Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents

Haag, Leonard
LEONARD HAAG, farmer; P.O. Aurora; was born in Germany Dec. 7, 1826, and is the son of Peter Haag, of Germany, a weaver by trade; in 1842, with his father, mother and family, emigrated to America; first settled in New York State; remained there about one and a half years, then went West to Illinois, and settled in Kendall Co.; thence to Kane Co.; here four years; he then, in 1869, settled on the present farm. Mr. Haag married Miss Mary Bruner, of Germany, by whom he has eight children. Mr. Haag came to the State very poor, but, with industry, he is one of the successful farmers of Wheatland Tp.; owns 280 acres of improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hack, John
JOHN HACK, merchant, Eagle Lake; was born at Hohen Vicheln, State of Mecklenburg, Germany, Sept. 1, 1825; came to America in 1864, and located in Washington Tp., four miles south of Beecher, on a farm of 160 acres, which he still owns. Was appointed Postmaster of Eagle Lake Postoffice in May, 1878. Married Miss Sophia Lut in March, 1852; the names of their children are as follows: Herman, Henry, Carl or Charles, Frank and Emma.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hagar, Edward C.
EDWARD C. HAGAR, attorney at law (firm of Hagar & Flanders), Joliet; was born in Plainfield, Will Co., Ill., April 19, 1846; he is the son of Jonathan and Catharine (Goodhue) Hagar; his father came from Cleveland, Ohio, and settled in Plainfield in 1835; he was the first merchant in that town; his mother is a daughter of Deacon Ezra Goodhue, and came to Plainfield with her father's family in 1834. Mr. Hagar was educated at the Northwestern Evangelical College in his native town, graduating in 1867; in 1870, he entered the Law Department of the University of Michigan, completing his course and graduating in the spring of 1872; he was admitted to the bar in Michigan in April, 1872, and by the Supreme Court of Illinois in June of the same year. In November, 1872, he was elected State's Attorney, and in December following, he formed a law partnership with James R. Flanders, which still continues; he held the office of State's Attorney four years. He was married March 24, 1875, to Miss Hattie C. Gager, a native of Warren, Ohio, and has one child - Elmer G.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hagar, Jonathan
JONATHAN HAGAR, retired merchant, Plainfield. Congregational; Republican. Owns 400 acres in Will Co., valued at $60 per acre; also 280 acres in Kendall, valued at $60 per acre; was born in Quebec, Canada, Feb. 19, 1807; when 2 years old, his parents removed to Montreal, where they remained eight years; then to Middlebury, Vt., where they remained eight years; then to Waybridge, Vt., where he remained two years, working on a farm which his mother owned; his father was a sea-captain, and owner of a vessel; he died of yellow fever, in South America, Jan. 29, 1821, during a voyage to that country; his mother's family, at that time, consisted of four brothers, besides himself and one sister. In 1830, Mr. Hagar started West; he stopped in Cleveland two years, during which time he was employed in a crockery store; he then went to Michigan, remained there two years, and taught school; then to this place, in company with Samuel Sargeant, with a stock of goods for a country store; they opened the first store in Plainfield; it was kept in a wagon-shop, owned by a man named Bill; about a year after their arrival, they built a store of their own and removed their stock into it; Mr. H. continued to do business in this town until the commencement of the late war, with the exception of four years that he was engaged in milling, in company with Messrs. Goodhue & Burrell; the storehouse that he put up still stands, and is now occupied as a parsonage for the Congregational Church. Mr. H. was married twice, first to Catherine Goodhue, Sept. 14, 1843; she was born in New Hampshire, and died March 19, 1858, leaving two children - Edwin C. (now of Joliet), and Ellen E. (now Mrs. Charles E. Fraser). Mr. H. held the office of Justice of the Peace for eighteen years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hahn, J.D.
J.D. HAHN, farmer, Sec. 1; P.O. Plainfield. The subject of this sketch was born in Columbiana, now Mahoning, Co., Ohio, July 3, 1826. He married Miss Rebecca Shreffler June 7, 1849; she was born in Pennsylvania April 4, 1829; they have six children - William T., Helen R., Kate J., Alice M., John D.S. and Nettie M. He lived in Ohio twenty-one years, when he came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Plainfield Tp.; he engaged in farming, and, in 1857, he came to his present place and has lived here ever since; he is no office-seeker, his only offices being connected with the school and road. He owns 207 acres of land in this county, which has been principally earned by his own labor and management. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Haley, Charles
CHARLES HALEY, blacksmith, Hadley; was born in Waldec, Prussia, Germany, Jan. 21, 1836; he was engaged in learning the trade of blacksmith from the age of 15 up to 18, when he came to Canada with his mother in 1854, living there up to 1874, carrying on the trade of blacksmith, and from there he came to Hadley Postoffice, in this township, carrying on a blacksmith shop, and is now also Postmaster. He married Miss Aldura Lawson, of Prince Edward Co., Upper Canada, May 5, 1863; she was born April 13, 1842; they have four children - Manly B., born June 20, 1864; John C., born April 7, 1867; Adolph, born Dec. 13, 1870, and Carrie, born Oct. 10, 1872. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Haley, G.L.
G.L. HALEY, farmer; P.O. Hadley; was born in Wayne Co., N.Y., Jan. 7, 1850; came to this State in 1860, and settled in Homer Tp.; he removed from Homer to New Lenox in 1876; he has now under cultivation thirty-five acres, valued at $2,100. He was married Nov. 25, 1875, to Miss Emma L. Dancer, who was born in Homer, Will Co., Ill., May 14, 1851; they have had one child - Mary Edna, born Nov. 19, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Haley, John
JOHN HALEY, farmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Hadley; was born in Waldec, Prussia, Germany, April 2, 1822; he lived there until he was 25 years of age, when he came to America in July, 1847, and settled first in Wayne Co., N.Y., living there six and a half years, blacksmithing; moved from there to Prince Edward Co., Can., working at the same trade; in the spring of 1860, he came to Will Co., and settled where he now resides; farms 250 acres. Has been Highway Commissioner six years and School Director many years. He married Miss Elizabeth Kunzen, of Prussia, in Alliance, Wayne Co., N.Y., in July, 1847; she was born Oct. 21, 1823; they have eight children - John, born May 14, 1848; George L., born Jan. 7, 1850; Carrie, born Nov. 3, 1852; William H., born Nov. 17, 1854; Charles F., born Sept. 26, 1857; Alexander, born Oct. 3, 1860; Frank, born Dec. 18, 1864, and Emma, born June 16, 1868. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Haley, P.C.
P.C. HALEY (of the firm of Haley & O'Donnell), attorney at law, Joliet; was born in Saranac, Clinton Co., N.Y., March 17, 1849, and came to this county with his parents in 1852; he was educated in the Joliet Union School and the University of Notre Dame, Ind., reading law during vacations in the office of T.L. Breckenridge, of this city; in 1870, he entered the law department of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., where he graduated in 1871; he was admitted to the bar in October, 1871, and began practice in May, 1872, in company with James R. Flanders, having an office in Joliet and also in Wilmington; this partnership continued until December, 1872, when it was dissolved, and Mr. Haley continued alone until 1874, when the present firm of Haley & O'Donnell was formed. Mr. Haley is at present Alderman from the Fifth Ward, being elected in April, 1878; he also served as City Attorney in 1874. He was married Dec. 1, 1875, to Miss Mary A. D'Arcy, of Joliet, and has one child - Margaret C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hall, Esaias
ESAIAS HALL, Superintendent of the Chicago & Wilmington Coal Co., Braidwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Rutland Co., Vt., Sept. 6, 1822, and is the son of Gen. Robinson Hall, of Vermont, who was a prominent military man; his mother, Sarah (Munson) Hall, of Connecticut; his father was owner of a farm here. Mr. Hall was engaged in farming until he was 30 years of age; he then entered the mercantile business, and continued in this business until 1865; in 1866, he came West to Illinois and settled in Wilmington; he first worked for the Hill & St. Clair Coal Company for two years; since 1868, he has been engaged with the Chicago & Wilmington Coal Company; he first was engaged as a traveling agent, and in March, 1874, was appointed Superintendent of the company. The Chicago & Wilmington Coal Company is one of the largest coal companies in the West; this company has worked and partially abandoned eight coal shafts; now engaged in running two shafts. G. & H. employ 700 men; capacity, 150 cars per day, twelve tons to a car. Mr. Hall has been married twice; his first wife was Miss Louisa Danforth, of Vermont; his second wife, Elizabeth S. Cogdon, of Vermont; have one child. In 1871, Mr. Hall moved to Chicago; here he has been residing ever since. Member of the Congregational Church, and a Republican in politics.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hamlin, N.S.
N.S. HAMLIN, retired farmer; P.O. Plainfield; born in Madison Co., N.Y., May 27, 1824; resided with his parents until the age of 27; then emigrated to this town. Married Parnel Keeler April 25, 1849. Engaged in farming soon after his arrival here, which he continued with success until about eight years ago; is at present living a retired life in Plainfield village; has held the office of Road Commissioner five years; also office of School Director five years, which office he now holds. The Hamlins of America are all descendants of one David Hamlin, one of the party who came over in the Mayflower in 1620. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hand, Dr. M.F.
DR. M.F. HAND, dental surgeon; Joliet; has been a practicing dentist in this city for the past twenty-two years; he was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., May 5, 1834; he received an academic education, and at about the age of 18 years, began the study of dentistry; in 1856, he came to Joliet, and began the practice of his profession. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. H, 100th Ill. Vols., serving in the army of the Cumberland, and afterward in the Quartermaster's Department of the Army of the Tennessee, under Capt. Alexander McIntosh, of this city; returning in July, 1865, he resumed practice in Joliet. He was married Jan. 14, 1874, to Miss Harriet E. Speer, of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hanson, Peter
PETER HANSON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Greengarden; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Sept. 24, 1830; came to the United States in 1857, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 360 acres, valued at $18,000. He was married to Miss Anna Wilkins, who was born in Germany Feb. 24, 1821; they have had four children, all of whom are now living - John, George, Louisa and Minnie. Since Mr. Hanson's residence in the township, he has held the office of School Director seven years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hardy, Otis
OTIS HARDY, P.O. Joliet; one of the early settlers of Will Co.; was born near Windsor, Vt., Sept. 23, 1810; in 1813, his parents left their Eastern home and made the journey to Marietta, Ohio, descending the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers on rafts; in 1819, they removed to Meigs Co., Ohio; when he was 14 years old, Mr. Hardy was apprenticed to the trade of a carpenter, serving an apprenticeship of six years, and receiving during that time the sum eighteen pence; he came to Joliet in 1836, making the journey from Cincinnati on horse-back, previous to which he spent about four years in Louisiana; he continued the carpenter's trade until 1848, when he engaged in the lumber business for twenty years, or until 1868, since which time he has been in the banking and gas business; he is one of the original stockholders of the First National Bank, and a stockholder in the Joliet Gas-Light Co. since 1862; he has always been an active temperance man, and for the past two years has been President of the Joliet Reform Club; he is a zealous member of the M.E. Church, to which he has belonged since he was 22 years of age, assisting liberally in the support of all its enterprises; he built, at his own expense, the Richards Street M.E. Church and parsonage at a cost of over $5,000; he also bore about half the expense of building the chapel at the Rolling-Mills, which cost some $2,000, besides contributing largely to the building and support of the Ottawa Street Church; he has been a member of the Quarterly Conference since 1837, and President of the Will County Bible Society for the past forty years. He was married Oct. 14, 1838, to Miss Angelia Hopkins, of Joliet, a native of Vermont; they have three children living - Mrs. W.J. Maclay, of Napa City, Cal., Mrs. N.D. Dyer and Mrs. T.H. McBride, of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Harley, J.L.
