Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents


Nelson, Robert W
., Joliet; born in Granville, Washington Co., N.Y., Sept 20, 1851; at the age of 15, he moved to Schenectady, N.Y., and entered the Union School, where he remained for two years; he then entered the dry goods store of H. Ostrom & Co., and , after a few months' stay there, obtained a situation in the drug store of A. Truaz & Co., where he remained for two years; by that time he was taken with the Western fever, and followed the advice of that astute philosopher, Horace Greeley, went West, and located in Chicago in the spring of 1871; here, in conjunction with his brother, he started in the coal trade, and afterward added that of clothing; the clothing store was moved to Braidwood in 1875; in 1876, he withdrew from the firm of Nelson Brothers & Barhgdt, they continuing in the coal trade in Chicgo, while he continued the clothing business at Braidwood until the fall of 1877, when he closed up that business, and commenced the publication of the Joliet News. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Nelson, Samuel G.
SAMUEL G. NELSON, farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Wallingford; owns 105 acres; born in Winchester, Randolph Co., Ind., May 8, 1827; resided in that State with his parents until 1846; then to this town the 25th of December, 1846. Married twice; first to Abigail Meacham, who died Aug. 29, 1854, aged 24; left one child - Elizabeth H., born in September, 1853; she now lives with her father; is a school teacher; his second marriage was with Sarah A. Thomas May 1, 1856; have had six children - Celia Jane, born July 1, 1857; William T., born May 21, 1859, died Aug. 24, 1873, from injuries received from the kick of a horse; Sarah Ellen, Oct. 28, 1861; Mary M., born Oct. 8, 1866; James M., Jan. 1, 1872; Laura B., Nov. 29, 1875. Enlisted in August, 1862, in the 100th I.V.I., as private; elected First Lieutenant at the organization of the regiment, August, 1862; promoted to Captain Nov. 21, 1863, and to Major March 24, 1865; served full term; in all the principal battles in which his regiment was engaged, including Stone River, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta campaign and Franklin; was badly wounded at Missionary Ridge, in the left hip; carried the ball three days; it was extracted, and he now has it in his possession. Held the office Supervisor five years, which office he now holds; has held the office of Justice of the Peace about seven years.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nelson, William
WILLIAM NELSON, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Wilmington; owns eighty acres, valued at $40 per acre; born Nov. 8, 1816, in Sterlingshire, Scotland; emigrated to Canada in 1830; thence to the United States in 1833; located at Trenton, Oneida Co., N.Y.; remained there four years; thence to Joliet, Will Co., Ill., remaining about six months; thence to what is known as the Five-Mile Grove, Manhattan Tp., and remained there one year; there were only two habitations in the township, both owned by Perkin Bros., one of which Mr. Nelson rented; being so sparsely settled in that vicinity, Mr. Nelson preferred to go to New Lenox Tp., which was then better populated; there he lived with A. Francis for about four years; in partnership he bought a farm with Asa McDonald, where he lived three years; sold to McD. and returned to Five-Mile Grove, where he lived until 1860. Married Mary A. Rudd in 1846, in New Lenox Tp.; she was born in New York State, and came to Illinois with her parents in 1845; having five children living - Mary E. (now Mrs. W. Cook), William W., James (deceased), Nettie (now Mrs. C. Faut), Olive Z. and Leonard. Mr. Nelson was Supervisor of Trenton (now Manhattan Tp.), also Assessor of Trenton and Florence, which office he now holds in Florence; in March, 1860, he moved to his present residence.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nettels, Henry
HENRY NETTELS, grain buyer, Frankfort Station; born in Germany Feb. 2, 1826; came to the United States in 1853, and settled in Frankfort, Will Co., Ill. He is one of the first German settlers in Frankfort. He was married to Miss Sophia Ilgen; they have had one child - Clara. Mr. N. was married again, to Miss Caroline Ilgen; they have had seven children, four of whom are living, viz., Hugo, Frank, Isabella and Charley; deceased, Caroline, Anna and an infant. Mr. N. has held office of Constable in Frankfort Tp., nine years, Collector one year and Assessor seven years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nevens, W.H.
W.H. NEVENS, Principal of the Crete school, Crete; was born in Lewiston, Me., March 9, 1845, and is the son of Charles H. and Mariah (Pettengill) Nevens. Father was a farmer; here Mr. Nevens was brought up on his father's farm, and engaged in farming; in the winter months attending school; in 1862 and 1863, he taught his first school in Maine. In 1864, he enlisted in the 32nd Maine V.I., and participated in the late war; was wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; was honorably discharged at the close of the war; returned to his home in Maine. Here he was engaged in going to school in 1866-67; then entered Bates College of Lewiston, Maine; here he received a full classical education; in August, 1869, came West to Illinois; taught school in Will Tp., Will Co., fifteen months; May, 1871, he came to Crete, and commenced teaching here; he has been ever since, excepting one year. The Crete school is conducted in a superior manner, showing conclusively the great advantages to be attained in employing a principal of the scholarly attainments and practical experience possessed by Mr. Nevens. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nicholson, William
WILLIAM NICHOLSON, hardware, etc., Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Cambridge, Washington Co., N.Y., March 26, 1838; he married Miss Caroline E. Benedict Oct. 12, 1863; she was born in Dalton, Mass., Aug. 19, 1839; they have four children, viz., Lewis, Edward B., Rollin H. and Franklin E. He lived in New York until 1865; was engaged in farming; he also spent nearly four years at the Troy University; he then came West to Illinois, and settled in this township; engaged in farming, which he followed until 1868, when he removed to Elwood and engaged in his present business, forming a partnership with George A. Pearson, whom he afterward bought out; in May, 1874, his place was burned, with his entire stock; on June 10, he was doing business in an old wooden building, hauled to the site of his former store, and the first of the following October he occupied his present brick store. He has held the offices of Town Clerk and Village Trustee.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nieland, John
JOHN NIELAND, farmer and stock-raiser, P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany March 6, 1824; came to the United States in 1854, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 165 acres, valued at $50 per acre. He was married to Dora Bobsien, who was born in Germany Jan. 29, 1829; they have had ten children, five of whom are living, viz., John, Minnie, Dora, Charley and Frederick; deceased, Sophia, Mary, Louisa, Heinrich and Ricka. Since Mr. Nieland's residence in the township, he has held the office of School Director and Road Commissioner several years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Nobes, Isaac
ISAAC NOBES, proprietor Oak Hill quarries; P.O. Joliet; was born on the Isle Wight Feb. 28, 1822; at the age of 13, he was apprenticed to sea and served four years; he then went as able seaman on board the clipper schooner Susan; engaged in the fruit trade up at the Levant; he remained at sea nine years; three years of that time he was on board the Ganges, an 84-gun ship of the British navy, and was present at the destruction of the forts along the coast of Syria in 1841, the last fort destroyed being that of San Juan Diego; in the taking of this fort, it was estimated that the Egyptian forces lost in killed, 15,000 in two and a half hours. The Admiral of the British forces was Sir Charles Napier. Mr. Nobes came to Quebec in 1843, on board a timber vessel; he spent one summer on Lake Erie and Ontario, sailing out from Gordon Island in the employ of Cook & Calvin, in the lumber trade; in June or July, 1845, he came to Buffalo, N.Y., and engaged in sailing on the lakes; during the summer of 1846, he sailed from Buffalo to Chicago; Jan. 7, 1847, he came to Joliet and engaged in hauling sand for the court house that winter; in the spring, returned to Chicago and sailed upon the lakes. Mr. Nobes states that upon this trip he paid $2.00 fare, walked a good part of the way, and carried a rail to help the coach out of bad places, and was on the road from 8 o'clock A.M. until 4 P.M. of the following day before reaching Chicago, a distance of 38 miles; the following winter, he returned to Joliet and soon went to Lockport, where he engaged in caulking the Gen. Fry, the first boat ever run on the I. & M. Canal, between Lockport and Chicago; he engaged in caulking and building boats one year; in the Spring of 1848, he purchased ten acres near his present location, and in March, 1851, opened his present quarries in connection with G.A. Cousens & Co. A difficulty having arisen among the partners, he abandoned the quarries and went again to the boat yards at Lockport. After twelve years litigation, he obtained entire possession of them in 1868, since which time he has successfully operated them. He was married Jan. 4, 1846, to Ann J. Haughey, a native of Ireland; has seven children - Joseph, Charles J., Sarah, Ann I., William I.R., Elizabeth J. and Elizabeth J. (deceased); owns eighty-six acres including his quarries. In 1874, he erected his large stone residence at a cost of nearly $20,000, the finest in all this section of country.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Noel, Gabriel
GABRIEL NOEL, farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Scioto Co., Ohio, July 2, 1820; he married Miss Elizabeth Zarley Oct. 15, 1848; she was born in Will Co., near Joliet, Nov. 22, 1831; they had twelve children - seven living - viz., Albert E., Calvin Z., Ervin R., Elvis C., Sue E., Rose M. and Frank G. He lived in Ohio twenty-seven years, and was engaged in farming and milling; he then came West to Illinois, and settled in Joliet, remaining there one summer; he came to his present place, and has lived here since; he has held the offices of Road Commissioner, School Trustee and Director. He owns 200 acres in this county.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Norton, Hiram
HIRAM NORTON, proprietor of the Lockport Carriage Factory, Lockport; born in Prince Edward Peninsula, Can., Oct. 3, 1828; his schoolboy days closed at the age of 11 years, and from that date until he arrived at the age of 18 years, he was completely disabled by rheumatism from engaging in any active pursuits; after recovering his health, he was three years on the farm, and, at the age of 21, went to his trade at Demorestville; in October, 1860, he came to Lockport and opened up his carriage factory. He was married in January, 1865, to Catharine Banner, a native of England; has four children - Mary, Benjamin F., Charles B. and John. Mr. Norton uses nothing but the best of material, employs none but the best of workmen, and fully warrants every vehicle sent forth from his establishment.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Norton, H.S.
H.S. NORTON, farming, Sec. 3; P.O. Plainfield; the above gentleman was born on his present place Dec. 1, 1845. He married Miss Matilda F. Bender March 23, 1870; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Nov. 16, 1852; they had five children, three living, viz., Alice, Frank and Hattie. He has always made this his residence; soon after becoming of age, he began to farm on his own account; he owns fifty acres, which he has principally earned by his own labor; he is operating a pit of building-sand on his place, which is of very superior quality; it was first discovered by his father in 1845; his parents, Benjamin K. and Mrs. Harriett Yaple Norton, were natives of Tompkins Co., N.Y.; Mr. Norton came to this county in 1839, and Mrs. Norton came in 1842; they settled on the present place in 1843; Mr. Norton died Oct. 17, 1874; Mrs. Norton lives on an adjoining farm.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Norton, Jesse O
., lawyer, Congressman and Judge, was born at Bennington, Vt., April 25, 1812, and graduated from Williams College in 1835. He settled at Joliet in 1839, and soon became prominent in the affairs of Will County. His first public office was that of City Attorney, after which he served as County Judge (1846-50). Meanwhile, he was chosen a Delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1847. In 1850 he was elected to the Legislature, and, in 1852, to Congress, as a Whig. His vigorous opposition to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise resulted in his re-election as a Representative in 1854. At the expiration of his second term (1857) he was chosen Judge of the eleventh circuit, to fill the unexpired term of Judge Randall, resigned. He was once more elected to Congress in 1862, but disagreed with his party as to the legal status of the States lately in rebellion. President Johnson appointed him United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, which office he filled until 1869. Immediately upon his retirement he began private practice at Chicago, where he died, August 3, 1875. ["Historical Encylopedia of Illinois", 1901, transcribed by K.T.]

HON. JESSE O. NORTON, deceased, whose portrait appears in this work, was born at Bennington, Vt., Dec. 25, 1812; he entered Williams College in 1831, and graduated with honor in 1835; he came West after graduating, and first taught school at Wheeling, Va., and afterward in Missouri; in 1839, he came to Joliet and opened a law office; he was first elected City Attorney; his genial manners made him popular, and the people of his county gave him all the honors and distinction in their power; in 1846, he was elected County Judge, and re-elected in 1848; he was also elected to the State Constitutional Convention in 1848; in 1850, he was elected to the State Legislature, and in 1852, he was elected to represent this district in the Congress of the United States; during that session, he took an active part in the appeal of the Missouri Compromise, resisting that measure with all his eloquence and power; his course was approved by the people of his district, and he was re-elected in 1854; in 1857, he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court; he was again elected to Congress in 1862, and served with honor until March 5, 1865; in 1866, he was appointed by President Johnson District Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, and removed to Chicago. He subsequently resumed the practice of law in company with Judge J.R. Doolittle. He died Aug. 3, 1875, and his remains were interred at Oakwood. He married Miss Phoebe Ann Sheldon Dec. 25, 1837, at the resident of Gov. Dunkin, Potosi, Mo.; they had seven children, four living - Martin, Libbie (now Mrs. Gen. J.T. Torrence), Annie and Jessie (now Mrs. Wallace C. Barker), and three who died in infancy. Mr. Norton in youth was sober, industrious, studious and ambitious, and when he came to man's estate, in every office he was called to fill by his fellow-citizens, he performed its duties with industry, promptness, ability and courtesy. There was in him a genial, affectionate and loving nature, refined, high-toned and exalted by a true Christian life, which those who knew him can fully appreciate. It was in his home that these virtues of the soul shone forth and made a beauty of character which no wealth can purchase and no intellectual greatness can supply. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


Oberman, Henry J.

