Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents


Salter, George B.
DR. GEORGE B. SALTER, dentist, Joliet; came to Joliet in 1860; he was born in Stark Co., Ohio, Oct. 6, 1837; in 1845, his parents removed to Monroe, Mich. and there he lived until 1857, when he went to Freeport, Ill., and there learned dentistry; in 1859, he removed to Whitewater, Wis., and one year later came to Joliet, as above stated, and has practiced dentistry here ever since; he has been a member of the State Dental Association since 1867, and in 1877, was a delegate to the American Dental Association. He served one term as Vice President of the Joliet Library and Historical Society. He was married Jan. 13, 1864, to Miss Mattie Ellis, of Whitewater, Wis., and has one daughter, Viola B. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sanborn, Katharine
MRS. KATHARINE SANBORN, farming; P.O. Lockport; was born in Schoharie Co., N.Y., March 22, 1809; her maiden name was Smith. She was married Sept. 16, 1823, to Justin Taylor, a native of New York State; he was born Oct. 25, 1801; in 1833, Mr. Taylor came West to prospect the country and returning East, in 1834, brought his family and erected a log cabin on the identical spot where the family residence now stands; in 1833, he laid a claim of 500 acres, which he afterward purchased at the Government land sale in 1835; this he improved and occupied till the date of his decease, which occurred Nov. 14, 1847. From first wedlock, she had eight children - Harriet, Francis, Smith, Sacia, Grosvenor, Harry, Justin and James L.; of these, Harriet, Smith, Sacia and James L. are deceased. Four of her sons went forth to battle for their country's honor, and two of them rest from toil far down in the Sunny South. Her second marriage, to William Sanborn, occurred July 4, 1850; one son, William, has been born to them, and still lives with his parents. Her first husband was present in Chicago at the treaty made with the Indians in 1833. Mrs. Sanborn says she has seen 400 or 500 Indians at her house at one time, when on their way to the Far West. Mr. Taylor held the offices of Supervisor, School Trustee, School Director and various other offices. Owns 155 acres in Lockport Tp., valued at $9,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sanders, M.F.
M.F. SANDERS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; our first settler in the township, was born in Rutland Co., Vt., Aug. 17, 1819; came to this State and settled in Greengarden, Will Co., in 1847; although the township did not, at that time, have a name. Since his residence in the township, he has held offices of Supervisor several years, Township Clerk, and was the first Justice of the Peace in the township after its organization, and performed the first marriage ceremony; his farm consists of 550 acres, valued at $27,000. He was married to Mrs. Sarah Sanders Nov. 13, 1844, who was born in Windsor Co., Vt., March 31, 1823. They have had seven children, four of whom are living, viz., Daphna E., William H., Charles R. and Josephine V.; deceased, George W., George A. and Frank.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sanger, Lorenzo P.
COL. LORENZO P. SANGER (deceased), Joliet; was born in Littleton, N.H., March 2, 1809. When but a small boy, he accompanied his father's family to Livingston Co., N.Y., at that time a vast wilderness in the then Far West, and, like other pioneers, could only obtain the common log schoolhouse education in the winter, and in summer worked on a farm or in a saw-mill. When the Erie Canal (termed at that time, in derision, "Clinton's Ditch") was begun, his father, David Sanger, took a contract on the Canal, at Rochester, and afterward at Black Rock, about 1824, where he remained until the Erie Canal was completed. At this time but three steamboats were running on Lake Erie, and Lorenzo P. Sanger went on the Pioneer as steward. In the fall of 1826, his father removed to Pittsburgh, Penn., and engaged in heavy contracts on the Pennsylvania Canal, and continued until completed, finishing near Johnstown, Lorenzo having charge of a part of the work. When about 20, he took a contract to build a lock near Livermore, Penn., and was known as the "boy contractor." When this was finished, he went into the mercantile business at Blairsville, Penn. He married Rachel Mary Denniston, of Denniston's Town, Westmoreland Co., Penn., Feb. 3, 1830, and, the same year, removed his store to that place. About 1831, he joined J. Noble Nesbit at Freeport, Penn., in sinking a salt-well. After drilling several hundred feet, they struck a large flow of salt water, and with it what the salt men termed "that infernal American or Seneca oil," since known as petroleum; and as the value of the oil was not then known, the well was abandoned and he lost all. From Freeport he went on the Beaver Canal and built a lock and dam twelve miles above Beaver, at the mouth of Kanakanessing Creek. When this was completed, he removed to Miamisport, Ind., and engaged in heavy contracts on the Indiana Canal. His work was on the Indian Reservation, and was completed amid many discouragements, the country being almost a wilderness and very unhealthy. In 1835, he started in the then fashionable way of traveling, viz., on horseback, to St. Joseph, Mich., and joined Gen. Hart L. Stewart, now of Chicago, in merchandising and warehouse business, and steamboating on the St. Joseph River. At the letting of the Illinois & Michigan Canal, in June, 1836, Stewart, Sanger & Wallace contracted to dig Sections 156 and 157, on the heavy rock excavation above Lockport, Ill. The next season, he removed permanently to Illinois, and followed the Canal to La Salle, where he built lock No. 15. He next formed a company and formed a contract to improve the rapids of Rock River at Sterling, Ill. In March, 1843, he joined Smith Galbraith in a line of stages from Chicago to Galena, via Dixon, and the next year purchased Galbraith's interest. While at Galena, he was elected State Senator. In 1847, Frink & Walker, Sanger & Co., Davis & Moore, and Neil, Moore & Co. united and formed the Northwestern Stage Co., embracing Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Missouri, Mr. Sanger removing to St. Louis and taking charge of the western division until 1851, at which time the firm of Sanger, Camp & Co. contracted to build the western division of the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, after completing which, Sanger, Stewart & Truesdail took the contract for building the North Missouri Railroad from St. Louis to Macon, Mo. Both of these roads were heavy enterprises, through comparatively new countries, and involved the engaging of hundreds of subcontractors. Both have become important trunk lines. In 1857, the State of Illinois let to Lorenzo P. Sanger and Samuel K. Casey, under the firm name of Sanger & Casey, the contract to build the State Penitentiary at Joliet, and in June, 1858, leased to them the convict labor of the State, the convicts being then confined in the Penitentiary at Alton, the commerce and discipline of the latter being in charge of W.A. Steel until July, 1860, when the last of the convicts were removed by him to the new Penitentiary at Joliet. During the last named year, he removed to Joliet, and, in 1862, to a farm one mile northwest of the city. Having, during his busy life, been the employer of tens of thousands of men, and the nation at this time being in the midst of the war of the rebellion, President Lincoln wrote to Gov. Yates to send Mr. Sanger a commission as Colonel and request him to join the army in Tennessee and Kentucky for staff duty or whatever his health would enable him to do. This was done, and Col. Sanger immediately threw up his business and joined the army in Kentucky, where he remained until his health was almost entirely gone, when he was compelled to return home in a prostrated condition, from which he never fully recovered. In 1865, Col. Sanger and W.A. Steel, under the firm name of Sanger & Steel, opened quarries north of and adjacent to Joliet, which proved to be the best limestone yet found in America, and which they developed into a very large business, employing from three to four hundred men and a hundred horses, the canal and railroad also passing through their works. Though Missouri, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana and Illinois patronized their works largely, the United States Government was their heaviest customer for material to build the Rock Island Arsenal, Marine Hospital in Chicago, Custom Houses at Des Moines, Iowa, and Madison, Wis., etc. The same year, 1865, Sanger, Steel & Co. took the contract to deepen the twenty-one rock sections of the Illinois & Michigan Canal. This was to remove solid limestone sixty feet wide and ten feet deep, the object being to remove permanently the lift-lock in Chicago and Jack's lock near Lockport. Col. Sanger died in Oakland, Cal., where he had gone for the benefit of his health, on March 23, 1875, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Joliet. He had three children - Maj. W.D. Sanger, who served as an aid on Gen. Sherman's staff in the late war, and died in St. Louis in November, 1873; Frances Louise, wife of Hon. W.A. Steel, of Joliet, and Henry A. Sanger, now of Florence, Ala. Col. Sanger, although a man of unyielding purpose and rugged character, was kind-hearted in his public dealings, and exceedingly tender in the private and domestic relations of life.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sanger, Louesa
Frankfort, Will Co., July, 1874.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Savage, Amos
HON. AMOS SAVAGE, farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Lockport; was born in Homer Tp. June 18, 1836, on the homestead where his parents had settled in 1833; his educational advantages were limited, as was the case among the early settlers in the wilds of the West; the subject of this sketch taught district school from the age of 19 to 24 during the winter months, working upon the farm during the summer; he was first elected Supervisor in 1861, and resigned shortly afterward to enter the army as Second Lieutenant of the 39th I.V.I., being afterward promoted to First Lieutenant, and then as Captain, serving three years and three months, until discharged on account of disability; upon his return to the county he was again elected Supervisor, serving continuously until his election to the Legislature of Illinois in the fall of 1872, serving one term of two years, upon which he was again elected Supervisor, serving up to 1876, when he was elected to the State Board of Equalization for the Seventh Congressional District for the term of four years. Mr. Savage has always been active in politics, and has worked faithfully in whatever position he has been elected to fill to the best interests of the county. He married Miss Mary L. Slate (daughter of Asahel Slate, of Georgetown, S.C.), in Lemont, Cook Co., Feb. 25, 1864; she was born in Georgetown, S.C., June 22, 1837; has five children - Helen E., born Dec. 8, 1864; Frank M., born July 19, 1867; John H., born June 25, 1870; Willard A., born Sept. 14, 1872, and Mary A., born May 13, 1874. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schaal, Christian
CHRISTIAN SCHAAL, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Germany Aug. 7, 1832, and is the son of Christian and Annie Mary (Leib) Schaal, of Germany; emigrated to America in 1856; came to Illinois, and was very poor; he first was working on a farm by the month near Naperville; then to Will Co.; here he worked very hard; he saved his money, invested in land, and to-day owns a farm of 120 acres, with good improvements. He married Miss Elizabeth Lantz, of Lancaster Co., Penn., daughter of John and Annie Mary Lantz, who were among the early settlers of Wheatland Tp.; have seven children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schaal, Peter L.
One of the recent settlers of Neosho county who has identified himself with agriculture in Tioga township, is Peter L. Schaal of this mention. He was born in Will county, Illinois, February 16, 1866, is German stock and is a son of Christian and Elizabeth (Lantz) Schaal, the father Wurtemberger born and the mother of the Germans of Pennsylvania. The parents had a family of twelve children of whom Peter L. was the eighth. Emigrating to the United States the father soon settled in Will county, Illinois, where he resided and was engaged in farming till 1883 when he came west with his family and settled in Dickinson county, Kansas. At this location he remained until 1897 when he disposed of his interests and became a settler of Wilson county and, in two years more changed his residence to Erie township, Neosho county. Peter L. Schaal was a member of his father's family till the latter left Dickinson county, Kansas, when he set up housekeeping on his own account. He was married November 16, 1893, and in 1898 came to Neosho county and purchased a tract of unimproved land in Tioga township - without tree or building. In the four years of his ownership and occupancy of the farm it has been broken out, fenced, watered with wells and substantial buildings have been erected on it until the whole is in happy contrast to many of the older places surrounding it. Mr. Schaal married Kate Bricker, a daughter of Susan (Line) and Samuel Bricker. She was born June 22, 1870, in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, moved to Dickinson county with her parents in 1889 and lived there until she moved with her husband to Neosho county in 1898. Jesse B. is the issue of this marriage and he was born January 3, 1896.  [Source: History of Neosho and Wilson Counties, Kansas, Pub. by L. Wallace Duncan, Fort Scott, Kansas, Monitor Printing Co., 1902; tr. by VB]

Scheer, Fred
FRED SCHEER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Sept. 7, 1839; came to the United States, with his father's family, in 1848, and settled in this State; his farm consists of 180 acres, valued at $10,000. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Rheingley, who was born in Germany; they have had two children, viz., Louisa and Herman. Mr. S. is now holding office of Street Commissioner.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheer, Peter
PETER SCHEER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Sept. 18, 1836; came to the United States in 1847, and to this State and settled in Frankfort, Will Co., in the same year; his farm consists of 180 acres, valued at $12,000. His was married to Miss Louisa Dralla, who was born in Germany; they have had two children, viz., Valentin and Emma. His farm is situated on Secs. 15 and 22.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheibe, Julius
JULIUS SCHEIBE, dealer in boots and shoes, Lockport. To the handiwork of no one individual in Lockport more indebted for her first-class buildings than to Mr. Scheibe. Under his immediate supervision was erected the stone business houses of Messrs. Myers, Col. Martin, Lull & Lynd; the M.E. Church, the brick business house of Dr. Bacon; in 1871, he built the Northwestern College, at Naperville. He was born in Saxony, Germany, Jan. 20, 1828; immigrated to America in 1850, and first settled in Milwaukee, Wis.; in 1851, he came to Lockport, and worked a short time for Robert Milne in the saw-mill; in the Fall of 1851, engaged at his trade, that of stone and brick mason; was engaged on the work of deepening the canal in 1864 and 1865; in the winter of 1873, engaged in the sale of boots and shoes, his present occupation. He was married in 1854, to Elizabeth Fickensher, a native of Germany; has six children. The large and commodious stone school-building, an ornament to the city and a monument to the liberality and enterprise of its citizens, was erected by Mr. Scheibe; this structure cost the district the snug sum of $40,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheidt, Anton
HON. ANTON SCHEIDT, dealer in hardware, tinware, stoves and house-furnishing goods, (Scheidt & Smith), Joliet; was born in Schoenenburg, Alsace, France, Jan. 30, 1827; in 1849, he came to the United States; spent one year in the State of New York, and then came West, remaining a short time in Chicago, and coming to Joliet in 1850; the first two years he worked in a wagon and plow shop in Homer Tp., and in April, 1852, was married to Elizabeth Palmer, of Joliet, who was born in Harthaem, in the Kingdom of Baden, Germany, in 1824, by whom he has four children; the same year (1852), he built the Chicago House, on Bluff st., and kept it as a boarding-house until 1862. In 1857, he entered into partnership with Sebastian Stephen in the brewery business; in 1862, he purchased his partner's interest, enlarged the brewery, and run it until 1874, when he leased it to Henry Eider, the present occupant. In 1875, he entered upon his present business, with his son-in-law, Paul Smith; besides their regular line of hardware business, they are large contractors and manufacturers of all kinds of galvanized iron-work, etc. Mr. Scheidt has served eleven years on the Board of Aldermen, being first elected in 1861; in 1874, he was chosen Mayor of the city of Joliet, holding the office one year; he has also served three terms on the Board of Supervisors.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheidt, John
JOHN SCHEIDT, manufacturer and dealer in pure candies and dealer in fruits, nuts, etc., Joliet; was born near Strasbourg, Alsace, Jan. 1, 1829; he came to this country at the age of 15, with his parents, who settled in Bloom, Cook Co., Ill.; he continued to reside in Bloom until 1856, when he came to Joliet, and kept a boarding-house up to 1864, after which he engaged in his trade of a carpenter. He was elected City Marshal in 1863, and served two years; he has twice been a member of the Board of Aldermen, and is now on the Board of Supervisors, having been elected in April, 1878. Mr. Scheidt erected his store and established his present business in 1877. He was married Aug. 6, 1850, to Miss Catherine Clos, of Crete Tp.; she was born in Prussia Feb. 22, 1831, and came to Will Co., with her parents, in 1840; they have nine children - Frank A., Mary A., John, Peter A., Michael, Edward, Henry B., George and Katrina A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheiwe, Christopher
CHRISTOPHER SCHEIWE, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Rodenburg, Germany, Feb. 21, 1827, and is the son of Phillip and Sophia (Swining) Scheiwe, of Germany; his father was in the huckster business. In 1847, Mr. Scheiwe, with his brother John, emigrated to America; came direct to Chicago; was engaged in working on a farm on the Des Plaines River, and received $8 per month, and board; in the winter months, he only received $6 per month; he then came to Will Co., and settled near Lockport; then to Michigan; returned to Will Co.; his first purchase of land was in Crete Tp., 80 acres; here he set out in farming; to-day, with hard work and good management, he ranks among the successful farmers of Crete Tp.; owns 435½ acres of improved land; held several offices of public trust in Crete Tp. - Constable, Township Collector, and Justice of the Peace; Mr. Scheiwe is President of the Crete Farmer's Mutual Insurance Company, of Crete, Ill. Married Sophia Lucke, of Germany; eight children.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Scheiwe, John
JOHN SCHEIWE, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Rodenburg, Germany, Feb. 7, 1822, and is the son of Philip and Sophia (Swining) Scheiwe, of Germany; his father was engaged in the huckster trade. In 1847, with his brother Christopher, he emigrated to America; first landed in Quebec, Can.; then direct to Chicago, Ill.; went to work on a farm; then on the canal, at $1 per day; in 1851, he came to Will Co., and settled in Crete Tp., on the present farm; he first purchased 80 acres for $70; Mr. Scheiwe, with good management, to-day owns a fine, improved farm, which ranks among the best improved farms of Will Co. Married in Cook Co., Ill., to Miss Mary Wamhafer, of Germany; she came to America at the same time Mr. Scheiwe did; four children. Member of the Lutheran Church.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schiek, Henry
HENRY SCHIEK, dealer in wines and liquors, Joliet; was born in Carlsruhe, Baden Baden, Germany, Oct. 25, 1842; in 1848, the family came to America and located in Frankfort Tp., Will Co.; here he grew to manhood, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits for about twenty-six years; in 1874, he moved to Joliet and engaged in his present occupation. He was married March 12, 1866, to Henrietta Mueller, a native of Germany; has three children - Matilda, Emma, Edward. Owns 120 acres in Frankfort Tp. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schiffer, August
AUGUST SCHIFFER, general merchant and grain-buyer, Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1855, and to this State in 1857, and, in 1858, he settled in the township of Monee; his pursuits, since his residence in the township, have been that of a general merchant and dealer in grain; he is the builder and owner of the first elevator in this township. He has held the office of Postmaster from 1861 to 1866. He was married to Miss Anna Schurz; they have six children, viz., August, Antoinette, Charles, Otto, Annie and Minnie.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schmid, Luis
LUIS SCHMID, proprietor Peotone Hotel, Peotone; born in Sigmaringen, Hohenzollern, Prussia, Aug. 12, 1842, where he lived until 22 years of age engaged at milling; he emigrated to America in 1864, landing in New York May 3, being forty-seven days on the voyage; here he remained one year, being employed in a hotel and restaurant; coming to Chicago, he worked in a tannery one year, then locating in Peotone in 1866, where he worked at the carpenter trade for seven years, then, for two years, was engaged in mercantile pursuits; at the expiration of which time, he exchanged his residence for the Peotone Hotel, located just east of the depot, which he has since successfully run as a hotel for a period of three years. He married Nov. 20, 1869, to Miss Katharina Conrad, oldest daughter of Peter Conrad; she was born in Odenbach Rheinpfels, Bavaria, Germany, Nov. 13, 1851; they are the parents of three children, viz., Julia C.D., Luida M.C. and Katharina A.D. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schoenstedt, Christian
CHRISTIAN SCHOENSTEDT, manufacturer of wagons, buggies, etc. and dealer in general farm machinery, Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany Jan. 30, 1837; came to the United States in 1854, and to this State in the same year; he has been a resident of Monee, Will Co., since 1859, and within that time his pursuits have been as above mentioned. He was married March 5, 1859, to Miss Louisa Guntz, who was born in Germany May 17, 1839. They have had seven children, six of whom are living - Fred, Anna, Leopold, August, Louisa and Otto; deceased, Rudolph.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schoettes, Henry
HENRY SCHOETTES, wines and liquors, Joliet; born in Westphalia, Germany, July 11, 1842, where he lived until 26 years of age, when, after receiving a common-school education, he learned and worked at the cigar trade, until he emigrated to America, landing in New York in 1868; coming directly West, he located in St. Louis for three years, being engaged in the manufacture and sale of cigars, when he came to Joliet in 1871, and was employed as foreman in J. Beohenberger's cigar-factory for one year; in 1872, he engaged in the saloon business, on Bluff st., for one year, when, in 1873, he purchased his present place of business and residence, at No. 159 South Chicago st. Mr. Schoettes was elected Alderman of the ward in which he lives, at the last municipal election of Joliet. He was married in 1873, to Elizabeth Moder; they were the parents of two children, one of whom is deceased; the name of the one now living is Mary F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schon, Carl
CARL SCHON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Greengarden; was born in Germany Jan. 14, 1833; came to the United States in 1864, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year. He was married to Miss Mary Kregar, who was born in Germany Sept. 22, 1830; they have had two children, viz., Charley and Frank. The farm of Mr. Schon consists of eighty acres, valued at $4,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schoop, Frederick W.