J.L. HARLEY, farming, Sec. 33; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Washington Co., Va., March 29, 1830. He married Miss Ellen Turpie Oct. 28, 1859; she was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 11, 1833; they had ten children, nine living, viz., Bruce T., Ruth A., Ida B., James E., Ralph J., Theodore L., Joel A., Mary and George W. He lived in Virginia three years, then moved with his parents to Clinton Co., Ind., and lived there about five years; while there, his father died Sept. 10, 1835; they then moved to Carroll Co., Ind., where he remained until 1852; from there he went to California; object, mining, which he pursued four years, with fair success; he then came to his present place. He is no office-seeker, his only offices being connected with the school and road. He started in poor circumstances; he owns 160 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor. His mother died in this county.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Harper, Mrs. C.W.
MRS. C.W. HARPER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Mokena; one of our early settlers; was born in Kentucky, Aug. 3, 1834; is the widow of the late Thomas Harper, deceased, who was born in England May 21, 1832; died July 28, 1870. He was one of our first settlers and pioneers. They were married March 5, 1857, and have had four children, all of whom are living, viz., Elizabeth F., Ann W., Susan E. and Thomas P. Mrs. H. continues the business in which her husband was engaged, namely, that of a farmer and stock-raiser; her farm consists of 180 acres, valued at $10,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Harrison, Amos
AMOS HARRISON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Greengarden; one of our early settlers; was born in England April 25, 1833; came to the United States in 1858, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in 1860; his farm consists of 140 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married June 30, 1868, to Miss Catherine Marshall, who was born in England Dec. 21, 1833; they have two children, viz., Henry Marshall and Annie Lina. Mr. H., since his residence in the township, has held the office of School Director three years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hart, William
WILLIAM HART, draying, Wilmington; born in county of Kent, England, March 14, 1819; entered the navy of his native country in 1835, serving until 1841, when he entered the merchant service, where he remained two years; in 1850, he moved to this country, locating at Wilmington, his present home, Saturday, Nov. 30. Married in 1845 to Miss Isabelle A. Knight, who was born in county of Kent, England; they have one child by adoption - Bertha. Mr. Hart is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, and Wilmington Chapter, No. 142.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hartwell, Levi
LEVI HARTWELL, farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Lockport; was born in Hadley, Mass., Dec. 10, 1817; at the age of 11, he was thrown upon his own resources; at the age of 12, he learned the trade of blacksmithing with John Lane, and served an apprenticeship of seven years - three years in New York State and four years in Illinois, having come to this county in 1833 with Mr. Lane; he also worked for John P. Manny one year, and in Galena about a year; returning to this township in 1838, he again worked for John Lane up to 1842, when he settled upon the farm upon which he now resides, making all the improvements on thirty acres, at the same time carrying on the manufacture of steel plows up to 1862, since which time he has devoted himself to his farm, now containing 110 acres. Has held the office of Constable and Path Master seven or eight terms; Town Commissioner thirteen years; School Director twelve years; Supervisor two years and Poor Master one year. He married his first wife, Miss Louisa Poor, in Homer Tp., Nov. 3, 1842; she was born in Indiana, Sept. 11, 1823, and died Oct. 26, 1867; they had five children, one only living - Samuel, born June 27, 1856, and four dead - William E., first, died Jan. 12, 1846; William E., second, died at Eastport, Miss., May 5, 1865, of disease contracted in the army; Charles died Feb. 14, 1869, and Levi died May 20, 1873. He married his second wife, Miss Emma Trask, of St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., in Chicago, April 22, 1868; she was born Nov. 10, 1847. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hartwell, P.N.
P.N. HARTWELL, architect and builder, Lockport; born in Westport, Essex Co., N.Y., Oct. 1, 1825; his education is quite complete, comprising a full academic course in the County Academy; his father was a mechanic, and into the profession the son naturally grew up, spending his vacation at work in the shop so that by the time his education was completed, he was also well advanced in his trade; in 1855, he came West, and settled in Lockport, remaining about six months, he then moved to Marion, Linn Co., Iowa, where he remained until 1864, when he returned to Lockport, since which time he has been doing business in Lockport and Chicago, his home remaining at Lockport. He was married May 29, 1849, to Elmina Jackson, a native of Vergennes, Vt.; has three sons - John J., Harold W. and Fred W. Held the office of County Superintendent of Schools in Essex Co., N.Y., and served five years as Assessor in Marion, Iowa; was a member of the Board of Education eleven years in Lockport.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Harvey, Jabez
JABEZ HARVEY, merchant, Sec. 9; P.O. Wilton Center. Republican. Owns thirteen acres in village of Wilton Center. Was born Jan. 20, 1831, in Canada East; came with his parents to Tazewell Co., Ill., in 1837, and to New Lenox in 1838, and then to where Wilton Center now is in 1841; was raised a farmer. Married Sarah Jane Weliver Dec. 6, 1853; she was born in Butler Co., Ohio, in 1832; Mr. H. went to California by land in 1850; remained there three years; in March, 1858, engaged in the mercantile business in this place, and has continued it ever since; in 1864, Mr. H. made a trip to the headwaters of the Missouri River, where he spent the summer, returning home by the way of Salt Lake and the plains, the same year. Was elected a member of the State Legislature in 1872, and served two sessions. Mr. H. has four children - Everett, Ettie, Judd and Jay C.; Judd accompanied his father to Springfield, and acted in the capacity of page during the second session. Mr. H. was elected Justice of the Peace in Wilton Tp. in 1858, and has held that office continuously nearly ever since; held the office of Township Treasurer fourteen years, which office he still holds; was appointed Postmaster in 1875, at the time the office was established, and has held that office ever since.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Harwood, Elvis
ELVIS HARWOOD, deceased; Joliet; whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Wilmington, Ind., May 17, 1824; where he remained until he was sixteen years of age; he then commenced the study of law in the office of Alexander C. Downey, at Aurora, Ind., and was admitted to practice Dec. 14, 1843; after the end of one year, finding this profession unsuited to his tastes, he studied medicine with his brother, John Harwood, M.D., and after attending a course of lectures in the medical college of Ohio, in the years 1846-47, practiced for three years at Crete and New Lenox, in this county, and in the year 1850, coming to Joliet, continued the practice of his profession up to 1868, from which time, up to the day of his death, Feb. 1, 1870, he was largely engaged in the real estate business. In 1861, he went to California, returning from there in the summer of 1862. The same summer, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 100th Regiment I.V.I., being afterward promoted to Surgeon of the "Pioneer Brigade," which position he held until his resignation, on account of ill health, in the spring of 1863. He was elected Alderman of the city of Joliet, from 1863-67, and Mayor, 1868-69. He married Miss Helen A. Cagwin (daughter of Abijah Cagwin, of Joliet), Jan. 24, 1850; she was born Oct. 30, 1830; they had five children, three living - Alma L., William E. and Bertha H.; and two deceased - Flora A. and George T.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hasenjaeger, Fred L.
FRED L. HASENJAEGER, farmer, stock-raiser, and breeder of Norman and Clydesdale horses; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our natives of Illinois; was born in Greengarden, Will Co., March 19, 1854; he is the son of Frederick Hasenjaeger, who is one of our early settlers; the farm of Mr. H. consists of 240 acres, valued at $12,000. He was married to Miss Catherina Brandan, who was born in Germany Sept. 14, 1857; they have two children, viz., Rosa and Henry.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Haviland, Frank
FRANK HAVILAND, proprietor of livery, sale and boarding stable, Joliet; was born in Ithaca, Tompkins Co., N.Y., March 15, 1842. Early in 1862, he enlisted in the 109th N.Y. Vols., and was appointed a Sergeant in Company A; he served in the Army of the Potomac, and participated in all the engagements of that army until the battle of Petersburg, where he was wound June 17, 1864; he received three wounds, one in the left hand, by a fragment of a shell, which carried away one of his fingers, and at the same time two wounds in the right leg; on his recovery, he was sent on detached duty to Annapolis, Md., where he remained till his discharge in August, 1865, just previous to which he received an unsolicited and unexpected commission as First Lieutenant. He came to Joliet in the fall of 1865, and the next spring engaged in his present business; he has served one year as City Marshal and one term as a member of the Board of Aldermen of Joliet. He was married Dec. 3, 1874, to Miss Merrion Millar, of the town of Troy, Will Co., Ill.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hawley, Robert
ROBERT HAWLEY, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Buckinghamshire, England, in 1822, and is the son of John and Fannie Hawley; who died when he was very young; was raised among strangers; at 14 years of age, he worked his passage on a lumber vessel to Quebec, Canada, and remained in Canada about two years; thence to America; here he spent his time in travelling in different parts of the United States; came to Illinois in 1844, and engaged in working on a farm in Kendall Co. about eighteen months; in 1847, he settled on the farm he now lives on, in Custer Tp., Will Co.; states that there was no house between him and Wilmington; country very wild. In October, 1861, he enlisted as private in Co. F, 9th Ill. Cav.; this regiment was principally on scouting duty, and did good service; was mustered out at the close of the war, at Selma, Ala., in 1865; returned to his farm and remained here ever since. Married Miss Sarah Ann Burd, of New Jersey. Mr. H. is about the oldest settler of Custer Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hawley, Warren
WARREN HAWLEY, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., July 8, 1812; his father, Lyman Hawley, was born in what is now the State of Vermont, Aug. 4, 1782; his mother, Althea H. Moore, was born in West Hartford, Conn., Sept. 3, 1787. Lyman Hawley was among the early pioneers of Will Co., having come with his family in the Fall of 1835; he settled just south of where his son Warren now resides; here he led a quiet, useful life until April 29, 1844, when he rested from his labors. Warren Hawley was married in Elgin, Ill., Feb. 14, 1839, to Louisa S. Heath, a native of Connecticut; she came West in 1836; May 13, 1871, she passed peacefully away, leaving a devoted husband, two daughters and a son to mourn her loss - Mary L., (wife of Selah P. North), Harriet L. (wife of Horace Cadwallader, of Dwight, Livingston Co.), and Edward W. (now shipping clerk for Ingraham, Corbin & May, of Chicago); Edward married Katie French, of Madison, Wis. Warren, like his father, Lyman, has never changed his residence since he came to Illinois; the land he owns to-day, 130 acres, passed from the Government into the hands of his father, and from his father to himself; here he has lived to see the "Star of Empire" westward take its way, and the wave of emigration spread over the fair prairies beyond him, converting them into rich, productive farms, and where now a hundred fine residences adorn as many farms, when he first settled the eye could rest on no habitation of man; from his home west to Plainfield, a distance of eight or nine miles, not a house was to be seen, but all was a vast stretch of unbroken prairie. He held the office of Assessor one year. He owns 130 acres, valued at $8,000. Though past his three score years, he bids fair to live many years yet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hayen, H. Henry
H. HENRY HAYEN, blacksmith, Joliet; born in Germany in 1845, where he lived until 21 years of age, where he learned and worked at the trade of blacksmith until he emigrated to America, landing in New York Oct. 29, 1866; came directly to Joliet, Will Co., Ill., and engaged in blacksmithing, wagon-making and general repairing, and manufacturing all kinds of stone-cutters' and marble-workers' tools, which business he has since successfully followed. He was married July 16, 1872, and has two children now living, viz., Francis and Mary. Mr. Hayen owns his place of business and residence located at No. 91 Bluff street, which he has made by his own hard labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hayward, C.B.