HENRY J. OBERMAN, who is filling the office of county auditor of Dickey county, North Dakota, in an efficient and public spirited manner, is one of the rising young men of that region. He is possessor of one of the most valuable tracts of land in the northern part of the county, consisting of one section, on which he conducted farming for many years, and from a limited start has acquired a comfortable competence, mainly by his own efforts and honest dealings.
Mr. Oberman was born in Joliet, Illinois, June 1, 1864, and was the ninth in a family of ten children born to John F. and Wilhelmina (Brinkman) Oberman. Both parents were natives of Germany, and the father was a quarryman by occupation. The mother of our subject died when he was but five years of age.
Our subject finished his education in the schools of Joliet and in 1882 went to Ellendale, Dickey county, Dakota, and filed claim to land thirteen miles north of the county seat, but at present owns one section of land in Porter township.
Our subject was married in Monango, Dickey county, North Dakota, in 1891, to Miss Francis E. Scott, a native of Iowa, who was born in 1872. One son has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Oberman, whom they have named Frederick S. Mr. Oberman is a member of the Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. He has served his township in many of the offices of importance, and his present position is gaining for him the confidence of the people among whom he has resided for so many yeas. Personal matters are at times cast aside for the more important issues of his community and county, and he labors for the general welfare of the people with a oneness of purpose which places him foremost in the rank of esteemed citizens. [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

O'Donnell, Cornelius
CORNELIUS O'DONNELL, saloon and boots and shoes, Braidwood; this gentleman was born in Tipperary Co., Ireland, and is the son of Jeremiah and Catherine (Powell) O'Donnell, of Ireland; his father was engaged in farming here; Mr. O'Donnell was raised on his father's farm, and in 1863, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; came direct to Will Co., and commenced farming; then in the coal mines, Goose Lake; thence to Keifersville; here he remained until 1870; thence to Braidwood, and entered the mercantile business. Mr. O'Donnell has held several offices of public trust; that of Constable seven years, and Deputy Sheriff of Will Co. four years under George M. Arnold; these offices he held in a creditable and efficient manner. Is a Democrat in politics, and is a very active worker; a member of the Catholic Church. Married Jan. 11, 1872, to Miss Margaret Leo, by whom they have had five children - four living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

O'Donnell, J.L.
J.L. O'DONNELL, of the firm of Haley & Donnell, attorneys at law, Joliet; is a native of the State of Illinois; he was born in La Salle Co., Aug. 10, 1849; he was educated in St. Mary's College, Niagara Falls, N.Y.; after which he read law in the office of Glover, Cook & Campbell, of Ottawa, Ill., and with Mayo & Widmer, of the same place. He was admitted to the bar in Springfield, Ill., in January, 1874, and the 1st of August following, formed a law partnership with P.C. Haley, Esq., which still continues. He was married on the 19th of September, 1877, to Miss M.C. Edgerly, of Putnam Co., Ill.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ogden, M.B.
M.B. OGDEN, M.D., homeopathic physician and surgeon, Joliet; has practiced medicine in Joliet for the past thirteen years; he is a son of Dr. S.G. Ogden, late of Cherry Valley, Ill., and who died in 1874, at the age of 75 years; he belongs to a family of physicians, his great-grandfather, grandfather, father, two brothers and some ten cousins being members of the medical profession. Dr. Ogden was born in Toronto, Province of Ontario, Oct. 24, 1834; he received his general education at the University of Toronto, and then pursued a medical course of three years at Ralph's Medical School in that city. In 1858, he went to Wisconsin and practiced nearly five years in Fond du Lac, where he was largely interested in flour manufacturing; thence he removed to Rockford, Ill., and during the winter of 1863-64, attended the Hahnemann (Homeopathic) Medical College in Chicago; in 1865, he located in Joliet, where he still remains; in the winter of 1867-8, he pursued his second course of lectures at the Hahnemann Medical College, graduating in February, 1868. Associated with him in practice is his brother, E.J. Ogden, of Chicago, who visits Joliet once a week. Dr. Ogden was married in August, 1859, to Miss S.M. Pitcher, of Fond du Lac, Wis., and has one son - Edward C., now a student in the Hahnemann Medical College, in Chicago.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

O'Heron, Dennis E.
DENNIS E. O'HERON (D.E. O'Heron & Co.), grocers, Wilmington; born in Cork, Ireland, Dec. 4, 1846, but removed to this country in early childhood, with his parents, locating in New York City in 1852, where he resided about five years; then removed to Illinois, locating at Wilmington, his present home; his early experience in his present line of business was first with D.L. Bachelers, and afterward with Randall Bros., of Wilmington, serving also as clerk in the stores of Geo. Monroe & Sons, and Chittenden, Northup & Co., of Joliet; in March, 1876, he commenced business at his present location, on his own account, Mr. W.C. Mitchell becoming a partner in April of the present year. Married in 1875, to Miss Sarah M., daughter of Norman H. Case; she was born in Connecticut; two children by this union, one living - Katie May; Norman C. died Sept. 17, 1876. Mr. O'Heron is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, Wilmington Chapter, No. 142, and Joliet Commandery, No. 4.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ohlhues, John J.

JOHN J. OHLHUES, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Wilmington; owns ninety-three acres, valued at $50 per acre; born in Holstein, Germany, Oct. 19, 1837; emigrated to the United States in 1859, with his father's family, which consisted of parents, Jacob Ohlhues and Margaret Graf (Ohlhues) and their three sons John, Peter and Henry, besides their daughter and son-in-law Mrs. and Mr. Reils. John married Mary Schultz, at Joliet, in Sept., 1867; she was born in Hanover, Germany, July 24, 1843, and came to this country with her parents in 1857; have five children - Magdalena, Henry, Edward, Emma and Mary. His brother Henry enlisted in February, 1864, in Co. E, ___ Ill. V.I., and was killed while pursuing the enemy at Fort Gregg, Va., on April 8, 1865. He was married to Ellen Neiman, here, in November, 1864; left no children. Peter Ohlhues resides with his brother-in-law, Mr. J. Reils.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Olin, Benjamin
HON. BENJAMIN OLIN, attorney at law, Joliet; was born in Alleghany Co., N.Y., Aug. 12, 1838; when he was quite young, his parents came West, and settled in La Salle Co., afterward removing into Kendall Co.; after receiving an English education, he spent awhile in Beloit College, and then entered the law office of Messrs. Gray & Bushnell in Ottawa, Ill., afterward continuing his studies with John Cruthers, Esq., of Oswego, Kendall Co. On the breaking-out of the war in April, 1861, he assisted in enrolling Co. K, 20th I.V.I.; was elected First Lieutenant, and served about one year, when he was obliged to resign owing to ill health; returning, he spent some time in Colorado recruiting his health, after which he reviewed his law studies in the office of Mather, Taft & Bates in Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in the winter of 1862-63, and began the active practice of his profession in Morris, Ill.; he afterward formed a partnership with Hon. Perry A. Armstrong, of that place, which continued until the removal of Judge Olin to Joliet in 1870. While in Morris, he served as Alderman and School Inspector. About a year after coming to Joliet, he entered into copartnership with Capt. Egbert Phelps, which lasted until 1873, when he was elected County Judge, and in 1877, was re-elected for another term of four years. He has held the office of School Inspector in this city, and has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Joliet Public Library since its organization in 1875. He was married in September, 1865, to Miss Julia A. Schauber, of Schenectady, N.Y.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Olney, C.C.
C.C. OLNEY, manufacturer and dealer in marble and granite monuments, tombstones, etc., Joliet; was born in Perry, Genesee Co., N.Y., June 15, 1833; he is a son of Hiram Olney, who came to Will Co. in the fall of 1835, and settled in what is now Homer Tp., and who afterward removed to Manhattan Tp., where he now resides at the age of 78 years. Mr. Olney remained at home until he was 19 years of age, and then came to Joliet and began working at the marble-cutter's trade, which has been his business ever since; he is therefore, the oldest marble dealer now in Joliet, having followed the business either for himself or in the employ of others for the past twenty-six years. His business is not confined to Will Co., but extends into Cook, Iroquois, Livingston, Grundy, Kendall, Kankakee and Du Page Cos., Ill., and Lake Co., Ind. He was married in January, 1868.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Olney, Hiram
HIRAM OLNEY, farming and stock-raising, Sec. 3; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Cayuga Co., N.Y., July 13, 1800. He married Miss Harriet Daniels Jan. 17, 1822; she was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., Feb. 22, 1803; they had seven children, four living, viz., Cephas C., William H., Marietta A. and Henrietta. He lived in New York until 1835; was principally engaged in farming and teaching; he then came West, and settled in the town of Homer, this county, and engaged in farming; remained until 1854, when he came to his present place, and has remained here since, except six years in Joliet. He owns 120 acres in this township. He has been Road Commissioner, Assessor, Town Clerk and Justice of the Peace, also Township Trustee; was also Town Clerk in Homer, and Trustee.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

O'Neil, Charles J.
CHARLES J. O'NEIL, farmer and fine stock-breeder; P.O. Peotone; born in the township of Alban, Canada West, March 6, 1839; in early childhood he removed with his parents to Chicago, Ill., where they remained about two years and then moved to Kane Co., Ill.; here spent some seventeen years of his life when he returned to Chicago, where he lived until the fall of 1873; he then removed to his present home, "Wide Range Farm," which he had purchased the spring before; this is a splendid high rolling prairie farm of 640 acres (being Sec. 20), with fine buildings, and beautifully, centrally located on a high knoll, overlooking the whole farm and giving a fine view of a wide surrounding country. Was married April 26, 1872, to Miss Mary J. McDonough, of Ottawa, Ill., who was born in St. Louis, Mo., March 17, 1848; they have three children - Mary C., Daniel C. and John.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

O'Meier, John
JOHN O'MEIER, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Germany Jan 17, 1824, and is the son of John Conrad and Sophia (Schweer) O'Meier, of Germany, who both died in Germany; his father was engaged in the manufacture of oil; here Mr. O'Meier was engaged in working in his father's factory; in 1844, he immigrated alone to America, and, August 24, landed in New York City, and came West; landed in Chicago Sept. 3, 1844, a stranger; he set out to find work, and commenced work on a farm at $6 per month and board; here he remained until the spring of 1845; he then came to Will Co., and commenced to work for John Miller, in Du Page Tp.; he remained there and saved sufficient money to purchase eighty acres, in Crete Tp., of the present homestead; in 1848, moved to Crete Tp., and was engaged in renting a farm two years; then he made sufficient improvements on his farm; he then moved on here; he has remained ever since; to-day owns one of the best improved farms of Will Co.; owns 380 acres in Will Co. and a half-section in Iroquois Co. Mr. O'Meier has held several offices of public trust; that of Supervisor since 1869, excepting three years; in these offices he has given entire satisfaction. A strong Republican in politics and a hard worker in the ranks. Married twice; first wife Annie Rinne; second wife, Ellen Scheiwe; thirteen children, ten living.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