FRED'K W. SCHOOP, M.D., physician and surgeon, Lockport; was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, Feb. 20, 1849; his father's family immigrated to America in 1852, and settled at Blue Island, Ill.; here he engaged in farming, but soon abandoned it and moved to Chicago, where he now resides engaged in the real estate business; at the age of 12, young Schoop left home and engaged in various pursuits till he was 17, when he located at the Grand Crossing, near Chicago, and entered the employ of the I.C. R.R. Co., working at night and attending school during the day; in June, 1874, he graduated from the Englewood High School, and the following October, began a course of study in the Chicago Medical College, which he completed March 20, 1877; he entered upon the practice of his profession in Chicago, where he remained four months; October 2, 1877, he located at Lockport. He was married March 27, 1878, to Ida O. Johnson, a native of Illinois. Rep.; Episcopalian. Dr. Schoop is the first German practitioner ever located in Lockport, and is rapidly building up a fine paying practice; being a thorough scholar and polished gentleman he is worthy the support and confidence of the people.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schrader, Henry
HENRY SCHRADER, farmer; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Germany, Jan. 13, 1816; came to the United States in 1851; settled in Joliet, Ill., in 1853, where he remained until 1873, when he removed to New Lenox; his present farm consists of 140 acres, valued at $11,000. He was married Nov. 15, 1855, to Miss Dora Bues, who was born in Germany March 28, 1835; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - Arvine, William, Alfred, Meta and Cora; deceased - Henry and an infant. Mr. S. is at present School Director in District No. 2, New Lenox Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schroeder, F.
F. SCHROEDER, dealer in general merchandise, Peotone; born in Holstein, Germany, Nov. 24, 1834, where he lived and followed blacksmithing until the age of 21, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York May 9, 1856; then coming directly West, he located in Elmhurst, Du Page Co., Ill., where he worked at his trade one year, when he removed to Monee, Will Co., and run a blacksmith-shop of his own for a period of eight years; then selling out, he lived upon his farm five months, when he removed to Peotone and purchased a blacksmith-shop, but sold out soon after on account of ill health; he then engaged in general merchandise with F. Rathje, which business he still continues under the firm name of Schroeder, Smith & Collins; he is also, with Mr. Collins, largely engaged in buying and shipping grain, owning what is known as the Collins & Schroeder Elevator. He married Aug. 30, 1857, Elizabeth Conrad; she was born in Odenbach, Bavaria, Germany; they are the parents of seven children living, viz., Fredrick, Henry, William, August, Carrie, Ida and Elizabeth. Mr. Schroeder now holds the office of Town Trustee, and is serving his second term as School Director. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schroeder, F.W.
F.W. SCHROEDER, grocery merchant, Joliet; was born in Hesse Cassel, Germany, April 30, 1848; when but 3 or 4 years of age, he came, with his family, to America, his father first settling in New York, where he engaged in the tannery business; about the year 1854, the family came West to Cincinnati, Ohio; here Mr. Schroeder attended school a number of years; at the age of 14, he went to Toledo, and engaged in learning the drug business; at the age of 20 or 21, he went to Kalamazoo, Mich., and took a course in Parsons' Business College; he next located in Lemont, Cook Co., and entered the employ of B. Van Buren, having general charge of the drug store, post office, etc.; in 1872, he opened a drug establishment in Joliet; in the fall of 1873, he bought his present place of business, and, in the fall of 1874, formed a copartnership with John Keyes for three years; in 1877, he bought out his partner, and, since that time, has conducted the grocery trade alone. He was married June 1, 1872, to Mrs. Alice M. Ireson, a native of England; she has one child by her former husband. Mr. Schroeder, though comparatively a young man, has gained for himself a fine reputation as a thorough business man, and his trade is almost double that of any other business house on the East Side; the stock is full and complete at all times.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schuberth, John
JOHN SCHUBERTH, general hardware merchant, Mokena; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany May 9, 1838; came to the United States with his father's family in 1847; he is the son of Andrew Schuberth. Mr. John Schuberth was married to Miss Catherine Cappel Jan. 27, 1863; she was born in Germany June 17, 1844; they have had ten children, five of whom are living, viz., John, Henry, Andrew, Georgie and Francie; deceased, Johnnie, Elizabeth, Caroline, an infant and Mary. Mr. S. has held the offices of Collector and Supervisor in Frankfort Township three years and six months.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schulte, G.
G. SCHULTE, editor and proprietor of the Wochenblatt fur Nord-Illinois, Joliet; was born in the Province of Westphalia, Germany, Feb. 25, 1841; he was educated as a civil engineer in the Academy of Berlin, where he graduated in 1862; in 1865, he came to America, and for two years was connected with the Abend Zeitung, Chicago; he was then engaged for a year as a civil engineer on the Hell Gate excavations in the East River, New York; he then returned to Chicago, and was employed by Cook Co. for three years as a civil engineer in the preparation of the "Cook County Atlas;" then, after spending a short time on the Illinois Staats Zeitung, he came to Joliet, and purchased the Wochenblatt, a live German newspaper, established in November, 1877, and having a circulation of some two thousand copies.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Schweizer, Conrad
CONRAD SCHWEIZER, wholesale dealer in wines and liquors, Joliet; is a native of Switzerland; he was born Nov. 25, 1838, and resided there until 1859, when he came to the United States, coming direct to Joliet; he had previously learned the trade of a carpenter, and, after reaching Joliet, he followed carpentering and farming until 1863, when he went to California and remained until the spring of 1870; while there he was engaged in mining and working at his trade; on his return to Joliet, he engaged in his present business.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Searles, D.C.
D.C. SEARLES, farmer and stock, Sec. 16; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Summit, Ohio, Jan. 30, 1830. He married Miss Hattie Walker Oct. 21, 1866; she was born in Plainfield Tp., Will Co., Ill., July 8, 1836; they had four children, three living, viz., Maud L., born Oct. 8, 1867; Lynn W., born June 8, 1869, and Edna, Jan. 14, 1874. He lived in Ohio twenty-one years, when he came to Illinois and settled in Plainfield Tp., where he engaged in farming; remaining until spring of 1856, when he came to his present place; he has been Justice of the Peace eight years, and is now serving in his fourth term of Supervisor; he started in poor circumstances and now owns 700 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor. His parents, Amos Searles and Mrs. Hannah (Hulbert) Searles, came to Will Co. in the fall of 1851, and settled near Plainfield; they died April 5, 1871, and Feb. 9, 1866, respectively. His wife's parents, James Walker and Mrs. Jane G. (Walker) Walker, were natives of North Carolina and Tennessee; Mrs. Walker came to Illinois in 1806, and passed through present Will Co. in 1820 and built a house where Plainfield now stands in 1829; Mr. Walker died in Plainfield Aug. 27, 1850; Mrs. Walker died in November, 1859, in Iowa, while on a visit. Her grandfather was a missionary among the Indians, and preached the first Protestant sermon in Chicago, also in St. Louis; he was of the Methodist denomination. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Searles, Frank
FRANK SEARLES, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Hadley; was born in Westchester Co., N.Y., July 24, 1828; came to this State in 1850, and settled in Homer, where he remained four years; he removed from there to New Lenox in 1854, where he has since resided; his farm consists of 104 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married to Miss Emily White April 1, 1851; she was born in Lake Co., Ohio, June 6, 1827; they have had two children - Frank W. and Agnes E. Mr. S. has held township offices of different kinds in New Lenox for several years. His son Frank W. passed examination and received diploma at Chicago Medical College as physician and surgeon; he is at present the only physician in New Lenox.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sehring, Frederick
FREDERICK SEHRING, proprietor of the Columbia Brewery, Joliet; has lived in Will Co. since 1847; he came with his parents from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, where he was born on the 19th of December, 1834; the family settled first in Frankfort Tp., and, in 1854, came to Joliet and engaged in the hotel business; Mr. Sehring remained in the hotel until 1860, when he entered the office of the Circuit Clerk as Deputy under B.F. Russell; in 1863, he was elected Treasurer of Will Co., and re-elected in 1865; in 1868, he purchased the Columbia Brewery, which he has since remodeled, putting in steam-power and all the modern improved machinery; it is now one of the largest and finest breweries in the State, outside of Chicago; Mr. Sehring has been Alderman from the Second Ward for the past five years. He was married Jan. 16, 1865, to Miss Louise Bez, of Wurtemberg, Germany, and has seven children living - Susan E., Louis J., Margaret, Henry, Herman F., Annie and George.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sennitt, John
JOHN SENNITT, Postmaster, Plainfield; born in Stretham, England, Jan. 15, 1830; remained with parents on a farm until he was 24 years of age; in the fall of 1854, he emigrated to this country; he stopped near Cleveland, Ohio; stopping there nearly two years, during which time he worked on a farm; then, in the spring of 1857, came to this village; at the time he was an entire stranger; worked on a farm for Mr. J.W. Pennington two years, and S.S. Pratt one year; in the spring of 1860, he was engaged in the post office by K.J. Hammonds; in 1861, W. Wright was appointed, and Mr. S. continued; he was succeeded by W.R. Fraser; he continued until Grant's first election; then Mr. S. was appointed; he still holds the office. Married in April, 1871, to Emma H. Drew; she was born in the New England States in the year 1839; she came with her parents to this State when she was 5 years old; have two children - L. May and Carrie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Seward, Calvin
CALVIN SEWARD, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Joliet; one of our early settlers; was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., Sept. 23, 1812; came to this State, and settled in Joliet, Will Co., in 1846, where he remained until his arrival on his farm in New Lenox, which contains 160 acres, valued at $10,000. He was married May 17, 1838, to Miss Sarah M. Van Dusen, who was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., March 22, 1815; they have had ten children - five of whom are now living - Nancy E., Gilbert, Lucinda J., Margaret E. and Sarah M.; deceased - four infants and Andrew J. Mr. S. has held the office of Collector in New Lenox Tp. one year.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Seward, Robert L.
ROBERT L. SEWARD, retired farmer; P.O. Joliet; was born in Otsego Co., N.Y., in 1828; his early life was that of a farmer's son; he enjoyed the advantages of the common schools of his native State; in 1847, he began the trade of wagon-making in Portlandville, on the Susquehanna River, and worked under instructions three years; in August, 1850, he came West to Illinois, and first engaged in working for Rodney House, and continued with him two years; he then engaged in carpentering about one year, and, in 1854, purchased a farm in New Lenox Tp., and followed agricultural pursuits about eleven years; in 1865, having sold out, he moved to Jackson Tp., where he farmed six years; in 1871, he moved to Joliet, and has since not been actively engaged in business, except some transactions in real estate and loaning money. He was married in April, 1853, to Sarah M. Moore, a native of Otsego Co., N.Y.; she died in January, 1859. His second marriage, to Mrs. Elizabeth German, was celebrated in June, 1861; her maiden name was Brown, a daughter of one of the early settlers of Will Co. From the first wedlock two children were born - Eugene W., of Russell Co., Kan.; Cora S. His father came with him to Illinois, and died at the advanced age of 89 years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shanahan, Mother M. Francis
MOTHER M. FRANCIS SHANAHAN, Joliet; Superior of the Convent of the Sisters of St. Francis; is a native of County Limerick, Ireland; when quite young, she came to this country with her parents, who settled in New York State, residing in Cold Spring and Hudson, and afterward removed to Chicago; she was educated in St. Patrick's School, in Chicago, completing her studies there when about 17 years of age; she remained with her parents until she entered into religion at the age of 24; after completing her novitiate, she was made Directress of the school of St. Boniface in Chicago; one year later, she was transferred to Freeport, Ill., returning thence to Chicago, from which city she went to Mansfield, Ohio, as Directress of St. Peter's School, and in June, 1877, came to Joliet as Superior of the Convent here; this is the mother house of the order in this portion of the country, having twenty-one missions in Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Missouri; there are eight teachers in the home institution, five of whom are engaged in teaching in the academy, and three in Father Gerardus' Parochial School.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sharts, Mrs. W.A.