C.B. HAYWARD, publisher and proprietor of the Joliet Daily and Weekly Sun, Joliet; was born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Ind., July 1, 1844; at the age of ten years he entered the office of the Locomotive, in Indianapolis, completing his trade with Cameron & McNeely, book and job printers. In 1860, he went to Carthage, Mo., where, with his brother, he engaged in publishing The Southwest. On the breaking-out of the war, their office was captured by the rebels, and taken into Arkansas. Mr. Hayward made his way to Fort Scott, Kansas, and purchased the Fort Scott Bulletin, and a year and a half later took a partner and founded the Fort Scott Union Monitor, now one of the leading papers of Kansas, which he continued to publish about a year and a half. In the mean time, he was appointed U.S. Assessor, for that division, and served about a year and a half. He then came to Marseilles, Ill., where he resided one year, and from that place to Joliet, and had charge of the Joliet Republican office about a year and three months. In 1872, he established the Joliet Sun. He has built up an extensive job-printing business, and a large and healthy circulation among the best people of the county. The Daily Sun is the oldest and largest daily published in the Seventh Congressional District. Mr. Hayward was married in April, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Monroe, daughter of George Monroe, of Joliet, and has three children - Josephine, George E. and Thomas.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hazard, Charles
CHARLES HAZARD, farmer; Sec. 33; P.O. Wilmington; owns 120 acres, valued at $50 per acre; held the office of Supervisor four years, Highway Commissioner and Justice of the Peace one term; born Aug. 13, 1813, in Sidway, R.I.; emigrated to New York in 1822; remained there until 1852; thence to Will Co., Ill. Married Fannie Broadrick in 1834, in Chenango Co., N.Y.; she was born at Conway, Mass., Oct. 31, 1815; have five children - Enos E., Sarah F., Charles D., George B. and Ellen M., all born in Sullivan, N.Y., except Enos E., who was born in New Berlin, N.Y. Mr. Hazard and his family located on the farm he now owns on his arrival (November, 1852) in Will Co., which was then unimproved prairie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hazelton, Charles R.
CHARLES R. HAZELTON, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Bennington Co., Vt., Dec. 31, 1809; son of Elisha and Mary (Kent) Hazelton; father was a cloth-dresser by trade. Mr. Hazelton was brought up on a farm; in 1833, he moved to Sandusky Co., Ohio, and there engaged in farming about eighteen years; in 1854, he came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Wesley Tp.; he first purchased 160 acres of land; to-day he ranks as one of the successful farmers of Will Co.; owns 516 acres of fine improved land. Mr. Hazelton has been married twice; his first wife was Mary Wolcott of Sandusky Co., Ohio; second wife Ann Ball; have seven children, two by first wife, and five by the second.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Heise, A.W.
A.W. HEISE, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; one of the oldest and most prominent physicians of Joliet, was born in Bramsche, in the Province of Hanover, Germany, Sept. 4, 1823; he received his literary education at the Gymnasium of Osnabruck, and entered the University of Goettingen, where he pursued his medical course, and graduated in 1846; he then attended a course of medical lectures in the University of Heidelberg, receiving an ad eundem degree of M.D. from that institution, in 1847; taking part in the revolution of 1848, he was compelled to leave the country, and accordingly sought a home in America; a general pardon of all those implicated was issued some five years later by the German Government, but Dr. Heise being then so long in this country, and intending to make it his permanent home, did not care to take advantage of it; the first year in this country he spent in traveling in the Eastern and Southern States, supporting himself by corresponding with some of the German newspapers; in 1849 he located in Du Page Co., Ill., and continued the practice of medicine there until 1856; he then went to New York as House Surgeon in the Marine Hospital on Ward's Island, remaining there until September, 1857, when he came to Joliet, and has been engaged in the practice of his profession here ever since. In 1861, he entered the army as Surgeon of the 11th I.V.I., and the following spring was appointed Surgeon of the 100th I.V.I.; after the battle of Murfreesboro, he was promoted to Brigade Surgeon, and after the battle of Chickamauga, was appointed Operator of the Brigade, with the privilege of choosing his own assistants without regard to rank; owing to illness, he was afterward obliged to retire from active service in the field, and was appointed Inspector of Hospitals and Consulting Surgeon of the Corps; in 1864, owing to continued ill health, he tendered his resignation, which was finally accepted with a great deal of reluctance; his ability and skill as an army surgeon were so apparent as to merit and receive recognition and honorable mention in the "Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion;" in 1872, he was appointed Physician in Charge of the Illinois State Penitentiary, in this city, which position he still holds.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hemphill, Cyrus
CYRUS HEMPHILL, farming, Sec. 17; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in this township March 14, 1837. He married Miss Elizabeth Linebarger March 14, 1861; she was also born in this township Oct. 7, 1840; they have four children, viz., Daniel E., Alvin W., Luella E. and Herbert H. He has always lived in this township, except two years in Florence, and, except one child, all the family were born here. He has not been an office-seeker, his only offices being connected with the school and road. His father, James Hemphill, was born in Adams Co., Ohio, Jan. 24, 1803. He married Miss Rachel Porter; she was born in same place June 18, 1808, and died Oct. 11, 1872; his father died Sept. 6, 1863; they were among the first settlers in this township, having settled here in 1831.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hemphill, D.C.
D.C. HEMPHILL, farmer, Sec. 25; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Adams Co., Ohio, Sept. 19, 1830. He married Miss Hannah Russell March 14, 1856; she was born in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Oct. 15, 1834; they had ten children, nine living, viz., Laura, Ida May, Russell J., Arthur D., Charles E., Frederick, Burton C., Kitty and Wilbur. He lived in Ohio two years; then moved to Indiana, where they remained two years, when they came to Will Co., Ill., and settled at Troutman's Grove; he remained with his parents until he was 21 years of age, when he went to Reed's Grove and engaged in farming; remained one year, when he was married and settled on his present place; he owns 152 acres in this township, which he has earned principally by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hemphill, J.P.
J.P. HEMPHILL, farming, Sec. 20; P. O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Adams Co., Ohio, Sept. 19, 1830. He married Miss Nancy Nott July 4, 1855; she was born in Washington Co. (now Morgan Co.), Ohio, Sept. 4, 1831; they have had ten children, eight living, viz., Alpha E., Belle M., Alonzo P., E. Mary, Phina E., Sarah L., Roswell J. and Cyrus W. He lived in Ohio two years, when, with his parents, he moved to Fountain Co., Ind., where they remained until 1834, when they came to Illinois, and settled in Will Co., at Troutman's Grove, where he lived until he was married; he then moved to Sec. 8, this township, and then to Sec. 2; he next went to Florence Tp., where he remained five years; he then came to this township, and, in 1868, he came to his present place; he has held no offices, except those connected with the school and road.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hemstreet, Alonzo
ALONZO HEMSTREET, retired butcher, Plainfield. Non-sectarian; Democrat. Owns house and twelve acres in the village; was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., Oct. 6, 1815; his parents removed to Lewis Co., N.Y., when he was 2 years of age; he remained there with his parents until he was 22 years of age; he then went to Buffalo, N.Y., where he remained nine months, during which time he was employed variously in a lumber yard and grocery; he then came to this place, arriving July 3, 1837; he soon after hired out to Daniel Ashley, and worked nine months on a farm, after which, he worked five months for Daniel W. Lamb; he then went to Fox River, and worked another year on a farm, after which, in company with Daniel Ashley, he built a shanty, and broke 100 acres of prairie, and sowed it to wheat; the rust destroyed it, and this enterprise was a failure; this was the first wheat ever blasted in this county (1840); in 1841, he drove an ox-team to Prairie du Chien for Ralph Smith and Alonzo Waldo, where he remained two years; he then came to Plainfield and rented a saw-mill of Jonathan Hagar, and run it two years; in 1846, he commenced butchering, and followed it for twenty years. Mr. Hemstreet married Augusta M. Foster, daughter of Lyman Foster, Esq., Oct. 26, 1848; she was born in Esperance, Otsego Co., N.Y., Dec. 20, 1826; have had seven children, only two of whom are living - Albert E. and Andrew J.; the names of the deceased are Harriet E., Esther A., Charles D., Alonzo Monroe and Frank F. Has held the office of Constable twelve years; President of Village Board of School Directors, which office he holds at present. Mr. H. has always been a strong Democrat.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Henderson, Hugh
HON. HUGH HENDERSON, Joliet; deceased; was born on the 9th day of June, 1809, in Norway, Herkimer Co., N.Y.; he received his education at Fairfield Seminary, in his native county; after which he read law in the office of George Feeter, Esq., a prominent lawyer of Little Falls, Herkimer Co.; in 1836, he came to Joliet, and shortly after his arrival was admitted to the bar, and at once took high rank among the members of the legal profession. He married Dec. 23, 1837, to Miss Helen A. Myers of Herkimer Co., who came to Joliet in the fall of 1836, and who still survives him, living in the same house which he built in 1838. In 1837, he was elected County Judge, holding the office one year; he was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1845; in 1849, he was elected Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, and held the office until his death, which occurred on the 19th of October, 1854, while on his first visit to his old home in Norway, N.Y. We quote the following from the remarks of the late Hon. Uri Osgood, on the occasion of presenting to the Circuit Court, the proceedings of the Will County Bar, upon the death of Judge Henderson: "By his knowledge of the law, his unremitting attention to the duties of his office, his urbanity, his sterling integrity, and accommodating business habits, he acquired the affections and respect of the members of the bar, and the people of the circuit; he had attained a high position as a lawyer and a judge; he was firm but courteous, honorable and irreproachable in morals, and in all the relations of private life; he was respected and honored, and highly esteemed as a useful member of society." He left four children - Sarah Margaret, who was born Oct. 21, 1839, and is now the wife of Capt. John A. Kelly, of Lyons, Mich.; Daniel C., who was born May 31, 1845, learned the printer's trade in Joliet, and in 1866, went to Chicago, and entered the employ of Horton & Leonard; in 1870, he returned to Joliet, and in 1871, established the Joliet Record, a Democratic weekly newspaper, which has steadily increased in circulation and influence, and has a circulation of 850 copies; James E., the second son, was born May 23, 1848, learned the printing business, and is now associated with his brothers on the Record; John D., the youngest son, was born Oct. 16, 1851, entered the telegraph office of the C., A. & St. L. R.R. Co., about ten years ago, remaining until some five years ago, at which time he joined his brothers in the publication of the Record.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Henderson, John D.
JOHN D. HENDERSON, Henderson & Stewart, dry goods, Wilmington; born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., December, 1814, where he resided until his removal to Illinois in 1845, locating at Joliet in the spring of that year; in connection with the work on the Illinois & Michigan Canal, then in progress, he superintended the work on the upper dam at Joliet; in May, 1848, he removed to his present home, and engaged in mercantile business, under the firm name of Bowen & Henderson, which continued until 1857, when Dr. Bowen's interest was purchased by Geo. T. Stewart, member of the present firm. Mr. Henderson has served in various official capacities; was member of the first Board of Trustees of the town of Wilmington in 1854; also served as Mayor of the city in 1867, 1868 and 1869. Married in 1837 to Miss Helen M., daughter of Daniel Johnson, of New York; by this union there are two children - Helen L. and Mary A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hennebry, Thomas
THOMAS HENNEBRY, boots and shoes, Braidwood; was born in Ireland in 1845; his parents are James and Ellen (Kenny) Hennebry, of Ireland; his father was a farmer; emigrated to America in April, 1848, and settled in Du Page Co., Ill.; here Mr. Hennebry remained on the farm until the breaking-out of the late war; he enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, as private in Co. C, 90th I.V.I., for three years; participated in some of the hard-fought battles during the war under Gens. Grant and Sherman - Vicksburg, Mission Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Sherman's march to the sea, through the swamps of the Carolinas to Washington, on the grand review; was mustered out as Corporal June 5, 1865; returned to the farm in Du Page Co.; in 1869, went to Wilmington, Will Co., in the mercantile business with Richard Baskerville - "Baskerville & Hennebry;" then, in 1872, came to Braidwood; entered the boot and shoe business with C. O'Donnell - "Hennebry & O'Donnell;" then with John Handlon - "Hennebry & Handlon;" to-day he owns one of the best boot and shoe stores in Braidwood. Was elected Supervisor of Reed Tp. in 1873; this office he filled with honor and satisfaction. Is a Democrat in politics; Catholic in religion. Married in 1875 to Miss Kate Keane, whose parents are among the first settlers of Reed Tp.; one child.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hennings, John
JOHN HENNINGS, tenant farmer; P.O. Wilmington; occupies a farm of the Whitter estate; born in Demark Dec. 2, 1823; married Catherine Youngson in Denmark Oct., 1854; they emigrated to the United States in 1854, locating in Will Co., where he has still remained; have eight children, Frank, Catherine, Dory, Mary, John, George, Willie and Fred; Mrs. Hennings died here, Nov. 23, 1873. Mr. Hennings enlisted in 39th Ill. V.I., Co. A, March 8, 1864, was wound simultaneously on the head and right shoulder while in the conflict before Richmond, from the effects of which he was confined to the hospital three months; at the expiration of said time joined his regiment again; was captured by the enemy in the morning of the day on which Gen. Lee surrendered.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Henry, J.A.
