting with much luck, he engaged in farming, and remained there seven years; he then came to Illinois and settled on his present place; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 185 acres in this township. His father settled in Will Co., while he was in California, and now lives in Wilmington Township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corwin, H.T.
H.T. CORWIN, farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Lockport; was born in Lima, LaGrange Co., Ind., Aug. 4, 1836; he moved to this county with his parents in 1855, and lived with them until the age of 21; in 1874, he purchased the farm upon which he now resides, now containing seventy acres. He has been School Director three years. He married Miss Helen C. Reed (daughter of George Reed) in Homer Tp., Jan. 31, 1867; she was born in Bristol, Ontario Co., N.Y., Sept. 24, 1845; they have two children - Elmer R., born Feb. 20, 1867, and Myrtie J., born June 10, 1877. Mr. Corwin served three years as Sergeant of Co. G, 39th Ill. Inf., and was wounded at Bermuda Hundred in 1864 and served the balance of his enlistment in Marine Hospital in Chicago. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corwin, Leroy
LEROY CORWIN, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in West Lockport May 15, 1851; he came with his parents to this township when he was about 3 years old; he remained with his parents, engaged on the farm until he was 15 years of age, from which time he has worked his own way through life; he now works the farm of H. McGregor. He married Miss Hannah Adams, of Indiana, in Richland Co., Wis., Sept. 5, 1875; she was born Feb. 11, 1855. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Corwin, Nathan
NATHAN CORWIN, farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Lockport; was born in Wayne Co., N.Y., March 15, 1810; he lived there, engaged in farming, up to the time he was 24 years of age, when he came West, and first moved to Wayne Co., Mich., and was engaged in clearing up timber land; two years afterward, he moved to LaGrange Co., Ind., where he remained thirteen years; he came to this county in 1848, and first lived in Plainfield two years, and then in Lockport Tp. three years, farming, and in Lockport three years, keeping hotel; in 1855, he came to this township, where he has since resided; has been Poor Master and School Director. Married his first wife, Sophia Jewell, of Arcadia, Wayne Co., N.Y., June 30, 1831; she died Jan. 26, 1843; they had five children - Melissa, Mary U., Horace T., Henry E. and Lydia. He married his second wife, Eliza Ann Cole, of Wayne Co., N.Y., in 1848; they had seven children - David R., Austin, Leroy, De Witt C., Alice, Edward L. and William F. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cossaart, R.G.
R.G. COSSAART, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in New York, Sept. 29, 1824, and is the son of David and Ellenor (Griggs) Cossaart; father a native of New York; soldier of the war of 1812; mother from New Jersey; in 1850, moved to Oneida Co., N.Y.; here he was engaged in the manufacture of scythes, pitchforks and farming implements; in 1854, he came West to Illinois, and was engaged in working in different parts of Will Co. at the carpenter and joiner trade; in 1864, he moved on the present homestead; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming. Married twice; first wife, C. Talmage, of New Jersey; second wife, Sarah McClain; have two children. Mr. Cossaart owns a fine, improved farm of 228 acres. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cotton, Augustus B.
AUGUSTUS B. COTTON, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; Justice of the Peace; was born in Isle of Wight, Eng., Sept. 14, 1828, and is the son of William and Jane (Brett) Cotton, who emigrated to America in 1841, with four children; came direct to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Plainfield; here they remained until 1843; then to Wheatland Tp. William Cotton was born in Fresh Water, Isle of Wight, Sept. 28, 1790; his wife, Jane Cotton, was born May 14, 1798; they returned to England, and father died at Plymouth, Eng., October, 1870; mother died at Leamington, Eng., May, 1870. The children are Caroline (married E. Clark), born Jan. 12, 1818, died in the fall of 1853; John, born April 16, 1824, died in February, 1842; Cornelius, born Jan. 21, 1838, died in September, 1854; William, born July 6, 1840, and Augustus B., who married Georgianna Robins, of England, daughter of James and Sarah Robins; came to Will Co. in September, 1843; parents both dead.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cowell, G.E.
G.E. COWELL, M.D., physician, Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Bradford Co., Penn., April 27, 1843. He married Miss Catheron M. Ferryman Nov. 8, 1868; she was born in Guernsey Co., Ohio, Aug. 16, 1843; they have one child living, viz., Nellie G. He lived in Pennsylvania twenty-two years, when he came West to Illinois, and settled in Grundy Co., at Minooka, where he read medicine; in 1871, he graduated at the Hahnemann Medical College, of Chicago, then settled at Elwood, where he has followed his profession since. In 1862, he enlisted in the 141st Penn. Vol. Inf., and was in the service about eighteen months; at the battle of Chancellorsville he received five separate wounds, which disabled him from further service. He has held the office of Alderman and was President of the Temperance Society.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cowell, Rev. Samuel
REV. SAMUEL COWELL, Episcopal clergyman, Lockport; was born in Providence, R.I., July 3, 1820; at the age of 20, he graduated at Brown University; he then studied law one year with his father, the Hon. Benj. Cowell, Chief Justice of Court of Common Pleas of Rhode Island; in 1844, he was ordained as an Episcopal Minister; he first preached in Western Pennsylvania for seven years; in 1854, he moved to Saco, Maine, and was Pastor of Trinity Church four years; in June, 1858, he came to Lockport, and was Pastor of St. John's Episcopal Church four years and Chaplain of State Penitentiary four years under the appointment of Gov. Bissell; although compelled by ill health to retire from the ministry, Mr. Cowell has been engaged upon missionary work, and laid the corner-stones of two churches at Lockport and New Lenox, in this county; he now resides on his farm, about one and one-half miles from Lockport. Married Margaret Marshall in Washington, Penn., Oct. 4, 1852; she was born in Washington, Penn., Oct. 27, 1829; they had five children, four of whom are living. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Crafts, Capt. Edward B.
CAPT. EDWARD B. CRAFTS, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Derby, Conn., Jan. 13, 1814, where his ancestors have lived ever since the settlement of New Haven in 1640, and one of whom (Maj. Moses Mansfield) destroyed the power of the Pequods in a battle, on the site of which was afterward located the village of Mansfield, named in honor of the victory. He married Miss Sarah Ann Thompson Oct. 9, 1846; she was born in Durham, Greene Co., N.Y., Nov. 21, 1813; her parents were from Connecticut; they have two children, viz., Edward Thompson and Elizabeth Mansfield. His son is a physician, and resides in Florida; his daughter is married, and lives in Joliet. He lived at his birthplace until he was 15 years old, training himself for college with the intention of becoming a physician, but failing in health he took passage on a brig bound for Barbadoes; this was in 1829; he then engaged as a sailor, being promoted until, in 1835, he was made Captain; during one of his voyages he was shipwrecked on Long Island; he then shipped as mate, but was soon again made Captain. He quit the sea in 1846, and engaged in general merchandise in Connecticut; in 1850, he bought his present place, and built and occupied same in 1851. He has been Supervisor three years, also School Trustee and Road Commissioner. He owns 160 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Craughwill, Thomas
THOMAS CRAUGHWILL, farming; P.O. Joliet; born in Galway Co., Ireland, in 1828; he was raised on a farm until he was 20 years old; in 1848, he came to America and landed in Boston; he then went to Watertown and worked on a farm; in 1850, he went to Lockport, and remained there a short time; the same fall, he went to Plainfield; in 1853, he moved to Joliet and bought a farm, where he has resided up to the present time; he was the son of John and Mary Craughwill, both natives of Ireland. Was married Oct. 3, 1850, to Mary Lane, by whom he has seven children. Democrat, and Catholic. He served as School Director a number of years, and, in 1874, was elected School Trustee. He came to America with only a few pennies, and went bravely to work, and by good management he has succeeded in accumulating a fortune, and to-day he owns a beautiful and well-improved farm of 600 acres. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cropsey, Daniel W.
DANIEL W. CROPSEY, retired farmer; P.O. Plainfield. Universalist; Republican. Owns homestead in the village; was born in Peterboro, Madison Co., N.Y., Feb. 15, 1797; resided with his parents in that county until 20 years old; he then went to Ontario Co., and remained five years; then to Niagara Co., where he remained twenty-five years; his business during that time was farming; in 1846, he came to this county, and continued the business of farming; he bought at that time 480 acres of Chester Ingersoll, and settled on the northwest quarter of Sec. 36. The eighty acres in the northwest corner was the farm that took the first premium as the best cultivated farm in the county in 1859. The following is a correct copy of the diploma received, viz.:  "The Will County Agricultural Society award this diploma to D.W. Cropsey for having on exhibition at the annual fair of said Society, A.D. 1859, the best cultivated farm of eighty acres of more". Ira Austin, Pres. (Signed) W.B. Hawley, Sec.
