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  Biographies of Cherokee Indians Important to Our State

Fields, George W.—Born in the same room, on July 10, 1882, in which the sterling old patriot, Stand Watie died on September 9, 1871, Senator George W. Fields seems to have in some mystical way been imbued with a similar character of reticent perseverance. Reared in a community of earnest honest integrity, where the mass was willing to receive limited educations and settle to lives of arduous husbandry, thus contributing to the sane thinking and deliberate backbone of the glorious republic. George Fields, as others of his would have done since the dawn of civilization, by steady pertinacity, gained by frugal care and close application on a common school education and while working on the farm and closing his days in the public schools came to him the listless longing for a Male Seminary education, the acme of solicitude of the patriotic Cherokee. The quiet, gentlemanly and agreeable country lad, stintinly saved small sums that gained the coveted goal of an entrance into the Seminary, where he graduated on May 28, 1902, using as the subject of his oration, Sequoya. The best indication of the regard that the instructors and fellow pupils had of him could be gained by their soft inflection of speech when they spoke of him.

Of generous physical proportions, manager of the Seminary baseball and football teams, an athlete of more than ordinary acquirement's, he listened not to the call of the plaudits of the diamond and roped arena, but sought the quieter vocations, the teacher and farmer.

On April 3, 1904, Mr. Fields married at Southwest City, Missouri, Miss Jennie, the accomplished and talented daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Glass of Chelsea, Oklahoma. Mr. Fields like all of the prominent Cherokees, transferred to the State of Oklahoma an equal mead of patriotic love and fealty that they had evinced for their Nation, as they felt that it was a natural fruition.

A democrat, he was nominated and elected as the first register of deeds of Delaware, his native county, in the first state election. The approval of his course in this office was bestowed in reelection by his fellow citizens, the people that had known him from boyhood. Five years were encompassed in these two terms and he was then elected State Senator from the thirtieth district in 1912. In the senate he never missed a roll call, was seldom heard on the floor but had the reputation of being one of the most efficient workers of that body of able men. In 1913, he was admitted to the bar and opened an office early in 1920, when he became established in Oklahoma City where his volume of business, within two years would bear favorable comparison with any in the state. His reticence is that of the annalist and omnivorous student. As Attorney in the Texas-Cherokee suit for reparations for one and one-half million acres of land, he has developed and is forwarding the largest civil case of the Cherokees.

Fraternally Mr. Fields is a Mason of the 32nd degree, an Elk and Shriner; also a member of the American Legion, Oklahoma State Bar Association and of the Christian church.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



DeLozier, Mr. Georgia
— Georgia Virginia Adair was born in Whitfield County, Georgia, January 29, 1869, educated in Flint and and Cooweescoowee District, Indian Territory. Married near Adair January 8, 1888 to Reuben E. DeLozier, born June 20th, 1855 at Osceola, Mo. He died at Adair, Okla., April 23, 1921. They were the parents of Fountain G. bom Sept. 19, 1888; Manford E. born Sept. 25, 1891; John Edward, bom July 16th, 1893; Ralph Adair, born April 4th, 1896; Hazel M. born August 18, 1898 and Vivian V. DeLozier born September 3, 1901.

John Edward DeLozier was a Master Mason. John Edward enlisted in the World War September 23, 1917 at Camp Travis, Texas. Assigned to Company A 344th Machine Gun Batallion, 90th Division. Sailed for France June 21, 1918 and arrived July 7. Corporal DeLozier was carrying ammunition for his platoon in the St. Mihiel drive, when an officer asked for volunteers to go forward and get military information and he offered his services. In crossing the battlefield he was struck on the helmet by a machine gun bullet which severely wounded him in the head, from which he died the following day, Sept 15, 1918. Te body of the young hero was returned to Adair and buried with military honors May 29, 1921.