J.A. HENRY, retired, Joliet; the above-named gentleman has been a resident of Joliet for the past twenty years; he is a native of Hunterdon Co., N.J., and was born April 25, 1825; he began railroading in 1842, on the Hartford & New Haven Railroad, where he remained four years, and then spent four years more on the New Haven & Northampton Railroad, at the end of which time he came West and engaged in railroad contracting in Ohio and Indiana; in the year 1858, he came to Joliet and spent several years as roadmaster of the Chicago & Alton R.R., after which he built two branches of the road; in 1870, he went to Texas and built the Houston & Great Northern Railroad; at the end of three years, he returned to Joliet and erected his elegant residence on Eastern avenue, the finest in the city. He was married in Winsted, Conn., April 26, 1846, to Miss Nancy Briggs, of Winsted; she died Jan. 21, 1878, leaving one daughter, wife of Dr. Julius Folk, of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Herschbach, Thomas
THOMAS HERSCHBACH, general hardware, Frankfort Station; was born in Joliet, Will Co., Aug. 31, 1844; is the son of Henry Herschbach, who was one of our first settlers and pioneers. Mr. H. was married to Miss Alvina Maue, who was born in Germany; they have had three children, all of whom are living, viz., Charles, Otto and Emma.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Herzog, George
GEORGE HERZOG, farmer; P.O. Plainfield; was born in Baden, Germany, July 9, 1836, and is the son of George and Razan (Swenty) Herzog; father was a farmer; Mr. Herzog was raised on farm, and, in 1852, emigrated to America, with his parents; they first settled in York Co., Penn.; here they were engaged in farming, and, in 1858, he came to Illinois and settled in Will Co.; here he has remained ever since; Mr. Herzog came to this county very poor, but, with hard labor and good management, owns 204 acres of land, with improvements that rank with the best in Will Co. He married in 1860 Miss Sarah Grill, of Lancaster Co., Penn., by whom he has had five children, four living. His father is now living, at the good old age of 69 years; mother died at 52 years of age.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hewes, B.F.
B.F. HEWES, merchant, Crete; the above-named gentleman is one of the oldest settlers of Crete Tp.; was born in Chittenden Co., Vt., in 1828, and is the son of Luman and Lucy (Elwell) Hewes, who emigrated West to Illinois and settled in Cook Co. in 1835, and, in 1837, moved to Will Co. and settled in Crete Tp. Mr. B.F. Hewes was brought up on his father's farm, and farmed it until 1850; he then went to California; here he was engaged in mining for gold, and was very successful; returned home and purchased land; in 1853, he with his brother Daniel E. entered the mercantile business in Crete, and has been engaged principally in this ever since; also engaged in the brick manufacturing business, and proprietor of the Hewes House, which is the only good hotel in Crete. The Hewes Bros. are the oldest merchants in Crete, and own one of the leading dry goods, notions and general stores of Crete. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hewes, Daniel E.
DANIEL E. HEWES, merchant, Crete; the subject of this sketch was born in Chittenden Co., Vt., March 22, 1830, and is the son of Luman and Lucy (Elwell) Hewes; his father was a farmer, and, in 1835, with wife and family, emigrated West via Detroit, Mich.; from thence they came by wagon to Illinois and settled in Cook Co., west of what is now known as Blue Island; here they remained until 1837, then came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Crete Tp. Mr. Luman Hewes first purchased eighty acres of land and set out in farming, and remained on the farm until his death. Daniel E. Hewes was brought up on his father's farm, and engaged in farming from the time he was able to handle the plow, and, in the winter months, attended the district schools of the period; here he received a common school education; he taught school one winter in Troy Tp.; in 1853, with his brother, B.F. Hewes, entered the mercantile business in the village of Crete; this business they have followed ever since; to-day they are the oldest as well as the most successful merchants of Crete. Mr. Hewes has held several offices of public trust in Crete Tp. - Justice of the Peace and Town Clerk. In 1874 and 1878, he received the nomination for Senator from the Democratic party, but Mr. Hewes being a Democrat and Will Co. strong Republican, he was defeated. Married Miss Fedelia L. Wood, daughter of Willard Wood, one of the old settlers of Will Co.; have three children. Mr. Hewes' grandfather, William Hewes, participated in the Revolutionary war. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Heydon, John Sr.
JOHN HEYDON, SR., farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 12; P.O. Elwood; owns 665 acres of land, valued at $55 per acre; born in Carlow Co., Ireland, March 15, 1814. Married Hannah Kinsler, in Carlow Co., in 1834; she was born in said county in 1814; they emigrated to the United States in 1834, and located in Kennebec Co., Maine, where they lived for seventeen years; then moved to Illinois in 1851, and located in Joliet, where they lived three years; thence to the place which he now owns, in 1854; have five children living, Daniel; Thomas, married Margaret Byron; John, Jr., married Bridget Bergan; Catherine, widow of the late P. Tulley, and Hannah. When Mr. Heydon came to this county, his finances were very limited, but by industry, care and economy, he has accumulated a competency, and is one of the most extensive farmers in Will Co.; he has given to those of his family, who are doing for themselves, a good start in the world; Thomas got 160 acres of land on Sections 8 and 17, and to John, Jr., he gave 180 acres of land on Secs. 11 and 12; besides having, as above stated, 665 acres in reserve, in a high state of cultivation, in a beautiful location. Such is the reward of industry. Daniel and Hannah reside with their parents on the old homestead.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hibner, John
JOHN HIBNER, farming, Sec. 8; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Guernsey Co., Ohio, about 1804. He married Miss Nancy Kirtz in 1837; she was born in York Co., Penn.; they have had fourteen children, twelve living, viz., George W., Frank A., James C., David, Martin E., John W., William A., Elizabeth, Phebe Jane, Nancy A., Sarah A. and Lucinda. He lived in Ohio until 1847, when he moved to Missouri, where he remained one year; from here he went to Wisconsin, remaining six months; in 1848, he came to Will Co., Ill., and settled on his present place, and has lived here since; he has not been an office-seeker; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns about 500 acres in this county, which he has earned principally by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Higinbotham, H.D.
H.D. HIGINBOTHAM, deceased, formerly of Joliet, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Worcester, Otsego Co., N.Y., Jan. 10, 1806; he was brought up upon a farm, and had such advantages of education as were offered at the district school of his neighborhood; his father's ancestors were English, and settled in Barbadoes in the early settlement of the American Colonies; his grandfather lived in Rhode Island, and married a Miss Lippit, of Providence; he followed the sea for some time, as captain of a whaler from Newport; Charles Higinbotham, the father of H.D., was born in Rhode Island, and came to Otsego Co., N.Y., with his parents, about the year 1800; he married Miss Gertrude Dumont, of Westford, N.Y.; from this marriage the subject of this sketch was born, and in 1831, married Miss Rebecca Wheeler, of Westford, N.Y.; she was born in Canaan, Columbia Co., N.Y.; soon after their marriage they moved to Oneida, N.Y.; there he engaged in the blacksmith business, and in June, 1834, moved to Illinois, and settled on Hickory Creek, in the now town of Joliet, and purchased a farm of 160 acres; here he engaged in farming and blacksmithing, and was very successful in his business; in 1854, and for some time after, he was engaged in a saw-mill and planing-mill, at what is now called the Red Mills of Hickory Creek. Here on Hickory Creek all their children were born, except Albert H., the eldest, who was born in New Lenox, Madison Co., N.Y., Nov. 5, 1831; Ambrosia R. was born Oct. 1, 1834; Ann Eliza, Dec. 2, 1836; Harlow N., Oct. 10, 1838; Gertrude D., July 6, 1842; Mary Ellen, Sept. 27, 1845, and Charles S., Dec. 24, 1848. Of these, Albert H. married Elizabeth Ella White, of Chicago, and are now living in Joliet; Ambrosia R. married M.O. Cagwin, of Joliet; Ann Eliza married M.G. Demmond, of Joliet; Harlow N. married Rachael Davidson, of Joliet; he is in the mercantile house of Field, Leiter & Co., Chicago; Gertrude D. married Thomas Leddy, of Joliet, both deceased; Mary Ellen married R.C. Darwin, of Joliet; she is now deceased; Charles S. married Cynthia L. Kemp, of New Lenox, now residing in Kansas. H.D. Higinbotham and family moved to Joliet in the fall of 1854; he built a fine residence on Cass st., where he resided until his death; with his energy and perseverance, he aided very much in making the city of Joliet what it is to-day. He held several prominent offices under the city government. He died March 13, 1865, leaving a widow and children and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss. His widow, Rebecca Higinbotham, in 1871, married C.H. Sutphen, a prominent citizen of La Salle Co., Ill., and a cousin of the late H.D. Higinbotham; Mr. and Mrs. Sutphen now reside at the old Higinbotham homestead, on Cass st., Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hilburn, Milton H.
MILTON H. HILBURN, proprietor of Phoenix Foundry & Machine-Shops, Wilmington; born in Livingston Co., N.Y., Jan. 31, 1828, but removed, when about 9 years of age, to Columbia Co., Penn., where he resided until 1847, then removing to Illinois, and, after spending about one year in other parts of this county, located at Wilmington in the fall of the following year, when he engaged in the manufacture of agricultural implements, making the manufacture of plows a specialty; in 1867, he removed to Ilion, N.Y., where he continued in the same business until his return to this city in 1877; was a member of the Board of Trustees in 1864; during his term of service, the charter of the town of Wilmington was amended and the city incorporated. Married, in 1853, to Miss Sarah Tuttle, who was born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y.; she died in 1855; their daughter, Sarah J., died in 1856; was again married, in 1858, to Adalade J. Marsh, who was born in Hartford, Conn.; three children, one living - Cora E. Etta E. died in 1863; Milton M., in 1874. Mr. Hilburn is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, Wilmington Chapter, No. 142, and Joliet Commandery, No. 4.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hine, Samuel H.
SAMUEL H. HINE, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., Feb. 19, 1825; came to this State in 1836, and settled in New Lenox, Will Co., where he now resides; his farm consists of 290 acres, valued at $17,000. He was married Jan. 1, 1867, to Miss Barbara Leisure; they have had four children - Esther M., Ida E., Isaac H. and Mary Roseanna.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hinrichs, Ulrich H.
ULRICH H. HINRICHS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our earliest settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1855, and to Illinois, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 160 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married to Miss Caroline Karch, who was born in New York; they have six children - Henrietta C., Charles F., Margaret C., Elizabeth F., Louis M. and Henry J. Mr. Hinrichs was a volunteer in the late rebellion; he enlisted in the 100th I.V.I.; served nearly three years, and was discharged with honor at the close of the war, 1865.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hogan, Dennis
DENNIS HOGAN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Ireland March 12, 1820; came to the United States in 1848, and to Illinois in 1854; settled in New Lenox, where he now resides. He was married to Miss Mary A. McCabe, who was born in Ireland May 6, 1837; they have five children - Ellen E., Katie M., Denice L., Gregory M. and Theresa J. The farm of Mr. Hogan consists of 240 acres, valued at $14,500.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hohenstein, Simon
SIMON HOHENSTEIN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Mokena; was born in Germany Sept. 17, 1837; came to the United States in 1853, and to this State, and settled in this county in the same year. His farm consists of eighty-five acres, valued at $6,000. He was married to Charlotte Knapp, who was born in Germany; they have had seven children, six of whom are living, viz., Simon, Charley, Daniel, Conrad, Charlotte and Peter; deceased, Charlotte J. Mr. H. is at present holding the office of Assessor; he has held office of Collector in Greengarden one year, and one year in Frankfort Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hohmann, Henry
HENRY HOHMANN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany Oct. 15, 1810; came to the United States in 1848, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in 1853; his farm consists of 350 acres, valued at $14,000. He was married to Miss Mary Herveg, who was born in Germany May 28, 1826; they have had six children, four of whom are living, viz., Martin, Henry, Kate and Christina; deceased, Mena and August.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holden, Charles C.P.