MRS. W.A. SHARTS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Herkimer, N.Y., Jan. 20, 1822; is the widow of the late W.A. Sharts, who was born in Columbia Co., N.Y., Feb. 12, 1825, and who died Feb. 2, 1878; they were married Oct. 23, 1851; they have had three children, two of whom are living - Ellen, born Nov. 11, 1852; Josephine, June 22, 1857; Charles T., born Jan. 1, 1856; died Jan. 17, 1864. Mrs. Sharts continues the business in which her husband was engaged, it being that of a farmer and stock-raiser; her farm contains 108 acres, valued at $7,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shenk, John
JOHN SHENK, butcher, Braidwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Erie Co., Penn., 1842, and is the son of Michael and Sarah (Carter) Shenk, who are among the early settlers of Reed Tp., Will Co., having made their home here in 1858; Mr. Shenk was raised on his father's farm and remained there until 1875; he then entered the butcher business in Braidwood; this business he has followed ever since; forms a partnership of Shenk & Kellogg; these gentlemen have one of the best meat markets in Braidwood. Mr. Shenk married in 1868, to Miss Sarah Wright. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shenk, Michael
MICHAEL SHENK, farmer; P.O. Braidwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Aug. 20, 1818, and is the son of Christian and Magdalene (Wolf) Shenk, of Pennsylvania; his father was a miller by trade, and died when Mr. Shenk was very young; from Lancaster Co. with his mother and children, moved to Erie Co., Penn., and remained there until 1858; he then emigrated West to Illinois and settled on the place he now lives on; he first purchased 160 acres at $20 per acre; when he arrived here the country was wild; he made all the improvements on his farm; Mr. Shenk, with hard labor, industry and good management, to-day owns 240 acres of fine, improved land, and ranks as one of the successful farmers of Will Co. Married in 1841 to Miss Sarah Ann Carter; have eight children. His mother, Magdalene Shenk, died in Erie Co., Penn.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shields, Francis
FRANCIS SHIELDS, groceries and farming, Wilmington; born in County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1833; removed to this country in 1852, locating in New York City, where he engaged as clerk in a wholesale dry goods house, and, two years later, came to this State, locating at Wilmington; in 1856, he engaged in the grocery business; owns 410 acres of land, valued at $10,450, and city property valued at $10,000. Married in 1857 to Miss Elizabeth Mahar, who was born in Queens County, Ireland; nine children by this union, six of whom are living - Thomas, Mary A., Caroline, Agnes, William and Julia; lost three - Francis, died in September, 1862; Michael, Sept. 29, 1864; Ann, Aug. 21, 1868.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shirk, Joseph
JOSEPH SHIRK, farmer and stock dealer, Sec. 29; P.O. Wilmington; owns 318 acres, valued at $30,000; born Aug. 17, 1819, in Washington, Penn.; moved with his parents and family to Franklin Co., Ind., in 1824; thence to Parke Co., Ind., in 1828, with all his father's family, consisting of seven boys and seven girls. Married Margaret Linton July 18, 1841, in Parke Co., Ind.; she was born in Crawford Co., Ill., in 1824; they moved to Will Co., Ill., in 1854; had five children - David L., Emily J., Joseph N., Sarah O. and William H. Mrs. Shirk died here March 5, 1854. Married for his second wife Mary A. Brown Dec. 15, 1854; she was born in 1829 in Parke Co., Ind.; had four children by second marriage - Andrew J., Alice, Albert and Isabell. Mr. Shirk's grandfather was born on the Alps, Switzerland, and emigrated to this country on the breaking-out of the Revolution with fifteen of his relatives, who settled in what is now Washington Co., Penn.; he was in the Revolution, participating in the battles of Trenton and Yorktown, at the latter being wounded in the heel so as to cripple him for life. At Mr. Shirk's residence may be seen the discharge from service of his grandfather in Gen. Washington's own hand-writing; he died in Franklin Co., Ind., at the advanced age of 81 years. Mr. Shirk's father (David) was a soldier in the war of 1812, under Capt. Armstrong, whose discharge Mr. Shirk has also as a relic; he (David) died in Parke Co., Ind., at the age of 73 years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shumway, Edgar B.
EDGAR B. SHUMWAY, physician and surgeon, Peotone; born in Windham Co., Vt., June 27, 1851, removing with his parents to Londonderry, Vt., when quite young; where he lived until 15 years of age, when he attended the Black River Academy at Ludlow, Vt., for five years; from there to the Chamberlin Institute and Female College, at Randolph, N.Y.; from there he came to Will Co., Ill., and taught school one term; then going to Chicago, he attended at Rush Medical College for three years, when he was interne one year at Cook Co. Hospital. He graduated at Rush Medical College in January, 1874; soon after he located in Peotone, Will Co., following his profession since that date with perfect success. He married May 25, 1875, Maggie A. Kearney; she was born in Racine, Wis.; they are the parents of one child living, viz., Edith May. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shurts, M.W.
M.W. SHURTS, railroad contractor, Joliet; was born in Hunterdon Co., N.J., Aug. 29, 1820; in 1846, he left New York for California, being a member of the 1st N.Y. Regt. I.V., raised for the Mexican war, Col. J.D. Stevens commanding; they were five months and eight days making the voyage, and on reaching San Francisco, theirs was the only vessel in the harbor; at that date, there were just six houses in the now prosperous city of San Francisco, and these were unworthy the name; the regiment was not actively engaged in the war, though it made several excursions after the Indians; in 1849, he returned to New York, occupying seven months on the eastern passage; in 1850, he came West, and located in Fulton Co., Ill., where he engaged in various pursuits; in 1859, he returned East, and subsequently went to Virginia; here he contracted on the Richmond & York River R.R.; afterward, he contracted work on Long Island and on the south side of Long Island; in 1870, he again came West, and subsequently went to Texas and engaged two years in railroading; he built 240 miles of the Houston & Texas Central R.R.; in 1875, he made a trip to Europe, and since then has spent much time in pleasure-seeking. His first wife was Agnes Hageman, a native of New Jersey; his second marriage was to Maria Simonds, a native of New York State. For the past few years Mr. Shurts has led a retired life, and is now devoting himself to the improvement of his farm, near the limits of the city, on which he hopes to lead a quiet and happy life during his declining years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Shutts, P.
P. SHUTTS, of the firm of Zarley & Co., publishers of the Joliet Signal, Joliet; was born in Ulster Co., N.Y., Oct. 7, 1849; when he was about 5 years of age, he accompanied his parents to Columbia Co., N.Y., when they spent a year in preparation for their departure for the West; in 1855, they came to Will Co., and settled about two and a half miles southeast of Joliet; Mr. Shutts received an English education in the old Babylon stone schoolhouse, and in the fall of 1872, entered the Signal office to learn the printer's trade. He became one of the proprietor's in March, 1876.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Siefker, William
WILLIAM SIEFKER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany March 15, 1825; came to the United States in 1848, and to this State in the same year; his farm consists of 160 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married to Miss Mary Holder, who was born in Russia; they have three children, viz., Lewis, Mary and William. Since Mr. Siefker's residence in this township, he has held the office of School Director four years, and Roadmaster one year.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Silliman, Samuel
SAMUEL SILLIMAN, boots, shoes, hats and caps, Wilmington; born in Williams Co., Ohio, June 3, 1848, where he resided until his removal to Wilmington, his present home, in 1870; engaged in his present business in the spring of 1874. Married, in 1877, to Miss Lettie, daughter of John Thomson; she was born in the city of Wilmington; they have one child - Chauncy L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sime, James
JAMES SIME, farmer, stone-mason and bricklayer; P.O. Wilmington; owns 160 acres, valued at $50 per acre; born in Fifeshire, Scotland, March 15, 1847; emigrated to the United States in 1869, with his father, James Sime, Sr.; his mother and rest of the family followed soon after; they all located in Plainfield Tp., this county; there his mother still resides; his father sustained injuries in his own house which proved fatal, from one John Wiley, who was giving them unnecessary disturbance while in a semi-drunken and epileptic fit, Oct. 2, 1876. Married Maggie Douglas March 30, 1875, in Chicago; she was born in Newark, N.J., Oct. 21, 1853, and came to Wilmington, this county, with her parents in 1872; have one child - James. Mr. S. worked on the building of the Iron Works at Joliet for six years; four and a half years of said time he was foreman on the building; also built the masonry along the line of the D. between the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Skeel, John F.
John F. Skeel, who is serving as clerk of the Joliet Township High School and clerk of the Joliet Township School Board is one of the best known citizens of Will County. He was born in Putnam County, Ill., Dec. 24, 1860, the son of Linus B. and Flora (Morrison) Skeel.
The boyhood of John F. Skeel was spent in Putnam County on his father’s farm. He attended the public and high schools of Granville, and later attended Wheaton College, from which he was graduated in 1883. For one year he taught in the schools of Tama, Iowa and was principal of the Granville (Ill.) High School for two years. He also served as superintendent of schools in Putnam County. Many years ago he came to Joliet, where he accepted the position of cashier and bookkeeper for the Barrett Hardware Company. He later was employed as an accountant for the Illinois Steel Company and as cashier of the Lambert & Bishop Company. In 1894 he was appointed principal of the Broadway school. Aug. 1, 1896, he was elected clerk of the Board of School Inspectors of Joliet. Upon the creation of the Joliet Township School Board in 1897, Mr. Skeel was appointed clerk. He has served both boards in that capacity continuously since that date.
On June 11, 1885, Mr. Skeel married Miss Flora C. Birdsell of Tamma, Iowa. They have two adopted sons: Gordon, born Aug. 27, 1899, is a World War veteran, lives at Joliet; and William H., born April 24, 1902, lives at Detroit, Mich.
Mr. Skeel is a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian Church of which he has served as elder for 37 years. [Source: History of Will County, Illinois by August Maue, Vol II., 1928, Page 855-856 - Submitted by Nancy Piper]

Sleeper, Daniel C.
DANIEL C. SLEEPER, Assistant Deputy Warden Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet; born in Sandown, Rockingham Co., N.H., July 5, 1832, where he lived until 13 years of age, when he went to Methuen, Mass., learning the trade of hatter; which trade he followed until 1854, when he emigrated West and settled in Joliet as clerk for Hayden Bros., in the grocery business, for two years; then one year in the same business with S.O. Simonds; in 1858, he was appointed, by Warden S.K. Casey, as keeper and assistant book-keeper of the Illinois State Penitentiary; in the spring of 1864, he visited Montana for his health and engaged in mining for three and a half years, when he returned to Joliet and was again appointed keeper until 1869, when he was appointed Assistant Deputy Warden, which office he has since held, with the exception of nine months, from July, 1871 to April, 1872, when he was Assistant Superintendent of the Reform School, at Pontiac, Ill. Married, June 20, 1861, to Alice M. Richardson; she was born in Joliet April 11, 1839; they are the parents of three children - Kate F., born May 1, 1862; George B., born May 29, 1864; Daniel C., Jr., born May 19, 1874.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Slick, Daniel
DANIEL SLICK, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Aug. 7, 1823, and is the son of John and Annie (Stoner) Slick, of Lancaster Co., Penn.; father was a carpenter by trade; Mr. Slick at 18 commenced to learn his trade, shoemaking, and followed this principally while in Pennsylvania; in 1844, he emigrated West to Illinois, and first settled in Du Page Co. While here, he married Margaret Swilly, of Lancaster Co., Penn.; he then came to Will Co.; returned to Du Page; thence to the present farm here; he has been engaged in farming ever since; Mr. Slick first made a purchase of forty acres of Government land, at $1.25 per acre; owns to-day 120 acres of fine, improved land; when he came West he was very poor; to-day is one of the successful farmers of Wheatland Tp. Member of the Evangelical Church.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Small, Eli D.
ELI D. SMALL, dealer in lumber and agent for the negotiation of loans, Wilmington; born in Noblesville, Hamilton Co., Ind., March 5, 1841, but removed to Ohio in early childhood, with his father's family; thence to this State in 1851, locating in Wilmington Tp., this county; came to the city of Wilmington, his present home, in 1854; since 1862, he has been engaged in the lumber trade and boating, in connection with other business; in 1867, he engaged in mercantile business, under the firm name of Small Bros., which continued till January, 1872, when he disposed of his interest in the store, and engaged in the lumber business on a more extensive scale, under the firm name of E.D. Small & Co.; they own propeller Mohawk Belle, and ship all lumber by way of canal and river to their lumber-yards at this place - Horse Creek and Hanford's Landing, the one at Horse Creek opened in 1875, and the latter in 1878. Several experiments have been made by different parties, and, up to 1866, over $260,000 had been expended on the Illinois & Michigan Canal and Illinois River in devising ways and means by which steam could be made a cheaper means of transportation on the canals than horse-power; great credit is due Mr. Small, owner of the Mohawk Belle, and N. Rullison, owner of the Whale, for their persistency and final success in this undertaking. In June, 1871, he was married to Miss Kate W., youngest daughter of I.B. McGinnes, of Gardner, Ill.; she was born in New Brunswick, N.J.; two children by this union - Charles D. and Howard McG.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Small, Eli N.
ELI N. SMALL, Postmaster, Custer; the subject of this sketch was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., June 20, 1828, and is the son of William and Evelina (Canfield) Small; his mother, a native of Connecticut, his father of New York, and was engaged in the wholesale grocery business in the city of New York. Mr. Small came West to Will County in 1853, and settled in Wilmington; then to Custer; here he has remained ever since; through his influence, the township of Custer was named, and in honor of Gen. Custer; is the Postmaster (the first) of Custer Tp. Married in 1857 to Miss Alice L. Easton, of New York, daughter of William Easton; they have three children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Small, John D.
JOHN D. SMALL, general stock of merchandise, Wilmington; born in Findlay, Hancock Co., Ohio, July 10, 1846; removed to Illinois in the spring of 1852, locating in Wilmington; in 1864, he attended school at Notre Dame, Ind., and four years later commenced business on his own account in this city, purchasing the stock of groceries owned by M.F. Blish. Married in 1868 to Lura Phelps, who was born in Lawrence, Mich.; three children by this union. Mr. Small is extensively engaged in the butter trade, having shipped over 100,000 pounds during the past year.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Small, William B.
WILLIAM B. SMALL, lumber merchant, Wilmington; was born in Hancock Co., Ohio, February 24, 1851, and is the son of Daniel and Sophronia (Hall) Small; came West in 1851; commenced the lumber business with his brother E.D. Small, known as E.D. Small & Co., in Wilmington, June 17, 1872; there they met with good success; they then started a lumber-yard in Jersey City, Custer Tp., 1876; then a lumber-yard at Smith's Landing; these gentlemen are the largest lumber merchants on the Kankakee River; buy their lumber they the cargo at Chicago; own one of the best steamers on the Kankakee River used in transferring lumber from Chicago to their lumber-yards at Wilmington, Jersey City and Smith's Landing; their prices in lumber are the cheapest in any part of the State. Mr. Small married Sept. 17, 1873, to Miss Addie Warner, of Illinois; they have two children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smillie, John J.