Edward Alexander, son of John and Ann Berry (Graham) Adair was born at Dalton, Georgia, February 25, 1847, was a member of Company C, Edmondson's Batallion, Georgia Confederate service. Married in October 1867 to Narcissa M. Harrison, born December 25, 1846, in Murray County, Georgia. He was elected sheriff of Cooweescoowee District August 5, 1889 and was elected Councilor from the same District August 7, 1899. He was killed by runaway team December 3, 1901 and Mrs. Adair lives at Adair, Oklahoma.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Alexander S. Lewis was born November 28, 1842 at Blountsville, Alabama and is the son of Rev. Stephen M. Lewis born in 1819 also in the state of Alabama an ordained minister in the Presbyterian church, removed to the State of Texas in 1850 was a Chaplain in Col. George Baylors regiment of Texas Cavalry Confederate Army and served throughout the Civil War in such capacity. Rev. Stephen M. Lewis was a direct male relative of the family of .Merriwether Lewis, the great explorer above mentioned. He died in 190 7 at the age of 88 years. Alexander S- Lewis settled at Dawson, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, in the early eighties of the nineteenth century, having moved from Texas, where his parents had lived since their removal from Alabama, and in common with the best families of the old South they had been reduced from affluence to poverty by the Civil War. Mr. Lewis married Elizabeth P. Dawson, related to the well known Dawson family of the Cherokee Nation, whose members were admitted to Cherokee citizenship after the Civil War. With their arrival at Dawson the family had again acquired a small competence, but through all their vicissitudes they had retained and cherished the priceless inheritance of gentility and integrity. The children were given the best educational advantages the parents could afford, which was the equipment with which Stephen Riley Lewis entered business life. From his beginning in the small town he has through honest enterprise arrived at the point of success which rehabilitates the old family name in financial prominence, while it always held the social position that the family standard at all times required.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley


Stephen Riley Lewis
was born December 27, 1873 in Hill County, Texas. He was educated in the Dawson neighborhood and in the Quaker Mission at Skiatook, Oklahoma. He was admitted to the practice o. law by the United States Interior Department in January 1902, admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Oklahoma June 10, 19io and the United States Supreme Court March 20, 1916. He married on March 23, 1898, .Minnie Carter born in Cooweescoowee District of the Cherokee Nation September 16, 1876. She was the daughter of David.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Tehee, Houston Benge
  — Houston Benge Tehee, whose activity has spelled success, is well known as the Register of the Treasury of the United States, whose name appears on all of the Government bonds issued during the world war period and is now a Vice-President and the Treasurer and General Manager of the Continental Asphalt and Petroleum Company, with headquarters in Oklahoma City- In various ways he has been closely identified with the development and upbuilding of this section of the country, his efforts being at all times a tangible element in the growth and progress that has wrought a most wonderful transformation in Oklahoma within the past few decades. Mr. Tehee was born in the Cherokee Nation, now Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, October 31, 1874, and is a representative of two of the old prominent Cherokee families ,the Teehee and Benge families. On the rolls of the Cherokee Nation his father is listed as seveneighths Cherokee, Houston B. Teehee as five-eighths. His mother was a one-half Cherokee, her death occurring prior to the enrollment. The father, Stephen Teehee, was born in the Cherokee Nation of Georgia, December 25, 1837, and died in the Cherokee Nation of the Indian Territory in 1907. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Phoda Benge, was born in the Cherokee Nation of the Indian Territory and passed away in 1886 at the comparatively early age of thirty-nine years. The father had come to the Indian Territory in young manhood. He had obtained a common school education in the Indian schools and afterward engaged in farming. Throughout his life he remained a student of men and events and became one of the most prominent citizens of the future State of Oklahoma. From 1867 until 1896 he was closely identified with public affairs of the Cherokee Nation .serving as district clerk, as district solicitor and as circuit judge and his decisions in the last named office were noted for justice and imrartiality. He served likewise as a member o fthe council and of the senate and was a member of the Executive Council. He likewise was made a member of the grand council and was assistant chief of the Nation. He also did most effective religious work, being a minister of the Baptist church and preaching extensively to his people. He spoke entirely in the Cherokee tongue and was universally honored and loved. His life was an example to the younger generation and an inspiration to all with whom he came in contact. He made his home near Sallisaw, Oklahoma. His was a large family, there being two sets of children, but only two of the first set survive; Houston B. and Stephen B-, the latter now connected with the United States Merchant Marine. The name was originally Tehee but on the Indian rolls the spelling was changed to the present form. The name has figured prominently upon the pages of history of the Indian Territory and later in connection with the development of the State of Oklahoma and the work instituted by the father has been carried on by the son, for Houston B. Teehee is today one of the prominent and influential residents of Oklahoma City.