HON. CHARLES C.P. HOLDEN, Chicago; is a native of Groton, New Hampshire; he was born on the 9th of August, 1827, and is the son of Phineas H. and Betsey P. Holden. His mother was the only daughter of Lieut. Levi Parker, of the Continental army. His parents had a small farm among the rugged hills of New Hampshire. In 1830, they removed to West Hartford, Vermont, settling on an eighty-acre farm, where they remained until June 1, 1836, at which time they removed, with their family of nine children, to Illinois. Arriving in Chicago on the morning of June 30, 1836, the family at once obtained conveyances and started for the country, first seeking the home of Josiah R. Holden, brother of the senior Holden, who lived a few miles below Plainfield, on the Du Page River, in Will County. After a brief visit, Mr. Holden located a claim at Skunk Grove on the headwaters of Hickory Creek, now Frankfort. Mr. Holden received but a very limited education, having to go with his brothers and sisters a distance of three miles to a school kept in a rude log hut. Subsequently, the family had a school taught in their own house, and the teacher of the school was Mr. A.B. Safford, now a leading banker of Cairo, Ill. In 1842, his father placed him in Charles Sweet's grocery store on North Water street, where the freight-house of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway now stands. In 1845, he went into W.W. Barlow's bookstore, where he remained on a salary of $12 per month until the spring of 1847, at which time, the Mexican war still raging, he enlisted in Company F, 5th Regiment Illinois Volunteers. Mr. Holden carried his musket for nineteen months, serving until the close of the war. After a short visit to his home he entered the employment of A.H. & C. Burley, booksellers, at that time at 122 Lake street in this city. He remained in their service until March 19, 1850, at which time he left, in company with seven others, by the overland route, for California, where he arrived early in July of that year. Mr. Holden immediately commenced mining, and following it closely for fifteen months in the dry diggings of Logtown, and on the Middle Fork of the American River, when in October, 1851, he joined his old employer, W.W. Barlow, and went to Napa Valley, where he entered into farming and stock-raising, remaining here until the fall of 1853, when he closed up his operations, and took passage on the steamship Winfield Scott from San Francisco, December 1, for home. The second night out, when off Santa Barbara, in a dense fog, the steamship was wrecked by running on the rocks of Anna Capa Island. The passengers, however, were safely landed, arriving in New York January 1, 1854. From New York he went to New England, returning to Chicago, March 18, 1854. February 20, 1855, he entered the service of the Illinois Central Railroad Company in its land department, with which corporation he continued until February 4, 1873. September 17, 1855, Mr. Holden was married to Miss Sarah J. Reynolds, daughter of Isaac N. and Rue Ann Reynolds, of New Lenox, Will Co., Ill. His wife was born on the farm where he married her; her mother, Mrs. Reynolds, was a daughter of the late Abraham Holderman, who was one of the first settlers in northern Illinois, having located a large tract of land at Holderman's Grove, La Salle and Kendall Counties, in 1830. Mr. Holderman was a native of Pennsylvania. In 1858, Mr. Holden was a delegate to the State Convention in Springfield, Ill., at which Convention Abraham Lincoln was first brought prominently before the American people. In April, 1861, Mr. Holden was elected to the Common Council of Chicago. When Mr. Holden first entered the Council, the war had just been declared. The Council voted money and supplies liberally to its citizen volunteers, and through his own effort, in 1862, he raised a company (E) for the 88th Illinois Volunteers. This company was commanded by his brother, Levi P. Holden, who had enlisted in the service at the beginning of the war in the 20th Illinois Volunteers. Subsequently Capt. Holden was promoted to Major of the same regiment. He had one other brother in the service, David L. Holden, who was commissary Sergeant of the 53rd Regiment. Mrs. Holden also had two brothers in the service, one of whom, John H. Reynolds, a Sergeant in Company E, 88th Illinois Volunteers, died January 23, 1863, in hospital at Nashville, Tenn., just after the battle of Stone River. Joseph S. Reynolds, another brother, was a Captain in the Yates Sharpshooters; and, after going with Sherman to the sea, he returned home a Brigadier-General. Mr. Holden had a representative in the army in the person of Alonzo C. Ide; Mrs. Holden had hers in the person of Harris Durkee; and her sister, Rowena P. Reynolds, had one in the person of Frederick A. Hausmann. Late in 1864, when President Lincoln called for 300,000 more, Chicago's quota was very large, and the various wards were called upon for their respective quota. Mr. Holden organized a draft association, of which he was President, for his ward (at that time the Tenth), to raise money to fill their quota, and succeeded in raising nearly $52,000 for this purpose. There was no draft in this ward.
In December, 1870, Mr. Holden was elected President of the Common Council, and at the time of the great fire, when all was in confusion, the main part of the city in ruins, after looking over the field on the morning of Oct. 9, he quickly concluded that something had to be done to relieve the 100,000 people then in dire distress, and that, too, quickly. Calling to his aid Mr. O.E. Moore and Capt. Miller, he took possession of the church on the corner of Ann and Washington streets, and here was formed a nucleus which subsequently became world-renowned for the great good done. At 3 o'clock in the afternoon of that ever memorable day, Mr. Holden had succeeded in getting together the Mayor and Police Commissioner Brown, when, at his request, the Hon. S.S. Hayes drew up the following proclamation:
WHEREAS, In the providence of God, to whose will we humbly submit, a terrible calamity has befallen our city, which demands to us our best efforts for the preservation of order and the relief of the suffering; Be it known, That the faith and credit of the city of Chicago is hereby pledged for the necessary expenses for the relief of the suffering. Public order will be preserved. The police and special police, now being appointed, will be responsible for the maintenance of the peace and the protection of property. All officers and men of the fire department and health department will act as special policemen without further notice. The Mayor and Comptroller will give vouchers for all supplies furnished by the different relief committees. The headquarters of the city government will be at the Congregational Church, corner of West Washington and Ann streets. All persons are warned against any acts tending to endanger property. All persons caught in any depredations, will be immediately arrested. With the help of God, order and peace and private property shall be preserved. The city government and committees of citizens pledge themselves to the community to protect them and prepare the way for a restoration of public and private welfare. It is believed the fire has spent its force and all will soon be well.

R.B. Mason, Mayor
George Taylor
Comptroller (By R.B. Mason)
Charles C.P. Holden
President Common Council
T.B. Brown
President Board of Police
Chicago, October 9, 1871

After the great fire both political parties nominated him for the mayoralty. Hon. Joseph Medill was nominated upon what was termed the fire-proof ticket for the same position. The city press indorsed the fire-proof ticket. Mr. Holden, with his associates on the ticket, made a gallant fight, but were beaten at the polls, and the entire fire-proof ticket was elected. Mr. Holden continued to serve in the Council until the expiration of his term Dec. 1, 1872. In February, 1873, Mayor Medill nominated Mr. Holden for the position of Police Commissioner. Mr. Holden, being largely engaged in building at the time, declined the proffered position, as will be seen by the following:

Hon. Joseph Medill, Mayor,
Dear Sir: From the proceedings of the Council last evening, I learn than my name was submitted by your honor as Police Commissioner, to fill the vacancy caused by the removal of Mr. Reno. While I am not only willing but anxious to serve your honor and the best interest of the city in its present difficulties, my other positive engagements will not allow me to fill the proffered position. Thanking you most kindly for your preference, I have to ask that you will submit some other name and withdraw mine from the Common Council.  I am, yours most respectfully,  CHARLES C.P. HOLDEN

Mr. Holden was appointed West Chicago Park Commissioner by Gov. Palmer, in March, 1869, and re-appointed in 1871, for seven years. In 1872, he was one of the Greeley electors on the State ticket; he was elected County Commissioner in November, 1874, for the term of three years; Mr. Holden was chosen President of the County Board on the first Monday in December, 1876; the Court House had just been commenced, but during his term of office he gave it his unqualified attention, laying the corner-stone of the same July 4, 1877; the County Hospital was also begun and carried to completion during his term of Commissioner; in 1867, Mr. Holden procured the charter from the Chicago & Illinois River Railroad, and during its first years was its President; it is now in operation between Joliet and Streator; Mr. Holden is now engaged in building the Joliet & Mendota Short Line Railway. Mr. Holden's wife died after a long and painful illness, July 26, 1873; she as a most lovely woman, adored by all who knew her; for nearly eighteen years she had been the joy of Mr. Holden's household, making all happy around her, and Mr. Holden attributes the great success which he had during those years to his departed and lovely wife; soon after their marriage, and in 1858, her sister, Rowena P. Reynolds, came to live with the family, and has ever since been a member of it; Mr. Holden's sister, Sarah Ann C., died of consumption in 1847; his sister, Mary Emeline, wife of Dr. J.W. Freer, died of consumption in 1846; his mother, Betsey Parker Holden, died of cancer in the face Sept. 24, 1869, aged 78 years; his father, Phineas H. Holden, died of old age, hurried on by a severe cold, Feb. 23, 1872, aged 79 years and 10 months; his wife and these members of his family now rest in the beautiful Oakwood Cemetery, near Joliet, in this State. Mr. Holden was married to Miss Louise R. Jones, daughter of John Jones, of Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 28th of April, 1875. Of his father's family living, there are Newton P. Holden, County Physician of Cook Co.; David L. Holden, station agent for the Illinois Central Railroad at Matteson, Ill.; George M. Holden, long of this city, now in the employ of the city as one of its trusted officers; Maj. Levi P. Holden, at Hampton, Iowa; Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilson, of Ft. Madison, Iowa, and Mrs. Mira J. Brown, of Chicago.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holden, Dr. N.P.