O'Reilly, Frank T.
FRANK T. O'REILLY, farmer; P.O. Braidwood; was born in Meath Co., Ireland, May, 1820, and is the son of Michael and Rose (Tully) O'Reilly, of Ireland; his father was a blacksmith and a farmer; was raised on his father's farm; at the age of 14 years, he was engaged in driving a dray between Kells and Dublin, and engaged at this business until he emigrated to America, in 1847, with his mother and children; his father died when he was about 9 years of age; landed in New York City; they then went to Somerset Co., N.J.; here he was engaged in working in the copper mines eighteen months; then to Newark, N.J., and worked in chemical factory about one year; then to the city of New York, where he was engaged in driving a team for a sugar refinery; at this business four years; then purchased a horse and dray, and was drayman in New York two years; then with the family they emigrated to Illinois, and settled in Will Co., Reed Tp., on the farm they now own, in July, 1855; first purchased 200 acres at $6 per acre, being among the first settlers of this township; made all improvements on the farm; country very wild; plenty of deer and prairie wolves. Married in 1853, to Miss Mary Bradly, of Ireland, by whom they have had eight children, seven living. Has held several offices of public trust of Reed Tp. Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic Church. Thomas O'Reilly is a brother of Frank T. O'Reilly, and was born about 1817; have been with each other throughout life; both are highly respected farmers of Will Co.; they started in life poor boys; have worked hard - driving the dray to a successful farmer; own 530 acres of improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Osgood, A.A.
A.A. OSGOOD, real estate and loans, Joliet; is a native of Joliet; he was born Sept. 29, 1839. His father, Hon. Uri Osgood, came to Joliet in 1836, from Oxford, Chenango Co., N.Y., where he was born Dec. 22, 1809; he studied law with Hon. Henry R. Mygatt, of his native town, taking a seven-years course, and at once came West, stopping in Chicago long enough to obtain his license to practice in this State, and then settled in Joliet, where he was a prominent and wealthy citizen and a leading attorney for thirty-five years. He at one time purchased all of Jefferson st., from Ottawa st. to the river for two black horses and $50 for money. He established the first bank in Joliet about 1850, which he continued until 1861; in 1852, he was elected to the State Senate, serving two years, and in 1856, was a candidate for Congress against the Hon. Owen Lovejoy. He also held various offices of trust and responsibility in this city and county, among them that of District Attorney. He died in 1871, leaving a wife and five children, of whom Augustus A. is the oldest. He was educated at Russell's Military Institute, and at Yale College. In 1861, he enlisted in the 100th Ill. V.I., and was elected First Lieutenant of Co. B; served as Aide-de-camp on Gen. Haskell's staff, and after the battle of Stone River, he resigned owing to ill health. After spending a few weeks at home he entered the Quartermaster's Department under Capt. J.M. Huntington, and three months later was made Chief Clerk under Capt. G.M. Smith, Chief Quartermaster of the Cavalry Corps of East Tennessee; he afterward held the same position with Capt. Thos. D. Fitch, Chief Quartermaster of the Department of Kentucky, remaining till the close of the war. He afterward read law in his father's office; was admitted to the bar Oct. 29, 1868, and practiced with his father until the death of the latter in 1871. In 1873, he purchased the insurance business of W.W. Stevens, which he continued till September, 1877, since which time he has been engaged in the real estate and loan business.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ott, Barney
BARNEY OTT, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Baden, Germany, June 5, 1821; he lived with his parents fifteen years; from that time up to the age of 21, he worked at the trade of weaver; he came to America in 1842; and the first year lived in Onondaga Co., N.Y., working in a salt factory; from there he went to Canada, remaining two years farming; in 1846, he came to this State and lived in Du Page Co. nineteen years farming, when he moved to this county (1865), and purchased the farm upon which he now resides, of 152 acres. He married Miss Elizabeth Walter (daughter of Andrew Walter, of Darmstadt, Germany), in Du Page Co., Sept. 10, 1851; she was born June 8, 1831; they had thirteen children - Frank, born Feb. 16, 1853, died Feb. 26, 1854; Michael, born May 10, 1854; Eva, Oct. 30, 1855; Catharine, born April 16, 1857, died Feb. 26, 1858; Mary, born Feb. 2, 1859; Libbie, Jan. 8, 1861; John, Aug. 8, 1862; Katie, July 14, 1864; Peter, Jan. 2, 1866; Clara, March 20, 1868; Emma, March 9, 1870; Maggie, Oct. 21, 1872, and George B., Nov. 24, 1874. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Owen, James L.
JAMES L. OWEN, farmer and breeder of Norman or Percheron horses from imported stock; P.O. Mokena; one of our first settlers and pioneers; was born in Clarke Co., Ky., Sept. 19, 1824; came to this State with his father's family and settled in Frankfort Tp., Will Co., in 1834, although the township at that time was not organized and did not have a name; he is the son of the late Francis Owen, who purchased the first land pre-empted from the Government that is now in the township of Frankfort; his pursuits have been those of a farmer and stock-raiser from boyhood; he has been a breeder of the Norman or Percheron horse since 1865, and a breeder of and dealer in the English draft horse since 1853; he is now one of our largest live-stock dealers in the county; his farm consists of 400 acres, valued at $25,000. He was married Dec. 23, 1853, to Miss Catherine Madden, who was born in the city of Dublin, Ireland, Dec. 25, 1822; Mrs. Owen, during her recent travels through Europe (A.D. 1874) visited Glassneven Churchyard, Ireland, wherefrom she plucked tufts of grass from the graves of Daniel O'Connell and William P. Allen and also from the graves of Michael Larkin and Michael O'Brien, who were hanged by the order of the British Government A.D. 1867, and whose last words were, "God save Ireland;" the monuments had been newly decorated; she had also the honor to visit St. Michael's Churchyard wherein is the grave of Robert Emmett, who was the leader of the Irish insurrection of 1803; the place of burial, over which she waved the American flag, is marked according to his request, with but a single slab which bears no epitaph.
Most tombs are engraved with the names of the dead, But yon dark slab declares not whose spirit has fled. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Owen, W.B.
W.B. OWEN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our first settlers and pioneers; was born in Clark Co., Ky., Jan. 24, 1826; came to this State, and settled in Frankfort, Will Co., in 1834, at which time, there was not to exceed twelve families located in this township. He is the son of the late Francis Owen, deceased, who preached the first sermon, and was the first local minister in the township. Mr. O. was married Jan. 22, 1861, to Miss C.A. Cleveland, who was born in Delaware Co., N.Y., Nov. 15, 1841; they have had seven children, viz., Mary Antoinette, Cora L., Francis Belle, Gracie E., James W., William C. and Edward F. The farm of Mr. O. is located on Secs. 30 and 18; it contains 110 acres and is valued at $6,500.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Paddock, D.W.
D.W. PADDOCK, retired; P.O. Mokena; one of our first settlers and pioneers; was born in Washington Co., N.Y., June 7, 1810; came to Illinois in 1834, and settled in Cook Co.; he removed to Will Co. in 1849, and settled in New Lenox; he has been a resident of Mokena for the past twenty-five years. He has held the office of Postmaster eleven years and three months. He was married to Miss Julia N. Campbell May 1, 1853; they have had six children, one of whom is living, viz., Harriet; deceased, four infants unnamed and Ira, aged 4 years and 6 months.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Paige, J.D.
J.D. PAIGE, proprietor of Paige's Bottling House, Joliet; was born in Oneida Co., N.Y., March 27, 1837; in 1844, he accompanied his parents to Jefferson Co., Wis.; in 1857, he left home and came on foot to Joliet, with $1 in his pocket; he went at once to work, and has been at work ever since; he has now one of the largest and best-appointed houses in his line of business in the West; besides which he has established branches of his business in Grand Rapids, Mich.,   Marshalltown, Iowa, and Braidwood, Ill.; he was appointed Fire Marshal of Joliet in May, 1877, and has given much study and his best efforts to the Department; during his administration the Department has been changed from a voluntary to a paid organization, the Gamewell fire-alarm telegraph has been introduced, the horses are now owned by the Department (instead of being hired wherever opportunity occurred, as was previously done), and are kept at all times in the engine-houses, with harness on, ready to be hitched up at ten seconds' notice; many other improvements have been added, and the proficiency to which the Joliet Fire Department has attained under the administration of Mr. Paige is evident from the fact that at the National Fireman's Tournament in Chicago, in September, 1878, the Joliet Steam Company No. 1 carried off first honors in extinguishing burning buildings, with a prize of $350 cash and an elegant silver set, and also took two other prizes, one of $100 and the other of $75; Mr. Paige is at present Township Assessor, to which office he was elected in April, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Palmer, Ithamer T.
ITHAMER T. PALMER, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; this gentleman was born in New York, March 20, 1846; his father, Jacob J. Palmer, was born in Vermont; emigrated West with his family, and first settled in Kalamazoo Co., Mich., here they remained but a short time, and, in 1849, came to Illinois and settled in Will Co.; he was engaged in farming one year on what is now known as the Ira Smith farm; then, with his family, to the present homestead, where Mr. Palmer now lives; here he purchased 116 acres, then wild land; he made all improvements; here he spent the remaining part of his life engaged in farming; died universally respected, leaving a wife and four children. Mr. Ithamer T. Palmer was married in 1877 to Miss Laura Williamson, born in London, England, in 1850, and is the daughter of Thomas and S. (Bruce) Williamson. Mr. Palmer is a Republican in politics. Has held the office of Assessor of Township; owns 122 acres of fine, improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Palmer, Jacob Jr.
JACOB PALMER, JR., farmer, Sec. 12; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Stark Co., Ohio, Aug. 13, 1824. He married Miss Eliza Bucher March 11, 1847; she was born in Stark Co., Ohio, May 3, 1830; they had seventeen children; twelve living, viz., William D., Ephron, Eldin P., Francis W., Marion, John J., Daniel, George E., Elmer E., Dora E., Alvin and Hiram. He lived in Ohio until 1857, when he came to Illinois and settled on his present place, and has lived here since. He has been Road Commissioner nearly twenty years. He started in poor circumstances, at first renting his place, and now owns 200 acres in this township. His father, Jacob Palmer, Sr., was born in Virginia Feb. 10, 1792. He married Miss Elizabeth Cutchall; she was born in Maryland and died in Ohio; his second wife was Mrs. Sarah Bucher (Hoffman); she also died in Ohio; his third wife was Mrs. Weaver (Cring); she was born in Pennsylvania and died in Ohio; he has five children by his first and three by his second wife. He came to Will Co., Ill., in 1871, and lives on Sec. 11, this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Parkinson, Henry H.
HENRY H. PARKINSON, editor and proprietor Braidwood Republican, Braidwood; was born in London, Eng., Dec. 22, 1849, and is the son of Henry and Rachel Parkinson, of England; when Mr. Parkinson was very young, with his parents, emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; then direct to Wilmington, Will Co., Ill. In 1860, he entered the Independent office, of Wilmington, Ill., and commenced to learn the art of printing; here he remained about three years, then in traveling in different parts of the country; at St. Louis; then to Joliet; here he was engaged in working in the Republican office; thence to Lexington, McLean Co., Ill.; here he started the Lexington Courier, Republican paper; then to Saybrook, Ill., and started the Saybrook Banner; he returned to Wilmington, Ill., and took charge of the Independent office, and remained there one year; he then returned to Saybrook and sold out his paper and moved to Bloomington, Ill.; here he commenced the publication of the Bloomington Anti-Monopolist, a Granger paper; thence to Braidwood, and purchased the Braidwood Republican with F.D. Dalton; the Braidwood Republican is a daily paper, having a circulation of 500 daily; this spicy paper is an earnest, live and unterrified Republican journal, free and outspoken, a terror to rings and corrupt office-seekers, and death to political stealings and unprincipled doings in general; its columns are devoted to politics, literature, agriculture, religion, science and local and general news; it is the best of advertising mediums; its editor and proprietor, Mr. H.H. Parkinson, ranks high among the citizens of Braidwood, and personally is a gentleman of long journalistic experience; in connection with the paper, there are complete job printing rooms, with facilities for turning out first-class work, from a visiting-card to a circus bill. Mr. Parkinson is a Republican in politics. Married Miss Harriet A. Smith of Michigan; two children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pasold, Christian Ferdinand
CHRISTIAN FERDINAND PASOLD, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, Joliet; this gentleman is a native of Fleiszen, Bohemia, and was born July 10, 1830; he began learning his trade with his father when about 12 years old; in 1852, he came to this country, spending one year in New York City, and locating in Joliet in 1853; the first eight years he was employed as foreman for Firman Mack, and in the fall of 1860, started in business for himself. He was married April 13, 1857, to Mrs. Catherine Sesser, of Joliet; she was born in Baireuth, Kingdom of Bavaria, June 5, 1837, and came to Joliet with her parents in 1854; they have eight children - Rosetta, Christian Ferdinand, Jr., Charles Wilhelm, Joseph Friederich, Henry Herman, Oliver George, Flora Elvira and Martin Julius. Mr. Pasold has served two terms in the City Council, from the Third Ward (now the Fourth); in 1869, he was elected City Collector, and, the same year, Town Collector, holding those offices one year.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, Alexander
ALEXANDER PATTERSON, furniture, livery stable, Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is one of the prominent merchants of Braidwood; was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, June 5, 1828; his parents are James and Christiana (Strong) Patterson, of Scotland; his father was engaged in the mining business; when Mr. Patterson was but 8 years old, he commenced working in the mines and followed this while he was in Scotland; in 1852, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; then to the coal fields of Pennsylvania; remained there two years, where he got the gold fever; he then went to California seeking gold; engaged in mining for gold two and a half years very successfully; he then came to Illinois and settled in De Kalb Co., here he purchased a farm with his hard earnings in California; he commenced farming in De Kalb Co., this, his first experience; he remained here about five years, then to Morris, Grundy Co., engaged in mining, then in the manufacturing of brick with one of the largest brick-making machines in the State, having a capacity of 25,000 brick per day; he then, in 1872, came to Braidwood and commenced the livery and feed business; firm's name Patterson, McKinley & Co., he then bought out McKinley, and it is now A. & J.W. Patterson; commenced the furniture business in 1874; is the largest store-room in the city of Braidwood, 22x80, two stories high; the livery is one of the best liveries in Braidwood, keep from ten to fourteen horses on hand, with buggies and vehicles for the same. Mr. Patterson commenced life a very poor boy, his first start was in the gold field of California; from this he has been very successful in life, to-day ranking as one of the successful men of Will Co.; he is the founder of the Masonic Braidwood Lodge, No. 704, and he and his son, J.W., are very active members. Mr. Patterson is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a National Greenbacker in politics. Married in 1849 to Miss Jane McKinley of Scotland; seven children, four living; two sons and two daughters; his two sons J.W. and Alexander, are engaged in business with Mr. Patterson.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, Anson
CAPT. ANSON PATTERSON, mail agent and express messenger of the Joliet branch Michigan Central Railroad, Joliet; was born in Cayuga Co., N.Y., April 14, 1830; when he was about 4 years old, his parents removed to Seneca Co., N.Y., in 1845 to Seneca Co., Ohio, and, in 1847, to Will Co., Ill.; his father, Joseph Patterson, still resides in Joliet Tp. Until the breaking-out of the war, Capt. Patterson followed farming, being engaged for nine years, during the winters, teaching, eight of which he taught in one district. In 1862, he entered the 100th Ill. V.I., as First Lieutenant of Co. E, and, after the battle of Chickamauga, was promoted to the rank of Captain, serving till June, 1865; among the principal engagements in which he participated were the battle of Chickamauga, siege of Atlanta, battles of Jonesboro, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville, besides several minor engagements; he was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga Sept. 20, 1863. Returning to Joliet, he was engaged in various kinds of business until 1869, when he was appointed Postmaster of Joliet, holding the office two years, at the end of which time he entered upon his present position. He was married in 1851 to Miss Helen M. McClure, of Joliet; they have had ten children, seven of whom are now living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, James
JAMES PATTERSON, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, January, 1832, and is the brother of D. Patterson, who was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, Oct. 8, 1829, who came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Wheatland Tp. in 1849; came here very poor, but, with industry, to-day they own 440 acres of land, with improvements that rank with the best of Will Co.; in 1853, they purchased the present farm from John H. Hall, who had erected a house 12x14, two stories high, the first floor used for a horse-stable, and the second story used to sleep in; this house was also the home of Messrs. D. and J. Patterson for several years, and is now standing on the farm. Mr. D. Patterson married in 1859 Miss Jane Williamson, of Scotland, daughter of John Williamson, a farmer of Lake Co., Ill.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, James G.
JAMES G. PATTERSON, of the firm of James G. Patterson & Son, grocers and news-dealers, Joliet; was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1831, and came to the United States in 1851, settling in Haverstraw, Rockland Co., N.Y.; three years later he went to Newburg, thence to New York City, coming to Joliet in the spring of 1855; he was engaged in manufacturing wagons and carriages, and followed that business until 1862, when he engaged in his present business. He was married April 23, 1855, to Miss Mary A. Harris, of New York City, also a native of County Tyrone, Ireland; they have seven children - William A., Margaret J., Lillie M., James C., Eliza E., Emma K. and John H.  [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, J.W.
J.W. PATTERSON, of the firm of Patterson & Longley, dealers in coal, wood and coke, Joliet; is a native of Newburg, N.Y.; he was born Sept. 12, 1853; he is a son of Thomas H. Patterson, of this city; in early childhood he moved with parents to Haverstraw, N.Y., near the battle ground of Stony Point, and there lived until the spring of 1865, when the family came to Joliet; he was educated in the public schools and at Russell's Business College in Joliet; he also attended the Chicago University for a time; in 1875, he began keeping books for his father and the firm of Lyons & Patterson, and continued at this until 1877, when he engaged in the coal business for himself. He was married Oct. 18, 1876, to Miss Hattie A. Strickland, daughter of the late Henry Strickland, an early settler of Joliet; they have one child - Claire.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, Mungo
MUNGO PATTERSON, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Dunfriesshire, Scotland, and is the son of John and Jane (Howell) Patterson; his father was a farmer; Mr. Patterson was raised on his father's farm; in 1841, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; he then went to Wayne Co., N.Y.; here he was engaged in farming, and remained there until 1844. While in New York, he was married in 1842 to Miss Agnes Clow, of Scotland. In 1844, they emigrated West to Illinois, and settled in Wheatland Tp., Will Co.; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming. Mr. Patterson is a Presbyterian in religion. Have six children; John was in the late war; enlisted in the 52nd I.V.I., served full time and at the close of the war was honorably discharged, and is now living in Indiana.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Patterson, Thomas
THOMAS PATTERSON, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Scotland Jan. 14, 1822, and is the son of John and Jane (Howell) Patterson, of Scotland; father was a farmer; Mr. Patterson emigrated to America in 1858, and, same year, came to Will Co., Ill.; here he has remained ever since. He married Miss Agnes Palmer, of England; have three children, two daughters and one son. Owns 120 acres of improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pauling, Frederick
FREDERICK PAULING, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1850, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in 1852; he is the father of Henry D. Pauling, of Monee Tp., whose farm consists of 133 acres, valued at $5,000. He was married to Miss Mary Kolstedt, who was born in Cook Co., Ill.; they have two children, viz., William and Amelia.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Paxson, Amos C.