His boyhood days were spent on the home farm, and imbued by the example of his father, his boyhood ambition was to become as good and upright a man as was his sire. He attended the common schools and afterward the Male Seminary at Tahlequah, while for one year he was a student in the Fort Worth University. He afterward returned to Tahlequah, where he engaged in merchandising as a clerk for a period of ten years. He afterward spent two years as cashier in the Cherokee National Bank of Tahlequah. While thus engaged he studied law under the direction of the Hon. John H. Pitchford, who is now a Justice of the Supreme Court of Oklahoma, and in March,

1907, was admitted to the bar. He resigned his position as bank cashier in June,

1908, and entered upon the practice of his profession in Tahlequah. devoting his attention to probate oil and gas law. His practice soon became extensive and of a very important character, connecting him with much of the notable litigations heard in the courts of the district. He likewise became very prominent in connection with public affairs there, serving as Alderman of Tahlequah from 1902 until 1906. In 1908 he was elected to the office of Mayor and remained the chief executive of the city for two years. He also filled out an unexpired term as County Attorney, succeeding his law partner W. L. Johns. In 1911 and 1913 he was elected to represent his district in the third and fourth general assembly of Oklahoma, where he was noted as an authority on constitutional law, and in 1914 he was appointed United States probate attorney. In 1915 he went to Washington, D. C, as Register of the United States Treasury. His entire career has been marked by steady progress. The money which he obtained from the Cherokee strip was used in paying his tuition in the Fort Worth University. He thus early displayed his ambition and the elementary strength of his character. Step by step he has advanced, each forward step bringing him into a field of wider opportunities and broader usefulness. In 1919 he became Treasurer of the Seamans Oil Company and The R. E. Seamans Company, Inc., of New York City and Oklahoma City, and in 1921 he was made Treasurer and General Manager of all of the Seamans Oil Company interests under the name of the Continental Asphalt and Petroleum Company and was elected as one of its Vice-Presidents. While in Washington he was very active in promoting Indian matters generally, as well as in performing the duties of his position in connection with the United States Treasury. He now devotes the major part of his attention to his oil business. He makes his legal home in Cherokee County where he has a beautiful residence of the bungalow type, the house being surrounded by spacious grounds and being one of the show places of Cherokee County.

Mr. Teehee was married in Tahlequah,

December 11, 1898, to Miss Mayme Hagelund, who was born in Marion, Alabama. Her parents were natives of Sweden and ir. their youth came to the United States, settling in Alabama, the father's death occurring in Marion. They were parents of two children. Mrs. Hagelund went to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and later became the wife of Dr. Stephen Foreman, one of the foremost physicians and leading citizens of the Cherokees. In 1893 they removed to Tahlequah. Mrs. Teehee occupies a very prominent social position. While they have no children, they have reared the children of Dr. Stephen and Mrs. Foreman since the latter's death. These are: Sue, now the wife of Roy J. Wiggins, an officer of the First State Bank of Tahlequah; John D. R. Foreman of Chattanooga, and Frank Foreman living in Sapulpa.