With the above diploma, he also received a set of silver forks, valued at $16. Mr. C. received other premiums at different times, once as high as $30 in silver; at one time, he took five animals to the fair, and took premiums on every one on grades. Mr. C. was twice married; first to Elizabeth Straight Feb. 14, 1819; she was born in Argyle, N.Y., in April, 1797, and died in August, 1871; had nine children, six now living - George, Jacob, Andrew J. (formerly Lieutenant Colonel of the 129th Ill. V.I., now in Lawrence, Texas), John, Mary Ann, Mahala (wife of D. Wyland, Esq.); the names of the deceased are Nancy, Laura and Harriet. Mr. C. was the first Supervisor from the town of Wheatland, and occupied the position of Chairman of the Board; was Poormaster (the first) one year; no tax was needed that year, there being no paupers. Mr. C. is now 81 years of age; he never was sick but three days in his life, to be confined to the house; he remembers well seeing the first steamboat as it came up the Hudson in 1808.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cross, Peleg
PELEG CROSS, farmer and dairy-man; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Rhode Island May 10, 1821; came to this State in 1869, and settled in New Lenox, where he now resides; his farm consists of 113 acres, valued at $7,000. He was married Dec. 31, 1852, to Miss Phebe Felps, who was born in Columbia Co., N.Y., Feb. 16, 1829; they have had three children - Sarah E., Mary A. and Phebe F. Mr. Cross, previous to his coming to this State, held the offices of Township Clerk and Assessor several terms in Rotterdam Tp., New York State.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Crossen, R.W.
R.W. CROSSEN, carriage manufacturer, New Lenox; was born in Coburg, Ont., Feb. 25, 1855; came to the United States in 1865, and settled in Joliet, Will Co., Ill; he obtained a liberal education by close and early attendance at school until he was 18 years of age; he engaged as an apprentice in carriage-making, and served three years, at the expiration of which time he went into business on his own account, and in which he continued for two years; finally disposing of his stock and other collaterals, he removed to New Lenox and purchased the right he now owns. His parents and relations are still residents of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Culbertson, Thomas
THOMAS CULBERTSON, retired miller, Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in New Castle Co., Del., Aug. 23, 1814, where he learned the trade of milling; he removed to Joliet in 1836, and engaged at his trade for two years, when the dam was destroyed for the benefit of the Canal; afterward worked at Norman's Island and Wilmington; returned to Joliet in 1839, and settled where he now resides, purchasing what is known as the Red Mill in 1849, which he continued to run until 1867. He married Miss Martha M. Kercheval in Joliet Nov. 19, 1856; her parents settled in Will Co., in 1829; they are parents of three children - Thomas Edwin, born July 16, 1858; May Evelyn, born Oct. 23, 1861; Emma Elizabeth, born Jan. 13, 1864, died Aug. 28, 1865. Mr. C. has filled the offices of School Trustee and Director in the town where he lives for several terms.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Culver, J.J.
J.J. CULVER, Joliet; dealer in live stock, and proprietor of Bluff Street Market; was born in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Dec. 5, 1828; at the age of 14 years, he entered a store as clerk, and at the age of 20, engaged in general merchandising for himself, which he continued till 1857; then, being in poor health he came West, bringing with him a stock of goods, which he traded off for a farm in Channahon Tp.; he followed farming there seven years, and then removed to Joliet and engaged in his present business, which is quite extensive, as he retails an average of forty cattle per month. During the war he did a large and successful business in buying and shipping stock. He has a farm of nearly 200 acres south of the city, and also rents some 300 acres more, on which he usually feeds 100 head of cattle, or 1,000 sheep. For the past four years, has confined his attention mainly to sheep raising, shipping stock, and attending to his business in town. He was married Oct. 21, 1853, to Miss Lydia A. Knox, of Montgomery Co., N.Y., and has four children - Willie K., Aggie C., Edward E. and Charles S.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Culver, Sereno
SERENO CULVER, farming, Sec. 14; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Montpelier, Washington Co., Vt., June 22, 1818. He married Miss Polly Miller Oct. 30, 1842; she was born in same place June 16, 1826; they have had six children, five living, viz., Harvey, Emiline B., Erwin, Ella and Frank; Lucy B. died Jan. 18, 1864. He lived in Vermont until 1834, when he moved to Chicago, Ill., with his parents, where they remained a few months; then came to Plainfield in Cook (now Will) Co., where they engaged in farming, where he remained until 1840, when he came to his present place. He has been a member of the M.E. Church for the past twenty-eight years. His parents, Daniel and Mrs. Betsey Lyman Culver, were natives of Connecticut; they died Aug. 15, 1834, and May 9, 1854, respectively; his wife's parents were Horace and Mrs. Lucy Bryant Miller; they were natives of Massachusetts and Canada; they settled in Plainfield in 1834, and died Sept. 14, 1872, and Oct. 15, 1876, respectively.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cunningham, Bridget
MRS. BRIDGET CUNNINGHAM, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Kilkenny Co., Ireland, Oct. 8, 1822; came to this country in 1850, and settled in the East, where she remained several years, when she removed to this State, and settled in Manhattan, Will Co., in 1857; she removed from there to her present home in New Lenox in 1866; she now owns 160 acres, valued at $8,000; is the widow of the late James Cunningham, deceased, who was born in Longford Co., Ireland; they have had eight children - Mathew, Thomas, Richard G., Martin, Mary E., Michael J., Katie L., and Maggie E. Mr. C., previous to his death, held several public offices in New Lenox Tp.; he died March 27, 1874.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Curran, James
JAMES CURRAN, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; this gentleman ranks as one of the successful farmers of Will Co.; was born in Ireland in 1814, and is the son of Owen and Catherine (Carney) Curran, of Ireland; his father was a farmer; here Mr. Curran commenced life, engaged in farming from the time he was able to hold the plow; in 1849, with his parents, he emigrated to America; thence West to Illinois, and settled in Will Co.; in 1852, Mr. Curran settled on the place he now lives on, the country being very wild at that time. Married Miss Nellie, Coregon, of Ireland, by whom he has seven children. Mr. Curran owns 240 acres of fine land in Will Co.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Curtiss, Romaine J.
ROMAINE J. CURTISS, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; was born in Richland Co., Ohio, Oct. 1, 1840; at the age of 16 years, he entered Hillsdale College, Mich., and after leaving there attended one course of medical lectures at Buffalo Medical College; in 1862, he entered the Union army as Hospital Steward of the 123rd Ohio Vols., and in April, 1863, was appointed a Medical Cadet in the regular army; served on the hospital-boat which, during the siege of Vicksburg, conveyed the wounded up the river to Memphis and St. Louis, and was afterward transferred to the General Hospital at Cincinnati; in 1864, he graduated and received his degree of M.D. from the Ohio Medical College, and was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the U.S. Navy, serving till the close of the war; he then located in Erie Co., N.Y., where he practiced medicine seven years, during which time he pursued a medical course at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, graduating from the institution in March, 1868; from Erie Co., he came to Joliet in 1873; he is a member of the Erie County Medical Society, of the Will County Medical Society, and also a corresponding member of the Boston Gynecological Society. He was married Nov. 29, 1870, to Miss Sarah A. Beal, of Erie Co., N.Y. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cushing, Samuel
SAMUEL CUSHING, Crete; was born in Salisbury, N.H., Jan. 23, 1799, and is the son of Theodore and Abigail (Jackman) Cushing; his mother was a native of New Hampshire; father of Massachusetts; was a mechanic and farmer; when Mr. Cushing was about 7 years old, he, with his parents, moved to Vermont; here he was brought up on his father's farm; at the age of 22, he commenced to learn the trade with his father as chairmaker; he went to Monroe Co., N.Y.; here he was engaged at his trade, chair making. Married twice; his first wife was Miss Rebecca Lee, who died; he then married Miss Elizabeth Stone; she was born in Massachusetts March 28, 1804, and is the daughter of Elias Stone, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war; in 1838, with wife and two children, started West for Illinois in a two-horse wagon; came via Buffalo, N.Y.; here they took steamer to Detroit, Mich.; thence by wagon and team to Illinois, taking them some five weeks to make the trip; never traveled on Sundays, and always managed to stop over Sundays at points where there was a place of worship, that they might attend church and Sunday school; they first settled in Du Page Co.; here but a short time, then to Will Co., and settled in Crete Tp.; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming and chairmaking until about eleven years ago he retired. Mr. and Mrs. Cushing are members of the first Congregational Church of Crete; this Church they took a very prominent part in helping to organize; the two children who came West with them were Henry T., who died July 14, 1878, and Charles S., now living at Hyde Park, Ill. Married twice; first wife, Sarah Foster, deceased; second wife, Mrs. Marcia Bruce. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cutler, A.C.