AMOS C. PAXSON, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Eastern Pennsylvania Nov. 21, 1810; his father moved to the western part of New York, near Buffalo, in 1818, settling on what was called the Holland Purchase; in the Spring of 1838, young Paxson came West and settled in Dupage Tp., Will Co., working at his trade, that of carpentering, for five years; in 1843, he purchased 100 acres of land and engaged in farming; in 1868, sold out and moved into Lockport, his present place of residence. In April, 1871, he was appointed Postmaster, and occupied the position four years. His first marriage, to Sabra L. Boardman, a native of New York State, occurred Nov. 18, 1841; she died Oct. 8, 1852; his second marriage, to Elizabeth Killmer, also a native of New York, was celebrated July 10, 1854; five children were born from the first wedlock - Luther B., born Feb. 12, 1843; Peninah L., born Aug. 4, 1844; Charles C., born Feb. 27, 1847; Julia E., born Dec. 6, 1849; Sabra I., born Dec. 23, 1851; from second wedlock one child was born - Minora C., born July 11, 1855. Peninah L. (wife of Robert Strong), died Dec. 22, 1871; Charles C. died March 6, 1873; Sabra I. (wife of Samuel Buttles), died Jan. 1, 1876. Mr. Paxson has held the office of Supervisor three terms; been Justice of the Peace, Assessor, School Treasurer, etc. Owns town property, and 104 acres in Lockport Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pease, Nelson H.
NELSON H. PEASE, assistant book-keeper for J.L. Norton & Co., Lockport; was born in Brasher, St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., Dec. 9, 1844; at the age of 15, he left home and entered the academy at Laurenceville, remaining two years. September, 1861, he enlisted in Co. I, 60th Regt. N.Y.V.I.; Jan. 23, 1863, was discharged at Harper's Ferry on account of disability. Returning home, he engaged for a short time in farming; Feb. 28, 1864, he came West, and stopping in Chicago, attended Bryant & Stratton's Business College. Re-enlisted in the 100 days' service, in Co. F, 134th Ill. V.I., and served 140 days. Next located in Dwight, Livingston Co., entering the employ of J.C. Hertzel as clerk in his dry goods and grocery store; at the expiration of five months, engaged in the service of the C. & A. R.R. as baggage master at the same place; this position he held sixteen months; he was next placed in charge of the station at Carrollton on the Jacksonville & Chicago line; here he remained one and a half years; was night operator on the Union Pacific at Elm Creek, Neb., and at a later date at Julesburg as agent six months; returned to Dwight as night operator, remaining three months; in 1869, he was appointed agent at Lockport, and remained one and a half years; then returned to Dwight, and was agent two and a half years; in 1872, took charge of Odell Station, remaining two years; in 1874, he abandoned railroading, and entered the employ of J.L. Norton & Co., in the position he now holds. Was married March 22, 1866, to Irene C. Riggs, a native of Dwight, Ill.; has two children - Alice L. and Myrtle K. Rep.; attends the Congregational Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Peltier, Moses
MOSES PELTIER, merchant, Braidwood; was born in Soral, Lower Canada, Aug. 3, 1833, and is the son of Antoine and Scholastic (Boivin) Peltier, of Canada; his father was a baker by trade; was born in 1811, and remained in Canada until the breaking-out of the war in 1837; he then came to Illinois and settled in Resden, Grundy Co.; here he was engaged in baking for the Canal Company; then engaged in keeping a hotel and stage house; was the first Postmaster of Resden; held that office for nine years; in 1840, he sent for his wife and son Moses, the only child, to come to Illinois; arrived, settled in Resden, Grundy Co.; here Mr. Peltier was engaged very extensively in the warehouse business; in 1844, he took a contract on the Canal feeder, from Wilmington to Canal, and built this feeder; his partner left, taking with him what money he had of Mr. Peltier's, which was almost a financial ruin to Mr. Peltier; he died in the old town of Kankakee in 1859, honored and respected by his fellow-man, leaving a wife and one son. Moses Peltier, in 1862, went to Wilmington and entered the mercantile business; in 1870, he came to Braidwood, and was engaged in the butcher business; in 1876, entered the boot and shoe business; to-day is engaged in the boots and shoes, flour and feed business. Democrat in politics; Catholic in religion. Married April 13, 1861, to Miss Mary J. McCabe, of New York; seven children. His mother was born in 1810, now living with Mr. Peltier.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Perkins, A.J.
A.J. PERKINS, physician and surgeon, Plainfield; is a native of New York; he was born in Mt. Upton March 20, 1834. He married Miss Eliza Bangs May 10, 1860; she was born in Bennington, Vt.; they had two children, one living, viz., Harry A. He resided in New York until 1855; his early days were passed on the farm in summers and in the district schools during winters; he then applied himself regularly to school and later engaged in teaching, also in reading medicine; in 1864, he graduated in the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio; he then came to Plainfield and engaged in his profession. Though not a member he has been actively identified with the churches of the village, and is persistent in his labors for the benefit of the schools of the place.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Perry, J.F.
J.F. PERRY, County Superintendent of Schools, Joliet; is a son of Dr. Joseph, of Crete; he was born in Fairfield, Conn., June 21, 1846; his father was a teacher in the public schools of New York City, and the family resided, a portion of the time, on the old homestead in Fairfield, and the balance in New York; in 1854, the family removed to Will Co., settling in Crete; Mr. Perry prepared for college principally in a classical institution in Bridgeport, Conn., and, in 1866, entered Yale College, where he graduated in 1870; after graduating, he taught a year in the East, and then returned to Illinois; he taught, one year, as Principal of the public school in Madison, Cook Co., and two years, in the same capacity, at Dalton; in 1874 he came to Joliet as Superintendent of the East Side Schools, continuing as such until Jan. 1, 1878; in November, 1877, he was elected County Superintendent of Schools, which position he now holds.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Perry, James A.
JAMES A. PERRY, proprietor of Riverview Stock Farm; P.O. Wilmington; born in Whitestown, Oneida Co., N.Y., Aug. 6, 1832; where he resided until 1859, when he removed to Illinois, and, after a short stay in Chicago, located in Florence Tp., this county, in the fall of that year; he followed farming for several years, and afterwards engaged in the grain trade at Elwood; since 1864, he has been engaged in raising, importing and exporting Norman and English thorough-bred horses, having now on hand a large number of fine horses at Riverview Stock Farm, near Wilmington; owns 425 acres of good farm land. Married in 1854 to Miss Esther Rockfeleller, who was born in the State of New York.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Petro, Geo. W.
GEO. W. PETRO, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in La Porte Co., Ind., and is the son of George and Catherine (Concannon) Petro; his father was engaged in farming and a soldier of the war of 1812, and was a native of Ohio; having settled in La Porte Co., Ind., at an early day, being among the first settlers of that county; Mr. Petro was raised on his father's farm, and remained there until he was 21 years of age; he then entered the mercantile business in Kankakee, Ill.; in 1872, he came to Will Co. and settled on the present farm; when Custer Tp. was first organized as a township, Mr. Petro was elected as Supervisor; this office he now holds, having been elected to same office three times. He is a Republican in politics. Owns 116 acres of improved land. Married Miss Mary Kelley, of Buchanan, Mich.; have five children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pettigrew, Charles
CHARLES PETTIGREW, master mechanic, Joliet; was born in New Lanark, Scotland, Feb. 4, 1844; in 1862, he went to his trade, in the Scotland Street Iron Works, at Glasgow; here he served an apprenticeship of five years; in May, 1867, he emigrated to America, first settling in Chicago, where he was employed as machinist in the Excelsior Iron Works; in 1870, he came to Joliet, and was employed as machinist two years; next, he was foreman in the machine-shops eighteen months; in August, 1873, he took his present position, that of master mechanic in the Joliet Steel and Iron Works. He was married in 1868, to Agnes Cameron, a native of New Lanark, Scotland; they have three daughters - Edith S., Agnes M. and Clara B.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pettigrew, John
JOHN PETTIGREW, foreman of the molding department, Joliet; was born in New Lanark, Scotland, March 2, 1842; at the age of 17 years, he went to his trade, in Glasgow, working under instructions seven years; Sept. 12, 1866, he emigrated to America, first settling in Chicago, where he labored for Carlisle, Mason & Co., for a period of five years; in May, 1871, he came to Joliet, and entered the employ of the Joliet Iron and Steel Co.; during the latter part of 1873 and the first part of 1874, he worked at Marseilles and Rockford, and, on the re-opening of the Joliet works, in October, 1874, he returned, and was employed as foreman in the molding department - his present position. He was married in 1864 to Agnes Robertson, a native of New Lanark, Scotland; has six children - John, Jane, Thomas, Charles, Agnes and William.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pfingston, John E.
JOHN E. PFINGSTON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Braidwood; was born in Kendall Co., Ill., in 1855, and is the son of Henry W. and Annie (Manegold) Pfingston; his father Henry W. Pfingston, was raised on a farm; was born in Hanover, Germany, and emigrated to America in 1847, and settled in Kendall Co., Ill.; here he engaged in farming until 1855, and with his family moved to Will Co., and settled on the present homestead in Reed Township, being among the first settlers in this vicinity, here he first purchased 160 acres of land, and set out in farming in Will Co.; here he remained until his death which occurred Nov. 8, 1875, at the age of 55 years, leaving a wife and two children; his widow is now living on the old homestead with her son John E., who is engaged in working the farm. He married in 1878 to Miss Myra Olmstead of Illinois. Sarah E. married I.G. McLane.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Piepenbrink, J.O.
J.O. PIEPENBRINK, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Rodenburg, Germany, April 24, 1826; son of Henry H. and Lotto (Myer) Piepenbrink, of Germany; his father was a farmer; Mr. Piepenbrink was raised on his father's farm. He married Sophia Wille and, in 1849, with his wife and one child, immigrated to America, and landed in New York City; in May, 1849, came to Illinois; first purchased 135 acres of land in Crete Tp., Will Co., near the present homestead; here he set out in farming; to-day ranks as one of the most successful farmers of Will Co.; came here with only $300; to-day owns over 700 acres of land, with fine improvements; Mr. Piepenbrink is engaged largely in the dairy and cheese manufacture, which factory is located on his farm. Eight children - Otto, Henry, Conrad, William, John, Philip, Ellen and Sophia.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Piepenbrink, John O. Jr.
JOHN O. PIEPENBRINK, JR., farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Germany Jan. 5, 1847, and is the son of John O. and Sophia (Wille) Piepenbrink, of Germany; Mr. Piepenbrink, with his parents, immigrated to America in 1849, and settled in Crete Tp., Will Co.; was brought up on his father's farm; was engaged at work in Joliet a few years; returned to the farm and has been farming ever since. Married Miss Dora Arkenburg, of Germany, daughter of William Arkenburg, Sr.; has one child - William Otto.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pooley, John
JOHN POOLEY, veterinary surgeon and farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Peotone. Methodist; Republican. Owns 120 acres. Born in the county of Norfolk, England, June 6, 1808; served apprenticeship as a blacksmith, and studied veterinary surgery; he practiced the latter in England, and also in this country, with success. Married Mary Miller Nov. 12, 1830, in Methwold, England; she was born Feb. 4, 1810. Mr. P. came to this country in 1855; lived in Oswego, this State, six years; then to the place where he now resides. They have had twenty children, fourteen of whom lived to grow up; four of those fourteen are now dead, viz., William, Martha, John and Julia; the names of those living at present are Clara, Mary, Ellen, Sarah, Mariah, Susan, Bessie, Robert, Sophia and Emma; John was a soldier in the late war; he was a member of Co. A, 127th I.V.I.; he died in the hospital at Memphis, Tenn., March 18, 1863; William was also a member of the same company, and served in all the principal engagements which the regiment was engaged in up to the time of his death, which occurred July 28, 1864, on the right of Atlanta; he was killed by a chain-shot striking him in the side; William was a true soldier, and his loss was deeply felt by all of his comrades; he was personally known by the writer of this sketch, who was also a member of the same regiment, and was near him when he fell; William's remains, also the remains of a young man from Oswego, of the name of Murdoch (who was in the same company and fell in the same battle), were buried side by side in one grave, and covered by the bloody ground where they fell.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pragst, Charles
CHARLES PRAGST, general hardware merchant, Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Jan. 19, 1834; came to the United States in 1853, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his present business has been his pursuit for the past nine years. He is now Clerk of the incorporated village of Monee.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rinne, Ernest
ERNEST RINNE, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Hanover, Germany, Feb. 4, 1836, and is the son of William and Sophia (Harsty) Rinne, of Germany; in 1844, with his parents, he came to America; came direct to Illinois and settled in Chicago; here they remained about six years; then to Will Co.; here, Mr. William Rinne died on the farm, in 1874; Mr. Rinne farmed it until 1869; he then moved to Crete; has been engaged in the manufacture of brick, and in the hay-press business; the hay-press employs from three to four men, and turns out about seven tons a day, when in full running order; when Mr. Rinne first came to Crete, he was in the hotel business. Married Miss Mary Engelkenng, of Germany; ten children; seven living.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pink, Wm.
WM. PINK, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Germany, Feb. 28, 1830; came to this country in 1856, and settled in Illinois; he has been a resident of New Lenox since 1866; his farm consists of seventy-five acres, valued at $4,000. He was married to Miss Mary Fullman, who was born in Germany; they have had eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Bernard, Susie, Kittie, Peter, Annie, Mary and Nick; deceased, Mary.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Plant, F.W.
F.W. PLANT, of the firm of Mason & Plant, lumber dealers, manufacturers of sash, doors and blinds, and proprietors of the Stone City Planing-Mill, Joliet; was born in Utica, N.Y., Sept. 13, 1843. His father, James Plant, was one of the earliest settlers of that city, and, at his death, in 1859, left but two older settlers than himself; he was from Brandford, Conn.; he left two children - one daughter, now living in Ottawa, Ill., and one son, Francis W. He prepared for college in the Utica Academy, and, in 1860, entered Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., graduating in 1864; he then entered the employ of the Oneida Bank, in his native town, and shortly afterward engaged in the book and stationery business; in 1871, he came to Joliet, and with F.A. Mason and H.B. Plant, established the lumber firm of Mason & Plant; they erected their storehouse on Des Plaines street, and the Stone City Planing-Mill, a two-story building, on Joliet street, and are undoubtedly the heaviest lumber dealers in the city; Mr. Plant is a Director and Treasurer of the People's Loan and Homestead Association of Joliet. He was married Oct. 16, 1867, to Miss Lizzie Merle, of Brooklyn, L.I., and has four children - Helen M., Laura M., Grace M. and James M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pohlman, William
WILLIAM POHLMAN, farmer, Sec. 36; P.O. Elwood; was born in Prussia May 16, 1828. He married Miss Amelia Harming Feb. 3, 1853; she was born in Prussia in February, 1836; they had eleven children, nine living, viz., Mary E., Catheron M., Emma C., Charles F., Henry F., George T., J. Edward, Sarah R. and Francis L. He lived in Prussia sixteen years; he then came to the United States, and landed at Baltimore, and remained in that neighborhood about six years, engaged in farm labor; then moved to York Co., Penn.; engaged in quarrying and lime-burning; remained five years; then came to Illinois and settled in this township, engaged in farming; in 1868, he came to his present place. He is no office-seeker, his only offices being connected with the school and road. He came to this county in poor circumstances; he now owns 422 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Porter, Edwin
HON. EDWIN PORTER, proprietor of the Eagle Brewery, and manufacturer of Porter's Joliet Ale and Lager Beer, Joliet; was born in Granger, Medina Co., Ohio, April 19, 1828; went to Cleveland when quite young, and there received an academic education; in 1856, he came to Joliet, and engaged for two years in manufacturing malt; in 1858, he erected his first brewery, which was burned down in 1868, and, the same year, he erected his present extensive buildings. He was Chief Engineer of the Fire Department for five years, beginning in March, 1861; he has served three years as a member of the City Council, and, in 1863, was elected Mayor, re-elected in 1864, and again in 1871.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Porter, Judson C.
JUDSON C. PORTER, local editor of the Joliet Republican, Joliet; was born in Fairfield Co., Conn., July 27, 1846; when he was 3 years old, his parents removed to Litchfield Co., in the same State; at the age of 15, he left home, and went to New Britain, Hartford Co., where he spent two years in the Connecticut State Normal School, after which he engaged in clerking; in 1868, he came West, and taught one year in Kankakee; in 1869, he removed to Aurora; thence, in 1872, to Joliet, and in 1875, became local editor of the Joliet Republican. He was married in New Britain, Conn., Oct. 8, 1867, to Miss Martha J. Holmes, of Hartford Co.; they have two children - Edith May and George E.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Power, Walter Henry
REV. WALTER HENRY POWER, Pastor of St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Joliet; was born in Waterford, Ireland, in May, 1830; he received his classical education at Tramore, a celebrated watering-place near Waterford; in March, 1849, he came to America, and entered the Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, on Logan Square, Philadelphia, where he spent five years, and completed his theological studies; he was ordained a clergyman of the Catholic Church in December, 1853, by Bishop Neumann, of Philadelphia, and was appointed Assistant Pastor of St. Patrick's Church, of that city, and was shortly afterward transferred to St. Philip's Church, Southwark, Philadelphia; he afterward spent a year as assistant to the Foreign Vicar General of the Diocese of Philadelphia; from there he went to Hamilton, C.W., as assistant to the Bishop, where he remained two years; in March, 1859, he came to Illinois, and located at Lacon, Marshall Co., where his jurisdiction extended over five counties, embracing some half a dozen churches; in June, 1860, he was transferred to Aurora, and in May, 1861, became Pastor of St. Patrick's Church, in Chicago; in November, the same year, he assumed the pastoral charge of St. Michael's Church, in Galena, where he remained eight years, coming to Joliet, as Pastor of St. Patrick's Church, in September, 1869.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Pratt, S.S.
S.S. PRATT, furniture, etc., Plainfield; is a native of Vermont; he was born at Bennington, Feb. 28, 1814. He married Miss Esther A. Beckwith Nov. 27, 1839; she was born in Norfolk, N.Y., Aug. 12, 1822; they had four children, three living, viz., Laura, Clara and Norman. He lived in Vermont about nineteen years, when he moved to New York; remaining until spring of 1834, when he came to Chicago and engaged in the furniture business, about eighteen months; in the fall of 1835, he came to Plainfield and engaged in same business, and has been identified with the business since, except ten years he engaged in farming; he was also interested in the furniture business in Joliet during the building of the canal; he has been a member of the Congregational Church for the past thirty years, and has taken an active part in its affairs. All his children are married and living in this village.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Preston, Dwight
DWIGHT PRESTON, farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., Feb. 21, 1823; he moved with his parents to Otsego Co. when he was 4 years old, and lived there until 1852, when he came to this county and settled on Sec. 11; in 1857, went to Marion Co., Ill. In 1861, enlisted in Co. F, 39th Reg. Ill. Inf., and was promoted to 1st Sergeant Nov. 15, 1862, serving until the close of the war; he was wounded at Warebottom Church, Va., May 20, 1864, and remained in hospital until his discharge June 8, 1865; he then came to Will Co., and has remained here ever since. Has been Collector and Constable. He married Emeline Brooks, of Otsego Co., N.Y., Dec. 1, 1844; she died Nov. 28, 1872; they have two children - Adelbert D., born Sept. 13, 1845, and Hannah E., June 15, 1848. His son, Adelbert D., married Lydia Coon Dec. 26, 1869; they had four children - Marion D., born Oct. 2, 1870; Grace E., Feb. 28, 1873; William Adelbert, June 23, 1875, died June 21, 1877; and Mary L., Aug. 25, 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Preston, Isaac