Mr. Teehee acts as counselor and adviser to many representatives of the Cherokee Nation. He greatly enjoys the out-of-doors and is a lover of nature and all that is beautiful. He also finds keenest pleasure in literature and his constant reading keeps him in touch with the trend of modern thought and progress. He belongs to Cherokee Lodge A. F. & A. M., the oldest Masonic lodge of Oklahoma, and he likewise has a membership with the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian Church.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Starr, J. C. 
— James, son of Ezekial and Mary (Upshaw) Starr, was born in Tennessee on February 13, 1883. He served the Confederacy in Captain George Harlan Starr's company. His first wife was Sarah Byers and they were the parents of: Mary, who married James Manuel Price; Charlotte Elizabeth, who married Richard Welch, John Stocker and Henry Harrison Sanders. George Washington Starr was the third and youngest child of James and Sarah Starr. After the death of Mrs. Sarah Starr, James Starr married on December 28, 1869, Mrs. Emma Jane Evans, daughter of John and Rachel (Smith) Rider, born September 8, 1842. Mrs. Emma Jane Starr had by her first husband, one daughter: Minnie Louisa Evans, who married Teesee Chambers.

James and Emma Jane Starr were the parents of: John Caleb, Lulu, Jessie, Emma, Ezekial and Susan Starr. John Caleb Starr was born October 15, 1870. Graduated from the Male Seminary December 12, 1890 and received the following diplomas from the Fort Smith Business College: Bookkeeping, May 28, 1891; Penmanship, May 26, 1892; and Stenography May 29, 1893. He married October 16, 1894, Miss Elizabeth Belle Zimmerman, born March 9, 1870, in Clinton, Missouri. They are the parents of: Jessie Belle, James Clarence, Martha E. and Charles J. Starr. Jessie Belle Starr married John Turner Dameron.

John Caleb Starr, who was one of the best, if not the best, stenographers and penmen among the Cherokees, was the secretary to the Cherokee Commissioners that made the final roll of the tribe. When this task was finished he was admitted to the bar and became actively interested in oil production. He is at present one of the largest land owners in Oklahoma and his oil interests are so large that he requires a large office to house his records and employs a stenographer and bookkeeper, besides doing an immense amount of the executive and clerical work himself. His hobby is farming. An omnivorous worker, a tireless student and an analytical thinker, Mr. Starr is always a man of the people and progressive citizen. His son, James Clarence Starr, has won laurels as an orator in the eastern colleges.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley


McGhee, Quilliki P.—Quilliki Phillips, son of Thomas Jefferson and Martha (Hanna) McGhee, is a native of Delaware District in which District he was educated. He married Miss Letitia Hanna and they were the parents of two children. Mrs. Letitia McGhee died and he married her sister.

Thomas Jefferson, son of Ambrose and Judith (Cochran) McGhee, married Martha Hanna and they were the parents of: Samuel Albert, James M., Thomas Jefferson, Viola, Clero, Saladin C., Joseph Fox and Quilliki P. McGhee. Thomas Jefferson Mc Ghee, Sr. was First Lieutenant of Company E of the First Cherokee Mounted Volunteers in the Confederate service. He was elected Sheriff of Delaware District in 1867 and was elected Clerk of the same District in 1880, 1881, 1883, 1885 and 1889. A brilliant interpreter and orator, he was one of the most popular and progressive citizens of Delaware District. Reared by such a father it was but natural that the talented and forceful son, Quilliki P. should be endowed with a logical and analytical mind that would render him one of the most successful attorneys and jurists of northeastern Oklahoma. He was admitted to the bar in December 1914 and his large legal practice has rendered him a wealthy one. While active in the councils of the republican party he never allowed his name to be used in connection with any office until 1920, when he was elected County Judge of Ottawa County by an immense majority.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Belcher, Mrs. A. M.
—Cora Mary, daughter of William Davidson, and Mary Jane (Baumgarner) Clingan was born at Gibson station, Cherokee Nation May 12, 1878, educated at the Female Seminary, and Cottey College, Nevada, Missouri; married at Wagoner November 21, 1911, Rev. A. M. Belcher, born February 22, 1867 in Bluntsville, Ala. They are the parents of Bruce Clingan Belcher, born June 14, 1912 at Henryetta, Okla.