A.C. CUTLER, farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Hadley; was born in Chenango Co., N.Y., Sept. 13, 1827; he lived there until he was 7 or 8 years of age, when he moved with his parents to Erie Co., Ohio, and from there to Huron Co., Ohio; at the age of 13, he followed the life of a sailor upon the lakes; in the fall of 1844, he came with his parents to Illinois, traveling most of the way by team; for some years he drove stage for Fink & Walker, of Chicago; he also freighted through this Western country, and afterward went to Chicago and was engaged in the manufacture of shingles and also connected with the Police Department for eight years; in 1865, he crossed the plains to Colorado, mining and prospecting, and again in 1866; he came to this county in 1869, and first settled on Sec. 36, and moved from there to Hadley P.O., being its Postmaster for three years; in 1873, he came to his present farm of 105 acres. He married Miss Elizabeth Glines, of Homer Tp., Sept. 6, 1870; she was born in Feb., 1864; they have two children - Clinton E.B., born July 3, 1871, and Ida Lucy, Feb. 5, 1875. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Cutter, N.H.
N.H. CUTTER, farmer; P.O. Joliet; whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Jaffrey, Cheshire Co., N.H., March 12, 1805; up to the age of 21, he was engaged in farming with his parents, after which he learned the trade of joiner and carpenter; in 1828, he moved to Lowell, Mass., and after being engaged at his trade for a short time, was employed in machine shops to the fall of 1829; he then went to Oneida Co., N.Y., and worked in Rogers' Machine Shops up to 1834; in the fall of the same year he came to Joliet, where he has resided ever since, engaged mostly in farming. Has been Alderman, Justice of the Peace, Assessor and School Director. He married Rebecca R. Bailey, of East Hampton, Mass., Feb. 15, 1838; she was born April 14, 1805. Mr. Cutter, while living in the East spent his winters in school teaching.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Daggett, John F.
JOHN F. DAGGETT, M.D., physician and surgeon, Lockport. The subject of this sketch was born in Charlotte, Chittenden Co., Vt., Feb. 19, 1815; with a good common school education, he began teaching at the age of 16; he entered upon his professional studies at the age of 19, attending the medical college at Woodstock, Vt., in the Spring, and that of Pittsfield, Mass., during the Fall; he graduated from Woodstock in 1836, and commenced the practice of medicine in 1838, at Lockport, his present home; for forty years he has had the leading practice of the town and vicinity. He was married in 1842, to Angeline Talcott, a native of New York; she came to Illinois in 1834; was sister of the late Mancel Talcott, of Chicago; her brother, Edward B. Talcott, assisted in surveying and laying out the Illinois & Michigan Canal; subsequently, he was Superintendent of the St. Jo & Hannibal R.R., and at a later period, held the same position on the Chicago & Galena R.R.; Mrs. Daggett died in 1844, without issue; his second marriage, to Cleora M. Parsons, of Marcellus, N.Y., occurred in 1846; has had five children, three dead, two living - Belle F., wife of Hugo Von Boehme, of Joliet (City Surveyor and Architect), and Clara P. Owns 500 acres in Lockport Tp.; also a mill on the Des Plaines River, just below the town of Lockport; this mill was built in 1836 or '37, and operates four run of stone. For many years Dr. Daggett did all the practical operative surgery of the surrounding country. In 1871, he was chosen to the Senate to represent the district composed of Will, Kankakee, Grundy and Kendall Counties. Republican; Episcopalian. Though 63 years of age, the Doctor bids fair to lead an active busy life for many years to come.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dague, David
DAVID DAGUE, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Washington Co., Penn., Feb. 9, 1826; son of Jacob and Catharine (Belman) Dague; father was a farmer, now living in Wayne Co., Ohio, having emigrated there when Mr. Dague was but 6 years old; here Mr. Dague remained until he came to Will Co., Ill., April 15, 1854; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming and stock-raising, having brought to Wheatland Tp., the first Jersey stock; this he is engaged in breeding for dairy stock; owns 140 acres of fine, improved land, and ranks as one of the leading farmers of Will County. Married Miss C. Grill, of Pennsylvania, by whom he has had five children, three living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Daly, Eugene
EUGENE DALY, undertaker and dealer in furniture, Joliet; is a native of the county of Longford, Ireland; he was born on the 13th of May, 1826; in 1844, he came to this country and spent three years in Sag Harbor, L.I., where he learned the trade of a cabinet-maker; coming to Chicago, he worked at his trade there until the fall of 1850, when he came to Joliet and started in business for himself; he is the oldest undertaker and furniture man in Joliet; he has held several public offices, among which may be mentioned those of Coroner of the county, Supervisor and member of the Board of Aldermen. He was married in 1852 to Miss Bridget Thompson, of Joliet; she is also a native of the county of Longford, Ireland; they have eight children living - Margaret, Mary A., John, Catherine, Joseph J., Ellen, Charlie and Willie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Damm, George
GEORGE DAMM, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Lockport; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Feb. 8, 1828; came to America in 1847, with his parents, who settled on the Du Page Co., Ill., and lived with them until he was 27 years old; in 1865, he came to this county and settled upon the farm upon which he now resides, containing 160 acres. Has been Road Master. Married Miss Elizabeth Ott in Du Page Co., Ill., May 8, 1855; she was born in Central Square, N.Y.; they had seven children - Laura Mariah and Francis Ellen (twins), born April 4, 1857; Frank Stephen, Jan. 18, 1860; Edward Valentine, May 27, 1862; Albert Casper, Aug. 27, 1866, and died Jan. 10, 1874; Barney Joseph, Nov. 30, 1871, died April 17, 1872, and Mary Sophronia, April 6, 1873. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dancer, Benjamin M.
BENJAMIN M. DANCER (deceased), farmer, Sec. 25; was born in the State of New York, Dec. 24, 1809; when he came West, first settled in Chicago, remaining there about two years; his parents coming West, they all went to Kankakee Co., Ill., where his mother died, when he first came to this county he lived near Hadley, P.O.; in 1843, he settled upon the farm his widow now resides on, and lived there until his death, Jan. 4, 1864. Had been Supervisor. Married Miss Emily Simmons (daughter of Thomas Simmons, one of the early pioneers of this county, having come here in 1833, from Dunkirk, N.Y.) in Joliet, Oct. 30, 1843; she was born May 3, 1823; they had eight children - John and William (twins), born Nov. 12, 1844; Mariah, March 7, 1846; Mary, born March 22, 1851, died March 21, 1864; Emma, born May 16, 1853; Benjamin F., born Feb. 22, 1857, died November of the same year; Alice R., born Aug. 12, 1859, died March 16, 1860; George, born Dec. 30, 1861, died July 14, 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Daniels, C.K.