ISAAC PRESTON, Lockport, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Fairfield, Cumberland Co., N.J., in 1792; he was left an orphan at the age of 6, and at the age of 7, went to Vermont; at 15, he began a six-years' apprenticeship at the tanning trade. In 1815, he was married at Granville, Washington Co., N.Y., to Miss Betsy Walker. Following his trade in the State of New York until 1836, he emigrated with his family to Illinois, and settled at Hadley, in Will Co., where he remained four years, during which time he opened and improved a farm of 200 acres; in 1840, he moved to Kane Co., in this State, where he lived twenty-five years, removing to Lockport, in this county, in 1865, where he still resides. Mr. Preston has been for more than half a century a firm and unalterable friend in the cause of human freedom, being among the first to espouse the Abolition cause in Western New York. He was a small stockholder in, and occasionally a conductor on the underground railroad, but never ran a night train, always taking his passengers through in open day before the faces and eyes of his neighbors (many of whom were the abject minions of the slave-holders), and frequently employing the fugitive on his farm. Mr. Preston became a total abstainer before the first move was made in the temperance cause in Western New York. He was the first employer in the city of Rochester who expelled liquor from his workshop, and has since that time in his own way used his best endeavors to discountenance the sale and use of all intoxicants and narcotics. He has also for more than fifty years been an open and persistent opponent of all oath bound secret societies, Freemasonry in particular, believing their tendency to be hostile to the best interests of morality, religion and civil government. Mrs. Preston is still living, and their combined ages aggregate over 172 years; they are as healthy, active and industrious as most people at 70; they have raised a family of five children - the late John B., Elizabeth L. (Mrs. Dr. Daniels), Mariah P. (Mrs. Codding), Julia M. (late Mrs. Bourland) and Josiah W., three of whom, Josiah W., Mrs. Daniels and Mrs. Codding, are still living. Mr. and Mrs. Preston have shared the joys and sorrows of connubial life for more than sixty-three years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Prindle, William W.
WILLIAM W. PRINDLE, manufacturer of wagons and buggies, Lockport; was born in Prince Edward District, Canada, Sept. 30, 1823, in the town of Hollowell (now Picton); at the age of 3 years, he went with the family to Oswego, N.Y.; here he spent his boyhood days; in the spring of 1837, he went to sea and remained till 21 years of age; coming home again, he found the family located at Logansport, Ind., and here he remained one year; he next moved to La Fayette, Ind., and in connection with his father engaged in the hotel business; this they carried on one year, and in the fall of 1846, came to Joliet. Mr. Prindle laid the cut stone in the court house, working for the contractors, Shepard & Brown. In the spring of 1847, he came to Lockport, where he has since resided. He was married July 25, 1847, to Mary A. Hutton, a native of Oxford, England; has two children - Louisa and Ada. He opened up his present shop about 1873, and has met with good success. He is a first class workman. Uses nothing but the best material, and gives his personal supervision to all the work going out from his establishment.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rafferty, N.S.
N.S. RAFFERTY, groceries and confectionery, Lockport; was born in Sligo Co., Ireland, Nov. 5, 1823; he immigrated to America Sept. 14, 1837, and settled in Hamilton, Canada West, and engaged in the merchant tailoring trade; in 1840, he moved to Jackson, Mich.; here he remained two years; in 1842, located in Chicago, and in 1845, came to Lockport, his present home; in 1868, he opened out a full line of confectionery, and later added a small stock of groceries; in 1876, he purchased a full line of groceries, and at present (1878) has a large and growing trade; his fruit and confectionery trade is the most extensive of any in the city. He was married Jan. 22, 1856, to Catharine Boland, a native of Tipperary Co., Ireland. Was elected Justice of the Peace in the Spring of 1877, which office he now holds.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rahm, Charles
CHARLES RAHM, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Jan. 21, 1835; came to the United States in 1847, and to Frankfort, Will Co., Ill., in the same year; his farm consists of 240 acres, is situated on Sec. 36, and is valued at $12,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rains, Robert
ROBERT RAINS, hay dealer, Peotone; born in Duckinfield, Eng., June 21, 1831, living there until 1848, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York Jan. 14, 1848, going at once to New Jersey, where he engaged in boiler making until 1861, when he came West and settled in Peotone, Will Co., Ill., and engaged in farming until 1869, when he engaged in the hay business, being in the employ of O. Lippincott two years, then with J.C. Willey two years; he then entered into partnership with Michael Collins and purchased the above business, doing business under the firm name of Rains & Collins four years, when Mr. Sultzbaugh purchased the interest of Mr. Collins, and the firm changed to Rains & Sultzbaugh, under which style they still continue; they do an extensive business, buying, pressing, baling and shipping hay to Chicago and the Eastern markets. He married in New Jersey Sarah A. Foulston; she was born in England in 1829; they have three children by this union - Martha F., Ellen and Elizabeth. Mr. R. has held the office of Town Trustee for two years. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ranck, Samuel E.
SAMUEL E. RANCK, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Jan. 9, 1834; his ancestry came, in an early day, from "der Faderland," and settled in the State, purchasing their land directly from William Penn; Mr. Ranck is able to trace his descent in a direct line through six generations, extending through a period of 200 years; his early life was that of a farmer's son; he enjoyed the advantages of the public schools, and acquired a good common-school education; having lost his father when he was 14 years of age, his older brother and himself conducted the home farm till he grew to manhood; in March, 1859, he came West to Illinois, and purchased eighty acres in Du Page Tp., Will Co., built a residence thereon, and farmed it six years; he then sold out, and purchased where he now lives. He was married in 1856, to Catherine M. Emery, a native of Pennsylvania; she died in 1867; his second marriage, occurred in 1868; from first wedlock six children were born - Maggie A., Carrie E., Ida F., Mary C., Effie C., Minnie A.; of these, Mary C. is deceased. Owns 165 acres, valued at $12,000. Has held the office of School Director for the past twelve years. He also owns 160 acres in Texas.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Randall, John T.
JOHN T. RANDALL, farming, Sec. 9; P.O. Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in Orleans Co., Vt., Aug. 2, 1815. He married Miss B.S. Russell Sept. 4, 1836; she was born in Wilbraham, Mass., April 24, 1815; they had six children, five living, viz., Albert T., Oscar T., Gershom A., Laura A. and Mary; Joseph R. died Jan. 21, 1872. He lived in Vermont ten years, when his parents moved to Western New York, where he lived until 1835; he then went to Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, where he was married, and lived there until 1839, when he returned to his old home in New York, and lived there until 1849, when he came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Troy Tp., and lived there five years, when he came to his present place. Three of his sons were in the army for the greater part of the war. He has been Supervisor of this and Troy Tps., and other offices connected with the school and road. He started in poor circumstances, and now owns 271 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Randeck, Joseph
JOSEPH RANDECK, saloon, Braidwood; was born in the county of Budevise, Bohemia, Nov. 21, 1850, and is the son of Michael Randeck, of Bohemia, who was a mason by trade; when Mr. Randeck was about 12 years old, he commenced to learn his trade as a tinsmith; in 1865, he emigrated to America and settled in Chicago, Ill.; here he remained about three years, engaged at his trade, tinsmithing; he then, in 1868, came to Braidwood; here he was engaged in working in the coal-mines, and remained in Braidwood ever since, excepting one and a half years he spent in Chicago. Mr. R. commenced the saloon business in 1877; to-day owns one of the leading saloons of Braidwood. In 1877, he was elected Constable; this office he still holds. Married Miss Rossi Jerena, of Bohemia; three children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rankin, Duncan
DUNCAN RANKIN, merchant, Braidwood; this gentleman is one of the most solid and reliable merchants of Braidwood; was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, May 19, 1828, and is the son of Angus and Margaret (Clark) Rankin, of Scotland; father at one time was connected with the Postoffice Department, but in the latter part of his life was mining. When Mr. Rankin was but a lad he commenced mining; this he followed, and in 1850, he emigrated to America and landed in Boston, Mass.; then to the coal-fields of Pennsylvania; here he remained for about twenty months; not satisfied with mining for the black diamond, he caught the news that gold could be found in the Far West, and in 1852, he started for the gold-fields of California; here he arrived, and commenced mining for gold; he remained about one year; success very good; returned to the States and settled in Illinois, De Kalb Co.; here he purchased a farm with the money he had made in California, and commenced farming in Illinois; this, his first experience in farming, but, with hard labor, he was successful; remained in De Kalb Co. ten years; then to Grundy Co.; here he entered the coal business by operating a coal shaft known as Rankin Coal Shaft; in this business two years; he then went to Morris, Grundy Co., and commenced the mercantile business; here he remained about six years, and in 1869, he came to Braidwood; opened a general store; his success was very good, doing about the largest business of any merchant in the city; he then opened on the opposite side of Main st., a clothing, dry goods, boot and shoe store; on account of business he consolidated both stores, then opened a branch store in Morris. Mr. Rankin is President of the Braidwood Creamery Association, manufacturers of cheese and butter, which rank as No. 1 in Chicago and St. Louis markets; is Inspector of Mines in Will Co. Also a prominent Odd Fellow and Mason. Member of the Presbyterian Church, and Republican in politics. Married Nov. 13, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Brown, of Scotland, by whom they have had thirteen children, eight living. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ransom, John P.
JOHN P. RANSOM, Justice of the Peace and insurance agent, Wilmington; born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., Nov. 29, 1817; removed to Illinois in June, 1844, locating in what is now Richmond Tp., McHenry Co.; served as Assessor in that town in 1850; this was the first assessment made after the township organization; he followed farming until 1851; then engaged as millwright till 1862. Enlisted in Co. H, 95th Ill. V.I., Aug. 13, 1862; commissioned Second Lieutenant in June, 1863, having command of the company in all the following engagements: Champion Hill, siege of Vicksburg, Red River campaign, Guntown, Miss., siege of Mobile and battle at Nashville; mustered out Aug. 22, 1865. Removed to Wilmington in 1868, and engaged in the grocery business; was elected Justice of the Peace in 1873; re-elected in 1877. Married in December, 1842, to Jane M. Denison, who was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y.; she died in 1849; had two children by this union, one living - Mariah, widow of Eugene I. Thomas; Ellen, wife of A. Brown, died in June, 1866. He was again married in 1850 to Louisa A. Streeter; she was born in Ontario Co., N.Y.; had two children, one living - John C.; Martha died in 1855. Mr. R. is a member of Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, A.F. & A.M., and Will Lodge, No. 301, I.O.O.F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rapple, F.J.
F.J. RAPPLE, dealer in live stock and proprietor of Joliet Street Market, Joliet; was born near Strasbourg, Alsace, France, Dec. 19, 1837; in 1845, he came with his parents to this country, coming direct to Joliet, where he has lived for thirty-three years. His father, Simon Rapple, a highly respected farmer of Will Co., died in 1877, leaving five children, the subject of this sketch being the third in age; for the past fifteen years, Mr. Rapple's business has been farming, dealing in stock, etc. He was married Nov. 13, 1856, to Miss Margaret Adler, daughter of Michael Adler, one of the early settlers of Joliet; they have ten children living - Lawrence L., Fred J., Jr., Veronica, John M., Louise B., Simon P., Angie M., Theresa, Ella and Frankie C.; one daughter, Louise, died in 1862. Mr. Rapple was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors in 1877, and re-elected in 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rapple, John H.
JOHN H. RAPPLE, dealer in live-stock and proprietor of Rapple's meat market, No. 3, North Bluff street, Joliet; is a native of this county; he was born in Joliet Township, on the 20th of January, 1848; he is a son of Simon Rapple, who came to Will County from Alsace, in 1845; he was educated in the parish schools of Joliet; he followed farming until 1870, when he engaged in business for himself in the confectionery trade; in July, 1874, he went to Southwestern Kansas and opened a farm and remained there until the summer of 1877, when he returned to Joliet and engaged in his present business.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rathbun, S.R.
S.R. RATHBUN, farmer; P.O. Plainfield; was born in Marcellus, Onondaga Co., N.Y., Sept. 17, 1805; in the spring of 1832, he came to Ohio, and settled in Orange Tp., Cuyahoga Co., where he opened up and improved 140 acres; in September, 1845, he came West to Illinois, and first settled in Du Page Tp., Will Co., near his present residence; in July, 1846, he moved into Wheatland Tp., and remained about twenty years; he then sold out and moved to Lake Co., where he resided two years; in February, 1868, he came to his present farm. He was married Sept. 27, 1827, to Maria Lander, a native of Florida, Montgomery Co., N.Y.; has nine children living - Volentine, William M., Permelia, Bela F., Sabrina L., Mary J., Esther A., Alvin O. and Charles W.; has five dead - Hiram L., died Jan. 9, 1863, at Nashville, Tenn.; he was a member of Co. D, 100th I.V.I.; he was in the march from Louisville to Nashville, when Gen. Buell was in pursuit of Gen. Bragg; the others died in infancy. He owns 480 acres, valued at $33,000; has held the office of Assessor in Wheatland Tp., two or three terms; also those of Commissioner of Highways, School Trustee, School Director; while a citizen of Ohio, he was a Justice of the Peace in 1840, and held the office of Deputy Sheriff and that of Constable.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rauworth, Samuel
SAMUEL RAUWORTH, proprietor of the City Meat Market, Wilmington; born in Sheffield, England, May 12, 1842; came to this country in October, 1860, locating in Wilton Tp., this county, where he engaged in farming, working in the packing houses in the city of Chicago during the winters; in 1870, he returned to England, remaining there about six months; on his return, he took up his residence at former location, where he resided until 1877; then locating in this city and engaged in his present business; owns 120 acres of land in Iowa, valued at $3,240. Married in 1864 to Miss Hannah, daughter of Charles Robinson; she was born in Edwinstowe, England; had seven children by this union, five living - Lotty, Harry, Ellen, Gracie D. and Eddie S.; Joseph B. died Feb. 26, 1866, and Florence P. Feb. 28, 1869. Mr. R. is a member of Will Lodge, No. 301, I.O.O.F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Raver, D.J.
D.J. RAVER, mason and farmer; P.O. Minooka; the subject of this sketch was born in Berks Co., Penn., Sept. 16, 1818. He married Miss Wilmina Wiles Nov. 15, 1842; she was born in Frederick Co., Md., in 1819; they have three children, viz., Lucetta L., Martha S. and James D. He lived in Pennsylvania about twenty years, when he moved to Ohio and remained there until 1864; he then came to his present place, and has lived here since; he started in very poor circumstances and now owns fifty-four acres of land in this township, well improved, which he has earned by his own labor. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ray, Wesley P.
WESLEY P. RAY, (Ray & Thompson, dealers in grain, coal, live and dressed hogs), Wilmington; born in Monroe, Saratoga Co., N.Y., Dec. 28, 1825; removed to Western New York when about 7 years of age, his parents locating in Chautauqua Co.; in 1840, he removed to the State of Michigan; thence to Illinois in 1844, locating at Lockport, this county, and four years later, came to Wilmington, his present home; in 1850, he went to California, by the way of the Isthmus, reaching San Francisco, then a city of tents, in November of that year, and engaged in mining operations, which he followed till 1855; then returned to the States; his second trip to the Pacific Slope was made in 1860, by the overland route; spent considerable time in prospecting in the mining districts of California, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Montana, and, in 1862, his exploring party (led by a Mr. Grimes, who was killed in an encounter with the Indians) discovered the Boise mines of Idaho; he was also among the first at the Owyhee mines, and in 1863, he discovered the Poor Man's Mine, which proved to be one of the richest silver-mines of the Pacific Slope. Married Jan. 1, 1850, to Miss Susan L. Tuttle, who was born in Portland, Me.; had five children by this union, four living - R. Belle, Joseph H., Georgie L. and Susie; Frank died in 1876 from injuries sustained while getting off the cars near Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Redman, David M.
DAVID M. REDMAN, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Upper Canada, Nov. 20, 1806, and is the son of Charles and Susanna (Marr) Redman; father was a school teacher, and a native of Ireland; was in the war of 1812; was taken prisoner at Queenstown Heights, was slightly wounded in the leg; his mother, a native of Pennsylvania; with his parents came to America when he was very young; at 17 years old he started to learn his trade as carpenter and joiner in Stroudsberg, Penn.; in 1856, he came to Illinois and settled in Kankakee, and remained there about seven years engaged at his trade; in 1863, he came to Will Co., and settled on the present farm. Married twice; first wife Miss Sallie Ann Yetter, of Pennsylvania; married second time to Miss Rachel King, of Indiana; fourteen children; owns 184 acres of fine improved land. His son John F., was in the late war, 113th I.V.I.; served until the end of the war, and was honorably discharged; Thomas M., born Oct. 29, 1855; has taught in the District School, and is now with his brother Eugene engaged in farming on the farm.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reed, Henry
HENRY REED, farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Lockport; was born in Ontario Co., N.Y., Nov. 30, 1825; he lived there until the age of 27, engaged in farming; in January, 1852, he moved to this county and with his brother was engaged in buying and selling cattle, near Gooding's Grove, for two years; he then purchased a farm near Hadley, and lived on it until the winter of 1864, when he returned East, and after remaining one year, returned and purchased the farm upon which he now resides, in January, 1868. Has been Supervisor two years, Assessor one year, Road Commissioner two years in Orland, Cook Co., Ill., and is now Road Commissioner of Homer Tp. He married Miss Mary Totman of Ontario Co., N.Y., June 13, 1854; she was born in Jefferson Co., N.Y., June 10, 1834; they had six children, five living - Morris A., born Aug. 8, 1860; Edna L., born Nov. 4, 1862; Wallace L., born Aug. 9, 1866; Frank L., born May 4, 1868 and Henry B., born Nov. 27, 1875; one dead - Emerson W., born Aug. 31, 1856, died June 20, 1859. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reed, Nelson
NELSON REED, farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Lockport; was born in Ontario Co., N.Y., Dec. 4, 1827; he lived with his parents until 9 years of age, when he was thrown upon his own resources, and has made his way in life upon his own exertions ever since; he came to this county in January, 1852, and first settled on a farm in Sec. 9; in 1872, he purchased the farm he now resides on, his wife's parents, James and Eve Ritchey, residing with them from that time. Has been School Director several terms, and is so at present. Married Miss Margaret Ritchey in Homer Tp. Jan. 21, 1858; she was born on the "Ritchey Homestead" Nov. 6, 1838; they have four children - Carson, born Feb. 19, 1860; William R., April 14, 1866; Mary P., Dec. 8, 1868, and Harry, Oct. 25, 1874. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reichman, Joseph
JOSEPH REICHMAN, of the firm of J. and J. Reichman, proprietors of the Joliet Meat Market, No. 4, Chicago street, Joliet; was born in Baden, Germany, Feb. 13, 1836; in that country it is necessary for every boy or young man to serve an apprenticeship to whatever business he intends to follow through life; Mr. Reichman remained on the farm until he was about 16 years of age, and then began learning his present business; in 1855, he came to this country, and after spending a few months in Erie, Penn., came to Chicago; in 1857, he settled in Joliet and engaged in his present business, being the oldest in the business in the city; he has attended strictly to business and enjoys the results of his labors in a fine home adjoining the city. He was married in July, 1869, to Miss Annie Koch, of Joliet; they have had five children, three of whom are living - Anton, Mary and Albert.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reichman, Joseph J.
JOSEPH J. REICHMAN, of the above firm was born in Baden, Germany, March 17, 1851, and lived there until he was 17 years old; in 1868, he came to the United States, coming direct to Joliet, where he entered the employ of his uncle, Joseph Reichman, in the market business, and, in 1874, became a partner in the firm. He was married Jan. 14, 1872, to Miss Christina Wucherpfening, of Mokena, Will Co., and has three children living - Regina, Julius and Amalia; his oldest child, Joseph, died in infancy.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reid, Alexander
ALEXANDER REID, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our first settlers and pioneers; born in Scotland March 22, 1816; came to the United States in 1838, and to this State, and settled on the Yankee Settlement in the same year; he removed from there to Frankfort in 1846. His farm consists of 475 acres, valued at $28,000; it is situated on Secs. 12 and 13.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reils, John
JOHN REILS, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Wilmington; owns ninety-four acres, valued at $50 per acre; held the office of School Director for four years, which office he still holds; born in Holstein, Germany, Dec. 15, 1827. Married Catharine Ohlhues Nov. 1, 1856, in Holstein; she was born March 13, 1832; they emigrated to the United States in 1859, and came direct to Florence Tp.; he rented various farms for about six years, then purchased the farm which he now owns, for $23.25 per acre, in 1869; have three children - Charles, Alice and Sarah. Mr. Reils, like many of the people who began life in the West, had nothing to begin with but good health and willing hands; he now owns a very nice and comfortable home.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Relf, Fredrick