Reverend Belcher is a South Methodist and built the first church to be erected in Wagoner. Mrs- Belcher is a member of the Home Missionary Society and the Eastern Star.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Benjamin Dustin Dobkins,
born Aug. 6, 1879, was educated at Vinita, the Male Seminary, and graduated from the Ontario, Canada, Veterinary College. He married June 3, 1903, Gertrude, daughter of J. M. and Gertrude Ragland of Lebanon, Mo. Dr. Benjamin D. and Mrs. Dobkins, have one daughter, Miss Jaunita Cherokee, born July 5, 1904.

Dr. Dobkins has been State Veterinary for ten consecutive years, is the author of the Oklahoma State Veterinary Laws and was President of the State Veterinary Association in 1912-13-14 and 15. He is a Mason. Odd Fellow and is President of the State Bank at Welch, Oklahoma.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Johnston, John Edward.
—John Edward Johnston, bom March 21, 1881. Married December 25, 1906 at Muldrow, Oklahoma, Ida, daughter of Alexander F. and Nannie (Ridding) McKinney, born June 10, 1887. Mrs. Johnston died April 21, 1915. They were the parents of Albert Sidney, born December 23, 1907; John Edward, born August 2, 1909; William Alexander, born November

28, 1910; and Joseph Franklin Johnston, born January 28, 1913. Mr. Johnston married Mrs. Anne Bruton Levy, February 25. 1921 .

John Edward Johnston was elected Sheriff of Sequoyah County, September 1 7, 1907; Noveinber 8, 1910 and Navember 5, 1912

Catherine, a full blood Cherokee married John Gunter, said to have been a Welshman. Their son, Samuel, married Ayoka and their son, George Washington Gunter, married Eliza Nave. He was elected Senator from Sequoyah District, August 6, 1849. Their daughter Susan Catherine Gunter married Robert Johnston and James Choate and was the mother of Albert Main Johnson who married Delilah Baldridge and they are the parents of John E. Johnston, the subject of this sketch. Albert M- Johnston was elected Sheriff of Sequoyah District August 4, 1879 and August 1, 1881.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Letteer, Mrs. Roy —Lahoma Lucile, daughter of Chief William Charles and Nannie (Haynie) ' Rogers, was born at Skiatook, May 4, 1900. Educated at Skiatook and married in Oklahoma City, Oct. 19, 1920, Roy, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Letteer. They are the parents of Jane E. Letteer, born September 11, 1921.

Mrs- Letteer is the daughter of William Charels Rogers the last chief of the Cherokees and the great grand-daughter of Captain John Rogers, the last chief of the Old Settler Cherokees.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Little, Mr. Joseph
—Joseph Carter, son of William and Theresa Lane (Davis) Little was born at Vinita, Monday May 19, 1879. Educated in Worchester Academy, Vinita. Married at Chelsea Oct. 23, 1904, Myrtle, daughter of E. M. and Victoria (Powell) Arnold, born Oct. 23, 1884, and educated at Chelsea, Cherokee Nation. They are the parents of: Joseph, born April 5, 1907; William, born Sept. 30, 1909; Robert, born Aug. 31, 1911; Mary, born Nov. 12, 1913; Ruth, born March 9, 1918; James, born March 3, 1920. Mr. Little is one of the largest range and feeding cattle men in Oklahoma owning and leasing an extensive acreage for that purpose west of Ramona.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Benjamin Dustin Dobkins, born Aug. 6, 1879, was educated at Vinita, the Male Seminary, and graduated from the Ontario, Canada, Veterinary College. He married June 3, 1903, Gertrude, daughter of J. M. and Gertrude Ragland of Lebanon, Mo. Dr. Benjamin D. and Mrs. Dobkins, have one daughter, Miss Jaunita Cherokee, born July 5, 1904.