C.K. DANIELS, traveling agent of the American Bible Society, Monee; one of the early and most prominent settlers of the village of Monee; was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., Sept. 1, 1822; came to this State in 1862, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his pursuits since 1867 have been, as aforementioned, in the interests of the American Bible Society. He was married Sept. 19, 1858, to Miss Cornelia B. Sleeper, who was born in Hillsboro Co., N.H., June 21, 1830; they have had three children, two of whom are living, viz., Florence E. and Carrie B.; deceased, George Clinton.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Darling, Abram
ABRAM DARLING, retired; P.O. Goodenow; this gentleman is one of the successful men of Crete Tp., who was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., Jan. 19, 1817, and is the son of Reuben and Sophia (Goodenow) Darling; his father was a native of New York, engaged in farming; Mr. Darling was brought up on his father's farm. He married Miss Elizabeth Irwin, of New York, and, in 1853, with wife and four children, emigrated West to Illinois, and settled in Crete Tp., Will Co., east of Goodenow; here he first purchased 120 acres of land and set out in farming, and farmed until about 1872; he then moved to Goodenow; here he has remained ever since. Mr. Darling has held the office of Road Commissioner for the last fifteen years. One son, in the late war, Abram R., enlisted in the 100th I.V.I.; was wounded at the battle of Resaca, then transferred to duty at Indianapolis, Ind.; here he served until the close of the war; now living at Enterprise, Kan., engaged in the livery business. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Davidson, William
WILLIAM DAVIDSON, Joliet; born in county of Cumberland, England, Oct. 28, 1851 (sic), where he lived until 22 years of age, when he came to America; he first located in Connecticut, and from there to Kankakee, Ill., in 1850, where he resided four years; then to Joliet in 1854, where he engaged in the quarry business, which he has continued to the present time; he owns what is known as Davidson's Quarry, located one mile southwest of Joliet, on the C., R.I. & P. R.R.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Davis, George B.
GEORGE B. DAVIS, farm and stock, Sec. 16; P.O. Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in Schoharie Co., N.Y., May 7, 1821. He married Miss Olive Comstock Jan. 12, 1843; she was born in Tompkins Co., N.Y., Jan. 8, 1824; they had nine children, four living, viz., George H., Sarah, Oliver C. and Wilber B. He lived in New York about sixteen years, when he came to Will Co., Ill., with his parents, and settled in this township; in 1846, he came to his present place; he has been School Director and Trustee of the School Fund; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 187 acres in this township and 300 in Texas, which he has earned by his own labor and management. His parents were from Rhode Island; his father, Joseph, was born Aug. 13, 1787, and died Sept. 30, 1838. He married Miss Martha Burlingame; she was born March 5, 1787, and died July 25, 1863. His father settled in this township in 1836, and the family followed in 1837. His wife's father was Dr. Alexander Comstock; he was born in Saratoga Co., N.Y., Sept. 9, 1788. He married Miss Esther Saltmarsh Feb. 10, 1823; she was born in Columbia Co., N.Y., Dec. 17, 1790; they came to Joliet in the fall of 1836, where he practiced medicine until he died, July 9, 1854; Mrs. Comstock died Aug. 7, 1874.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Davis, George W.
GEORGE W. DAVIS, farmer; P.O. Aurora. The subject of this sketch was born in Rutland Co., Vt., and is the son of Jonathan and Jerusha (Lochlin) Davis, who, in 1842, emigrated West and settled in Wheatland Tp., Will Co., Ill.; here they lived until their death. Jonathan Davis was a soldier in the war of 1812, died Jan. 10, 1850, aged 64 years and 6 months; Jerusha Davis died Feb. 9, 1850, aged 61 years; they came to this country very poor; they first settled near what is now known as Vermont Schoolhouse, which was erected by the settlers from Vermont, in about 1847. Mr. Davis is the only male that is left in the neighborhood out of a large settlement that settled in here from Vermont; he has been engaged in farming and at his trade, wagon-making, in Will and Grundy Counties. To-day owns a fine improved farm of 160 acres of land. Married in 1847, to Miss Harriet Curtis, of Vermont, daughter of Thaddeus and Charlotte (Kimble) Curtis, of New Hampshire; have ten children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Deeming, Arthur R.
ARTHUR R. DEEMING, foreman grocery store, Lockport; was born in Liecestershire, England, May 31, 1843; in 1855, he emigrated to America, and settled in Lockport, Ill.; he entered the employ of Stephen Dowse as clerk in his grocery store, and remained in his employ about nine years; leaving Lockport, he next located in Ottawa, La Salle Co., remaining, however, but a few months; he next engaged in carpentering for a short time; in 1865, he engaged with Norton & Co., and at the end of six months took charge of their large grocery and boat stores, which position he now holds. He was married Dec. 26, 1868, to Annie M. Smith, a native of Illinois; has one child - Leonora M., born Oct. 21, 1869. Mr. Deeming is at present Superintendent of the M.E. Church Sabbath school.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Delius, Detmar
DETMAR DELIUS, farmer; P.O. Aurora; was born in Germany May 12, 1812, and is the son of William Delius. Mr. Delius emigrated to America, and landed in New York City in 1852; he came West and settled near Naperville, Ill.; then to the present farm; he owns eighty acres here; he and his brother William have been engaged in farming; his brother William is now dead, having died in August, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Demmond, Sophia (Murray)
MRS. SOPHIA (MURRAY) DEMMOND, Joliet; was born in Petersburg, N.Y., July 26, 1804; she is a daughter of John Murray, who was formerly from Bennington, Vt.; her mother, Cynthia Weaver, was a native of Rhode Island; Mrs. Demmond's parents removed to near Auburn, N.Y., when she was a child, and after five years to Sharon, in the same State, where they resided till their death. Her marriage with the late Martin H. Demmond, occurred in Frankfort, Herkimer Co., N.Y., April 10, 1831. Mr. Demmond was a native of Massachusetts, and was born March 4, 1803; he went with his parents to Sangerfield, N.Y., where he was apprenticed to the tanner and currier's trade; he, however, did not find this business congenial, and having a taste for mercantile pursuits, he soon afterward engaged in merchandising in various places, in which he was quite successful; he first married, soon after becoming of age, Miss Adelia Woodruff, a daughter of Theodore Woodruff, of Clinton, N.Y.; and a sister of George H. Woodruff, of this city; she, however, died during the first year of their marriage. While in business in Frankfort, he married Miss Murray, as above stated, and, in 1834, removed to Joliet; he was so intimately identified with the early history and growth of this city, and his connection therewith is so fully recorded in the historical portion of this work, that any further allusion here is unnecessary. He was a man of pure morals and sterling integrity; "his word was as good as his bond." He died of cholera July 18, 1854, leaving a wife, but no children. A niece of Mrs. Demmond's, Miss Catherine Murray, was a member of the family, from the age of 10 years until her marriage with Frederick Bartelson, an attorney at law in Joliet, who afterward raised a company for the 100th Regiment, I.V.I., was commissioned Captain, afterward promoted to Colonel, and killed at Kenesaw Mountain. She is now the wife of J.R. Casselberry, of Philadelphia. Mrs. Demmond continues to reside in the old homestead erected by her husband soon after his arrival here.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Denby, George
GEORGE DENBY, farmer; P.O. Monee; born May 20, 1816, in Yorkshire, Eng., where he lived until 1852, when he came to the United States, and, after living a short time in Kankakee Co., he settled in Cook Co., Ill., where he lived until the spring of 1869, when he moved to his present home on his farm; he was engaged on the Illinois Central Railroad a large portion of the first twenty-two years after he came to this country. He was married Dec. 23, 1844, to Miss Anne Athern, of Yorkshire, England; their children now living are Emma, Charles, Amy and Robert; his wife, Anne, died in 1863, and, on May 28, 1864, he was married to Mrs. Jane Jackson, daughter of John Daft, of Staffordshire, England; they have four children - Almira, Maggie, Ada A. and George. Mrs. Jackson had, when married to Mr. Denby, two children - Lucy R. and Annie Jackson. He has a good farm of 160 acres, valued at $8,000.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Deutschman, Harmon
HARMON DEUTSCHMAN, farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Germany Feb. 25, 1851. He married Miss Sarah Gockley Nov. 16, 1871; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Sept. 25, 1854; they have three children, viz., Clara, born Dec. 10, 1872; Frank, born March 30, 1875; Ellen, born June 5, 1877. He lived in Germany until he was 15 years old; he then came to the United States and settled in Will Co. with his parents. His father, William, came to this county in 1855, and worked on the farm until 1873, when he bought his present place; he lost his wife in Germany, and he died here in 1875; they had but the one child. Mr. Harmon came to his present place in 1874; he owns 160 acres, which are well improved.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Devine, Frank
FRANK DEVINE, contractor and builder, Joliet; is a native of Dutchess Co., N.Y.; he was born at Fishkill Landing, on the Hudson River, July 3, 1849; when he was about 18 years old he went to New York City and worked at his trade of carpenter until the great fire in Chicago in 1871; he then went to that city and took part in its rebuilding during the next two years; in 1873, he came to Joliet and began business as a contractor and builder; he is acknowledged to be one of the most skillful and reliable workmen in his line of business; he has built some of the best residences in the city, besides other buildings, among which may be mentioned St. Mary's Church, on which he did the carpenter work. He was married June 5, 1876, to Miss Nellie O'Reilly, daughter of James O'Reilly, of Joliet; they have one child - James.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dewitz, Jacob
JACOB DEWITZ, wagonmaker and dealer in pumps, Peotone; born in Rendel, Dukedom of Hessen, Germany, Oct. 17, 1831, where he lived and followed the trade of wagonmaker until 1855, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York June 27 of the same year, coming directly to Danby, Du Page Co., where he remained six months; then to Grundy Co., where he engaged in farming until 1857, when he returned to Bloomingdale, Du Page Co., for one year; he then went to Kansas for a short time, returning to Bloomingdale, where he lived four years, farming; in October, 1863, he removed to Monee and engaged at his trade until March 15, 1865, when he removed to Peotone and engaged in the manufacture of wagons, which he has since followed. He married May 21, 1866, Mary M. Offner; she was born in Crainthal, Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Dec. 10, 1841; they have by this union five children - Theodore H., Mary, August C., Otto and Ludwig C. Mr. Dewitz has held the office of Town Trustee, and is now serving the fifth year as School Director. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dick, Peter
PETER DICK, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Lockport; was born in Rheinboyer, Germany, May 19, 1821; he came to America with his father in 1845, who settled in Williams Co., Ohio, and lived there thirteen years; in 1858, he came to this county, and lived in Lockport Tp. five years, when he purchased and moved upon the farm he now resides on, containing eighty acres. He married Miss Barbara Saltsgiver, Feb. 6, 1847, in Williams Co., Ohio, Dec. 25, 1828; they had nine children - George E., born Nov. 23, 1847; Liddy C., born Nov. 5, 1849; John W., Aug. 28, 1851; Lewis L., June 8, 1853; Theodore R., Feb. 6, 1855; Michael A., Jan. 23, 1858; William H., Feb. 24, 1862, died March 15, 1863; Mertie, June 15, 1864 and Bertie, July 26, 1866 - both the latter dying at birth. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dickinson, Rev. Orville C.