FREDRICK RELF, farmer; P.O. Joliet; was born in East Kent Co., Eng., April 27, 1827; in March, 1849, he landed in New York City, and first settled in Vernon, Oneida Co., N.Y.; here he engaged in farming for three years; in the Fall of 1852, he came West to Illinois; settled in Joliet, and for a time engaged in labor on the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad; in February, 1866, he moved to Bureau Co., where he remained four years; in 1870, he returned to Will Co., and located on the farm now owned by the heirs of Edw. Kelley; in 1872, he moved to his present place of residence. He was married Oct. 2, 1852, to Sarah Beeching, a native of England; nine children have been born to them - Emma J., Clara, Thomas H., Rosa, Laura, Julia, Allie, Charles H., Cora. When he came to America he was possessed of little or no means, but by industry and frugality he has reared his family and accumulated considerable property; he is a thorough-going, energetic farmer, and is highly esteemed for his many good qualities by his friends and acquaintances.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reuter, Peter
PETER REUTER, farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Lockport; was born in Trier, Rhenish Prussia, Oct. 10, 1834, and farmed until he came to America in 1864, and settled in Will Co.; in 1874, he purchased the farm of ninety-six acres upon which he now resides. He married Helen Beaver in Prussia, Jan. 7, 1862; she was born in 1840; they have nine children - Angelina, born Nov. 4, 1862; Susie, born Aug. 4, 1864; Mary, born Dec. 5, 1865; Louisa, born Feb. 2, 1867; Lizzie, Jan. 2, 1869; Katie, Aug. 9, 1871; Peter, Aug. 19, 1872; Edward, Oct. 16, 1875, and John, born Nov. 21, 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reynolds, Isaac N.
ISAAC N. REYNOLDS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Lenox; one of the earliest and most prominent settlers; was born in Champaign Co., Ohio, Oct. 13, 1811; came to this State with his father's family in 1818, and settled in the southern part, where he remained until 1833, when he came north to Will Co. and settled in New Lenox, where he now owns 365 acres, valued at $27,000. He was married April 10, 1834, to Miss Ruey A. Halderman, who was born in Ross Co., Ohio, March 26, 1815; she is the daughter of Abram Halderman, who was among the very first settlers in La Salle Co.; they have had ten children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Abram, Joseph S., Isaac N., Charlotte E., Hattie A., William N. and Ruena P.; deceased, Sarah J., John H. and Charles P.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reynolds, J.S.
GEN. J.S. REYNOLDS, lawyer, Chicago, formerly of New Lenox Tp.; was born Dec. 3, 1839, in New Lenox Tp., Will Co., Ill., where his parents, Isaac N. and his wife, still reside; the son, after arriving at the age of 17, went to Chicago, and attended the public schools, graduating from the high school in 1861. On the breaking out of the war, he presided over a series of war mass-meetings of young men; he soon enlisted, and began recruiting the battalion called Yates' Sharpshooters; he was in active service nearly four years, and made a gallant record; he was promoted five times by commissions from the Governor of Illinois, and twice by commission from President Lincoln; he took part in seventeen battles and many skirmishes, was thrice wounded, and had his sword shot from his hand at Resaca; he commanded the 64th I.V.I., which he had once helped to recruit under the name of Yates' Sharpshooters, during its march with Gen. Sherman from Atlanta to the sea; at the recommendation of his superior officers, he was promoted to Brigadier General, near the close of the war. After leaving the army, in 1865, he began the study of law in Chicago, graduated from the law department of the Chicago University, was admitted to the bar in 1866, and began the practice of law in Chicago, at first with a partner; he is now engaged in the practice of admiralty alone in the city of Chicago. In 1867, he was elected a member of the Illinois Legislature, from Chicago, and re-elected in 1869, where he served with honor; he also served four years on the Chicago Board of Education; in 1872, he was elected to represent the First District in the Illinois State Senate, after which he was appointed, by the Governor, a commissioner from Illinois to the Exposition at Vienna; in May, 1873, he sailed abroad, and his travels extended throughout most of the countries of Europe and into Asia Minor; in 1875, he became a member of the Board of Commissioners to locate the State Institution for the Education of Feeble-minded Children; in 1875, he was elected Senior Vice Commander in Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. Jan. 31, 1877, he was married to Mattie A. Carey, of Chicago, daughter of George W. Carey, Esq.; has one child - born Jan. 23, 1878, named Joseph S., Jr.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Reynolds, John M.
JOHN M. REYNOLDS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Mokena; one of our early settlers; was born in Champaign Co., Ohio, Feb. 11, 1813; came to this State with his father's family in 1818, and settled in the southern part, where he remained until 1833, when he came north to Will Co., and settled in New Lenox. He was married Oct. 15, 1835, to Miss E.W. Snapp, who was born in Cayuga Co., N.Y., Oct. 2, 1818. She is the daughter of Mr. Abram Snapp, now deceased, who was the first settler, and constructor of the first building on the prairie then called the Yankee Settlement; they have had four children, two of whom are living - Clara M. and Nellie I.; deceased - Abram S. and Sarah J. The farm of Mr. Reynolds consists of 290 acres; its probable value is $18,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rice, John I.
JOHN I. RICE, hay dealer, Peotone; born in Rutland Co., Vt., Feb. 16, 1837, where he lived until 1844, when he removed with his parents to Wheatland, Will Co., Ill., and worked upon a farm until 1862, when he was engaged with the army as Government Agent in the Quartermaster's Department stationed at Pilot Knob, Mo., for one year, when he came North and contracted for the supply of hay to the Government, which business he followed for one year, shipping from Lockport and three other points in Illinois to St. Louis; in 1864, he again went South, and was Government Agent in the Quartermaster's Department until the close of the war, when he came North, and again located at Lockport in the lumber business for two years, when he went to Chicago and in the provision business, which he followed for two years, when, being burned out, he came to Joliet, and was for several months Steward of the Illinois State Penitentiary; in 1871, he came to Will Tp. and engaged in the raising, pressing, baling and shipping of hay to the Chicago and Eastern markets, which business he now follows at Peotone and Monee. He married in Lockport Dec. 17, 1868, to Fanny Goodwin; she died October following. Married again June 11, 1873, Bella Milne, of Lockport; they have by this union one child - Robert M., born Oct. 14, 1875. Mr. Rice was Supervisor of Will Tp. for 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Richards, Charles
CHARLES RICHARDS, M.D., physician and surgeon, Joliet; was born in Newport, Herkimer Co., N.Y., July 26, 1832; at the age of 10 years, he removed with his parents to New Haven, Huron Co., Ohio; after receiving an English education, he began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. F.G. Armstrong, of New Haven, Ohio; he attended medical lectures at the Albany Medical College, where he graduated in 1855; he then located in New Haven, Ohio, and practiced medicine there until 1868, when he came to Joliet, and has been a practicing physician here ever since. He is a member of the Will County Medical Society, of which he was formerly Secretary; he held the office of Coroner of Will County from 1870 to 1874. He was married on the 25th of March, 1858, to Miss Harriet Mulford, of New Haven, Ohio.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Richards, Daniel
DANIEL RICHARDS, farmer, Sec. 1; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., Aug. 4, 1826. He married Miss Elmira Cooley Dec. 10, 1848; she was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., June 22, 1828; they had three children, two living, viz., Euratus and Elsey G. He lived in New York until June, 1839, when he moved to Huron Co., Ohio, and engaged in farming. While here, he was married, and, in 1853, he came to Illinois and settled in Joliet; in 1857, he came to his present place, and has lived here since. He has not been an office-seeker. He came West in poor circumstances, and now owns 220 acres, which he has principally earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Richards, David
DAVID RICHARDS, farmer and stock-raiser, P.O. Joliet; was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., March 27, 1813; he was raised to the dairying business, which he followed until he came West in 1837, making the journey with a team, and settling in Joliet; the first three years he spent in handling stock through the West, buying principally in Illinois and driving to Wisconsin and selling to the settlers; he then engaged in the meat business in Joliet, handling stock at the same time; in 1842, the State became bankrupt and all internal improvements ceasing, Mr. Richards being engaged in supplying the contractors on the Canal, became involved in the financial wreck, and although he paid in full, lost the accumulation of years; in 1844, he engaged in farming and raising and dealing in stock, in which he has continued with good success to the present time; he was one of the parties engaged in the Joliet Woolen-Mill enterprise which was started in 1866; he had the management of the feeding department of the Michigan Central Stock-Yards, for seventeen years, and received the first car-load of stock which was shipped into Joliet by rail; he subdivided and sold the east half of the northwest quarter of Section 15, known as Canal Trustees' Subdivision, and embracing a part of the best-settled portion of the city at the present time; he still owns a large amount of real estate in the city, besides about seven hundred acres of farm lands in the county; he erected his fine residence on the corner of Washington and Richards streets in 1860. He has been too much engaged in his own business to seek or accept public office of any kind. Mr. Richards was married Jan. 16, 1840, to Miss Mary A. Larraway, of Herkimer Co., N.Y.; they have six children living - Mary, now Mrs. T.H. Ingersoll, of Joliet; Nancy Jeanette, wife of J.D. Smith, of Omaha, Neb.; John, Newton, William M. and Anson.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Richardson, A.
A RICHARDSON, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Vermont, June 23, 1805, and is the son of William and Mary (Starks) Richardson; father was a shoemaker; with his parents he moved to New York; here he remained until 1856, and with his wife and nine children emigrated to Illinois, and settled on the present homestead; here he has remained ever since. He holds the office of Justice of the Peace; this office he has held for the last twelve years. Married Miss Martha Goodwin, of New York. Mr. Richard is a Republican in politics; owns 170 acres of improved land; one son, Joseph W., enlisted in the late war, in 39th I.V.I., First Lieutenant; died of sickness in the war. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Riorden, Dennis