N.P. HOLDEN, M.D., retired, Frankfort Station; one of our early and most prominent settlers; was born in New Hampshire June 20, 1820; received a liberal education in boyhood; at the age of 23, he entered Rush Medical College, at Chicago; graduated and received a diploma in 1846; his practice continued until the time of his retirement in February, 1878; in 1854, he purchased the property he now owns, and which is located on Secs. 26 and 25, and which contains 400 acres, valued at $20,000. Dr. H. was married to Miss Caroline Parrish June 30, 1847; they have had six children, three of whom are now living, viz., Wright, Milton and Franklin; deceased, Charley, James and Sarah.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holden, Phineas Hemmenway
PHINEAS HEMMENWAY HOLDEN, was born in Hollis, N.H., May 6, 1792; was the son of David Holden and Bridget Atwell; his father was born July 31, 1769, and his mother was born in 1770; they were married July 31, 1788, and had fourteen children, to wit: David, born July 31, 1789; died Dec. 12, 1700; William Cummings, born Aug. 16, 1790; Phineas Hemmenway, born May 6, 1792; died Feb. 23, 1872; Bridget, born Jan. 19, 1795, died Aug. 9, 1796; Josiah Rhodes, born Feb. 22, 1797; Bridget, born Dec. 10, 1798, died Sept. 12, 1800; Mira, born Nov. 28, 1800; David, born Dec. 27, 1802, died Dec. 11, 1833; Milton, born July 11, 1804; Adam Montgomery, born May 18, 1806, died Oct. 5, 1863; Sarah, born March 10, 1808; Lucetta, born March 4, 1810; Charles Cotsworth Pinckney, born Jan. 10, 1812, died March 7, 1816; Mary Ann, born Sept. 17, 1814, died July 24, 1841; of these, Rhodes, Milton, Sarah and Lucetta, are still living; Mr. Holden's grandparents were David Holden, born Dec. 10, 1738, and Sarah Hemmenway, born Oct. 25, 1739; they were married July 13, 1761, and had nine children. David Holden, died Aug. 8, 1803, and Sarah Hemmenway Holden, died April 7, 1830; his great grandparents were John Holden, born about 1695, and Sarah Davis, born in 1700; they were married Nov. 22, 1715, and had ten children; she died Dec. 21, 1753, and he died Dec. 27, 1753; John's grandparents were Richard Holden, born in 1609, and Martha Fosdick; they were married between 1634 and 1639; they had nine children; he died March 1, 1696, aged 87 years; she died in 1681. John, the last named, and his brother Justian, were born in Suffolk Co., Eng.; they were arrested in the streets of London for their adherence to Puritanism, but through the influence of a member of Parliament, named Holden, they were released and fled to America; they embarked at Tipwich, in April, 1634, in the ship Francis, and settled in Watertown and Cambridge, in Massachusetts. The father of Phineas Hemmenway was a cooper by trade, and, with his young wife, early removed to Groton, N.H., where they settled on a small farm, where the subject of this sketch received as good an education as the country at that time afforded. His father was for many years one of the Selectmen of the town, quite a prominent position at that time, and died Oct. 13, 1823; his mother died Dec. 30, 1839; Mr. Holden was married April 17, 1817, to Betsey Parker, daughter of Levi Parker, who was born June 25, 1752, and Abigail Pool, of Hollis; her father had by his first wife, who was Rebecca Fletcher, of Westford, Mass.: Levi, born Jan. 9, 1778; William, born in 1780; George, born Oct. 11, 1783; by his second wife, whom he married in 1785: Luther, born ____; Calvin, born _____; Betsey, Jan. 14, 1792; and Samuel, June 23, 1800. Her grandparents were William Parker, of Groton, and Susanna Kemp, who were married March 30, 1736, and had: Susanna, born Feb. 10, 1737; William, Sept. 28, 1741; Samuel, March 7, 1746; Isaac, born Jan. 22, 1749; Levi, June 25, 1752; Susanna, Oct. 10, 1755, and Ruth, no date given. Mrs. Holden's mother died July 16, 1823, aged 64 years; her father died Sept. 10, 1825, aged 72 years; of the children, Samuel only is living; he resides at Davenport, Iowa; is now 78 years old, but in good health. Mrs. Holden's father was an officer of the Revolution, and was attached to the command of Gen. Washington, and stationed near West Point at the time of the treason of Gen. Arnold, and at which time Major Andre of the British army, was detected as a spy and arrested at Tarrytown, N.Y., and executed at Tappan, on the Hudson River; Lieut. Levi Parker saw him hung, and, so long as he lived, related the sad spectacle, and regretted that Arnold could not have been hung in his stead; Lieut. Parker was a meritorious and gallant officer, serving during the war. Mr. and Mrs. Holden were married at Dunstable, Mass., April 17, 1817, and immediately commenced life together on a small farm in Groton, N.H.; here they lived until 1830, when the removed with their family of six children to West Hartford, Vt.; at this place, Mr. Holden purchased 80 acres of land, mostly timber, and commenced his new farm with that energy only known to those who have seen the ups and downs of New England life; they remained here until the spring of 1836, when they sold their little homestead, and, on June 1, emigrated with their family of nine children, for Illinois, arriving at Chicago June 30, 1836; Mr. Holden's younger brother, Josiah, had settled in Will County, near Joliet, in 1834, whither Mr. Holden and his family immediately proceeded; they found him and his family finely located on the Du Page River, about seven miles below Plainfield, and were received with true Western hospitality; shortly after this, Mr. Holden located a claim of 160 acres at Skunk Grove, on the headwaters of Hickory Creek (now Frankfort), where they commenced life in earnest on the prairie; they erected a snug log house, and here they struggled together for many years to raise their large family, working early and late, and economizing in every possible manner; when they began their prairie home, the county was entirely new, the nearest neighbor on the south was thirty miles, at Bourbonnais Grove; the nearest post office, fourteen miles, at Joliet. Their claim was on the Sac trail, a path worn deep in the ground by the Indians; this trail had been traveled for centuries, by all appearances - it was the Indians direct route from Detroit to the Far West - it ran nearly on a bee-line; the Indians had displayed such good judgment in laying out this trail, that the settlers, as the country became settled, adopted it; in many places this trail was worn for more than two feet in the earth, and no man of this day can tell or form any idea as to how long it had been traveled by the red man. Their family now consisted of Elizabeth W., born in Tyngsboro, Mass., April 27, 1818; Newton P., born at Groton, N.H., June 20, 1820; Mary Emeline, born in Groton, N.H., Sept. 13, 1822; David L., born in Groton, N.H., Nov. 13, 1824; Charles C.P., born in Groton, N.H., Aug. 9, 1827; Sarah Ann C., born in Groton, N.H., Sept. 3, 1829; George M., born in West Hartford, Vt., July 11, 1831; Mira Jane, born in West Hartford, Vt., June 30, 1833; and Levi Parker, was born in West Hartford, Vt., July 14, 1835; Mary Emeline was married to J.W. Freer, then a farmer on the Kankakee River, above Wilmington, in this State, Feb. 22, 1844; she died of consumption, Nov. 28, 1845, leaving one son, Henry C. Freer; Sarah Ann C. died of consumption, Feb. 13, 1847; she was a lovely girl, admired by all who knew her; she was the idol of her father's family; the loss of these two loving daughters weighed heavily upon Mr. Holden, as also upon the whole family; Elizabeth W. was married to Cromwell Wilson, of Fort Madison, Iowa, Jan. 9, 1848; Mr. Wilson is a retired capitalist; they have never had any children; they reside at Fort Madison. Newton P. was married to Caroline Parish, June 30, 1847, at Bristol, Ill.; they have had: Sarah, Wright P., Milton and Frank; Sarah died Feb. 11, 1873, with consumption; Wright is studying law; Frank is at school, and Milton is on his father's farm, at Frankfort; David L. was married to Miss Esther Parish in 1871, and has four fine boys - Homer Phineas, Charles C.P., Howard and Morton; George M. was married in 1856, to Minerva Butler, and had several children, two of whom only are living - Charles and William; Mira Jane was married to J.M. Brown, and has had several children, two of whom only are living - Malcolm and Willis; Levi Parker was married to Charlotte E. Reynolds in March, 1865; they have two lovely little girls - Birdie and Cora; Charles C.P. was married Sept. 17, 1855, to Sarah J. Reynolds, who died July 26, 1872, of purpura hemorrhagica, aged 37 years 3 months and 15 days; Mr. and Mrs. Holden lived to see the country, which was a wilderness when they came to it, settled up and dotted all over with first-class farms, with villages in every direction, railroads running through all parts of the State, with one through their own farm; they had lived to see all these things accomplished, and their children well settled in life. April 17, 1867, they had their golden wedding, all their children being present, except Elizabeth; many came from Chicago to congratulate the aged couple on their fiftieth anniversary of their wedding; it was a happy time for all - children and grandchildren. Mrs. Holden was afflicted with a cancer in the face, which first made its appearance in about 1864; it continued to grow and spread, until Sept. 24, 1869, when she yielded up other life this dreaded disease; during the last years of her life, she had suffered the most excruciating pain, but bore it all with a meekness and forbearance seldom to be met with in this world; from her youth, she had been a consistent Baptist, not merely in word but in deed; the privations she had to endure during many years after her removal to Illinois, were met without a murmur, saying "it is all for the best;" she lived for her family, and those she left behind her are sad witnesses of this fact; she always had a kind word for everybody and none knew her but to love her; Mr. Holden took her death very hard, but would fill up the time as best as he could in visiting his children in Chicago, Joliet and elsewhere; he had been in his neighborhood quite a prominent man, always taking an active part in politics, but never seeking office; he had been an original Henry Clay Whig, but since that party had become extinct, he had joined the Republicans; when Lincoln was nominated for the Presidency the first time, in 1860, he was an anxious looker-on in the lobby of the Convention; Lincoln having been an old Whig, he claimed that he would make a safe and good President; of this he was sure; the truthfulness of this assertion has been verified to the letter. Mr. Holden was present at the laying of the corner-stone for the Bunker Hill Monument, which corner-stone was laid by Gen. Lafayette, June 17, 1825; he was a careful observer, and read much from the newspapers of the day, keeping well posted as regards current events; early in February, 1872, he took a severe cold, caused by a trip which he had taken to visit his children in Chicago; his condition was not thought to be dangerous, when, suddenly he was taken away, dying on February 23, 1872, at the good old age of 79 years 9 months and 18 days; he died on his farm, that which he located in August, 1836; he was buried by the side of Mrs. Holden and his two daughters, Emeline and Sarah, in a beautiful lot in Oakwood Cemetery, near Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


Holden, Sarah J.