REV. ORVILLE C. DICKINSON, minister, Sec. 15; P.O. Wilton Center. Baptist; Republican. Owns sixty acres; born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., Sept. 10, 1836; went with parents to Michigan when 8 years old; resided there twelve years; attended the High School at Battle Creek three years; came here about the year 1856; was ordained in August, 1860; resided and preached in Wilton Tp. ever since, with the exception of three years that he was Pastor of a church at Bloomingdale, Mich.; he has preached continuously at this place since 1872. Married Susan Beedle, daughter of Rev. Emory Beedle, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; she was born Sept. 1, 1837; have no children of their own; have an adopted child of the name of Lizzie. Mr. D. carries on farming in connection with his other duties; had two brothers in the late war - Anson and Albert; they served in the 12th I.V.I.; Anson received a mortal wound on the 22nd of July, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga., and died Aug. 3, following.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dillman, J.C.
J.C. DILLMAN, proprietor of the Mansion House, Joliet; was born in Summit Co., Ohio, Sept. 7, 1824; his early years were passed upon the farm, his father and grandfather being farmers; in the fall of 1849, he came to Will Co., his father, Michael Dillman, having come with the other members of the family the spring before; the family settled in Plainfield, where the father died in 1861, leaving ten children, five of whom now live in Will Co.; Mr. Dillman followed farming until 1871, when he removed to Joliet; in 1875, he became proprietor of the Mansion House, where the traveler is always sure of courteous treatment and good accommodations, at a reasonable price; being a strictly temperance house, it is a desirable family hotel. Mr. Dillman was married Feb. 19, 1846, to Miss Sarah A. Steese, of Summit Co., Ohio, and has five children living - Lavina C., Amanda J., Michael S., Edward L. and Charles S.; one daughter, Alice J., died Feb. 12, 1861.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dix, William A.
WILLIAM A. DIX, farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Minooka; the subject of this sketch was born in Windham Co., Vt., Jan. 17, 1828. He married Miss S.R. Richardson Jan. 27, 1859; she was born in Concord, Vt., April 6, 1831; they have four children, viz., Lucy E., born June 12, 1859; Hattie E., born Jan. 31, 1861; Emma M., born Nov. 25, 1862, and William C., born April 13, 1868. He lived nearly eleven years in Vermont, when, with his parents, he moved to Bureau Co., Ill.; this was in 1838; they came the entire distance in a wagon; they engaged in farming, and remained there until 1861, when he came to his present place; he came here in fair circumstances; he owns over 200 acres, mostly in this township, which he has earned principally by his own labor; his parents, Moses Dix and Mrs. Lucy (Stearns) Dix, are living in Mendota, Ill.; his wife's parents, Stephen Richardson and Mrs. Erepta (Wilder) Richardson, are living in Bureau Co., Ill., where they settled in 1839. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dixon, George
GEORGE DIXON, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Lincolnshire, England, Dec. 25, 1832; he emigrated to America in 1851, and engaged in farm labor for G.R. Dyer; he remained with him six years, and then labored for a Mr. Ray for the same length of time; in 1856, he purchased 320 acres of land in Michigan; this he purchased chiefly for the timber upon it, and, in the great fire which occurred throughout that region a few years ago, he suffered a loss of $3,000 to $4,000; subsequently, he sold out and went to England, and, after a sojourn of nine months, returned to America, and, in 1869, purchased where he now resides. He was married Sept. 14, 1869, to M. Jennie Burgess, a native of Lincolnshire, England. Owns 160 acres, worth $5,000. Mr. Dixon has led a somewhat romantic life since coming to America; while a young man, he was accustomed to spend the winter season hunting and trapping in Michigan, and always realized handsomely from his winter's sport; much of the time was passed with the Indians, and oftentimes he was far from the habitations of white men, surrounded by the beasts of the forest, with only the savage for a companion.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dodge, John
JOHN DODGE, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Crete Tp., Will Co., Ill., Aug. 11, 1840, and is the son of Enoch and Susan (Adams) Dodge, who were among the early settlers of Crete Tp., Will Co., Ill.; Enoch Dodge, a farmer, was born in Beverly, N.H., Dec. 8, 1795; with his parents, moved to Vermont; here he married in Eden, Vt., Nov. 26, 1818, Miss Susan Adams, born in Rutland, Mass., in 1803; in 1838, they emigrated West in a two-horse wagon; started Oct. 4, and arrived in Will Co., Ill., Nov. 26, 1838; they first lived in a log cabin on the Hewes farm; Mr. Dodge purchased 160 acres of Government land (the old homestead); here he made improvements, and moved his family on the farm, and engaged in farming throughout life; he died on the old homestead March 4, 1873, respected and honored by his fellow-men, leaving a wife and nine children to mourn his loss. Mr. John Dodge is engaged in farming on the old homestead. He married Martha Wilder, daughter of Almon Wilder, one of the old settlers of Will Co. Mr. Dodge enlisted in the late war, in the 9th Minn., Co. F, as Sergeant; mustered out at close of the war. Enoch enlisted in the 100th I.V.I.; participated in some of the prominent battles; mustered out at close of the war; now farming in Kansas. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Donahoe, Edward
EDWARD DONAHOE, groceries, provisions, crockery, glassware, etc.; Wilmington; born in County Tipperary, Ireland, Jan. 7, 1848; came to this country in early childhood with his parents, who located at Joliet, this county, in April, 1854; in September, 1867, he removed to Wilmington and engaged in business, and, in 1874, established a branch store at Braidwood, which he afterward gave to his brother John T.; was member of the City Council in 1876-77. Married Feb. 1, 1872, to Miss Bridget M. Feehan, who was born in Ireland; have three children by this union - Mary J., Timothy J. and Mathew J.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Donahoe, John T.