JOHN J. SMILLIE, farmer and merchant; P.O. Wilmington. This gentleman is one of the oldest settlers of Will Co.; was born in Madison Co., N.Y., Oct. 24, 1828, and is the son of John and Catharine (Kern) Smillie; his father was a native of Scotland and engaged in farming, having died when Mr. Smillie was very young; his mother (of New York), married to Jeremiah Gray. Mr. Smillie was raised on a farm, and with his parents emigrated West to Illinois in 1835, and settled in Will Co., east of Joliet, then on the forks of the Du Page River; thence to McHenry Co.; here he remained until 1850; he then went to the gold fields of California, engaged in mining, remained in California about four years, was very successful; he then returned to Illinois and settled on the farm he now lives on; he first purchased 160 acres of land at $3.75 per acre, which land was purchased with money he had made in California. Mr. Smillie has been very successful in life; he commenced a poor boy, and to-day ranks as one of the successful farmers of Will Co.; owns 674 acres of fine, improved land. He moved to Wilmington in order to school his children; returned to the farm, and has lived here ever since. When he first came to Will Co., the country was very wild; plenty of Indians, and very troublesome at times; game in abundance, deer and wolves; Mr. Smillie has killed many deer, being considerable of a hunter in his younger days; has held various offices of public trust in his township. Married in 1855 to Miss Olive Reed, of Will Co., whose parents settled in Will Co. at an early day; eleven children, nine living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smit, Carl
CARL SMIT, farmer; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1862, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 100 acres, valued at $5,000. He was married to Mrs. Smit March 28, 1876; they have one child, viz., Joanna. Mrs. Smit was previously married to Mr. John Smit, now deceased; they have had seven children, six of whom are living, viz., Augusta, August, Amale, Anchan, Willie and Ernest; deceased, Frederick.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, Allen
Florence township: Allen SMITH, farmer, Sec. 16: P.O. Wilmington; 100 acres, valued at $50 per acre owned by his sons Oscar and Silas. Silas married Mary NIECE in March, 1878, Mr. Smith Sr. was born in Franklin Co., Vt, October 24, 1809. Married Annie BELL in 1831, in Vermont; she was born in Franklin Co., Vt, and died there in 1833. Married for his second wife, Annie RICE; she was born May 15, 1811; they emigrated to Illinois in 1857, and located in this neighborhood; had eleven children, all by second marriage, ten living - Elvira, Olive (deceased), Warner, Edgar D. (should be N.), Ednah R. Laura M., Joseph A., Ezra W., Oscar L., Silas C. and Emma R., all born in Franklin County, VT. Warner enlisted in 1861 in Co. I, 100th IL V. I; Edgar D. in 1861 in Co, A, 100th IL V.I.; both served until the close of the war. Elvira is now Mrs. Philo DRAPER of Minnesota, Ednah is now Mrs. Andrew BAIRD, of Iowa; Laura is Mrs. W. BASKERVILLE, of this county; Emma is Mrs. Alex NIECE, of this county. [The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr & co; 1878]

Smith, Charles C.
CHARLES C. SMITH, farm and stock, Sec. 20; P.O. Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in Jefferson Co., East Tenn., May 2, 1818. He married Miss Corinza Burr July 24, 1850; she was born in Tippecanoe Co., Ind., June 19, 1831; they had ten children, nine living, viz., Barton, Emma Jane, William T., Ella May, Charles W., Lucy M., Corinza A., Sarah E. and Floyd H.; Edgar F. died Sept. 5, 1873. He lived in Tennessee ten years, when his parents moved to Fountain Co., Ind., and engaged in farming; remained until 1835; they then moved to Joliet, Ill., where they carried on a general teaming business until 1840; he then followed peddling until 1847, when he came to his present place, and followed stock-raising during the summer, and acted as buyer for the American Fur Company during the winters until 1852, when he turned his entire attention to his farming and stock interests; his business, though starting in a very small way, has grown to enormous proportions, and he is at present farming over 3,000 acres; he is also very largely interested in stock-raising; during the past year, he has bought an interest in a creamery at Channahon, Ill., since which time he has added a dairy of 150 cows to his farming and stock business. He has been Road Commissioner some five years, and was Supervisor four years, one year receiving the unanimous vote. His father, Barton Smith, continued his residence in Joliet until he died in September, 1862; his mother, Mrs. Fatha Smith, died in 1875. Mr. Smith practiced as veterinary surgeon in Joliet, and was Justice of the Peace and Police Magistrate.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, D.Y.
D.Y. SMITH, foreman of the car repairs, Chicago & Alton Railroad, Joliet; was born in Fallsbury, Sullivan Co., N.Y., June 9, 1833; he remained on the farm until he was 16 years old, and then learned the carriage and sleigh making business, which he followed until 1856, he then went to Scranton, Pa., and was employed for a year in the car shops of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co., from which place he went to Dubuque, Iowa, in the car department of the Dubuque & Pacific Railroad Co. (now the Illinois Central); in July, 1860, he came to Joliet, and was employed under the master mechanic until 1863, when he became foreman of the car repairs, which position he still occupies. He was married Jan. 21, 1863, to Mrs. R.E. Tullock, of Joliet; she is a native of Delaware Co., N.Y., and has been a resident of Joliet for the past thirty-three years; they have one daughter - Zuleika Y. Mrs. Smith has also three children of her former marriage - Jannette A. Tullock (now Mrs. Hurd), Avalena (wife of L.P. Baker, of Winterset, Iowa) and George A., of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, F.G.
F.G. SMITH, carriage manufacturer, Joliet; was born in Walpole Co., N.H., May 1, 1837; when he was about 12 years of age, he removed with his parents to Essex Co., N.Y.; at the age of 13, he entered his father's carriage manufactory, and there thoroughly learned every branch of the carriage business, which he continued in Essex Co. until 1876, when he came to Joliet; he first located at 54 and 56 Bluff street, and recently removed to Van Buren street, opposite the Episcopal Church; he was the first to introduce the Concord side-spring in Joliet, and is also the sole manufacturer in this city of the New Empire cross-spring buggy. Mr. Smith was married in October, 1855, to Miss Abbie R. ______, of Montpelier; she died in March, 1875, leaving one son, Franklin A., now engaged with his father. He was married again Oct. 11, 1877, to Miss Ella A. Haywood, of Will Co.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, George Y.
GEORGE Y. SMITH, farmer, Sec. 1; P.O. Plainfield; the above gentleman is a native of Pennsylvania; he was born in Centre Co., Aug. 8, 1813. He married Miss Magdalena Ream Oct. 6, 1836; she was born in Stark (now Summit) Co., Ohio, Jan. 2, 1818; they had eleven children, nine living, viz., Sarah, John R., William B., Mary M., Andrew A., Conrad E., George B., Adam K. and Amos M. He lived in Pennsylvania about eleven years, when he moved to Stark (now Summit) Co., Ohio, with his parents; engaged in farming, and remained until 1851, during which time he learned the wagon-making trade; he then came to his present place. He has been a member of the Evangelical Church since 1835, and has acted as Superintendent of Sabbath schools, Trustee, Class Leader and Exhorter. He owns 176 acres in this county, which he has earned principally by his own labor. His parents, John and Mary Yearick Smith, are not living; they died in 1849 and 1850 respectively.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, Hugh
HUGH SMITH, merchant, Peotone; general merchant, of the firm of Schroeder, Smith & Collins; born in Johnstone, Scotland, Aug. 28, 1839, living there until 15 years of age; he emigrated with his parents to America in 1855; removing to Vermont, he lived seven years and followed farming; then to Saxonville, Mass., a short time, where he enlisted in August, 1862, in the 33rd Mass. V.I., remaining with his regiment until the close of the war; he was in many severe battles, among them Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in the East; Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca and Dallas with the Western army, under Hooker; at the battle of Dallas, being severely wounded, he was granted a furlough, and, when sufficiently recovered, he again joined his regiment, and was with Sherman's army on its march to the sea, and until the close of the war, when, being mustered out of service, he came West and located upon a farm in Will Co., Ill., for six years; then to Massachusetts one year; then returning to Peotone, he engaged in the mercantile business, which he has since followed. He married June, 1866, Amelia Gilkerson; she was born in Vermont; they are the parents of three children now living, viz., Elmer T., Jessie A. and Amelia B. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, Ira W.
IRA W. SMITH, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Huron Co., Ohio, Nov. 27, 1834, and is the son of Ira W. and Louis (sic) (Beckwith) Smith, of Vermont; his father was engaged in farming and stock-raising, and died universally respected, Feb. 18, 1870, at 64 years of age; his mother died June 7, 1847, 37 years of age. Mr. Smith came West to Illinois in November, 1844, and settled in Rockville, Kankakee Co., and, in 1857, he came to the place he now lives on; here he has remained until the breaking-out of the late war. At the first call for volunteers (Aug. 27, 1861), he enlisted as private in Co. D, 4th I.V.C., under Col. T. Lyle Dickey, who was a soldier in the Mexican war; the 4th I.V.C. was changed to the 12th I.V.C., and participated in some of the hard-fought battles during the war - Ft. Henry, Ft. Donelson (where the first substantial success of the war was achieved), at Pittsburg Landing (where a victory was snatched from the jaws of death), in the campaigns, the battles, and the siege of Vicksburg and other prominent battles under Gen. Grant, Gen. McPherson and Gen. Dodge; Co. D was with these generals as an escort; in a skirmish in Mississippi, Mr. Smith was wounded, which caused him to be off duty six weeks, and four months' sickness; excepting this he served full time and was honorably discharged; mustered out as Captain of Co. D, in December, 1865. At the close of the war he returned home here; he has remained here ever since. Married June, 1866, to Miss Ella Hanson, of Illinois, by whom he has two children; has 755 acres of fine, improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, Mrs. Jacob
MRS. JACOB SMITH, farmer and fruit grower; P.O. Lockport; Mrs. Smith was born in Ripley, N.Y., Feb. 25, 1816; she is the daughter of Martin and Margaret (Sacia) Smith. She was married first to Almon Taylor, a native of Chenango, N.Y., Jan. 26, 1832. In the fall of 1835, she came with her husband to Illinois, and settled in Lockport Tp., Will Co., on the farm just north of that now owned by Patrick Fitzpatrick; in 1850, Mr. Taylor went to California and engaged in mining; while there, he met with a severe accident, from the effects of which he died Oct. 31, 1850. Mrs. Taylor was married a second time, March 26, 1852, to Jacob Smith, a native of Tennessee; from first wedlock, four children were born - Katie, Marcus M., Martin S., Horace A.; of these Marcus and Martin are dead; from second wedlock, she has two children - George B. and Jennie L. Owns fifty acres in Lockport Tp., forty of which is set in fruit. Mrs. Smith has seen much of pioneer life in the West, and is one of the few that is left who settled here in those early days.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Smith, John W.
JOHN W. SMITH, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 28; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Lincolnshire, England Feb. 10, 1825. He married Miss Catheron Phillips April 15, 1861; she was born in Herefordshire, England March 19, 1834; they had seven children, four living, viz., Saline C., Anna N., Mary C. and Martha Jane. He lived in England until he was 20 years of age; he then came to the United States via New Orleans; thence to St. Louis, when he returned to England, remaining some six months; he went to Australia, where he remained one year, and then again come to the United States and settled in Ohio, where he remained a short time, and came to Illinois; in 1858, he settled in Will Co., and in 1868, he settled on his present place. He had no means to begin with, and now owns 480 acres in this township, all of which he has earned by his own labor. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Snapp, Henry
HON. HENRY SNAPP, attorney at law, of the firm of Snapp & Snapp, Joliet; was born in Livingston Co., N.Y., June 30, 1822; when he was but 3 years old, his father's family removed to Rochester, N.Y., and, in 1833, came to Will Co. and settled in what is known as "Yankee Settlement," in Homer Tp.; his father, Abram Snapp, was a farmer, a man of inflexible will, of sterling and uncompromising integrity, of commanding presence, and, though of unassuming manners, a man of great talent, and a highly respected citizen; he died in 1865, leaving four children - three daughters and one son, Henry, who inherited, to a large extent, the characteristics of his father; he remained at home, on the farm, until he became of age, when he came to Joliet and read law in the offices of E.C. Fellows, Esq., and Hon. S.W. Randall; he was admitted to the bar in 1843, but did not begin practice until 1850; he started out in his profession with a determination to make an able lawyer; he relied not upon natural ability, but applied himself to study, and has been a close student ever since; being a ready speaker, and a man of brilliant imagination, and of pronounced opinions on all moral and political questions, it is not strange that he should be selected by his fellow-citizens to represent them in the councils of state; he was elected to the State Senate in the fall of 1868, and in 1872 resigned the office to accept the nomination as Representative in Congress, from the Sixth Congressional District (now the Seventh); he was elected for the unexpired term of Hon. B.C. Cook, who had resigned, and having served out his term, declining a renomination, he returned to Joliet and resumed the practice of his profession; it may be mentioned that in 1854 he held the office of City Attorney; was for eight years a partner of Hon. Francis Goodspeed, now Judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit of Illinois. He was married in January, 1847, to Miss Adeline Broadie, of Joliet, and has five children - Sarah, wife of Dorrance Dibell, of Joliet; Elizabeth (now Mrs. George M. Campbell, of Joliet), Henry D., (engaged in practice with his father), Howard M. (attorney at law in Joliet), and Charles D.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Snoad, Henry
HENRY SNOAD, of the firm of H. Snoad & Co., dry goods and groceries, Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Kent Co., England, Sept. 26, 1819. He married Miss Julia Caswell Oct. 20, 1847; she was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., and died March 6, 1857; they had three children, none living; his present wife was Mrs. Betsy A. Winslow, formerly Miss Sheldon; she was born in New York Aug. 9, 1822, and married Jan. 3, 1858. He lived in England twenty-two years; then came to the United States and settled in Tioga Co., Penn., and engaged in farming; remained four years; then came to Illinois and settled in Will Co., at Plainfield, where he engaged as clerk in general merchandise store; remained three years, when he moved to Joliet and engaged in grocery, and remained one year; he then went to Kankakee Co., engaged in farming, and next returned to Will Co., and, in 1853, he engaged in farming in Jackson Tp., and followed same until 1867, when he engaged in his present business. He has held the offices of Postmaster, Justice of the Peace and Town Clerk. He formerly was Station Agent on C. & A. R.R.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Snow, Dwight M.
DWIGHT M. SNOW, farmer and breeder of herd registered Jersey cattle; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Worcester Co., Mass., Sept. 28, 1826; came to this State in 1861, and settled in McLean Co.; he removed to Will Co., and settled in New Lenox in 1870; his present farm consists of eighty acres, valued at $6,000. He was married Oct. 9, 1849, to Miss Maria A. Woods, who was born in Worcester Co., Mass., March 8, 1826; they have had four children, three of whom are living - Nellie M., Kate F. and Fred M.; deceased - Charles E.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sollitt, J.B., Jr.