SARAH J. HOLDEN, daughter of Isaac N. and Rue Ann Reynolds, was born April 11, 1836; she was the second child of a family of ten children, the eldest being a boy; her parents, at the time of her birth, lived on a farm seven miles east of Joliet, in this State (now New Lenox); they were among the very first settlers in Will Co., having located there in 1834; Mrs. Holden's mother was the daughter of the late Abraham Holderman, one of the pioneers of Northern Illinois, having located at Holderman's Grove, in La Salle Co., in 1830. Mrs. Holden being the eldest daughter of the family, much devolved on her, as is usually the case, especially in a new country; and when a mere child she exhibited those traits of industry that were so noticeable in her through life. At the age of 7 years, pieced, with her own hands, a bedquilt, which is now in the possession of the bereaved husband as a relic of her industrious habits in her younger years. At the age of 10, while gathering gum from the wild rosin weed, on the prairie, in company with her younger brother, Joseph S. (now State Senator from Chicago), she was bitten by a rattle-snake, and, being some distance from her home, ere she reached it the virus had developed itself throughout her system. Everything was done that could be to allay the poison; physicians were called, and, after weeks of great suffering, she slowly recovered from the effects of the bite of this most poisonous reptile. She received a good education at the district school and in the academies of Joliet and Plainfield. Mr. Holden can well remember seeing her by the roadside, going to and from school when a mere child, the Holden family living but a few miles from the Reynolds homestead. On Sept. 17, 1855, she married Mr. Charles C.P. Holden, and from that period till the day of her fatal sickness, it was her greatest pleasure to make her home pleasant, and friends around her happy. She always wanted some member of her parents' family included in her household, and, in the spring of 1858, she prevailed upon them to let her younger sister (Birdie) come and live permanently in her family. She loved her home, and very seldom took the usual pleasure-trips that most people enjoy so much. In 1857, she accompanied her husband on a trip to New England and the White Mountains. She liked well enough the trip of a couple of days, to Springfield, Cairo, Dubuque, or some other neighboring city, but did not enjoy long ones. On one occasion, Mr. Holden was going to Cincinnati on business; it was in 1870, and when asked if she would not like to go along, she replied, "No; I will stay at home. Birdie had better go." Again, Mr. Holden proposed to go to Niagara, but Mrs. Holden suggested that she preferred to remain at home, and said, "Take Hattie and Birdie." And so it was at all times. When but a child it had been her greatest delight to aid her mother in her household duties. Long before she was large enough to stand by the side of the table, she would get a chair and stand in that, and by so doing be enabled to wash and wipe her mother's dishes, which otherwise she could not accomplish. She lost a dearly-beloved brother, who died in hospital at Nashville, Tenn., a few days after the hard-fought battle of Stone River, in January, 1863 - John H. Reynolds, who but a few months before had enlisted in Capt. L.P. Holden's company, in the 88th Ill. V.I.; and, the following spring, her younger brother, C.C.P. Reynolds, died of scarlet fever. The death of these two brothers seemed a hard blow to her. She had one brother in the army, Gen. Joseph H., whom she followed with a sister's love until he went with Sherman to the Sea, and then returned in safety to his home. Her eldest brother, Abram H. Reynolds, lived with his family at Wenona, Ill., and it was in the spring of 1867 that word came that his family were severely sick, when by the next train Mrs. Holden was en route for Wenona, and in a few days, when she returned, she brought with her his youngest daughter, then 3 years old, a lovely little girl. She had been named after Mrs. Holden, Sarah J. She had taken such a liking for little Sadie that she prevailed upon the parents to allow her to keep the child, and she has ever since remained in the family, Mrs. Holden always taking the greatest pains to properly bring up and educate her. Before her death, she would often speak of Sadie, hoping that she might continue to be a good girl and a blessing to the family. Mrs. Holden was very benevolent, and from the time she commenced housekeeping until the day of her sickness, she had one or more families whom she was aiding in various ways to make a livelihood, and some of those whom she had so befriended, with tears in their eyes, followed her remains to the tomb. Early in March, 1872, she went to visit her parents at New Lenox, as was usual with her several times a year, and, whilst at their home, on March 14th, was suddenly prostrated in sickness. She was taken violently sick with purpura hemorrhagica. Dr. Holden, her brother-in-law, who resides at Frankfort, was called immediately to her bedside, and did all that could be done to save her life. Dr. Casey, of Joliet, and Freer, of Chicago, were also called in consultation. For four months she lay at the point of death. Her mother and sisters Hattie, Birdie and Lottie (who came from Iowa on purpose to minister her), were constantly in attendance, as was also her sister-in-law, Caroline P. Holden, for a large portion of the time; and her husband attributes the saving of her life at that time to the extraordinary care and attention that she received from those above mentioned and others; he believes if it had not been for Dr. Holden she could not have survived that first attack. In July, a change took place, and she slowly began to recover; and, on Oct. 12, had so far recovered as to be enabled to once more look upon her own home; and never was mortal more happy at the result than was Mr. Holden. But, sad to say, she was not fully restored to health; it was only partial, and that but temporary. She had several severe attacks during the winter of 1873, the disease having assumed another character, and now appeared in disease in the bladder. In the month of April, she expressed much anxiety for the health of her sister Birdie, whose constitution she feared was giving away, caused by over-watchfulness and care upon her during her long sickness; and an opportunity having presented itself by which Rowena (Birdie) could take a trip with her brother Joseph S. Reynolds, to Europe, Mrs. Holden urged that she should do so; "for," she said, "it will, in all probability, save Birdie's life, and her absence will have no effect as to the final result with myself." Birdie left Chicago for this trip May 7, 1873, in company with her brother, her sister Hattie immediately taking her place until her return. It was a sad parting, the two sisters, who had been so closely allied together for more than fifteen years, now to separate, and probably forever. In July, she commenced rapidly to fail; her mother and sister Hattie were constantly with her to alleviate her suffering as best they could. She gradually grew weaker, and, on Friday, July 25, at about 3 o'clock P.M., she called her husband to her bedside, when she said to him, "Charles, I cannot live but a little while. God has forgiven my sins, and I am ready to die." She then made various bequests - to her sister Birdie she gave her diamond ring and many other articles of great value and usefulness; to her sister Hattie she gave her watch and chain; also a heavy plain ring, together with other articles; to her sister Lottie she gave her pearl and jet jewelry; to her mother, her sister-in-law Caroline (Dr. Holden's wife), her niece Sadie, and others, she gave beautiful presents. While making these bequests, she suddenly stopped and said, "Charles, what shall I give you?" Thinking for a moment, she said, "Oh, I will give you my books." As she had quite a collection of valuable works, and knowing her husband's fondness for their library, no doubt flashed across her mind when she made this valuable gift. Mr. Holden asked her what disposition she wished to make of her silverware - for she had a large quantity - her reply was, "Oh, you will need it." She had, at different times, brought money into the family, but, above all, had brought to her husband's aid, for more than seventeen years, her advice, which was to him of inestimable value. Soon after this conversation, she relapsed into a weak stupor, but was perfectly conscious when aroused, and during the night repeatedly assured those caring for her of her trust in the Savior. Toward morning she was suffering very much, and, as her mother was bending over her, in deep grief, the husband said, "Sarah, do you know your mother?" when, quickly looking up, she replied, "Why, bless your heart, yes." The Messenger came at 10:25 A.M., July 26, and then passed away one of the noblest and best women that ever adorned a household.
"Forever shall she be in praise, Named softly as the household name Of one whom God has taken."

Her father and mother are still living. Her brother, Abram H., married Martha Link, and they have five children living: Sarah, his second daughter, has been adopted by Mr. Holden. Her brothers, Isaac, William and Gen. Joseph S., are still living, as also her sisters, Harriet A., Charlotte E. and Rowena P.; the latter is a member of Mr. Holden's family.
(From the Chicago Evening Journal, July 28, 1873.)
This forenoon, at 11 o'clock, the relatives and friends of C.C.P. Holden, Esq., assembled at his residence, No. 323 West Monroe street, for the purpose of uniting with him in paying the last earthly tribute of respect to his wife, deceased on Saturday last. It will be remembered the readers of the Journal, that early in the spring of 1872, Mrs. Holden, while on a visit to her parents at New Lenox, Will Co., in this State, was taken violently sick with purpura hemorrhagica, and for many months was not expected to live, but finally a change took place, and in the following October she so far recovered as to be able to be brought home. She gained steadily until the middle of December, when she was again prostrated by severe sickness. From this attack she partially recovered in the months of March and April, but in the month of May she was again attacked with more severity than ever, resulting in her death, as stated. The deceased was a few months over 37 years of age, and was married to Mr. Holden on Sept. 17, 1855; she was the daughter of Isaac N. and Rue Ann Reynolds, upon whose farm, in Will Co., she was born; she was a granddaughter of the late Abraham Holderman, who was one of the original pioneers of Northern Illinois, having settled at Holderman's Grove, La Salle Co., in 1831. Mrs. Holden was a woman of most amiable disposition and great kindness of heart. Her manners were very engaging, and all who knew her were won by the kindness which always illuminated her face with its attractiveness. She was eminently domestic in all her tastes, finding the happiness of her life in her family, and studying to make home attractive, and those she loved happy. During her entire and most distressing illness, she constantly exhibited a childlike trust in God and submission to His will that most beautifully illustrated the consolations afforded by a religious faith. Only the day before her death, she called her friends about her, assured them of her trust in the Savior, her belief that she could not live, he readiness to die, and then passed away in the hope of a blessed immortality. Mr. Holden, in this deep affliction, has the heartfelt sympathy of an extended circle of friends, as was attested by the large number present at the funeral services this morning. Among the prominent citizens present were Hon. L.L. Bond, Samuel Hoard, E.F. Runyan, Alderman Wilce, ex-Alderman Daggy and Salisbury, E.S. Albro, Alderman Bateham, and C.N. Holden. The house was filled to overflowing with friends of the family, all desirous of viewing the face of the "dear departed," ere her remains should be laid away forever in the silent tomb. In the center of the front parlor stood the elegant metallic casket in which reposed the remains of the deceased lady. The casket was beautifully adorned with flowers and sprigs of evergreens, and at the foot stood a small harp encircled by flowers of sweetest fragrance. On the top of the burial case, surrounded by a wreath of white roses, there was silver plate bearing the following inscription: "Sarah J. Holden. Died July 26, 1873, aged 37 years 3 months and 15 days." Around the casket containing the sacred clay were gathered the husband, child, father, mother, brother, and several other relatives of the deceased. The solemn and impressive ceremonies were opened with music, a portion of the choir of the Second Baptist Church singing a plaintive dirge, with organ accompaniment. After the singing, Rev. T.W. Goodspeed, of the same Church, read a portion of Scripture from the eighth chapter of Romans. He then proceeded to make some very appropriate and touching remarks, setting forth the more prominent characteristics of the deceased, mentioning several interesting incidents of her illness, and her religious experience, etc. He spoke from a personal acquaintance with the departed one, of her amiability and many virtues. At the close of his address, the choir sang the well-known hymn commencing: "Sister, thou wast mild and lovely." At the conclusion of this exercise, Rev. E.S. Osgood, D.D., an old and intimate friend of the Holden family, make a few remarks appropriate to the occasion, and then the friends took a final look at the face of the deceased, and amid sobs and tears which told of the heavy sorrow resting upon many hearts, the casket was closed and borne to the waiting hearse, Messrs. Alderman Wilce and Bateham, E.S. Albro, Prof. Palmer, J.T. Little and David Cole acting as the pall-bearers. A long line of carriages was then formed, and the funeral cortege slowly wended its way to Rosehill Cemetery, where the remains were deposited in a vault.
LINES ON THE DEATH OF MRS. C.C.P. HOLDEN
O, weary suffering one, How sweet must be the blessed hour of rest! Life's labors ended, duties nobly done, The tired hands folded on the peaceful breast, No more life's road by weary feet is trod; She rests in peace - the perfect peace of God, That passeth understanding - all the strife, The conflict, ended, and the crown of life And victory is won. We will not call her dead -Only passed on a little while before us; Though very bitter are the tears we shed, And dark the clouds of sorrow brooding o'er us, A light comes through the open gates of heaven, Glimpses of Glory to our souls are given; The still, small voice, calming the troubled deep, Whispers, "He giveth His beloved sleep;" And we are comforted.

Passed from our longing sight, Like stars at dawn of day - not dead, but risen, Ascended to the morning-land of light; Like a glad bird escaping from its prison, The soul has found its wings, and soars on high, Throwing the worn-out mortal garments by -Borne by the Angels to the realms of day, Where God Himself shall wipe all tears away, And there is no more night.
The tears of sorrow shed Are not for her, our beautiful departed; But for ourselves we mourn uncomforted, Left desolated, alone, and broken-hearted, And longing with unutterable pain To hear the sweet and loving voice again. The dear companionship of love to share That once made life so beautiful and fair; What bitter grief to know the holy light Of loving eyes no more will bless our sight! Alone life's path to tread.
Alone and desolate, But not forsaken. Love can never perish; The faithful dove cannot forget her mate, Nor cease Love's holy memories to cherish. The faithful friend, the gentle, loving wife, The brightest jewel in the crown of life -O Love! most precious gift to mortals given, Gone, but not lost - to be restored in Heaven -For this we pray and wait!


Holmes, Asher
ASHER HOLMES, deceased, New Lenox Tp., whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Sherburne, Chenango Co., N.Y., in September, 1796; at the age of 9, his parents moved to Chautauqua Co., N.Y.; in 1826, he returned to Chenango Co., and married Aug. 26 of the same year Miss Eliza Ann Elmore; they moved back to Chautauqua Co., and remained there until the year 1831, when they again returned to Chenango Co., remaining there until his coming to Will Co. in the spring of 1835; he settled on Sec. 22, in New Lenox Tp., where he died; his widow still lives on the homestead. He held the office of Justice of the Peace in Chenango Co., and that of School Treasurer in New Lenox Tp. He had six children, five living - James E., born June 25, 1827; Myron P., born June 8, 1830; Orsamus, born in August, 1838; Lydia E., born Feb. 5, 1840, and Sophie, born Aug. 14, 1852, and one deceased - Eliza Ann, born Jan. 18, 1834, died in May, 1873.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holmes, J.S.
J.S. HOLMES, dealer in grain, coal and ground feed; P.O. Spencer; was born in New Lenox, Will Co., Aug. 30, 1848; is the son of the late Asher Holmes, deceased, who came from New York State in 1835. Mr. H. was married Jan. 24, 1871, to Miss Sophie Willis, who was born in New York City Aug. 14, 1852; they have had five children - Raynor E., Arthur W., Laura E., Herbert H. and Bessie J. Mr. H. is at present School Trustee; was elected in April, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holmes, James E.