DENNIS RIORDEN, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Wilmington; owns 160 acres, valued at $50 per acre; born in McCrome, Cork Co., Ireland, 1817; when about 20 years of age, he went to England, and was employed by Pratt & Sewil, contractors, for five years in London; then he went to Shetlam, Scotland, where he worked eighteen months; thence to Gravesend, where he worked two years; returned to London, and took passage on the Christiana, Capt. Hammond, and was seven weeks on the ocean; landed at New York; went to Bridgewater, Mass., and worked there for the Mount Hope Iron Co. fifteen years; eleven years of said time was night work; at the expiration of said time he moved to Illinois, and located in Florence Tp., Will Co., where he worked by the day, and rented farms on the share for about nine years; then purchased the farm which he now owns, for $35 per acre. Married Sarah Moran, daughter of Paul Moran of Leitrim Co., Ireland; she came to the United States about the year 1843; have three children - Hannah, Timothy and Mary. Mr. Riorden's brother Timothy enlisted in the late war in the 69th Mass. V.I., and was captured by the enemy, and died in prison at Salisbury, N.C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ripsom, Henry
HENRY RIPSOM, Superintendent of cooper shop, Lockport; was born in Genesee Co., N.Y., Sept. 15, 1809; in 1811, his father moved to Syracuse, Onondaga Co.; at that time but two or three houses were standing where Syracuse now is; at the age of 15, he ran away from home, and coming to Lower Sandusky, Ohio, engaged in learning his trade; he afterward returned home, but at the age of 20 settled in Clarkson, Monroe Co., N.Y.; in 1848, he came West, settled in Lockport, entering the employ of Norton & Co.; in March, 1850, he took the position of Superintendent of the cooper shop, and has been continued in that position ever since. He was married in August, 1832, to Eliza Coleson, a native of New York State; has had eight children - Nancy, Isabel, Ursula, Alice (living), Elizabeth, Sarah, Clarkson, Cora (deceased). From 1832 to 1846, he was engaged in boating on the Erie Canal in the employ of the Merchants' line. The shadows of two great afflictions have rested upon the family hearthstone during the past ten years, that of the untimely death of the only son Clarkson, as also that of the sudden decease of the youngest daughter, Cora; in the early part of the winter of 1868, Clarkson, a young man of 19 summers, while coasting with young friends on the streets of Lockport, was almost instantly killed by coming in contact with a team standing in the street; a few years later little Cora, a bright and interesting child 9 years of age, fell from the suspension bridge into the canal and was drowned, her body being rescued in about one hour from the time the accident. Mr. Ripsom at present holds the office of Township Collector.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ritchey, Benjamin D.
BENJAMIN D. RITCHEY, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Ross Co., Ohio, Oct. 24, 1815, and is the son of Matthew and Rachel (Davis) Ritchey; father was a native of Scotland, having emigrated to America when he was very young; was a soldier during the Indian war, also a soldier of the war of 1812; died in 1822, at 65 years of age; mother died in June, 1862, at 88 years of age. In 1855, Mr. Ritchey came to Illinois and settled in Wesley Tp.; first purchased 560 acres of land at $15.50 and $8 per acre; has been engaged in farming and stock-raising ever since; owns to-day 367½  acres of fine improved land. Republican in politics.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ritchey, James
JAMES RITCHEY, retired farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Lockport; was born in Bedford Co., Penn., Oct. 30, 1800; he remained there until he was 4 years of age, when his parents moved to Ross Co., Ohio, and remained there until Oct. 20, 1830, when Mr. Ritchey and family moved to Fountain Co., Ind., and in Nov. 24, 1830, he came to this county, and took up his claim to the land he now resides on, and returning, brought his family on in the fall of 1831; in 1832, himself and family were compelled to take refuge in Fort Dearborn for eighteen days; his family then returned to Indiana, and he himself back to his farm, returning several times that season to visit his family; the fall of same year, he brought his family again to Will Co., where they have resided ever since. He married Miss Eve Thatcher (daughter of Sylvester Thatcher, of Ross Co., Va.) in Ross Co., Ohio, Dec. 30, 1823; she was born in Aug., 1801; they had eight children - Mary (now Mrs. Lewis Bush), born Dec. 5, 1824; Riley, Oct. 2, 1827, and died Nov. 7, 1862, at Cave City, Ky., from disease contracted in the army; George, April 26, 1830 (now residing in Oregon); Samuel I., Aug. 16, 1833 (now living in Montana); John, May 24, 1836 (residing in Boulder City, Colo.); Margaret (wife of Nelson Reed), Nov. 6, 1838; James Marion, April 7, 1841, and died at the age of 10 months, and Elizabeth R. (wife of Levi Poor, of Audrain Co., Mo.), Oct. 30, 1843. Mr. Ritchey and wife are the only living persons who were in this township who were "forted" in May, 1832; when he came here there was but one family (the Johnstons, now all dead); as a pioneer of this county, he has encountered many hardships and struggles in the wilds of this great West, when their only companions were the Indians and the wild beasts of the forest; his recollection of the events of that early day are vivid and fresh to him, and he is now in the enjoyment of a hale and hearty old age, being near 78; he lost, however, his eyesight from inflammation in 1854; his journey to Indiana from Ohio, was made by horse-teams, and from there to this county by ox-teams, as the roads at that day were impassable to horses, being "mired down;" he has made numerous trips to Indiana for provisions, it being the only place they could get them in the years 1831, 1832 and 1833, as they raised nothing until 1834; Chicago in 1833 contained only 170 persons. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Robbins, Frederick
FREDERICK ROBBINS, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Wilton Center. Liberal Republican. Owns 164 acres in Wilton Tp.; also 200 acres in Wayne Co., Iowa. Born in Pennsylvania May 15, 1812; when 4 years old, went with parents to Ohio; resided there until he was 22; then to Indiana; stopped there fourteen years; then to Michigan four years; then to this town in 1851; stopped at Twelve-Mile Grove the first winter, then to the place where he now resides. Married Nancy M. Woodward March 9, 1843; she was born in Pennsylvania Sept. 18, 1818; have had seven children, four now living - Kate, Isaac, William and Fanny; the names of those that died were John, David and Edward. Oliver Sanford, a boy raised in the family, was a soldier in the 2nd Wis. V.I., and was killed at the battle of Antietam. Mr. R. has held the offices of Road Commissioner and School Director.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Roberts, Alexander
ALEXANDER ROBERTS, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Plainfield; was born in Canada June 9, 1809. He married Miss Sallie Sawyer Feb. 7, 1831; she was born in Canada, and died Aug. 11, 1844; they had six children, three living - James, Alexander and Sarah; his present wife was Miss Harriet C. Hoag; they were married Feb. 18, 1844; she was born in Weare, N.H., April 14, 1825; they had four children, three living - Isabell S., Frank G. and Alice E. He lived in Canada until he was 24; he then moved to Vermont and engaged in farming; remained four years; then returned to Canada and engaged in general merchandise; remained seven years, when he went to Michigan and engaged in farming and stock-raising four years; he then went to Chicago and engaged in packing pork and beef; he next engaged in the lumber business at Palos, Cook Co., Ill.; he furnished the first ties on the C. & G. R.R.; he manufactured the first lard-oil in Chicago. He was Supervisor of Palos Tp., and one of the Commissioners that built the first Court House in Chicago. He assisted in furnishing material to build the lock at Bridgeport, and then came to Plainfield and settled on his present place. In 1837, he was living in Canada, and took part in the rebellion of that date, he forming a company to fight for the liberty of Canada; the uprising having been put down, he had to flee for safety, there being £1,000 reward offered for his capture; he took to the woods for one week; then changing his attire, he had to cross a bridge guarded by twelve soldiers; he boldly walked up and inquired of the guard if they had caught the man Roberts, stating that he must have lately passed there; the guard, unsuspecting, answered in the contrary, and asked if he was looking for him; he was told "Yes," and that he was prepared to take him dead or alive; after some talk they took a drink of the strong, and Roberts went on, escaping to the United States.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Robertson, R.
R. ROBERTSON, proprietor of the Robertson House, Joliet; was born in Fifeshire, on the Firth of Forth, Scotland, within a few miles of the City of Edinburgh, May 16, 1822; he was raised to the business of flour-milling, and, at the age of 20 years, came to America, and settled in New York City; there he engaged in the distillery business, which he continued until 1864, and then came to Joliet and purchased the Joliet Distillery, which he run for two years; in 1872, he built the Robertson House, which burned down in 1874; the following year, he erected the present elegant four-story-and-basement building, containing seventy-two sleeping-rooms above the office floor, commodious and spacious parlors, etc.; this is the largest hotel within a circuit of forty miles. Mr. Robertson was married, previously to coming to this country, to Miss Margaret Duncan, of Alloway, Scotland, and has six children living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Robesson, Frank
FRANK ROBESSON, dealer in groceries, liquors, flour, feed, etc., and proprietor of Robesson's Hall, Joliet; was born on the 24th of June, 1828, in that portion of Italy then adjoining and now a part of France; at the age of 18 years he was apprenticed to learn the shoemaker's trade, and two years later (1848), he became a cavalry soldier in Victor Emanuel's Italian army, where he served eight years; after this, he spent one year in Lyons, and, in 1857, came to America; in 1858, he came to Will Co., and worked three months for Thomas Mapps for his board; after this, he built a small shanty in Joliet and began working at his trade; he was so poor then that for two days he had nothing to eat; he followed shoemaking about a year, in the mean time selling a little confectionery, etc., when, having accumulated a little money, he started in a small way selling liquors, groceries, etc.; he now owns four buildings in Joliet, besides other property; in 1875, he built Robesson's Hall, at a cost, including lot, of $31,000. He was married in 1862 to Miss Josephine St. Angie, of Oswego, N.Y., and has one child - Josephine.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Robins, John
JOHN ROBINS, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; was born in the Isle of Wight, England, Feb. 7, 1824, and is the son of James and Sarah Robins; his father was a pilot; he, with wife and family in 1843, emigrated to America; came direct to Illinois, and settled in Wheatland Tp.; here they purchased forty acres of land, and built a small house and commenced farming; father died the second winter after they came here; mother died Oct. 6, 1870, aged 78 years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Robinson, Stephen
STEPHEN ROBINSON, farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Joliet; was born in Cumberland Co., Me., June 3, 1820. He married Miss Sarah Grundy July 8, 1843; she was born in Sheffield, England, March 4, 1824; they had six children, five living, viz., Ellen J., Mary F., Frank, Annie and Eva. He lived in Maine eighteen years; then came to Illinois and settled in Tazewell Co., where he followed farming and carpentering, and remained until 1853, when he came to Will Co., and settled in Plainfield Tp., where he followed farming, also acted as foreman for a bridge-building company. In 1867, he came to his present place, and has lived here ever since. He has held the office of Supervisor for two terms, also School office. His oldest son, Orestes, enlisted in the 2nd Ill. Regt. V.C., and died in New Orleans Oct. 6, 1863.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Roe, Thomas
THOMAS ROE, farmer; P.O. Braidwood; was born in Lancashire, Eng., in 1820, and is the son of Henry and Mary (Knight) Roe, of England; in 1855, he emigrated to America and landed in New York City; then to Illinois, and settled in Chicago; here he was engaged in the lumber business; he came to Will Co. in 1865, and first purchased eighty acres at $5 per acre; here he has lived ever since, engaged in farming; owns a good, improved farm of 200 acres. Mr. Roe is a very prominent member of the P.M. Church, having been a local preacher of this church over twenty years; is Superintendent of the Sunday School. Married in 1840, to Miss Sarah Hill of England, by whom they have five children living. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rohrbach, Adam
ADAM ROHRBACH, farming, Sec. 10; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Hesse, in Germany, March 3, 1835. He married Mrs. Hazemann, formerly Miss Catheron P. Bernard, March 12, 1860; she was born in Alsace, France, Jan. 28, 1828; they had four children, three living, viz., Henry J., Frederick A. and Louisa J.; his wife had three children by former marriage, one living, viz., Eliza Ann. He lived in Germany nineteen years; he then came to the United States and settled near Peoria, Ill.; and after three years residence there, he became converted and joined the Evangelical Association, and became a preacher in same, traveling to most all parts of the State; in 1875, he settled in Will Co., and in 1877, he settled on his present place. He came to the United States in very poor circumstances, and now owns 160 acres well improved in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