J.B. SOLLITT, JR., Deputy Sheriff of Will Co., Joliet; was born in Yorkshire, England, Sept. 9, 1843; when he was about 6 years old, his parents came to this country and settled in Chicago, where they resided until 1855; they then came to Will Co. and settled in the township of Will, being among the early settlers of that township; they now reside in Peotone; Mr. Sollitt followed farming until March, 1877, when he engaged in business in Peotone; in March, 1878, he was appointed to his present position. He was married Feb. 26, 1868, to Miss Jennie E. Sollitt, of Chicago, and has three children living - Della E., Elmer A. and Beatrice V. In 1874, Mr. Sollitt was elected Supervisor, and served three years, until his removal from the town, when he resigned the office; he served nearly three years as Township Treasurer, two years as Commissioner of Highways and about three years as School Director.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Spafford, Robert
ROBERT SPAFFORD, Postmaster, Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Upper Canada Sept. 30, 1822. He married Miss Elizabeth Beckwith April 20, 1847; she was born in Upper Canada March 5, 1827; they have eight children, viz., Moses, Sarah E., Irinda, Daniel, Robert, Jr., Mary, Rachel and Norah. He lived in Canada about twenty-six years; was engaged on his father's farm; he then moved to Illinois, and settled in Will Co., in 1848, and engaged in farming in Jackson Tp., and has lived here since, except three years in Marseilles; he followed farming until 1860, when he took the position of railroad agent at this place, and continued eight years; he then clerked in a general merchandise store for four years; in 1872, he was appointed Postmaster, and has held the office since. He has been Assessor several years; also Constable, Town Trustee and School Director.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Spangler, George
GEORGE SPANGLER, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Center Co., Penn., May 18, 1826; he remained with his parents till about 19 years of age, engaged in farming; in 1846, he left home and came to Germantown, Montgomery Co., Ohio, where he engaged in peddling pottery for a cousin, in whose employ he remained about two years. In 1848, he returned home, and May 17 of that year was married to Catharine Kopp, a native of Pennsylvania; as a result of this union, ten children have been born - George F., Allie A., Wilson, Oliver Z., Elmore E., Howard, Agnes A., Mary C., Emma and Allie. Owns 400 acres of land in Lockport Tp., worth $60 per acre; his farms are well improved, and ornamented with good, substantial dwellings and barns. Most of his sons are married and started in life for themselves. Mr. Spangler was not by any means wealthy when he came West, but, by industry and good management, he has reared his large family and secured a fine competency for them all; he is recognized in his community as a very successful farmer.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Spangler, Henry
HENRY SPANGLER, farmer, Sec. 12; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Summit Co., Ohio, Feb. 26, 1837. He married Miss Rachel Grove in February, 1857; she was born in Summit Co., Ohio, April 26, 1836; they had five children, four living, viz., Samuel M., Elvy G., Alvin O. and Dora A; Amanda M. died July 13, 1878; he lived in Ohio twenty years, then came to Illinois and settled on his present place, and has lived here since. He has been Supervisor of this township ten terms, Justice of the Peace eight years, also Collector and Road Commissioner. He was in moderate circumstances when he came here; he bought an eighty, going in debt for the greater part of the same; he now owns 400 acres in this township which he has principally earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Spencer, Horace
HORACE SPENCER, M.D., physician, Plainfield; was born in Shaftsbury, Vt., Feb. 11, 1846; resided with his parents until of age; came to this State in 1858; studied medicine with Dr. Perkins three years; spent eight months in the St. Louis Medical College, after which he attended one course of lectures in the Bennett Medical College of Chicago; graduated there in 1871. Married Hattie Corbin Sept. 29, 1869; she was born May 20, 1848; have two children - May and Flora. Mrs. S. is a daughter of Dr. O.J. Corbin (deceased) a former resident and practitioner here; he was born in New Hampshire May 2, 1807; graduated at Dartmouth College, N.H.; came to Plainfield in 1836, and commenced the practice of medicine until his death, which occurred April 3, 1869; his wife was Mary L. Goss; she was born in Montpelier, Vt.; came to this town with her parents in 1833; she died in 1864, aged about 48 years. Dr. C. was well known as a good physician and had a very extensive practice.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sperry, George
GEORGE SPERRY, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Lockport; was born in Rochester, N.Y., April 27, 1826; he carried on agricultural implements business two years, and taught school for three years in the State of New York; in 1856, he came to this county, teaching school eight years during the winter months and farming during the summer; in 1857, he came to the farm he now resides on. He enlisted as a private in 1862, in the 100th Ill. V.I., serving two years, and was promoted to First Lieutenant 22nd N.Y. Cav., serving as such six months, when he was promoted as Captain in the same regiment, and also served as Regimental Quartermaster, and subsequently, before being mustered out, as Brigade Quartermaster; he was promoted to the rank of Major for service in the field in the capture of Early's army at Waynesboro, Va., and remained such until mustered out July 4, 1865; Mr. Sperry, during his term of service, was responsible for over one million and a half of Government property, and, what very few officers of our army can say, has certificates of non-indebtedness from every department of the Government from which he had drawn supplies, consisting of the Quartermaster's, Ordnance and Commissary. In 1873, he went to Kansas and took up a claim of 160 acres under the "Homestead Law." He married his first wife Miss Mary D. Cook (daughter of Hon. Bates Cook, former Controller of the State of New York under the late Gov. DeWitt Clinton) in Lewiston, N.Y., July 6, 1851; she died in Henrietta, N.Y., April 6, 1853; he married his second wife, Mrs. Oliver Peck, April 5, 1857. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sprague, Thomas J.
THOMAS J. SPRAGUE, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Hamburg, Erie Co., N.Y., Nov. 23, 1810; he remained at home until his majority, experiencing the life of a farmer's son; farming summers and attending school a short time during the winter; in 1837, he came West to prospect the country, and in March, 1838, he settled in Du Page Tp.; the first year, he tilled a farm owned by Joseph Bessey, and the following year labored on the I. & M. Canal on the section just below the Joliet Mound; in 1840, he purchased 160 acres on Sec. 22, Du Page Tp.; this he still owns, and here he has resided about eighteen years; in the fall of 1858, he removed to his present residence, on Secs. 34 and 27. He was married Jan. 8, 1844, to Mrs. Lydia Godfrey, daughter of Shubel Swift; her father was one of the pioneers of Du Page Tp.; have had nine children - Charles, Elizabeth, Harriet, Thomas, Frank and Celia living; Lydia, Douglas and Thaddeus, deceased. Owns 590 acres, valued at $30,000; has held the office of Township Collector and that of Assessor three or four terms. Mr. Sprague was without means when he came West, and by industry and good management has accumulated what he has; he is also extensively engaged in dairying in connection with his farming.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Staehle, C.W.
C.W. STAEHLE, bookbinder, Joliet; was born in Tubingen, Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, March 13, 1825; he was educated at the University of Tubingen, and afterward learned the bookbinder's trade, which he followed until he was 26 years of age, when he came to the United States; this was in 1851; he spent four years in New York City, working at different trades, the last year as draughtsman for Elias Howe, the inventor of the sewing machine; from New York, he came directly to Joliet, and for eight years was engaged as pattern-maker in Jones' agricultural foundry; in 1859, he established his present business in a small way, having no capital, afterward combining the picture-frame business; by attention to business and the wants of his customers, his business has steadily increased, until now his house is the leading one in his line in the city. Mr. Staehle has been Notary Public for the past nine years; in 1868, he was elected City Collector, serving one year; he has been a member of the Board of School Inspectors constantly since 1868, the past six years being Clerk of the Board. He was married in 1849 to Miss Mary Bertsch, of Wurtemberg, Germany, and has seven children living - Christian, Louise, Otto, Albert, Edwin, Fred and Martha.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stark, Israel
ISRAEL STARK, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Dec. 11, 1842, and is the son of William and Elizabeth (Coller) Stark; his father was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; his mother was born near Philadelphia, Penn.; in 1844, with nine children, emigrated West to Illinois, and settled in Wheatland Tp., Will Co., on the farm where his son Jacob now lives; here they set out in farming; Mr. Wm. Stark having retired from farming, he moved to Plainfield, then to Naperville; at present, he is living in Du Page Co., at the good old age of 78 years. Mr. Stark married Miss Sarah Lantz, of Erie Co., Penn., by whom he had seven children. He is a member of the Evangelical Church. His brother Martin was in the late war; enlisted in the 33rd Ill. V.I.; served until the end of the war and was honorably discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stark, Jacob
JACOB STARK, farmer; P.O. Naperville; the subject of this sketch was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., and is the son of William and Elizabeth (Coller) Stark, of Pennsylvania, who emigrated West in 1844, with nine children, and settled on the present farm that Mr. Stark now owns; here they set out in farming and made all the improvements on the farm, as the country was comparatively new; Mr. William Stark has retired from farming, being in his 78th year; now living in Du Page County; Jacob Stark married Miss Mary Hartman, daughter of Adam and Susan (Buget) Hartman, of Lancaster Co., Penn., who emigrated West to Illinois, in 1842; have ten children. Is a member of the Evangelical Church. Owns 220 acres of fine, improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stassen, H.H. Sr.,
H.H. STASSEN, SR., retired farmer; P.O. Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany Sept. 15, 1805, under King Peter of Oldenburg; came to the United States in 1854, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in the same year; he is the father of H.H. Stassen, Jr., of Greengarden Tp. The farm of Mr. S. consists of seventy-seven acres, valued at $4,000. He was married to Miss Meta Ulreachs, now deceased, who was born in Germany March 11, 1808, and who died Sept. 3, 1865; they have had eight children, four of whom are living, viz., Mary, Henry, Matilda and Mena; deceased, Anna, two infants and Diedrich.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stassen, Herman Henry
HERMAN HENRY STASSEN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers in the county; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1854, and to this State and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 160 acres, valued at $7,000; he has held the office of Supervisor six years; he has also been a member of the Legislature one term. He was married to Miss G. Maria Dudden; they have two children, viz., Charles and Menno. He is also Chairman of the Board of Supervisors; was elected this present year; he is Treasurer of the Greengarden Insurance Company, which is fully described in the general history of the township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stassen, John
JOHN STASSEN, nurseryman, and agent for Greengarden Insurance Co., Monee; one of our first settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1856, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm and nursery grounds consists of eighty acres, valued at $5,000. He was married to Miss Anna Tolkers, who was born in Germany; they have seven children - Maggie C., Dora K., Annie J., Gerry F., Henrietta, Dietrieck and Riecka.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Steel, W.A.
HON. W.A. STEEL, proprietor of the Joliet Stone Quarries, Joliet; was born in Blairsville, Penn., Oct. 11, 1836; his father, Hon. Stewart Steel, was a lawyer of eminence in that State; Mr. Steel, when about 17 years of age, spent a short time in mercantile business in Cumberland, Md., and Pittsburgh, Penn.; in 1855, he came West and spent a short time in Joliet on his way to Missouri, where he built six miles of the North Missouri Railroad, and there made his first start in a business career which has been so eminently successful; in 1857, he returned to Joliet, which since that time has been his permanent home. He became cashier for Messrs. Sanger & Casey, who had just obtained the contract for building the State Penitentiary. In 1858, he went to Alton as Deputy Warden of the State Penitentiary; then located in that city, the Warden being Samuel K. Casey, who resided in Joliet, and remained in the sole charge of the commerce and discipline of that institution until July, 1860, at which time he removed the last of the convicts to the new institution at Joliet; he then entered the law office of Judge Newton D. Strong, of St. Louis, having previously pursued his law studies in private; he was admitted to the bar in St. Louis on the 4th of April, 1861. On the breaking-out of the rebellion, he engaged in the construction of four monitors for the Government, viz.: the Tuscumbia, Indianola, Chillicothe and the Etlah, the last being a full-blooded monitor; he afterward enrolled a battalion of 450 men, called the National Iron Works Battalion; was commissioned Major and placed in command of the battalion, and stationed in St. Louis for the defense of that city, where he remained until after the close of the war. In July, 1865, Mr. Steel engaged with his father-in-law, Lorenzo P. Sanger, in opening his present extensive quarries, the largest in the country, the firm being Sanger & Steel, and so continued till March 1, 1871, when he purchased Mr. Sanger's interest, and is now the sole proprietor. Among the prominent buildings for which Mr. Steel has furnished the stone may be mentioned the Custom-houses at Madison, Wis. and Des Moines, Iowa, about sixty Court Houses and Jails in Illinois, Indiana and Michigan, among them the new Court House at Rockford, Ill., the finest in the State outside of Chicago, and the St. Louis Four Courts; the Government buildings at Rock Island, for which he furnished fully 30,000 car-loads of stone; the railroad bridge over the Mississippi River at Dubuque, the United States Marine Hospital at Chicago, and a portion of the stone for new State Capitols of Illinois and Michigan, besides which are churches and private buildings without number. Stone from his quarries is to be found in cemeteries throughout all of the Northwestern States. Besides his quarry interests, he sank and worked the first shafts in the Wilmington coal region. In March, 1870, Mr. Steel was licensed to practice in the Supreme Court of the State, and on the 22nd of April following, in the Supreme Court of the United States, and in the United States Court of Claims, Jan. 10, 1871; he has not followed the practice of law except in the United States Courts at Washington, and then only attending the cases of himself and friends. He led the movement which procured the passage of an act of the Legislature empowering the city of Joliet to make an appropriation for the building of the Joliet Iron and Steel Works, the largest in this country, and with two exceptions, the largest in the world; this was accomplished in the face of the most violent opposition, not the least being the Governor's veto. He was married Jan. 16, 1862, to Miss Frances Louise Sanger, daughter of the late Col. Lorenzo P. Sanger, of Joliet, and has three children - Sanger (now a student in Racine College), Louise and Frances. Mr. Steel has collected a very valuable library of 6,000 volumes, including works on law, medicine, theology, science and general literature, among which are many old and rare volumes some of which were printed as long ago as 1537; a further notice of this library may be found in the history of the city, in another part of this work; he also inaugurated the first public library in Joliet, in 1867. Mr. Steel was first elected Mayor of Joliet in 1869, and has three times since been elected to the same office.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Steen, William H.
WILLIAM H. STEEN, merchant, Braidwood; was born in Renfrewshire, Scotland, July 29, 1849, and is the son of James and Agnes (Hare) Steen, of Scotland; his father was a coal miner; here Mr. Steen, at the age of 9, entered the mining business; in 1865, with his father, emigrated to America and landed in New York City, thence to the coal field of Pennsylvania, in Schuylkill Co.; engaged in mining about three years; then to Ohio one and a half years in mining; returned to Schuylkill Co., Penn., and in 1870 came West to Illinois and settled in Braidwood; here he commenced working in the mines, and remained in this business until 1877. Was elected City Clerk of Braidwood in 1877, which office he still holds; was also Alderman of the city of Braidwood two years. Is a National Greenbacker in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. Married in 1869, to Miss Mary Ann Robinson, of Scotland, by whom they have two children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stein, Heinrich
HEINRICH STEIN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Germany, Jan. 15, 1837; came to the United States in 1856, and settled on his present farm in New Lenox, Will Co., Ill.; it contains 148 acres; is situated on Sec. 34, and is valued at $7,500. He was married to Miss Louise Stricher, who was born in Germany July 22, 1838; they have had four children - Henry, Lizzie, Emma and Louise. Mr. Stein has held offices of Street Commissioner and School Trustee, three years each.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stellwagen, Mathias
MATHIAS STELLWAGEN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany May 12, 1832; came to the United States in 1842, and to this State in 1844, when he settled in Frankfort, Will Co.; his farm consists of 240 acres, valued at $14,000; it is situated on Secs. 14 and 15 in Frankfort Tp., and Sec. 32 in Orland Tp., Cook Co. Mr. S. was married to Miss Margaret Stellwagen; they have had six children, viz., William, John, Margaret C., Henry, Jacob and George A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stephen, D.S.
D.S. STEPHEN, of the firm of Stephen Bros., manufacturers of agricultural implements, wagons, buggies, etc., Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Scotland March 14, 1836; came to the United States in 1843, when he settled in Homer, Will Co., excepting three years absence in Michigan, his residence has been in Will Co. He was married to Miss Addie C. Bathrick; they have had two children, viz., Marian F. and Edwin L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stephen, Joseph
JOSEPH STEPHEN, manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles, etc., Joliet; is a son of John Stephens (sic), who came to Joliet in 1846, and is now a resident of this city; he was born in Grassendorf, Alsace, France, Feb. 17, 1837, and came with his father's family, to this country in 1845, and, after spending one year in Ohio, came to Joliet as above stated; he learned his trade of a harness-maker with John Bergen, in Joliet, completing his apprenticeship when he was 15 years old, after which he worked at his trade in various places in this State and Iowa for six years; he then went to Waco, Texas, where he remained till the breaking-out of the rebellion, when he found himself obliged to either take sides with the South or leave the country; he chose the latter alternative, and returned to Joliet; in the fall of 1861, he began his present business. He was married Nov. 12, 1861, to Miss Antonette Helmel, who was born in Rinough, Alsace, Aug. 4, 1832, and came to this country, with her parents, in early childhood; they have five children: Lottie L., Oscar J., Edmund R., Herman and Bertram. Mr. Stephen is at present School Trustee, to which office he was elected in April, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stephen, Joseph S.