JOHN T. DONAHOE, Joliet; Treasurer of Will Co.; was born in Joliet Oct. 16, 1855; he is a son of Timothy Donahoe, who came to Joliet from Ireland in 1853, and is now a resident of Wilmington. John T. left school at the age of 13, and entered the grocery store of his brother in Wilmington as clerk, remaining with him until he was 17 years old; they then engaged in business in partnership in Braidwood, and, on attaining his majority, he purchased the interest of his brother and continued the business alone until his election as County Treasurer in November, 1877; he is the youngest Treasurer Will Co. has ever had, and probably the youngest man ever elected to that office in this country.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Donnelly, Joseph
JOSEPH DONNELLY, merchant, Braidwood; born in Durham Co., England, March 19, 1852, and is the son of Matthew and Mary Ann (Hull) Donnelly, of England; his father was a dry goods merchant here; with his father, Mr. Donnelly was engaged in clerking in the dry goods store, and in 1871, emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; came direct to Will Co., Ill., and settled at Braidwood; when Mr. Donnelly first came here, he was engaged as clerk in a store, and continued in this business until 1877; he then purchased the store he now owns, and commenced business on his own account; ranks to-day as one of the leading merchants of Braidwood. He was married in 1874, to Miss Mary Dwyer, daughter of Patrick and Bridget Dwyer, who were among the first settlers of Reed Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Doocy, James
JAMES DOOCY, farmer; P.O. Peotone; born in Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 30, 1853; when but 2 years old, his parents removed with him to Grundy Co., this State, and afterward brought him to this county, where he has lived since his childhood. Was married July 27, 1874, to Johanna Hurley, who was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1857; they have two children - Willie and Julia.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dooley, P.F.
P.F. DOOLEY, farmer, Sec. 10; P.O. Joliet; was born in Troy, N.Y., Aug. 3, 1835. He married Miss Sarah M. Brown March 21, 1864; she was born in this township May 27, 1839; they have six children, viz., Susannah, Eleanor, Gertrude, Sarah F., James C.Z. and Francis B. When 3 years old, his parents left New York and went to Chicago, Ill., where they remained a few months, and then came to Will Co., and settled in Channahon Tp., and engaged in farming. Mr. P.F. remained there until he was 17, when he went to California; engaged in mining and remained until 1861, when he came to this county; in 1864, he went to Montana, and remained three years, when he returned to Will Co. and settled on his present place. He is now serving on his third term as Justice of the Peace; he has also been School Trustee and Director. He owns 209 acres in this county. His parents were among the early settlers of Channahon. His father, James Dooley, died in 1856; his mother died in 1853.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Doolittle, R.
R. DOOLITTLE, Justice of the Peace, Joliet; was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., June 15, 1809, where he resided until his removal to Joliet in the spring of 1837; after following the grocery business two years, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and held the office twelve years, and was also Assignee in Bankruptcy during the existence of the old United States bankrupt law; in 1838, he was elected County Judge, but declined to qualify, and Geo. H. Woodruff was elected in his place; in 1852, he resumed business, the firm being Doolittle & Stone, who erected the three-story brick building on the south side of Jefferson street, the second building west of Ottawa street; the same year, 1852, he, with six other citizens of Joliet, was appointed by the Legislature to divide the city into wards, and call an election for city officers. In 1840, previous to the organization of the city, he had served on the Board of Trustees, of which he was the Treasurer; he remained in the grocery business until 1862, when he sold out to Mr. Stone, and for a number of years was engaged in railroad contracting, merchandising, etc.; he served as Alderman from 1862 to 1866; in 1871, he was again elected Justice of the Peace. He was married April 5, 1838, to Miss Sarah A. Boss, a native of Canada, and has five children living - Theresa C., Eben B., George H. of Port Huron, Mich., Georgeana and Jesse A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dorney, M.J.
REV. FATHER M.J. DORNEY, Pastor of St. Dennis Catholic Church, Lockport; was born in Springfield, Mass., March 11, 1851; at the age of 9 years, he entered the University of St. Mary's of the Lake, situated in Chicago, in which he remained a student seven years; leaving there, he entered the college at Suspension Bridge, N.Y.; here he remained three years, completing his literary course, and received the degree of A.B.; one year after, that of A.M.; he next entered upon his theological course in St. Mary's Seminary, located in Baltimore; this institution is among the oldest in our land, the grant of land on which it is situated having been made by Chas. Carroll, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence; he finished the course in December, 1873, and Jan. 27, 1874, was ordained a priest in the Holy Catholic Church. By appointment from the Bishop, he was sent to St. John's Catholic Church, in Chicago, to assist Father Waldron in the ministrations of the Church; here he remained two and one-half years. Aug. 29, 1876, he came to his charge in Lockport; under his direct supervision, a splendid stone church is now being erected, at a cost of $30,000, and which when completed will far surpass in size and beauty all other churches in Lockport.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Douglass, William
WILLIAM DOUGLASS, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; was born in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland, March 1, 1842; his father, John Dougall, was a leading cotton-spinner in the west of Scotland, and, in 1858, came with his family to this country, settling near New Haven, Ind., where he died in 1874 at the age of 75 years; his mother was Margaret Houstoun, a descendant of the ancient Renfrewshire family of that name; she was born in the town of Houstoun, Renfrewshire, and still survives; the son, William, was educated in the high school of Glasgow. On the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in Co. C, 15th Ind. V.I., June 1, 1861, and participated in all the engagements of his regiment until Oct. 1, 1863, being severely wounded at the battle of Stone River; on the above-mentioned date he was commissioned Capt. in the 13th U.S. Colored Regiment, and served as such until April, 1865, when the war, having closed, he resigned, and, returning home, resumed the study of medicine; he attended a course of medical lectures in the University of Michigan, and afterward in the Chicago Medical College, from which institution he graduated, and received his degree March 4, 1868, and soon afterward began practice in Lemont, Cook Co., Ill., in 1872, he located in Joliet, where he is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He was married Oct. 1, 1872, to Miss Cassie Walker, daughter of Edwin Walker, of Lemont, and has one child - Mamie C. Dr. Dougall is a member of the Will County Medical Society, and of the American Medical Association, and was Secretary of the former two years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Doxtader, Jerome
JEROME DOXTADER, farmer and hotel-keeper; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Nov. 1, 1829; came to Illinois, and settled in New Lenox, Will Co., in 1852, where he now resides. He was married to Miss Delia Hartshorn Sept. 24, 1856; she was born in Will Co., Ill., Oct. 23, 1840, and died July 24, 1878; they have had three children - Willard, born Jan. 6, 1859; John D., Feb. 13, 1862; Lydia L., Oct. 6, 1868. Mr. Doxtader is now the proprietor of the first hotel constructed in New Lenox; his present farm consists of ninety-four acres, valued at $7,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Drauden, John
JOHN DRAUDEN, farming, P.O. Plainfield. The above gentleman was born in Prussia in March, 1831; he married Miss Elizabeth Roush Oct. 3, 1868; she was born in Prussia Sept. 28, 1834; they had seven children, six living, viz., Maggie, Mary, John, Michael, Edward and Matilda. He lived in Germany twenty-three years, when he came to the United States and settled in New York; engaged in farming, and remained four years; he then came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Plainfield Tp.; in 1867, he came to his present place. He has held no office except connected with school and road; he came to this county without any capital, and now owns 240 acres which he has earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Duck, C Hill
C HILL DUCK, editor and publisher of the Wilmington Phoenix, Wilmington; born in Du Page Co., Ill., May 15, 1842, but moved to Chicago in early childhood, where he resided until 1854, when he moved to Lockport, this county, and entered the drug store of Dr. Hanley, with whom he remained four years; then returned to Chicago and continued in the same business. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. I, 127th Ill. V.I., and the same year he was appointed Hospital Steward, Acting Assistant Surgeon; mustered out in the latter part of 1863. Soon after his return from the army, he located at Seneca, La Salle Co., and engaged in mercantile business under the firm name of Wright & Duck; in April, 1877, he took charge of the Wilmington Phoenix, as editor and publisher; Mr. Duck is now a member of Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, A.F. & A.M.; also Past Master and charter member of Seneca Lodge, No. 532.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dunn, Patrick