JAMES E. HOLMES, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; one of our early settlers; was born in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., June 25, 1827; came to this State with his father's family and settled where he now resides, in New Lenox Tp., in 1835. He was married Jan. 8, 1854, to Miss Mary E. Stiffler, who was born in Miami Co., Ohio, Jan. 29, 1838; they have had four children, three of whom are living, viz.: Delia J., William R. and George E.; deceased - Rosilla. The farm of Mr. H. consists of 138 acres, valued at $8,500. Since his residence in this township, he has held the office of Town Clerk one year, Postmaster twenty-two years, which position he still retains; also the office of Street Commissioner nearly two years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Holmes, John
JOHN HOLMES, contractor and builder, Wilmington; born in Glasgow, Scotland, Dec. 17, 1832; came to this country in 1857, stopping for a short time in Chicago, and locating in Wilmington, his present home, in October of that year, where he engaged in contracting and building; in 1867, the firm of Clute & Holmes built the planing-mill which they operated in connection with contracting and building for several years. Married in 1862 to Miss Adeline E. Kelley, who was born in Wesley Tp., this county; five children by this union, four living - Fred G., Mabel, Isabelle and James; Frankie died in 1864. Mr. Holmes is a member of Talmud Lodge, No. 24, Knights of Pythias.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Homeding, Peter,
farmer, Sec 24; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Prussia, Germany, Sept. 18, 1829; he lived there until he was 23 years old, farming; in 1852, he came to America, and came to Will Co., and has lived here ever since; in 1864 he purchased the farm upon which he lives, containing sixty-four acres. Married Miss Susan Miller, of Prussia, in Joliet, Nov. 28, 1858; she was born Feb. 2, 1824; had five children -- Katie, born Sept. 15, 1858; Maggie, born April 16, 1860; Matt, born May 10, 1861; Nicholas, born in 1864, died in 1865, and Peter, born March 24, 1866. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Hopkins, Henry
HENRY HOPKINS, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Wayne Co., N.Y., May 3, 1826; he remained at home till he was 18 years of age; his early life was that of a farmer's son; in February, 1865, he came West to Illinois and settled near his present residence; in December, 1874, he purchased his house, and occupied it the following February. He was married April 12, 1853, to Caroline M. Sly, a native of New York; has had three children - Irving W., Eugene S., Lillian D.; of these, Irving W. died in November, 1875. Mr. Hopkins has been very successful in his business transactions; what he possesses to-day, he has accumulated through honest toil and well-directed energy. In the death of his eldest son he lost a most valuable factor from his working and his accumulating force; he was a young man of more than ordinary promise. Mr. Hopkins owns 160 acres, with fine improvements, valued at $15,000. In early life, he worked on the farm during the summer, and engaged in teaching school during the winter for six terms; in this way, he saved about $600, a sum which, when he came West, started him on the road to success and competency.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hosmer, George H.
GEORGE H. HOSMER, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; is the oldest son of W.H.C. Hosmer, the poet, author and lecturer; he traces his ancestry to a period prior to the Revolutionary war; at the battle of Concord the first two who fell by a volley of British musketry, were Capt. Davis and Abner Hosmer, the latter of who whom was a lineal ancestor of the subject of this sketch; the Doctor's great-grandfather, Dr. Timothy Hosmer, was surgeon of the Sixth Continental Regiment in the war of the Revolution, and afterwards a prominent pioneer in the settlement of the Holland Purchase, in Western New York; his father, George Hosmer, was an aide-de-camp of General Schuyler in the war of 1812; a prominent lawyer, member of the State Legislature, and for twenty-one years District Attorney of Livingston Co., N.Y.; Miss Harriet Hosmer, the famous sculptress, is also a cousin. Dr. Hosmer was born in Avon, Livingston Co., N.Y., Aug. 23, 1839; he thoroughly prepared for college at the Oswego Academy, where he spent nine years; he then entered the University of New York, remaining two years in the literary department, after which he pursued a three-years course in the medical department of the same institution, graduating in 1865; he practiced medicine one year in Ontario Co., N.Y., removing thence to New Baltimore, Macomb Co., Mich., where he remained until his removal to Joliet in 1870. He was married in 1866, to Miss Ann Belford, of Boston, and has one son - George B. Dr. Hosmer is a regular physician, but clings to no dogma, seizing upon any remedy from whatever source, which will accomplish his object, the relief of the patient and the cure of the disease; he takes an active interest in educational matters, and is now on his second term as a member of the Board of School Inspectors of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Houck, George
GEORGE HOUCK, of the firm of Houck & Brown, tanners and curriers, wholesale and retail dealers in sole-leather and shoe findings, etc., Joliet; was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, Dec. 13, 1827; when he was about 12 years of age, his parents came to this county, and purchased a farm in Erie Co., N.Y.; Mr. Houck remained on the farm until 1846, when he went to Buffalo, and entered the employ of ex-President Millard Fillmore, where he continued one year; he then served three years at the tanner and currier's trade, learning thoroughly every branch of the business; in 1850, he came to Chicago, living there until 1853, when he came to Joliet, and entered the employ of Mack & Cleghorn; in 1863 the firm of Mack, Cleghorn & Co. was formed, Mr. Houck becoming partner; the same year, they built the Joliet Tannery; the present firm of Houck & Brown was formed in 1876; they give employment to twenty men. Mr. Houck was married in 1853, to Miss Anna Hohman, of Chicago, a native of Hess Cassel, Germany; they have three children living - Mary, now Mrs. William Grassley, of Chicago; Lizzie, wife of Frederick Steinburn, of Joliet, and Annie S.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

House, George S.
GEORGE S. HOUSE, attorney at law, Joliet; is a native of this State; he was born in Grundy Co., then a part of Cook Co., March 1, 1837; he is a son of Rodney House, one of the early settlers of Will Co., and now a resident of Joliet; he came with his parents to Joliet in infancy, and this city has been his home ever since; he prepared for college in Utica Academy, Oneida Co., N.Y., after which he entered Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1856, graduating in 1860; he then pursued the study of law under Prof. Theodore W. Dwight, now of Columbia College, New York, receiving the degree of B.L. in 1862; returning to Joliet, he entered upon the practice of his profession, in which he still continues. He was married in 1863 to Miss Virginia A. Osgood, daughter of the late Hon. Uri Osgood, of Joliet, and has five children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Howk, H.
H. HOWK, retired merchant and miller, Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., Feb. 23, 1806; in his early life he engaged extensively in lumbering in his native State; in 1851, he came west, and located in Joliet, and in connection with Joel A. Matteson, afterward Governor of the State, took a contract on the R.I. & P. R.R., extending from Blue Island to within ten miles of Joliet; they graded and put in the culverts a distance of thirty-four miles. His son subsequently built a store-room on the West Side, near the lock, and engaged in supplying boats on the Canal. Mr. Howk built the Joliet Mills, on the lock, with six runs of stone, and in company with Mr. Hyde, his nephew, and now sole proprietor, operated them seven years; he contracted all the machinery in Watertown, N.Y.; since retiring from the mill, he has not been actively engaged in business pursuits, but is leading a quiet, retired life, enjoying the fruits of honest toil and the competency gained by a well-directed and well-spent early manhood.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Howland, Henry F.  Sr.
HENRY F. HOWLAND, SR., dealer in furniture, Wilmington; born in Seekonk, Mass., May 5, 1836; removed to Providence, R.I., in childhood, which was his home until he came West; removed to Illinois in 1870, locating at Wilmington, his present home. Married in 1857 to Miss Mary Carlin, who was born in Ireland; seven children by this union, four living - Mary E., Ludia A., Henry F., Jr. and John F.; lost three - Lydia, Susan and Joseph.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hudson, Henry
HENRY HUDSON, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Huntingdon Co., Penn., and is the son of Mathew and Sarah (Cook) Hudson; Mr. Hudson, when he was but 3 years old, with his parents, moved to Trumbull Co., Ohio; his father was a farmer; here he set out in farming, and, when 17 years of age, he commenced to learn the carpenter and joiner trade; this he followed while in Ohio; in 1846, he came to Illinois, and settled in Wilmington, Will Co.; here, in this vicinity, he has remained ever since; Mr. Hudson, before there was a railroad in the vicinity, was engaged in carrying the U.S. mail from Wilmington, Will Co., to Pontiac, Livingston Co., for nine years. Married twice; first wife, Lydia A. Fenner, of New York; second wife, Mariah Bell, of Ohio; six children. Mr. Hudson had three sons in the late war, who participated in some of the hard-fought battles, and were honorably discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hulsworth, John
JOHN HULSWORTH, foreman of the smith-shops, Joliet; was born March 2, 1822, in Yorkshire, Eng.; he emigrated to America in 1847, and first labored in Philadelphia and New York about one year; he next went to Richmond, Va., and remained a short time; he then made a tour through the Southern States, visiting New Orleans, Memphis, and various other cities South and West, finally locating in St. Louis in the latter part of 1849; here he remained till 1853; he then came to Alton, on the C., A. & St. L. R.R., where he was foreman most of the time in the shops till August, 1859; he then came to Joliet, and was eight years foreman in the shops of the State Prison; he was next foreman for the Dillman Manufacturing Company four years, in 1871, he took the position of foreman in the shops of the Joliet Iron and Steel Works, which he still holds. He was married in 1854 to Caroline P. Bryant, a native of Connecticut; had one son - John H., deceased, and one, Edwin A., living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Huston, Robert
ROBERT HUSTON, merchant, Braidwood; was born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1844, and is the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Shaw) Huston, of Ireland; his father was a weaver by trade, having emigrated to America about 1832. Mr. Huston, when he was very young (1850), with his parents came West to Illinois, and settled in Grundy Co., here he was engaged on his father's farm at the breaking-out of the late war. In 1862, he enlisted as private in Co. I, 58th I.V.I., for three years or during the war. Participated in some of the hard fought battles; at the battles of Fort Donelson, Tenn., and Pittsburg Landing, April 6, 1862; here he was taken prisoner and taken South as a prisoner; was paroled, returned to his regiment, and at the battle of Yellow Bayou, La., 1863, he received a severe gunshot wound which caused the loss of his leg; he was sent to the Hospital at St. Louis, and in 1864, was discharged, returned home to Grundy Co., and engaged in teaching school; in 1870, he entered the mercantile business in Braidwood, and has continued in this business ever since. Married in 1872 to Miss E.A. Blanchard, of Will Co., Ill., whose parents were among the early settlers of Will Co.; they have two children. When Mr. Huston first came to Braidwood he was worth $54; he was engaged at the coal mines in weighing coal and speculating; he managed to save enough capital to start in the mercantile business; to-day he ranks as one of the successful merchants of Braidwood. Is a Republican in politics.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hutchins, Hannah
MRS. HANNAH HUTCHINS, farmer; P.O. Joliet; the widow of Wm. H. Hutchins, resides one mile north of Joliet; she was born Aug. 28, 1817, in Saratoga Co., N.Y.; she was married to W.H. Hutchins in 1837, in New York State. Mr. Hutchins was born in New York City, Sept. 1, 1817, where he lived until 15 years of age, when he removed to Northern New York, where he lived three years; then to Saratoga, where he was married, living there nearly five years; thence to New York City, living there five years. He removed to Will Co., Ill., in 1847, and always lived within four miles of their present home. In early life, Mr. Hutchins was engaged in mercantile business, after coming West, he was engaged in loaning money and dealing in real estate. They had seven children by this union, viz., Thomas H., George Edgar, deceased, Sarah E., deceased; Anna M., Mary E., Jennie C. and William J. Geo. Edgar died from wounds received in the army. Mr. Hutchins died July 21, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Hynd, J. & J.
J. & J. HYND, confectionery and stationery, Braidwood. These gentlemen commenced business in Braidwood in the spring of 1877; both were born in Scotland; James, born October, 1855, and John, born in 1857; are the sons of John and Margaret (McKinley) Hynd, of Scotland; their father died when they were very young. Messrs. Hynds have followed mining principally throughout life; in 1868, they emigrated to America; came direct to Illinois and settled in Morris, Grundy Co., and remained there, engaged in mining until 1871; they then came to Braidwood; here engaged in mining; in 1877, James retired from the mines, and in partnership with his brother John, entered the confectionery and stationery business; they own to-day one of the largest and best assorted stocks of confectionery and stationery in Braidwood.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


 

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