JOSEPH S. STEPHEN, Notary Public, collector and conveyancer, Frankfort Station; one of our early and active settlers; was born in Scotland June 10, 1841; came to the United States in 1843. He has been a resident of Will Co. for the past thirty-four years. Since his residence in Frankfort, which commenced in 1847, his business has been, at first, that of a farmer boy, receiving a liberal education. He, at the age of 31, entered into the grain business, also, at about the same time, he was elected Justice of the Peace; he retained the position four years. As a participant in the late war, he served in the 20th and 134th Ill. V.I. three years and six months. He was married to Miss Helen Mitchell July 3, 1866.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stephen, Magdalena
MRS. MAGDALENA STEPHEN, Joliet; was born in Schoenenburg, Canton Sultz, Alsace, Feb. 24, 1826; she is a daughter of Peter and Barbara Weishaar, and came to this country with her parents, who settled in Madison, Cook Co., Ill., in 1844; her father died April 15, 1862; her mother is still living in the full possession of her health and faculties, at the age of 88 years; she was married July 12, 1851, to Michael Blattner, of Madison. He was a native of Schoenenburg, Alsace, and came to this country at the same time with the Weishaar family; he died Oct. 2, 1852, leaving one daughter, Mary Philomena, wife of Dr. John Scheuber, of Fond du Lac, Wis. On the 14th of July, 1853, the subject of this sketch married the late Sebastian Stephen, an early and respected citizen of Joliet. He was born in Dowerdorf, Alsace, on the 8th of September, 1810; was apprenticed to the tailor's trade at the age of 14, and at 22 entered the French army and served seven years; in the spring of 1843, he came to this country, and the following year, 1844, settled in Joliet; he followed the merchant tailoring business until about 1857, when he engaged in the brewery business; in 1862, he resumed merchant tailoring, which he continued till his death, which occurred July 4, 1873; he was first married in 1845, to Miss Angeline Orte, who died in December, 1852, leaving three sons - Sebastian, Aliosius and Henry. Mrs. Stephen still resides in Joliet, surrounded by her family of six children - Frances C. (now Mrs. Michael Meyer, of Joliet), Mary E., Theresa J., Joseph A., Rosa K. and Jennie A.; one daughter, Mary Magdalena, died in February, 1857.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stephen, Michael
MICHAEL STEPHEN, farming, Sec. 19; P.O. Joliet; was born in Alsace, France (now Germany), May 22, 1835. He married Miss Mary M. Blattner Jan. 15, 1857; she was born same place in 1836; they had seven children, six living, viz., Mary J., John A., Mary A., Frank M., George S. and Annie M. He lived in Alsace about ten years when his parents came to the United States, and, in 1846, they came to Will Co. and settled in Joliet, and engaged in farming; in 1857, he came to his present place; he has been School Director and Road Commissioner; he started in poor circumstances and now owns 140 acres here and 240 in Kendall Co., which he has earned by his own labor. His parents, John Stephen and Mrs. Otillia (Hout) Stephen, are living in Joliet. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stevens, Benjamin
BENJAMIN STEVENS, butcher, Sec. 21; P.O. Joliet; born in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, England, Oct. 16, 1824, where he learned and followed the slaughtering business until he came to America, in 1854, and settled in Joliet the same year and engaged in the slaughtering business, which business he has since followed; Mr. Stevens has slaughtered nearly all the meat used in Joliet for nearly twenty years. He married, July 18, 1857, Miss Elizabeth Bossom; she was born in Oxford, England, June 23, 1831; she came, with her parents, to America in 1854. Mr. Stevens has about thirty acres of land one mile south of Joliet. They have one child living - Ann, born Oct. 3, 1858.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stevens, I.D.
I.D. STEVENS, secretary Solar Stove Works, Joliet; was born in Joliet, Will Co., Ill., in 1851; he enjoyed the advantages of the public schools of his native town, gaining thereby a good common-school education; in 1863, he entered the employ of John Virgil, now of Chicago, as clerk in his confectionery store; here he remained two years; he next clerked one year for W.R. Ramsdell, in his grocery store; in 1868, he and his brother W.D., purchased the lumber-yard of Otis Hardy, and conducted the business two years; he next entered the employ of the U.S. Express Co., and labored for it about two and one-half years; he then engaged as clerk for the Solar Stove Works, and at the death of the late William N. Moore, the founder of the establishment, Mr. Stevens was chosen Secretary, a position he still holds; these Works employ some 40 men, turning out annually 3,000 cook-stoves, 40,000 pieces of hollow-ware, consuming 3,000 tons of the best pig-iron in their production. Mr. Stevens was married in 1872, to Kate Flack, a native of Aurora, Kane Co., Ill.; has two children - Mortimer and Jennie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stevens, Nancy
MRS. NANCY STEVENS, farmer; P.O. Joliet; the widow of Robert Stevens, resides just east of the limits of the city of Joliet; she was the daughter of Lewis Kercheval and was born in Ohio, and came to Illinois when 16 years old, with her father's family, in the fall of 1830; she remembers vividly the winter of the "deep snow" and its accompaniment of severity. In 1835, she was married to Robert Stevens, whose portrait is found on another page of this work; Mr. Stevens was born in Kentucky, but reared mostly in Ohio, and at an early age immigrated to Indiana, where he remained several years, coming to Illinois, and to Joliet Tp. in 1831, and settled upon the place where his widow still lives; Mr. S. was Captain of a military company in Bartholomew Co., Ind., until his removal to Illinois, in 1831, and retained his sword and uniform until the time of his death, which occurred Jan. 6, 1864; he was elected the first Sheriff of Will County, but, not desiring office, refused to qualify; during the fright occasioned by the Sac war of 1832, Mr. S. took his family to Danville, Ill., and sent them, under safe escort to the Indiana settlements, while he returned and raised a crop on his claim. Mr. S. was twice married, his first wife was Lydia Ann Pence, and three children were the fruit of this marriage - all dead; by his last wife, who survives him, he had six children - Lewis K., Thomas J., James, Sarah Ann, Mary A. and Albert.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stevens, W.W.
W.W. STEVENS, attorney at law, Joliet; was born in Oxford Co., Maine, July 14, 1832; when he was but two years of age, his parents removed to Dover, thence to Sullivan Co., N.H., where he made his home until 1855. He received an academic education at the Andover Academy, N.H., where he graduated in July, 1854; the following year he came to Will Co., and engaged in teaching, soon afterward settling in Joliet, where he studied law in the office of Parks & Elwood; he was admitted to the bar in March, 1859, and has continued the practice of his profession ever since; he formerly did an extensive insurance business, having the largest agency in the city; but in 1873, he disposed of that branch of his business to A.A. Osgood; he was elected City Attorney in 1863, and has been several times re-elected to the same office; he has, also, served three years on the Board of School Inspectors. He was married Sept. 6, 1859, to Miss Althea H. Hawley, daughter of Oscar L. Hawley, one of the earliest settlers of Will Co., and has seven children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Steward, W.D.
W.D. STEWARD, farmer; was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, July 30, 1826, and is the son of John P. and Elizabeth (Moatz) Steward; his father was a shoe maker by trade; the latter part of his life was farming; Mr. Steward was raised on his father's farm, and in 1850, came West to Illinois and settled in Custer Tp.; he first purchased 420 acres of land, at 80c per acre, purchased from the Government; here he has remained ever since, engaged in farming and stock-raising; owns to-day 280 acres of fine improved land. Married Rosella Tanner, by whom they have six children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stewart, Daniel
DANIEL STEWART, deceased; born in Scotland in the year 1799; in 1825, he removed to this country, locating in Herkimer Co., N.Y., where he resided until 1836, when he removed to Illinois, locating near Wilmington in the fall of that year; here he engaged in farming, which was his occupation up to the time of his death, which occurred Aug. 15, 1874. His marriage to Miss Calphurnia Jackson, of Herkimer, N.Y., was in 1836; she survived him but a few years, her death occurring Nov. 9, 1877; by this union, there were seven sons, only two of whom are living - Peter D. and Jerome B., now residents of Wilmington. Thomas enlisted in the 39th I.V.I. in August, 1861; wounded Oct. 13, 1864, at the battle of Petersburg, and died of wounds on the 30th of the same month; Lincoln died at Chicago May 15, 1875.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stewart, James N.
JAMES N. STEWART, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; born in Wilmington Tp., Will Co., Ill., July 14, 1838, and is a son of Peter Stewart, who settled there in the spring of 1836; this has been the home of Mr. Stewart since childhood, and he is the oldest native-born of Wilmington Tp. now living; owns an undivided interest in 1,400 acres of farm lands. He was a member of the City Council in 1868, and has served as President of the Board of School Inspectors one term. In 1863, he was married to Miss Emily, daughter of Charles Stowell; she was born in St. Charles, Kane Co., Ill.; two children by this union - Edward P. and Charles J. Mr. Stewart is giving considerable attention to raising fine cattle for Chicago and other markets.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stewart, Malcolm N.M.
MALCOLM N.M. STEWART, banking, Wilmington; born in Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., N.Y., July 24, 1834, and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth Stewart; in 1836, his father's family removed to Illinois, locating in the north part of the present city of Wilmington, the location having been selected by his father the year previous; this has been the home of the subject of this sketch since the above date. At the breaking-out of the war in 1861, he enlisted in the Chicago Dragoons (April 17), being the first volunteer from Will Co.; on the 15th of July, 1862, he enlisted in the 100th I.V.I., receiving this commission of First Lieutenant of Co. A on the 30th of the following month; promoted to Captain in September, 1864, and on the 13th of March, 1865, received Brevet Major's commission; during his term of service, he participated in the following battles: Phillipi, Rich Mountain, Laurel Hill, Chaplin Hill, Stone River, Chickamauga, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Columbia, Franklin and Nashville. Owns several tracts of farm and coal lands; also city property. Married in 1871, to Miss Annie, eldest daughter of A.J. and Jane McIntyre; two children by the union - Jean and Margaret. Mr. Stewart is giving considerable attention to thorough-bred horses, having imported from both France and England some very fine stock.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stinson, Charles E.
CHARLES E. STINSON (Trott & Stinson), homeopathic physician, Wilmington; born near Bath, Me., Jan. 22, 1848, where he resided until he came West; he received his early education at Litchfield Academy, graduating at that institution in 1869, and, in September of the following year, removed to Illinois, locating at Wilmington, where he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. S.E. Trott; the completed his course of study in the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, and graduated with the class of '72 and '73; commenced the practice of medicine in this city in 1873, and, the following year, removed to Pontiac, where he continued his practice for two years, returning to Wilmington at the expiration of that time; he is a member of the Will Lodge, No. 301, I.O.O.F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

St. Julien, John I.
JOHN I. ST. JULIEN, manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles, etc., Joliet; was born near Strasbourg, Alsace, on the 15th of February, 1840; in the fall of 1854, he came to this country in company with his uncle, who settled in Naperville, Du Page Co., Ill.; he remained with his uncle two years, and in 1856, came to Joliet, and learned the harness maker's trade with Henry Schrader, and worked at that until May, 1870, when he started in business for himself. He was married Oct. 6, 1869, to Miss Helen Stephen, daughter of John Stephen, of Joliet, who came in infancy with her parents from Alsace; they have four children - Albert J., Frank E., Adelia M. and Ida L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stofflet, Prof. Francis
PROF. FRANCIS STOFFLET, Principal in Monee Public School, Monee; was born in Northampton Co., Penn., Feb. 22, 1841; came to this State and settled in Will Co. in 1874; and since that date, with the exception of one year, he has been a resident of the village of Monee. He was married to Miss Mary A. Sprague, Aug. 13, 1873; they have two children - Elmer and Harvey. Mr. S. was a volunteer in the late rebellion; he enlisted in the 153rd Penn. V.I., served ten months and was discharged as time for enlistment expired. His principalship in the public school has, with the exception of four years, continued since A.D. 1856.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stoos, Joseph
JOSEPH STOOS, retired, Joliet; was born near Strasbourg, Alsace, May 28, 1826; his father was an extensive contractor, employing as many as 300 men; his son Joseph remained at home and learned thoroughly every branch of the builder's art; in 1855, he came to America, locating at once in Joliet; he followed his trade here for about two years when he began contracting for himself; he did the carpenter work on St. John the Baptist's Church, and superintended the building of Porter's brewery, Werner's Hall, the Jefferson Street Bridge and Scheidt's brewery, besides erecting over two hundred other buildings in Joliet, which stand as monuments of his skill; in 1876, having acquired a comfortable fortune, he retired to give place to younger men and those more needy of employment. Mr. Stoos has served two years in the City Council of Joliet. He was married Feb. 29, 1857, to Miss Mary Hossinger, who was born near Strasbourg Dec. 14, 1837, and came to this country with her parents when 8 years of age. They have had eight children, four of whom are living - Theresa A., Mary E., Josephine M. and Alfred P.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Strong, Robert
ROBERT STRONG, farmer; P.O. Naperville; Mr. Strong is the only surviving pioneer of the few that settled in Du Page Tp., in the early period of 1831; was born in Greensboro, Vt., April 28, 1806; when he was 8 years of age, his father moved to Susquehanna Co., Penn., and engaged in clearing land and farming; in 1819, the family moved to Chemung Co., Penn., and opened a farm where the town of Waverly now stands; in 1825, his father moved to Ogden, in Monroe Co., N.Y.; in 1831, Robert came to seek a home in the Far West and settled where he now resides, having purchased a claim of a half-section of Selby & Walker; here, in company with his young and lovely bride, he commenced, amid the difficulties and privations incident to pioneer life, to carve out his fortune. He was married April 21, 1831, to Caroline W. Willey, a native of Oneida Co., N.Y.; she was born May 10, 1811; eleven children have blessed their union, four - Alfred W., Robert H., Mary A. (now widow of James N. George) and Albert M. - are living; seven are dead. Owns 230 acres of land, valued at $17,000. Has held the offices of Supervisor, Justice of the Peace eight years, School Treasurer sixteen years, with the enormous salary of $10 for the first ten years. And here upon a portion of his original purchase made almost one-half of a century ago, he still lives, the only remaining landmark of those who settled in Du Page in 1831 or 1832; all the others have either rested from their labors or changed their locations; to him we are indebted for much of the early history of Du Page Tp.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Strong, W.A.
HON. W.A. STRONG, President of the Joliet Gas-Light Co., Joliet; was born in Waterloo, Seneca Co., N.Y., Oct. 3, 1828; he made his home there until 1850, when he came to Illinois, settling in Joliet, where he shortly afterward engaged in the hardware business; in 1863, he was elected Mayor of the city of Joliet, holding the office one year; he has served several years as a member of the Board of Aldermen; he was at one time engaged in the stone-quarrying business, the firm being Strong & Davidson, and owning and operating the quarry formerly known as the Wilson Quarry; he continued this business three years; in 1865, he was elected President of the Joliet Gas-Light Co., which had been organized in 1858.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Storms, Alexander M.
ALEXANDER M. STORMS, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. New Lenox; was born in Ross-shire Scotland, Jan. 10, 1840; came to the United States in 1861, and settled in New Lenox, Will Co., Ill., where he now resides. He was married Feb. 17, 1876, to Miss Emily M. Frank, who was born in New Lenox, Will Co., Ill., March 12, 1848; they have one child - Frank R., born April 4, 1877. The farm of Mr. Storms consists of 172½ acres, valued at $13,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Storms, Carrie
MRS. CARRIE STORMS, farmer; P.O. Hadley; was born in New York Nov. 3, 1851; came to this State in 1860; is the widow of the late James Storms, deceased, who was born in Scotland Dec. 15, 1846, and who died May 23, 1877; they have one child - Harry W., born Aug. 9, 1874. The farm of Mrs. Storms consists of sixty acres, valued at $4,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stowe, F.F.
F.F. STOWE, merchant, Lockport; was born in Jamestown, N.Y., July 11, 1834; his early life was such as is common to most farmer's sons; beginning in 1850, he attended the High School at Jamestown for three years completing the course in 1854; soon after finishing his studies, he came West and settled, purchasing 240 acres in Clayton Co., Iowa, which he improved; having sold out his farm, in 1856, he went to Erie Co., Penn., and purchasing 100 acres, engaged in farming and the dairy business; in 1869, he came to Lockport and engaged in his present business, that of the retail grocery trade. He was married Oct. 27, 1855, to Sophia F. Barnard, a native of New York State; has three children - Fred W., Grace E. and Wayne B. Much of his early life was spent in teaching, thus acquiring means to complete his education. While a citizen of Erie Co., Penn., he served the county as Auditor for a term of three years; he is at present a Justice of the Peace; has held the office six years; is Master of Lockport Lodge, A.F. & A.M., No. 538. His son, Fred W., conducts the news office of the city.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stowe, Wm. M.