PATRICK DUNN, farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Lockport; was born in the parish of Laighlin Bridge, Carroll Co., Ireland, March 17, 1825, and lived there until he was 25 years of age, when he emigrated to America, and first lived in Salem Co., Mo., one year; he then crossed the plains to California, and remained six years, coming to this county where he has resided ever since; he purchased his present farm in 1861, now containing 150 acres. He enlisted as a private in Co. F, 100th Ill. Inf., Aug. 10, 1862, and served to the close of the war in 1865. He married Miss Johanna Dugen in Lockport, March 6, 1869; she was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1839, and came to America in 1858; they have two children - William, born Feb. 1, 1870, and Mary, born Nov. 13, 1871. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dwyer, James
JAMES DWYER, farmer; P.O. Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is one among the oldest settlers of Custer Tp.; was born in Ireland about 1825, and is the son of James and Catherine (Cary) Dwyer, of Ireland; his father was a carpenter and wagon-maker by trade; lived on a farm; here Mr. Dwyer commenced farming, and, in 1840, he immigrated to America and landed in New York City; thence to Susquehanna Co., Penn., and commenced farming; he was a foreman on the New York & Erie Railroad for six years; in 1849, he came West to Illinois, and settled in Will Co.; in 1850, he came and settled on the place he now lives on, which was a very wild country at that time; plenty of wild game - deer, wolves and prairie chickens; he has made all the improvements on his farm. Mr. Dwyer has held several offices of public trust. Is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic Church. Married in 1852 to Miss Winnifred Noonan, of Ireland; eight children. Mr. Dwyer came to America a poor boy; by his railroading East he saved a little money, came West and invested it in 200 acres, at $2.50 and $5.00 per acre; he worked hard and by good management is one of the successful farmers of Will Co.; owns 310 acres of land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dwyer, Patrick
PATRICK DWYER, farmer, P.O. Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is the oldest settler now living in Reed Tp., was born in Tipperary Co., Ireland, March 17, 1828, and is the son of James and Catherine (Cary) Dwyer, of Ireland; father was a carpenter and wagon maker by trade, living on a farm here. Mr. Dwyer commenced life by farming; in 1840, he emigrated to America and landed in New York; then to Susquehanna Co., Penn., and engaged in farming about eight years; in 1848, came West to Illinois and settled in Wilmington, Will Co.; in 1850, he came to Reed Tp., and settled on the place he now lives on; he first purchased 120 acres at $3 per acre; he made all improvements on his place; when he first came here, the country was very wild, plenty of wild game, deer and wolves in abundance. Mr. Dwyer has held several offices of trust in his township. Married November, 1851, to Miss Bridget Clark, of Ireland; seven children. Mr. D. is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic Church. He owns 232 acres of fine, improved land, made by hard labor, industry and good management; his father died in 1852, at 60 years of age; his mother is now living on the farm at the good old age of 76.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Dyer, George Randolph
GEORGE RANDOLPH DYER, retired, Joliet; was born in Rutland Co., Vt., June 13, 1813; his father, Daniel Dyer, had a State reputation as a sheep-raiser and substantial farmer; he was a soldier of the Revolutionary war; after the close of the war he was commissioned Major in the Massachusetts State Militia, and his commission, signed by Gov. John Hancock himself, is now in possession of his son, George R.; the venerable and well-known Dr. Charles V. Dyer, of Chicago, was his brother; his mother was a Miss Olin, of the popular Vermont family of that name. Capt. Dyer received an academic education in West Rutland Academy, and at the age of 21, started West, and drove from Clarendon, Vt., to Chicago, Ill., alone; he resided in Chicago and Milwaukee till 1841; during this time, he helped organize the Territory of Wisconsin; in 1838, he assisted in surveying the Fox River, with a view to use the same as a feeder for the Illinois Canal; in 1841, he came to Will Co. and engaged in farming and stock-raising; in his early life in Will Co. he was noted far and wide for his remarkable energy and success in life; in 1856, he was elected Sheriff of the county, and after his term of office expired he returned to his farm, where he resided until the breaking-out of the war in 1861; when the first gun was fired, true to the blood of his patriotic ancestors, he, with his two sons, went into the war for the Union; his oldest son was commissioned Captain when but 17, and served through many a well-fought battle; he died Nov. 13, 1863, from disease contracted in the Southern swamps. During the last thirty-five years Will Co. has known Capt. Dyer as a citizen of note, not a little eccentric, witty, jolly as a companion, and satirical in the reproving of that which had not sense to recommend it. As a defender of the rights of man, he has always been distinguished, and he considered it no disgrace to be called an Abolitionist; he joined hands with them in bringing this country to be what it is to-day. In bold activity and uncompromising devotion, Capt. George R. Dyer was the undisputed pioneer in Will Co. of that enthusiastic movement, as it was called by his friends, and fanatical movement, as it was called by his enemies, which ultimately struck the shackles from the American slave. He was married Jan. 8, 1841, to Miss Elizabeth H. Kimball, of Elgin, a lady of fine natural endowments and graceful manners, whose excellent sense, fine culture and domestic accomplishments eminently fitted her for a helpmate for a young man with a full head and an empty pocket; the matured woman has more than fulfilled the fair promise of the young bride; six children have been born to them, four of whom still survive - Belle R., Daniel B., Lizzie L. and Ida May (now Mrs. A.A. Whiting). George D. died in 1863, and Susie Olin (Mrs. R. Schermerhorn) died in 1872.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Easterbrooks, Laban
LABAN EASTERBROOKS, conveyancer, real estate and collecting agent and Police Magistrate, Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Bristol Co., Rhode Island, March 14, 1814; came to this State and settled in Monee, Will Co. in 1858. He was married to Miss Sabrina M. Wright, who was born in Washington Co., R.I., Jan. 2, 1830; they have had ten children, six of whom are living, viz., Mary L., Sabrina, L. Fillmore, William G., Isabella and Robert L.,; deceased, Ellen M., Sarah G., Rosamond and Rebecca. Since Mr. Easterbrook's residence in the township, he has held offices of Township Clerk and School Director, and at the outbreak of the war was Assistant Enrolling Master.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eaton, Daniel
DANIEL EATON, farmer, Sec. 10; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Antrim Co., Ireland, Sept. 26, 1827. He married Miss Mary McClintock Aug. 15, 1848; she was born in same place Nov. 8, 1829; they had ten children, six living, viz., Joseph, Daniel, Robert, Nancy, Ann and Mary. He lived in Ireland until 1855; was engaged in farming; he then came to the United States, and settled in Kendall Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming, and remained until 1862, when he came to Will Co., and settled on his present place. He is no office-seeker, his only office being connected with the school and road. He came here in poor circumstances, and now owns 300 acres, which he has principally earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eaton, Norton
NORTON EATON, farmer; P.O. Du Page; was born in Rutland Co., Vt., Aug. 25, 1831; at the age of 14 years, he came West to Illinois, with the family, and settled in Kendall Co., near Au Sable Grove, and engaged in farming; in 1854, he moved to Du Page Tp., Will Co.; in 1861, he moved to his present residence. He was married March 25, 1858, to Esther A. Rathbun, a native of Ohio; she is the daughter of S.R. and Maria (Lander) Rathbun; four children have been born to them - Mary A., Carrie E., Gracie G., living; one died, Edith E. Owns 91 acres in Du Page Tp., valued at $5,000. Mr. Eaton has held the offices of Assessor, Town Clerk, Constable, Commissioner of Highways, etc.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eddy, H.G.

H.G. EDDY, foreman, I. & M. Canal yards, Lockport; was born in Oxford, Chenango Co., N.Y., March 19, 1829; at the age of 9, he came with the family to Lockport, his father having come the year before. His father was a mason by trade, and during the construction of the canal, worked upon it. At the age of 16, H.G. went to his trade, serving an apprenticeship of five years; in 1850, he went to California; engaged in mining a short time; in the winter of 1850-51, aided in putting up a mill on the North Fork of the Yuba River; he returned to Lockport about the 1st of July, 1851; here his home has been ever since. April 19, 1861, he enlisted in the three months service, and on the 22nd was in Cairo, where he superintended the mounting of all the guns of the battery, under Gen. Wagner, Chief of Artillery. This was the first battery that blockaded the Mississippi and brought to the first rebel boat. Capt. Eddy was most of the time in command of the fort. November 22, 1864, he re-enlisted in Coggswell's 1st Ill. Indp. Battery, and served during the war; was actively engaged in the battles of Jackson, siege of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, Cold Water, and went with Sherman through the Atlanta campaign. Since 1865, he has been in the employ of the canal company most of the time. Beginning in 1868, he spent some time in contracting and building bridges on various railroads in the State; in 1873, he came to the position he now occupies. He superintended the laying of the foundation of the Copperas Creek Lock on the Illinois River, a work of no small moment. He was married Sept. 12, 1852, to Mary J. Eyer, a native of Pennsylvania; has two children - Lizzie J. (now wife of H.R. Osgood, of Chicago) and Marcia E.M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Edgerly, D.G.