A Rohmeier & Boden
A ROHMEIER & BODEN, confectioners and tobacconists, Monee; both born in Germany, and early settlers in the county; their property in said establishment consists of one store, or place of business, and one Lot, No. 1/3 of 5, 6 and 7, in Block 1, and is valued at $3,000.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rosenheim, David
DAVID ROSENHEIM, dealer in clothing, hats, caps, gents' furnishing goods, trunks, valises, etc., Joliet; was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Dec. 11, 1847; he was educated in the public schools of his native country; on arriving at the age of 15 years, he left home and came to this country; his father had died but a short time before; his mother followed her son about twelve years ago, and now resides in Chicago; on arriving in Joliet, young Rosenheim entered the employ of Morris Einstein, with whom he remained until 1869, when he became a partner in the firm; in 1875, he purchased his partner's interest in the business, which he has since continued alone; he carries a well-selected stock of about $12,000 - the largest in his line in the county - consisting of all grades of men's, youths', boys' and children's clothing, furnishing goods, hats, caps, trunks, valises, etc., at prices to suit the times; he is courteous in manner and honorable in his dealings, and it is these qualities that have contributed largely to his success. He was married June 18, 1878, to Miss Augusta Lindaur, of Chicago. Mr. Rosenheim is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken all the Consistory degrees of Scottish Rite Masonry, and for the past year has held the office of High Priest of Joliet Chapter, No. 27, R.A.M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ross, Daniel
DANIEL ROSS, farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Peotone; born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, June 27, 1823, living there until 20 years of age, when he emigrated to England in 1843, and followed railroading and quarrying for nearly eight years in London, Liverpool and the Channel Islands. He emigrated to America in 1852, landing in New York Sept. 20, going to Quincy, Mass., where he remained a short time, then to Illinois, where he engaged in quarrying and railroading at Joliet and other points until 1854, when he located upon his present place, where he has since lived. He owns 120 acres of well-improved land, valued at $40 per acre. He married April 6, 1858, to Annie Anderson; she was born in West Point, Orange Co., N.Y., May 24, 1840; her father was one of the pioneers of Will Co., securing his farm of 240 acres directly from the United States Government; they are the parents of six children, now living - Emma J., Charles A., David D., William G., Alexander and Luella J. Mr. Ross is now School Director in the district which he lives. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ross, Jacob
JACOB ROSS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; was born in Germany July 4, 1838; came to the United States in 1860, and to this State the same year and settled in Cook Co.; he has been a resident of Greengarden for the past ten years; his farm consists of eighty acres, valued at $4,000. He was married to Miss Mary Sangmeister, who was born in Germany; they have one child, viz., Eliza. Since Mr. R.'s residence in the township, he has filled the office of Road Commissioner and School Director three years. He was also a participant in the late war, having enlisted in the 57th I.V.I.; served three years and eight months, and was discharged with honor at the close of the war, A.D. 1865.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rowe, Orlando D.
ORLANDO D. ROWE (Johnson & Rowe, contractors and builders), Wilmington; born in Warren Co., Penn., Jan. 12, 1843; moved to Ottawa Co., Mich., in 1855, where he resided until 1870, removing to Topeka, Kan., that year; came to Wilmington, his present home, in 1875. Married in 1871 to Miss Frances E. Spencer, who was born in Branch Co., Mich., in 1853; they have three children by this union - Elanor M., Mary A. and Eva M. Mr. Rowe is a member of Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, A.F. & A.M. He enlisted in the 3rd Mich. V.I. in June, 1861; transferred to Battery K, first U.S. Artillery, Jan. 3, 1863, and remained in the service until June 10, 1864; participated during his term of service in the following battles: Blackburn's Ford, July 18, 19 and 20, 1861; first Bull Run, July 21; all engagements on the Peninsula up to and including the battle of Williamsburg; Chancellorsville, May 4, 1863; Beverley's Ford, June 9; Upperville, June 19, 20 and 21; Gettysburg, Md., July 3; Williamsport, July 6; Boonsboro July 7 and 8; Brandy Station, Aug. 1 and 4; Culpeper, Sept. 13; Rapidan River, Sept. 14; movements against Richmond from May 4 to June 10, 1864.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rowell, Hopkins
HOPKINS ROWELL, contractor, Joliet; was born in Hopkinton, N.H., May 16, 1810; removed, in infancy, with his parents, to Clarkson, Monroe Co., N.Y. (then part of Genesee Co.), and there lived until he first came West, in 1834; he followed the business of brickmaking and farming, receiving an academic education in the Clarkson Academy; he came West, as an explorer, in 1834 and 1835, and on his latter visit purchased from the Government 80 acres of land, containing the gravel-pit adjoining the city on the east, first buying the claim of John Cook, an old Revolutionary soldier, who had settled there in 1832; he also purchased another tract, of 160 acres, near by; he still  retains his original purchases, on one of which he began about twelve years ago to develop the extensive gravel-pit above alluded to; in 1847, Mr. Rowell again came West, as the General Agent for C.H. McCormick for this region of country, including Wisconsin, Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois; he was the first to introduce the McCormick Reaper in Joliet, selling it to Robert Stevens, Henry D. Higinbotham and Mansfield Wheeler; this reaper was in existence until a few years ago, when it was allowed to be destroyed, much to Mr. Rowell's regret; in 1857, Mr. Rowell located here, with his family, and has since been a prominent resident; he is the author of a pamphlet entitled, "The Great Resources and Superior Advantages of Joliet," published in 1871, of which 20,000 copies were circulated, and did much toward bringing the natural resources of Joliet to the attention of capitalists and others, in the East; he also furnished numerous articles on the subject to the Eastern papers, besides personally visiting, on the part of this city, several of the Eastern cities. He was married in 1848, in Watertown, N.Y., to Miss Mary E. Blood, of that city, and has five children - Jacob H., of Minneapolis, Minn., Annie J., Nathaniel J., Laura J. and S. Jennie. Mr. Rowell has absolutely declined being a candidate for any office, both before and since coming to Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rowley, Hiram
HIRAM ROWLEY was one of the earliest settlers of Will Co.; he arrived in the year 1833; we are indebted to his son, John K. Rowley, of Chicago, the historian of the Rowley family in the United States, for the following extract from the proof-sheets, pertaining to the lineage of Mr. Rowley; he says, "After years of research, my conclusions are that the Rowleys are all related; that Moses Rowley, who emigrated from South Wales in the year 1700, was the original Rowley in this country; he married at Cape Cod, Mass., and settled in East Haddam, Conn. Joseph Rowley, the grandfather of Hiram, resided in Richmond, Mass., where he enlisted Oct. 1, 1775, in the Revolutionary War; was in Col. Simon's regiment; marched to Lake George, thence by boats to Ticonderoga, N.Y., where trace is lost of his exploits. In 1776, he served under Col. Ford, hunting Tories; in 1777, was in the same service under Col. Ashley. During 1778, 1779 and 1780, frequently volunteered to go out in scouting parties after Tories and Indians. He was a brave soldier, and would have served longer had it not been for an accidental fall, which rendered him unfit for hard service. He was born in Colchester, Conn., in 1752, and died at Victor, N.Y., Dec. 23, 1835. Col. Aaron Rowley, of Revolutionary fame, was a brother of his." Capt. Jirch Rowley, the father of Hiram, was twice married. The second time to the mother of Charles M. and George M. Gray, well-known citizens of this county, as well as the county of Cook, in fact, throughout our whole country. The Captain in business, was the Vanderbilt of his time, and distinguished himself as a true citizen and brave defender of his country in the war of 1812. More of his life will be found elsewhere in this history. Hiram Rowley was born Nov. 16, 1813, and was one of the family of eight children who grew to maturity by the first wife, consisting of one daughter and seven sons, all of whom are now living but three. Jirch Rowley, Jr., died Aug. 6, 1875. It is a singular coincidence, that he was named after the father of so large a family, and filled a similarly prominent place in the estimation of the public in Western New York, where he always lived. Hiram had none of the advantages in early life for cultivation children now have. His mother died when he was quite young, and to use his own language, "he came up instead of being brought up." The spirit of adventure seized him at the age of 20 years, and he left his home in Victor, Ontario Co., N.Y., and all the hallowed associations of his youthful days for the uninhabited West. The journey by boat and stage took three weeks. He settled on a tract of 376 acres of land at Beebe's Grove, three miles east of Crete, where he commenced the struggle for a livelihood on his own account. Farming in those days meant hard labor without any of the luxuries of life, and as an evidence, one year in particular, Mr. Rowley transported oats by ox-teams to Chicago, a distance of thirty miles, and sold them for 10 cents per bushel, and other cereals at a proportionate rate; but notwithstanding all discouragements, he persevered and finally built on his place a comfortable log house, and married Cynthia Kile, in 1837, who, like himself, had come with her family from an adjoining county in the Empire State. H.N. Marsh, Esq., of Joliet, married Miss Mary Kile, a sister of Mrs. Rowley, for his first wife. Aunt Cynthia, so called, on account of her eagerness to be doing Christian acts for everybody and everywhere, proved a helpmeet indeed, and the young people, prospered in a worldly point of view. A few years later, they sold their farm and moved to Yankee Settlement, now Homer Tp., and settled permanently upon the east half of his father's homestead, about one mile west of Hadley. Here is where the old settlers locate them, and where a thousand memories cluster, dear to their hearts, because the scenes enacted there were at a period in their lives when they had become matured and best calculated into the arena of life in earnest. They added farm to farm, and were honorably prosperous. The result of their marriage, has been three sons and one daughter. The eldest son became quite well known as a teacher in this county before he took up his abode in Chicago, where he has for many years been prominently identified in the banking and real estate business. The second son, Andrew W., also became known as a music teacher. His youngest son, Asa B., and charming daughter, Sarah E., the Benjamin of the flock, also became proficient in music before the family moved to Lockport, and afterward to Chicago, where they all now reside. Mr. Rowley was too far advanced in life to imitate his forefathers in the late rebellion, but the Union army had his hearty sympathy, and his sons, although they did not enlist, aided with their means the families of those who did enter the service. In politics, he has been an unswerving Republican since the organization of the party. The success of the Roman Catholic Church in this country has given him much uneasiness. He has always been a warm advocate of free schools and of having the Bible read in them. Personally, Mr. Rowley is of a sympathetic nature, and clings with great tenacity to the beliefs he has once espoused. His house was a home for itinerant Methodist preachers, and he has for forty years been a zealous member of that denomination. He is hale, hardy and temperate, and has the promise of many years of life. His sons are all married and settled in life, and he has a competence even in these depressing times, and an abiding faith in the future that it will be well with him. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rowley, J.B.
J.B. ROWLEY, farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Lockport; was born in Ontario Co., N.Y., Feb. 11, 1811, where he resided fifteen years, and afterward in Monroe Co. seven years; in 1833, he moved to this county and made a claim, and afterward purchased the land upon which he now resides, at the land sale in Chicago in 1835; his farm now contains over 210 acres, which he laid out, and upon which he made all the improvements. Married Miss Ardelia Lanfear in Homer Tp., April 13, 1836; she was born in Cayuga Co., N.Y., Feb. 17, 1818; they had six children, two living - Olive (now Mrs. Link), born April 21, 1838; Irvin E., born May 11, 1863, and four dead - Francis B., born April 17, 1844, died Dec. 9, 1844; Adelia Ann, born Feb. 25, 1846, died April 23, 1848; Albert, born Feb. 27, 1851, died April 6, 1865, and Ella M., born June 21, 1858, died Dec. 30, 1859. Mr. Rowley was among the first settlers, and passed through the many struggles of a pioneer life. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Royce, Abner
ABNER ROYCE, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Essex Co., N.Y., June 13, 1826; he is a son of Jonathan and Polly (Emery) Royce; his father was one of the early settlers of Du Page Tp., having settled in the summer of 1835 where his son now lives; here he lived till the date of his decease, which occurred Dec. 14, 1863, at the age of 83 years; his faithful companion followed him April 25, 1875, at the advanced age of 91 years; his father was a very successful business man, and owned at one time between three and four thousand acres of land; he divided his vast accumulations of wealth among his children, and they are following in his footsteps to a successful life; Abner has always lived upon the old homestead, except a temporary absence of four years; in 1850, he went to California, and engaged in mining; in 1854, he returned home. He was married October 18, 1855, to Charlotte Phelps, a native of Essex Co., N.Y.; has six children - Elisha, Truman, Helen J., Irving, Lottie E. and Abner, Jr. Owns 985 acres in Will Co., valued at $65,000; Mr. Royce has met with good success in all his undertakings.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Royce, Jonathan
JONATHAN ROYCE, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Essex Co., N.Y., May 9, 1822; when 13 years of age, he came with the family to Illinois, his father settling on the East Branch of the Du Page in the summer of 1835; he remained at home until he reached the age of 25 years; in 1847, he came upon his farm, and engaged in cultivating it some six years before his marriage. His union with Sarah A. Mather, a native of Essex Co., N.Y., was celebrated Oct. 18, 1853. His life has been largely and successfully devoted to agricultural pursuits; in the fall of 1873, he moved to Naperville, and entered the banking business in partnership with Willard Scott; in the fall of 1876, he returned to his farm, and entered again upon a farmer's life. Has five children - Jonathan F., George E., Asa M., Maria P. and Emma M. Owns about five hundred acres, valued at $40,000; has held the office of Supervisor a number of terms; he deals largely in stock, buying and fattening a large number of cattle annually; his farm is the best improved and his buildings the most substantial of any of his entire neighborhood.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Royce, Miles
MILES ROYCE, farmer; P.O. Plainfield. Episcopal; Republican. Owns about ninety acres, valued at $50 per acre; was born in Bristol, Hartford Co., Conn., Aug. 20, 1806; his father died when he was 3 years old; Mr. R. resided with his mother until 15 years of age; then, in company with a brother, he went to Onondaga Co., N.Y., where he remained until 1834, during which time he was variously engaged in farming and manufacturing fanning-mills; he then came to this place and engaged in the manufacture of fanning-mills, which he continued for ten years; the first year he made fifty, the second seventy-five, the third one hundred and fifty; these were the first manufactured in the northern part of the State; he then engaged in farming, and has continued up to the present time. He married Sarah G. Gilman Jan. 10, 1837; she was born in Salem, Mass., May 12, 1809; they have three children living - Philander C., Orland W. and Sarah Elizabeth; lost one son - Stephen (deceased); Orland served three months in the late war; was discharged on account of disability.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ruden, Charles F.
CHARLES F. RUDEN, physician and surgeon, Beecher; was born in Prussia, near Berlin, Jan. 26, 1832; received education at the University of Berlin, which institution conferred the title of M.D. upon him in 1854; came to America in 1855, stopping at New York City one year; located in Will Co. in 1857, where he has been practicing homeopathy ever since; he also keeps the largest stock of drugs in Beecher. Was married to Louisa Shilling in 1866; she only lived till 1869. Married again in 1870 to Miss Ida Wagener at Frankfort Station in Will Co., Ill.; their children are Libby, Eddy, George and Louisa.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rudd, Ernest
ERNEST RUDD, farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Joliet; born in Will Co., Ill., Aug. 24, 1854, where he has always lived, and followed the occupation of farming upon the place where he now resides; he owns 50 acres of land, two and one-half miles from Joliet, valued at $60 per acre. Married Martha M. Miller, May 21, 1875; she was born in Niagara Co., N.Y., March 20, 1853; they have two children - George Sanford, born Dec. 12, 1876; David Clarence, born Aug. 11, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rudd, Rositer
ROSITER RUDD, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Joliet; was born in Lafayette, Ind., Nov. 3, 1840; removed with his father's family to Joliet Township, Will Co., Ill., when 1 year old; he worked upon his father's farm until 24 years of age, when his father died and Mr. Rudd became the possessor of his present farm, which consists of sixty acres of well-improved land, valued at $50 per acre. Married Aug. 15, 1860, Miss Jane Gregg; she was a native of Canada; they are the parents of five children - Luly, Fayty, Harriet, Freeman and Mansfield, all living; Mr. Rudd has filled the office of School Director for six years with entire satisfaction.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Russell, Phoebe
MRS. PHOEBE RUSSELL, P.O. Joliet; one of the early settlers of Will County; was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., Nov. 1, 1812. She is a daughter of Benjamin and Phoebe Weaver, and came to Homer Tp. with them in 1833. Her father was familiarly known as "Uncle Ben Weaver," and was a prominent citizen of Homer till his death in March, 1872, at the age of 91 years. Her mother had died ten years previously. Miss Weaver was first married Dec. 12, 1833, to Chester Ingersoll, a native of Vermont, who settled in Will County in 1828, and took an active part in the Black Hawk war. After their marriage, they removed to Chicago and kept the first hotel kept by an American in that city; returning after two years, they settled in Plainfield; and, seven years later, removed to Lockport, thence to Wheatland, and, in 1847, removed to California; Mr. Ingersoll died in San Francisco in Sept., 1850, and Mrs. Ingersoll returned with her family in Will County; the family consisted of four children - Chester, now of Kansas; Benjamin F., who served through the war, and now resides in Joliet; Josiah, who also served through the war, and died in January, 1871, from disease contracted in the service of his country; and James K.P., now of this city. In July, 1851, Mrs. Ingersoll married the late Benjamin F. Russell, of Steuben Co., N.Y., a native of New Hampshire; they resided in Homer until Mr. Russell's election as Circuit Clerk and Recorder of Will County, in 1859, and then they removed to Joliet; Mr. Russell held the office two terms of four years each, making one of the most efficient officers the county ever had; he also held the office of Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue two terms; he died Sept. 12, 1874, and in his death Will County lost one of her most honored citizens. He left three daughters - Emily J., Ida M. and Mary W.; but one of whom is now living - Ida May, now Mrs. J.J. La Fontaine, of Joliet; he also left one son of a former marriage - Francis A., now of Michigan. Mrs. Russell was on the first stage ever run from Chicago to Plainfield, when there was but one house between the two places.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Russell, Samuel C.
SAMUEL C. RUSSELL, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Greengarden; one of our early settlers; was born in St. John, N.B., Aug. 4, 1823; came to the United States in 1841, and to this State, and settled in Greengarden, Will Co. in 1855; his farm consists of eighty acres, valued at $4,000. He was married Nov. 25, 1846, to Miss Susan W. Avery, who was born in Plainfield Plain, N.H., Feb. 15, 1825; they have had five children, four of whom are living, viz., Samuel A., Mary J., John W. and Emma L.; deceased, Emily M.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Rust, Henry
HENRY RUST, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; was born in Germany Jan. 14, 1814; came to the United States in 1848, and to Illinois in 1852; he has been a resident of Greengarden for the past fourteen years; his farm consists of 160 acres, valued at $7,000. He was married to Miss Mary Matust, who was born in Germany; they have had seven children, five of whom are living, viz., Hannah, Henry, Mary, Carl and William; deceased, two infants. Since Mr. Rust's residence in the township, he has held the office of School Director one year. He was also a participant in the war in Germany in 1834.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


 

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