WM. M. STOWE, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., Aug. 5, 1842; he is the youngest son of Nathaniel H. and Eliza (Partridge) Stowe; in 1858, the family moved to Erie Co., Penn.; in addition to his common school education, he attended for some time an academy in Waterford, Penn.; he remained at home farming till he was 24 years of age; in 1868, he came west to Illinois and settled two miles north of Lockport, where he engaged in farming and the dairy business; this he followed six years; in 1874, he purchased the farm on which he now resides, being the west half of the southwest quarter of Sec. 17, Lockport Tp. He was married Oct. 26, 1865, to Laura Barnard, a native of New York; has two children - Frank J., born May 11, 1868; Howard D., born May 9, 1877; owns eighty acres, valued at $5,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Stuffler, Fred X.
FRED X. STUFFLER, hardware merchant, Joliet; was born in Wilmington, Will Co., Ill., April 1, 1848; when he was 1 year old, the family moved to Joliet; here he grew to manhood, attending the city schools until he began the active duties of life; at the age of 18 years, he left home and engaged in learning the tinner's trade; in this he served an apprenticeship for three years; in 1874, he engaged in business for himself at his present location. He was married April 23, 1872, to Mary A. Barthelme, a native of Joliet, Will Co.; has two children - Josephine, Laura. Mr. Stuffler started in life with limited means, and what property he now owns has been accumulated by personal industry and good management; he has a good and growing trade; he handles only the best of material, and suffers no work to go out from his establishment without his personal inspection.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sultzbaugh, Philip
PHILIP SULTZBAUGH, hay dealer, firm of Rains & Sultzbaugh, Peotone; born in York Co., Penn., June 9, 1831, where he lived until 18 years of age, attending school in winter and farming in summer, when he went to Perry Co., Penn., and was engaged in driving a six-horse team for four years; then burning lime for two years; in 1857, he emigrated to Will Co., Ill., and engaged in farming for a period of fifteen years, during which time he also was engaged in the hardware trade for three years; in 1872, he engaged in general merchandise, under the style of Schroeder, Conrad & Sultzbaugh, which business he followed four years; then selling out, he engaged in buying, baling and shipping hay and straw to Chicago, and all the Eastern markets. He married Nov. 15, 1853, to Susan Burrill; she was born in Perry Co., Penn., March 5, 1831; they are the parents of three children now living, viz., Julia K., born in Pennsylvania Dec. 3, 1854; Sadie E., born March 26, 1860, in Will Co., Ill.; Alice J., born May 1, 1864, and three deceased. Mr. S. has held office of School Director for six years, Road Commissioner and School Trustee, three years each, and is now serving his fifth year as Trustee of the town corporation. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sunderland, Noah
NOAH SUNDERLAND, farmer; P.O. Plainfield; this gentleman was born in Bridport, Vt., Dec. 18, 1814. He married Miss Caroline Randall April 29, 1841; she was born in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., May 7, 1812; he lived in Vermont twenty-four years, he then moved to Westfield, N.Y., and engaged in the milling business, remaining ten years; he then came to Illinois and settled in Joliet, remaining two years; he then came to his present place, and engaged in farming; in 1866, he bought and conducted the flouring-mill of this place, and continued the same until 1876, when he rented it to its present occupant. He has been a member of the Baptist Church for last twenty years. His parents were natives of Vermont; his wife's parents were natives of Connecticut.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sutphen, Charles H.
CHARLES H. SUTPHEN, retired; P.O. Joliet; was born in Cherry Valley, Otsego Co., N.Y., Feb. 15, 1806; his father, Gilbert Sutphen, was a native of New Jersey, and was of Dutch and Irish descent, his father, John Sutphen, having come from Holland some time before the Revolutionary war, and his mother being of one of the first families of Dublin, and came with her parents to America and settled in New Jersey about the same time. Shortly after the Revolutionary war the family removed to Cherry Valley, N.Y., and settled on a farm about four miles south of the village; on this farm Gilbert Sutphen, the father of Charles H., grew to manhood, and married Mary Higinbotham in Worcester, Otsego Co.; she was of English descent, born in Rhode Island, and removed to Worcester, N.Y. with her parents when quite young. After their marriage, Mr. Sutphen's parents continued to reside in Cherry Valley until the breaking-out of the war of 1812; his father was called upon to help defend his country, and joining the army, fell at the battle of Lundy's Lane; his family consisted of five children - Julia Ann, Mary Ann, Charles H., Sarah and Jane, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only one now living. After his father's death, Charles H., then 8 years of age, was sent to live with his grandfather, Higinbotham, in Cazenovia, Madison Co., N.Y., and remained two years, attending school a portion of the time; he afterward lived three years with one James Cagwin in the same county; his mother then marrying Thomas Southworth, of Sherburne, Chenango Co., N.Y., he lived on the farm with them until the age of 21, with the exception of one year spent in attending an academy; his health being impaired, he, on the advice of a physician, went to Boston, and took a voyage on a cod-fishing vessel up the Straits; returning with his health somewhat improved, he shipped as Captain's clerk with Capt. Law on board the ship Concordia in the merchant service, making one voyage, and on his return to Boston, Capt. Law obtained him a situation in the Custom-house as messenger to the Surveyor of Customs - Elbridge Gerry, son of the late Elbridge Gerry, Governor of Massachusetts and late Vice-President of the United States; in this office he remained two years, spending his evenings in the acquisition of useful knowledge. Mr. Gerry then secured him a situation in the Pay Department of the U.S. Army, where he remained eight years, or until Sept. 1, 1834. He was married in 1831 to Elizabeth H. Dow, of Boston, and, in April, 1834, came to Illinois and selected a claim at the head of Indian Creek (timber), in La Salle Co.; on a portion of his claim now stands the village of Earlville; he returned for his family in May; left the army office Sept. 1, and started for Illinois, arriving safely with his family in his new home in October, 1834; he built a double log house on the site of the present village of Earlville and went to farming; in 1835, the land came into market, and, in 1839, he purchased 1,000 acres, and occupied it as a stock farm for over twenty years; in 1853, he built a large brick house near where the log one stood; he was one of the first Justices of the Peace in Indian Precinct, Earl Tp., and held the office continuously for fifteen years, when he resigned; he was also Postmaster of Earlville for seven years; he held many other prominent offices, including that of Supervisor from that town. He had a family of six sons and three daughters. Charles T. Sutphen was the first white male child born in the township; he and Albert are in California; George is in Aurora, Ill., Frederick in Missouri, and Gilbert and William are in Iowa. Sarah married S. Cook, of Earl, now deceased. Carrie T. was the first white female child born in the township, and married W.H. Graham, of St. Louis. Mary married O.S. Gray, of Ottawa. They are now both deceased. Mr. Sutphen's wife died April 16, 1870, and, in 1871, he removed to Joliet, where he still resides, and married the widow of the late H.D. Higinbotham.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sutherland, James
JAMES SUTHERLAND, manufacturer of carriages, wagons and farming implements, Frankfort Station; was born in Scotland Sept. 16, 1842; came to the United States in 1864, and settled in Frankfort in 1869. His business, since his residence in this township, has been that of a manufacturer and dealer in carriages and farm implements. He was married to Miss Mary Dunnett, who was born in Scotland; they have seven children, viz., Mary, Maggie, Matilda, Kenneth, Edith, Evan and Harold.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sutten, John
JOHN SUTTEN, farmer, Sec. 16; P.O. Lockport; was born in Hackonby, Lincolnshire, Eng., Sept. 21, 1819; he was engaged in farming up to the time of his coming to America in 1854; he first stopped in Arnoldsville, Steuben Co., N.Y., eighteen months, when he came to Lockport; in 1870, he settled upon the farm upon which he now resides. He married Mrs. Ruth Beals (widow of Ebenezer Beals, of Cambridge, Eng.) in Lockport on Nov. 20, 1870; she was born in Ditton, Cambridgeshire, Eng., Dec. 24, 1814. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Sutton, Joseph
JOSEPH SUTTON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in England June 12, 1833; came to the United States in 1844, and to Illinois in the same year; he has been a resident of Frankfort for the past thirty-four years; his farm consists of 117 acres, valued at $6,000; it is situated on Sec. 29. He was married March 18, 1869, to Miss Sophia Unruh; they have one child, viz., Ella.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Symington, William
WILLIAM SYMINGTON, farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Joliet; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in January, 1811, where he lived until 14 years of age, when he removed to Erie County, living there until he came to Will Co., Ill., in November, 1837; on April 2, 1850, he started overland for California, arriving at Sacramento Aug. 10; he went directly to the mines and followed mining for six months, meeting with good success; on Feb. 22, 1851, he sailed from San Francisco and arrived home the 15th of May; he settled upon his present place in 1852; he has 150 acres of well-improved land, which he has accumulated by his own energy and industry. He married, June 12, 1837, Dorothy Haarer; she was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Oct. 8, 1815, and came to this country when 16 years of age; they are the parents of seven children - Sophia, Charles W., William H., Dolly, Rosa E.A., Alice A., Warren A.; two deceased were Margaret and Catharine. Mr. S. has been School Director for more than twenty years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tait, Thomas
THOMAS TAIT, farming, Sec. 2; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born on one of the principal Isles of Shetland, Sept. 23, 1830. He married Miss Catherine A. Shutts Oct. 12, 1858; she was born in Columbia Co., N.Y., Sept. 19, 1840; they had eight children, seven living, viz., John S., Magnus P., Margaret, Thomas H., Fred, Cassius and Sarah V.; Kate died in infancy. He lived at the place of his birth until May 14, 1838, when he took ship for America, arriving in Chicago, Ill., the 19th of July following; remaining but a short time, he went to Lake Co., Ill., and remained there until the winter of 1841, when he came to Will Co., Ill., and remained about one year; he then went to Canada and remained until 1846, when he returned to Will Co. and settled in Homer Tp.; remained two years, and then moved to Joliet Tp., where his father still lives; he bought his present place in June, 1851, and moved on same in fall of 1858. He has held the offices of Supervisor, Road Commissioner, Town Trustee and Collector. He owns 170 acres, well improved, which he has earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tatge, Conrad
CONRAD TATGE, Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, May 26, 1827; he was raised to farming pursuits, and, in 1848, came to this country, remaining in Chicago until 1851, when he came to Will Co. and settled in the town of Crete; he purchased land from the Government and opened a farm; he was the first German to settle upon the open prairie; those who had come previously had located in the timber along the creek; he remained on his farm until 1865, when he rented it out, and purchased another adjoining the village of Crete, to which place he removed; he was elected Commissioner of Highways in 1853, and Township Collector in 1854; in 1858, he was chosen Justice of the Peace, and held that office ten years, resigning in 1868, upon being elected Clerk of the Circuit Court of Will Co.; he then removed to Joliet, and, in 1872, was re-elected to the same office, serving until 1876; he joined the Republican party on its organization, in 1856, and has been a member ever since; he was married Nov. 11, 1851, to Miss Sophia Wassmann, of Hanover, Germany; they have had twelve children, eight of whom are living, viz., Caroline, Sophia, William H., Emmilia, Gustavus, Emma, Amanda and Juliana.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tatge, Henry
HENRY TATGE, farmer; P.O. Crete; was born in Germany, June 8, 1821, and is the son of Henry and Christina Tatge; his father was a farmer, and, in 1851, with his wife and family, emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; came direct to Illinois, and settled in Cook Co.; here his father and mother both died. Mr. Tatge's father gave him $2,000; he then came to Will Co., and purchased 320 acres of land, for which he paid $1,120; here he set out in farming; he first built a small frame house on the present farm; here, with good management, he owns 560 acres of land, with fine improvements. Married Catherine Olendorf, daughter of Conrad Olendorf, of Germany, who settled in Indiana; have had eleven children; six living. Member of the Lutheran Church.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Taylor, A. G.
, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., and is the son of Hiram and Eliza (Weller) Taylor; his father was born in Rutland, Vt., June 30, 1806, and at an early day, moved to St. Lawrence Co., N.Y.; here he remained until 1849, engaged in farming; he then, with his wife and family, emigrated to Illinois, via railroad and lake to Chicago; then canal to Joliet; from Joliet they came by wagon to Reed Tp., Will Co., Ill., and rented a farm on the east side of Horse Creek , and in 1853, Mr. Taylor purchased the farm now owned by Mr. A.G. Taylor; here he remained until his death, which occurred Feb. 21, 1877; he died respected and honored by his fellow-men, leaving a wife whom he was married to Dec. 28, 1826, living together for over fifty years. Mr. A. G. Taylor holds office as Treasurer of Road Commissioners; owns 160 Acres of land. Married in 1868 to Miss Eliza Hicks, of New York; four children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Taylor, Justin -
farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Lockport Township, Will Co., Jan. 24, 1843; he is the son of Justin and Katharine (Smith) Taylor; he has lived all his life on the farm on which he was born, excepting his temporary absence in the army. He enlisted in the service Aug. 20, 1862, in Co. C, 100th Regiment, I.V.I.; he remained in the service three and on-half years, and participated in the battles of Stone River and Chickamauga; was in Sherman's campaign to Atlanta; was also in the battle of Nashville and in the campaign of Gen. Thomas; he was mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tenn., in July, 1965. On returning from the army, he again engaged in farming, and was married March 7, 1866, to Marian Stewart, a native of Illinois; she died in Nov. 1874; his second marriage, to Catharine Chapin, a native of Michigan, was celebrated Aug. 13, 1876; has two children from first wedlock -- Lizzie and Gracie. Owns 160 acres, valued at $9,600. In connection with his farming, he keeps a large number of milch cows and ships milk daily to Chicago; he has been engaged in the milk trade for the past ten years. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Temple, William E.
WILLIAM E. TEMPLE, farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Wilton Center. Owns 120 acres. Born in Madison Co., N.Y., May 6, 1833; came to this State in 1853; settled in this town in 1856; served as a soldier in the late war in Co. H, 100th I.V.I. Married Jane Robinson March 5, 1867; she was born March 19, 1839; have five children - Ervin I., Otis M., Farmer E., Cora A. and Frances A. Mr. T. was badly wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, from the effects of which he will probably never recover; his health has been very poor ever since. Mr. T. had a brother in the same company and regiment; he was taken prisoner the same day that the subject of this sketch was wounded, and sent to Andersonville; after suffering nine months in that prison-pen he died, thus adding another name to the long list of martyrs of human liberty. James T. Douglas, a nephew of the above, was also in the same company and regiment; he was wounded June 3, 1864, during the Atlanta campaign; was sent to the hospital, and remained there until his muster-out; he was drowned in 1867 while bathing in Samuel Goodspeed's pasture.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thiel, Henry
HENRY THIEL, farming, Sec. 29; P.O. Joliet; was born in Cur Hessen, Germany, Aug. 16, 1829. He married Miss Christianna Winneka April 2, 1866; she was born in the same place in Germany Aug. 21, 1843; they had three children, two living, viz., Henry August and Christian Frederick. He lived in Germany twenty-eight years, working at his trade of stone mason; he then came to the United States, and settled in Will Co., Ill., at Troutman's Grove, where he engaged in farming, and remained fourteen years, and then came to his present place, and has lived here since. He came to this county in poor circumstances, working by the month; he now owns 160 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thomas, A.S.
A.S. THOMAS, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; the subject of this sketch is one of the old settlers of Wheatland Tp., Will Co.; was born in Franklin Co., N.Y., June 26, 1809, and is the son of E. and Lepha (Smith) Thomas, who both died in New York; his father was a shoemaker, tanner and currier, by trade; Mr. Thomas learned the shoemaking trade, and followed this and farming, while in New York; in 1837, he and Mr. Orland Royce started in a wagon drawn by two horses, for Illinois, then the Far West, taking them the whole of November to make the trip; they arrived in 1837; Mr. Thomas purchased 160 acres of the present farm at a Government land sale in Chicago, in 1839, at $1.25 an acre; he states that there was not a house between his farm and Plainfield when he first came here, only a shanty standing on what is now known as Jacob Fry's farm, and also says the first frame house built in this vicinity was on the farm now owned by Wm. King. Mr. Thomas married in 1872.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thomas, P.P.