D.G. EDGERLY, agent M.C. R.R. Joliet Cut-Off, Joliet; was born in Perry, Genesee (now Wyoming Co.), N.Y., in 1831. At the early age of 5 years, he lost his father, a prominent merchant of the town. His mother subsequently married a wealthy farmer, and his life, to about the age of 16, as spent upon his stepfather's farm. On leaving home, he spent one year in a dry goods store in Warsaw; he next went to Buffalo, and was employed as check clerk in the firm of Kimberly, Pease & Co. (late Pease & Beecher), forwarders of general merchandise. This firm owned and operated lines on the lakes and Erie Canal. The formation of the American Transportation Co., in 1855, absorbed all the small offices and companies, and he next located at Dunkirk, N.Y., in employ of the N.Y. & Erie R.R., under S.D. Caldwell, now chief manager of the Red Line; he served eight years as check clerk; from Dunkirk he returned to Buffalo and was appointed assistant agent; here he remained ten years. In January, 1873, he was placed in charge of the 33rd station, New York City; this position he held two years. In 1876, he engaged in business in Buffalo, but only continued a short time. In January, 1877, he came to his present position at Joliet. His fine business qualifications have won for him positions of honor and trust, that do not usually fall to men so early in life.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eib, George
GEORGE EIB, farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Harrison Co., W. Va., March 17, 1816. He married Miss Mary Ann Zumaalp; she was born in Adams Co., Ind.; they had nine children, seven living, viz., Peter B., Louisa, Elmenda, Mary Alinda, Catheron Amanda, George W. and Jacob L. He lived in West Virginia about ten years, when with his parents, he moved to Columbus, Ohio, where they remained two years; they then moved to Fountain Co., Ind., and remained there six years; in 1833, they came to Illinois, and settled on their present farm. His mother was Miss Matalena Gilbert; born in Pennsylvania and died in Ohio; his father, Peter Eib, died here; he was born in Lancaster Co., Penn. There were but a few families in this township when they came here, they being among the first settlers.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eichelberger, John
JOHN EICHELBERGER, farmer; P.O. Naperville; this gentleman was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Dec. 21, 1814, and is the son of George Eichelberger, of Lancaster Co., Penn., who was a farmer here; Mr. Eichelberger was brought up on a farm and farmed it through life; in 1848, he came West to Illinois and purchased fifty-four acres of land, paying $200 for the same; he returned East, and, in 1852, with his wife and two children, came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Wheatland Tp.; here he has remained ever since; been engaged in farming, and, with hard labor and good management, to-day owns a fine, improved farm, 276 acres. He married Susan Hembright, of Lancaster Co., Penn. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Eisenbrandt, Henry
HENRY EISENBRANDT, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany May 26, 1829; came to the United States in 1846, and to this State in the same year; he has been a resident of Will Co. for the past twenty-nine years; his farm consists of 320 acres, valued at $16,000. He was married to Miss Dorothea Koepke, who was born in Germany Nov. 18, 1839; they have one child, viz., Christian. Since Mr. Eisenbrandt's residence in the township he has held the office of Supervisor two terms and Collector one year; he is now President of the society known as the Greengarden Insurance Company, which is fully described in the general history of the township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Elliot, John
JOHN ELLIOT, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Peotone; born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, in August, 1822; lived there until 20 years of age; he emigrated to America in 1842, landing in Kingston, C.W., where he engaged at his trade of stone-mason for six years, until 1848, when he located in County of Huron, C.W., and engaged in farming and also working at his trade until 1875, when he sold out all his interests in lands and emigrated to Peotone, Will Co., Ill., and located upon his present place, where he has since lived; he owns 120 acres of well-improved lands, valued at $40 per acre, which he has earned by his own hard labor. He married in October, 1851, to Isabella Habkirk, a native of Canada; they have two children by this marriage - Janette and William. Mrs. Elliot died in 1858. He married for his second wife Margaret Cowan; she was born in Scotland; they have four children by this union - Agnes, Isabella, John and Elizabeth. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Emery, H.W.
H.W. EMERY, lumber merchant, Lockport; the subject of this sketch was born in Ellsworth, Hancock Co., Maine, Dec. 18, 1821; at the age of 21, he left home and went to Boston, Mass., where he engaged in the trade of house carpentering; in 1846, returned to Maine, and back again to Boston in 1849; in April, 1849, he went to California, and engaged one year in mining; he next settled in Oregon City, where he engaged in house building; in 1854, returned to Boston, and in 1855, came West to Illinois, and settled in Lockport; in 1860, he opened a lumber yard, and has continued the business ever since. He was married in 1860 to Sarah F. Bartlett, a native of Maine; she died without issue. Republican; Congregationalist. Mr. Emery is a member of the City Council; he is highly esteemed as a man for his many good qualities, and is strictly upright and honest in all his business transactions.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Engelmann, Henry
HENRY ENGELMANN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; was born in Germany Oct. 30, 1824; came to the United States in 1853, and settled in Monee Tp., Will Co., Ill.; he removed from there to Frankfort in 1863; his farm consists of 120 acres, valued at $6,000. He was married to Miss Mary Voigt; they have had four children, viz., Mary, Henry, Sophia and Louisa.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Erhard, George
GEORGE ERHARD, Joliet, whose portrait appears in this work, was born May 7, 1807, in the town of Middlestray, Province of Milrickstuart, Lower Frank, Wurtzberg, kingdom of Bavaria; he emigrated to America in June, 1832, with his mother and two sisters, and first went to Detroit, Mich., where in August of same year his mother died of cholera; in October, 1833, he moved to Chicago, and April 26, 1836, came to Joliet with his brother-in-law, John Belz. In 1838, they returned to Chicago, and married two sisters, Louisa and Veronica Periolet; Louisa, the wife of Mr. Erhard, was born in the town of Highfelt, in Alsace, near Strasbourg, in France; she emigrated to Chicago, with her two brothers and sister, in 1834. Mr. Erhard returned to Joliet, and having formed a copartnership with John Belz, built a large brewery on Bluff street, West Side, Joliet, being very successful until the depreciation of wildcat money caused them to close their business. He had nine children, five living - George C., born Nov. 22, 1838, now carrying on an agricultural and seed store in Joliet; Emily, born Nov. 11, 1842, wife of J.C. Adler, of Joliet; Joseph, now farming in Troy Tp., Will Co.; Louisa and Lawrence; his four younger children are dead, and are buried in the West Side German burying-ground, in Joliet. He and his brother-in-law, John Belz, were the first German settlers in this county, and George C., the eldest son of Mr. Erhard, was the first German male child born in Will Co.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Evans, James E.
JAMES E. EVANS, livery and feed stable, Wilmington; born in Oneida Co., N.Y., Oct. 8, 1853, but moved to Illinois in early childhood with his parents, who located in Will Co. in 1856; removed to Wesley Tp., this county, in 1860; in 1865, he removed to Hamilton Co., Iowa; thence to Chicago in 1872; came to Wilmington, his present home, and engaged in the livery business in May, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Evans, M.H.
M.H. EVANS, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Clark Co., Ill., Oct. 8, 1831. He married Miss Hannah C. Tenny Nov. 14, 1850; she was born in Grafton Co., N.H., Aug. 29, 1826; they had eight children, six living, viz., Sarah A., Eunice A., Walter A., Milton H., Ira E. and Carrie H.; Mary E. and William H. died; he lived four years in Clark Co., and then came to Will Co., with his parents, who settled in this township and engaged in farming; he lived here until 1852, when he moved to Kendall Co., Ill., and engaged in farming; remained until 1865; he then came to his present place; he owns 189 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor. He has been connected with the M.E. Church for the past twenty-eight years; he is now the Steward, and has been Trustee, Class Leader and Sabbath School Superintendent.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Evans, William
WILLIAM EVANS, foreman roll-turning department, Joliet; was born in England June 20, 1841; his family emigrated to America in 1846, and settled in Pennsylvania; here his father engaged in iron-mining, and in the mining districts William passed his youth and early manhood; in 1862, he went to his trade in Danville, Penn., working five years under the instruction of Charles D. Hunt; in 1870, he came to Chicago, and was employed in the roll-turning department in the North Chicago Rolling-Mills; here he remained one year; in June, 1871, he came to Joliet, and entered the employ of the Joliet Iron and Steel Co.; here he has since resided, excepting a residence of about six months in Springfield in 1873, when these works shut down. He was married in December, 1864, to Mary E. Propst, a native of Pennsylvania; has one child living - William D.; three died - Phillip D., and two in infancy.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


 

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