P.P. THOMAS, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Darien, N.Y., Nov. 17, 1834; he went with his parents to Naperville in June, 1835, and remained with them until the age of 12, when his mother died in December, 1846, and he was then thrown upon his own resources; at the age of 13, he drove a notion wagon through Northern Illinois and Wisconsin; at the age of 16, he worked in the lead mines near Mineral Point, and at various other places, and smelted for Corwith & Co. at the age of 19, after which he worked at the trade of carpenter and joiner up to the spring of 1864; in May of the same year, he crossed the plains to Montana, mining and prospecting for five years; in December, 1868, he returned to Chicago, and, in February, 1869, purchased the farm upon which he now resides, containing 320 acres; has been School Director. Married Miss Mary Rogers, daughter of D.B. Rogers, of Luzerne Co., Penn., Dec. 30, 1870. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thomas, William
WILLIAM THOMAS, General Superintendent of the Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport; was born in Bristol, Ontario Co., N.Y., Feb. 20, 1821; his opportunities for acquiring an education were limited; at the age of 14, he came West to Michigan, engaging in various pursuits to obtain a livelihood; in 1840, he returned to Western New York, and learned the trade of house carpentering; here he remained till 1857, when he came West again to Lockport, Ill., and served four years as Master Mechanic on the canal; in 1862, he was appointed Assistant Superintendent, and placed in charge of the Western Division, with headquarters at Ottawa, LaSalle Co.; this position he held till Dec. 1871, when he was appointed General Superintendent, with headquarters at Lockport, a position he at present holds. He was married Feb. 22, 1844, to Phebe D. Wilder, a native of New York; has one child - Ella P., wife of Col. D. Hapeman, of Ottawa. Rep.; Cong. Mr. Thomas is altogether a self-made man and has attained to his present important position through industry and correct business habits.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thompson, David C.
DAVID C. THOMPSON, manufacturer of carriages and farm-wagons, Wilmington; born in Wigtonshire, Scotland, Oct. 20, 1820; came to this country with his father's family in 1834, settling in Oneida Co., N.Y.; in 1850, he removed to Illinois, locating in Wilmington, his present home, and four years later engaged in his present business, in which he has continued since. Owns eighty acres of land in this county, valued at $1,500; eighty acres in Minnesota, valued at $1,000; and city property valued at $10,000. Married in 1847 to Miss Ellen Wright, who was born in England; she died in 1853; three children by this union, one living - James W. John C. died in 1849; Samuel in 1853. Was again married in 1856 to Miss Helen, daughter of H.D. Risley; she was born in Salina, Onondaga Co., N.Y.; five children by this union, four living - Ellen E., Jesse D., Frederick W., Helen J. Minerva J. died Nov. 24, 1871.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thompson, Robert C.
ROBERT C. THOMPSON (Ray & Thompson, dealers in grain, coal, live and dressed hogs), Wilmington; born in Gallowayshire, Scotland, Nov. 28, 1828; removed to this country in childhood with his father's family in 1833, stopping in New York City until the following spring, when they removed to Oneida Co., N.Y.; in 1853, he removed to Illinois, locating in Wilmington, his present home, and soon after engaged in boating on the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers, which he followed some five years, and then took the position of foreman for Taylor & Co., of Joliet, stone contractors; a few years later, he engaged in the grocery and provision business at Wilmington, and, in 1868, in the grain trade under the firm name of Ray & Thompson. Has served as Deputy Sheriff of Will Co. four years, Supervisor of Wilmington Tp. three years, and member of the City Council six years. Married in 1856 to Miss Christie Zuell, who was born in Johnston, Fulton Co., N.Y.; one child - Sarah L. Mr. Thompson served as foreman on the mason work in the construction of Rush and Madison Street Bridges, Chicago, using the debris of old Fort Dearborn for the abutment of the former.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thomson, Adam
ADAM THOMSON, farmer; P.O. East Wheatland; born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, Sept. 6, 1822, and is the son of Benjamin Thomson, of Scotland; when Mr. Thomson was but 17 years of age, he commenced to learn the carpenter trade; this business he followed for over twenty-three years, working in Scotland, England and America; in 1854, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City, and, on June 29, 1854, arrived in Will Co., Ill.; here he has lived ever since. Mr. Thomson has held several offices of public trust; at present, holds office as Township Assessor, which office he was elected to in 1877. Is a Republican in politics, and a Presbyterian in religion. He married Miss Mary Patterson, of Scotland.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thomson, William P.
WILLIAM P. THOMSON, farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Joliet. The subject of this sketch was born in West Turin, Lewis Co., N.Y., April 22, 1843. He married Miss Helen A. Hadcock Dec. 25, 1867; she is a native of Watertown, N.Y., and was born Dec. 25, 1846; they have three children - Mary L., Earl W. and Sarah G. He lived in New York until 1872, except two years spent in California and Oregon, where he was engaged as civil engineer for the city of Portland; in 1872, he came to Illinois, and, in 1873, he settled on his present place; the only offices he has held have been connected with the school and road; he owns 240 acres in this township; in November, 1878, he was elected on the National ticket, Representative from the Fifteenth District. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Thornton, Cary
CARY THORNTON, retired, Joliet, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Bucks Co., Penn., Oct. 3, 1800; his ancestors were Quakers, and came to Pennsylvania with Wm. Penn in 1681; the subject of this sketch lived with his parents until he was 23 years of age, assisting upon the farm; in 1823 he moved to Michigan, and, after remaining one year, moved to Rochester, N.Y.; engaged in trade of carpenter and joiner up to 1836, when he came to Will Co., and settled in Troy Tp., on Sec. 34, farming up to the time of his removal to Joliet, in 1866, where he still resides, at the good old age of 79. He has been Commissioner of Highways, and although repeatedly solicited, he would never accept of any other office in the gift of his neighbors. He married Miss Lucy Ware (the daughter of Benjamin and Betsy Ware), at Rochester, N.Y., Oct. 21, 1832; she was born in Putnam Co., Vt., July 18, 1810; they had three children, two living - Rutledge, born Aug. 1, 1834, and Beulah, born Oct. 15, 1839, and married to John Keyes, of Joliet, Oct. 21, 1872; and one deceased, Sidney, born June 22, 1846, and died April 4, 1848. Mr. Thornton is the oldest living settler of Troy Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tilden, Martin F.
MARTIN F. TILDEN, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; this gentleman is one of the oldest settlers of what is now known as Custer Tp.; was born in Orange County, Vt., February 6, 1811, and is the son of Diah and Irenah (Flint) Tilden; his father was a farmer; here Mr. Tilden was brought up on his father's farm; from Orange Co., he went to Lawrence Co., N.Y.; here he remained about nine years engaged in farming; then West to Illinois and settled on the farm he now lives on, May, 1849; here with his brother Turner, and brother-in-law Jacob J. Palmer, settled on a half-section of land; when Mr. Tilden first came here with his family, they moved into a log cabin and remained until he made improvements on his farm; the country was very wild at that time, plenty of wild game; with hard labor and good management Mr. Tilden owns to-day one of the finest improved farms of Custer Tp., known as the "Evergreen Home," of 170 acres of land. Married Miss Sarah A. Kimball, of Vermont, by whom he has had seven children, two living; Mr. Tilden's parents both are dead, his father Diah, died when he was near 84 years of age; his mother, at 83 years of age; both buried in the family grave-yard in Custer Tp. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tilsy, William
WILLIAM TILSY, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, May 15, 1833; when he was 17 years of age, he came to America and worked on the canal, and afterward worked for many farmers in Will Co. - six years for A.B. Brooks; he purchased his farm in 1856, and settled where he now lives in 1876; has been School Director six years. Married Miss Dora Holm, of Mecklenburg, Germany, in Chicago, Nov. 7, 1857; she was born Sept. 3, 1838; they have five children - Lewis, born Sept. 3, 1858; William, born May 3, 1862; Mary E., born Nov. 25, 1864; Henry, born Dec. 29, 1869, and Carrie, born Aug. 5, 1873. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tinslar, Laurance
LAURANCE TINSLAR, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; owns 161 acres of land, valued at $10,000; born June 19, 1823, in Madison Co., N.Y. Married Delia S. Marsh Nov. 9, 1847, in Allegany Co.; they moved to Skaneateles, Onondaga Co.; thence to Auburn, where he was superintendent of the spinning department in the Auburn Woolen Mills for three years; gave up said position with the intention of going to California, but finally abandoned the idea. From Rochester, N.Y., they came to Illinois, located at Braceville, Grundy Co., where they resided until November, 1866, at which date they moved to Wilmington, Will Co., where he established a meat market, which he conducted one year; disposing of his interest in that, he opened a similar establishment in Braidwood, which he owned for two and a half years; at the end of said period, he opened a boot and shoe store in Braidwood, which business he was in about one year, then sold, and purchased the establishment (boots and shoes) of Arnold & Sisson, of Wilmington, which establishment he owned three years, then traded it for his present farm. Children by first marriage are Lucian W., Eva A. and Esther A. Mrs. Tinslar died in Braceville, Ill., 1866; married second wife, Katie McCabe; she was born in Malone, Franklin Co., N.Y., June 2, 1842; children by second marriage are Laurance (deceased), Hiram, Delia, Laurance (deceased) and Katie B.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tonner, William
WILLIAM TONNER, City Clerk, Joliet; was born in Centre Co., Penn., June 24, 1816; he was raised on a farm, received a thorough English education, and, at the age of 16 years, engaged in teaching; he taught about twelve years, six of which he taught in one school; in 1846, he came to Will Co., and engaged in farming, in Plainfield; in 1850, he made the overland trip to California, where he spent two years in mining, returning in 1852; in 1857, he was elected County Clerk, and removed to Joliet; he held the office for eight years; from 1865 until 1877, he was engaged in investing money, buying and selling property, etc., also having considerable interests in the oil regions of Pennsylvania; he was elected City Clerk in December, 1877. He was married Feb. 5, 1839, to Miss Catherine J. Shreffler, of Centre Co., Pa., and has one daughter living - Mary Alice (now Mrs. Henry A. Sanger, of Florence, Ala.); one daughter, Myra J., wife of R.H. Willis, died in Omaha, Neb., Oct. 31, 1867.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tounshendeau, Harry A.
HARRY A. TOUNSHENDEAU, barber, Plainfield; was born on the French frigate Pathfinder, on the Atlantic ocean, January 14, 1845, of French parents; was left an orphan in New York City before he was one year old; his mother died the 13th of February following, in New York City, and his father the 26th of August following; he was then taken in charge by a man named Clouney, who resided in Newburg, N.Y., with whom he remained six years; he then went to live with Mr. Shannon (the famous hatter of New York City) and remained with him five years. I.T. Ashmead was then appointed his guardian soon after he came to Kalamazoo, Mich., where he remained two years; then to Minooka, and then to Plainfield in 1868, where he has remained ever since. Married a daughter of John Newsome, of Wheatland, Sept. 6, 1869. He opened a barber-shop soon after his arrival here, which business he has continued to follow ever since; in connection with this, he has edited and published a newspaper one year (The Plainfield Echo). Mr. T. has always been an earnest advocate of temperance, and during the publication of his paper wrote a series of articles on that subject which attracted a great deal of attention, and which made him both friends and enemies.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Trainer, Robert
ROBERT TRAINER, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; the subject of this sketch was born in the Isle of Man, February, 1844, and is the son of William Trainer, who was born in the Isle of Man, 1798; was engaged in farming, and, in 1853, emigrated to America, starting with his wife and five children, but on the way, at sea, his wife died, leaving him with his five children; they landed in New York City; then went direct to Illinois, and settled on the farm they now live on; when Mr. William Trainer first came here, he was worth about $1,000, invested in land; and, with the help of his four sons, they labored hard, and at his death he was one of the respected farmers of Will Co., leaving 301 acres of land. The sons are James, William, Thomas and Robert, all born in the Isle of Man. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Trainer, William
WILLIAM TRAINER, deceased; the subject of this sketch was one of the first settlers of Reed Tp. (now Custer Tp.); was born in Scotland May 21, 1798; his father was a farmer; Mr. Trainer was a farmer, and followed this business principally throughout life; when he was young, with his parents, emigrated to the Isle of Man; here he remained engaged in farming; he returned to Scotland, remained there but a few years, then back to the Isle of Man. He married in 1833, Margaret Moore, of the Isle of Man, born July 31, 1807; in 1853, with his wife and five children, he started for America; during the voyage, Mrs. Trainer was taken sick, and died at sea Oct. 15, 1853, on board the Wm. Tapscott; Mr. Trainer and his five children landed in New York Nov. 12, 1853; left his family in Cleveland and came West to find a location; returned to Cleveland, brought his family and settled in Reed Tp. (now Custer Tp.); he purchased 120 acres of land, paying about $1,000; here he remained, except two years in Dwight, Livingston Co.; he died at the old homestead, June 25, 1878, respected and honored by his fellow-men, leaving four sons, all born at the Isle of Man. William, Dec. 30, 1834, married Miss Margaret Monty, of Canada - four children; James T., born Nov. 23, 1836, married Miss Catherine McDonald; Thomas T., born July 18, 1841, married Elizabeth McDonald; Robert T., born Feb. 27, 1844. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Triem, Philipp
PHILIPP TRIEM, merchant tailor, Monee; was born in Germany Jan. 6, 1832; came to the United States in 1854, and to Illinois and settled in Chicago, where he remained two years, when he removed to Monee, where he has since resided; his profession since his residence in this township has been that of a merchant tailor. He was married to Miss Eliza Demmal, now deceased; they have had six children, only one of whom is living, viz., Rosa.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Trott, Stinson E.
STINSON E. TROTT (Trott & Stinson), homeopathic physician, Wilmington; born in Whitefield, Lincoln Co., Me., Oct. 26, 1842; he received his early education at the Maine Wesleyan Seminary, located at Readfield, Me.; in the winter of 1864 and 1865, he attended lectures at the Commercial Hospital and Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating at the Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago in 1867; he commenced the practice of medicine in Iroquois Co., this State, in 1866, and two years later removed to Wilmington, his present home, where he has been in the constant practice of his profession since, having also taken an active part in the business interests of the city, especially in connection with the water-power, being instrumental in securing the location of the paper-mill and the adoption by the City Council of the Holly system for protecting the city from fire; elected Mayor of the city of Wilmington in March, 1877, and is the present incumbent. Married in 1873 to Miss Augusta J. Swarthout, who was born in Romulus, Seneca Co., N.Y.; one child by this union - Josephine.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Truby, Marshall
MARSHALL TRUBY, grain, lumber and stock; P.O. Bird's Bridge; is a native of Armstrong Co., Penn.; he was born Nov. _8, 1819, and married Miss Mariah McCrackin Jan. 12, 1845; she is a native of Somerset Co., Penn.; they had ten children, four living - Mary A., Henry T., Libbie A. and Lillie M. He lived in Pennsylvania until 1851, being engaged in boating; he then came West to Illinois and settled in La Salle Co., where he remained one year; he then moved to Joliet Tp. and engaged in farming, continuing ten years, when he moved into the city and engaged in the lumber business, remaining until 1870, when he came to his present place; in 1871, he was appointed Postmaster at this office. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Tyler, S.B.
S.B. TYLER, retired farmer, P.O. Plainfield. Baptist; Republican. Owns 184 acres of land, valued at $75 per acre; was born at Bethel, Sullivan Co., N.Y., February 23, 1811; his parents died before he was 10 years old. Mr. T. lived on a farm until he was 17 years old; he then learned the carpenter's trade, and followed that occupation until his 50th year. Came to this State in 1835. Married twice; first to Ruth W. Flanders, sister of the late Jason Flanders; she was born in Hebron, N.H., January 10, 1815, and died April 5, 1873; had nine children, all living but two - Harriet M., Sarah M. (deceased), Alfred H. (deceased), Albert H., Simeon S., A. Lansing H., Ralph W., Esther R. and Florian B.; Alfred and Albert served in the 100th I.V.I.; Alfred died two months after he enlisted (in 1862); Albert served full term, and participated in many battles. Mr. T. married second time to Mrs. Adela A. Goddard (daughter of the late Dr. Wight, and widow of the late Capt. Goddard), October 5, 1875; she had, at the time of her marriage with Mr. T., four children, three boys and one girl; her late husband Capt. G., formerly commanded Co. G, in the 100th I.V.I.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]


 

BACK -- HOME

©Genealogy Trails