Dr. Dobkins has been State Veterinary for ten consecutive years, is the author of the Oklahoma State Veterinary Laws and was President of the State Veterinary Association in 1912-13-14 and 15. He is a Mason. Odd Fellow and is President of the State Bank at Welch, Oklahoma.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley


Johnston, John Edward. —John Edward Johnston, bom March 21, 1881. Married December 25, 1906 at Muldrow, Oklahoma, Ida, daughter of Alexander F. and Nannie (Ridding) McKinney, born June 10, 1887. Mrs. Johnston died April 21, 1915. They were the parents of Albert Sidney, born December 23, 1907; John Edward, born August 2, 1909; William Alexander, born November

28, 1910; and Joseph Franklin Johnston, born January 28, 1913. Mr. Johnston married Mrs. Anne Bruton Levy, February 25. 1921 .

John Edward Johnston was elected Sheriff of Sequoyah County, September 1 7, 1907; Noveinber 8, 1910 and Navember 5, 1912

Catherine, a full blood Cherokee married John Gunter, said to have been a Welshman. Their son, Samuel, married Ayoka and their son, George Washington Gunter, married Eliza Nave. He was elected Senator from Sequoyah District, August 6, 1849. Their daughter Susan Catherine Gunter married Robert Johnston and James Choate and was the mother of Albert Main Johnson who married Delilah Baldridge and they are the parents of John E. Johnston, the subject of this sketch. Albert M- Johnston was elected Sheriff of Sequoyah District August 4, 1879 and August 1, 1881.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Letteer, Mrs. Roy
—Lahoma Lucile, daughter of Chief William Charles and Nannie (Haynie) ' Rogers, was born at Skiatook, May 4, 1900. Educated at Skiatook and married in Oklahoma City, Oct. 19, 1920, Roy, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Letteer. They are the parents of Jane E. Letteer, born September 11, 1921.

Mrs- Letteer is the daughter of William Charels Rogers the last chief of the Cherokees and the great grand-daughter of Captain John Rogers, the last chief of the Old Settler Cherokees.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley



Little, Mr. Joseph
—Joseph Carter, son of William and Theresa Lane (Davis) Little was born at Vinita, Monday May 19, 1879. Educated in Worchester Academy, Vinita. Married at Chelsea Oct. 23, 1904, Myrtle, daughter of E. M. and Victoria (Powell) Arnold, born Oct. 23, 1884, and educated at Chelsea, Cherokee Nation. They are the parents of: Joseph, born April 5, 1907; William, born Sept. 30, 1909; Robert, born Aug. 31, 1911; Mary, born Nov. 12, 1913; Ruth, born March 9, 1918; James, born March 3, 1920. Mr. Little is one of the largest range and feeding cattle men in Oklahoma owning and leasing an extensive acreage for that purpose west of Ramona.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Reagan, Austin.— Austin Greely, son of Meriweather G. and Lydia A. (Hicks) Reagan, born September 25, 1888, educated in Male Seminary from which he graduated May 29, 1907. He married at Tahlequah, September 17, 1917, Grace, daughter of John Robert and Nancy J. Wade, born May 18, 1896. They are the parents of: Knowlton, born March 30, 1918; Ruthben, born December 30, 1919, and tin: twins Woodrow and Warren Reagan, born March 4, 1921. Mr. Regan is a farmer and school teacher in Cherokee Ccounty, Oklahoma.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Robinson, Juliette M.  - John Gunter Scrimsher, born August 1 7, 1835 in Alabama. educated in the Cherokee public schools and Male Seminary. Taught school one term at Greenleaf and married September 15. 1859 Juliette Melvina Scrimsher, born August 7, 1841. He was a Captain in the Confederate Service and a Senator in the Southern Cherokee Council during the Civil war. He was elected sheriff of Cooweescoowee District August 5, 1867 and August 5, 1877; Senator August 4, 1879 and August 6, 1883; D=lagate to Washington 1883 and 1885, Sena tor August 1, 1877; District Judge August 1, 1893 and Senator August 2, 1897. He was killed by a lightning stroke on July 5, 1905.

John Gunter and Juliette Melvina (Candy) Scrimsher were the parents of Sarah Catherine, born July 27, 1866 married March 2, 1890 William Edward Sanders and died January 28, 1892; Elizabeth Bell born September 3, 1873 and married Stephen Riley Lewis; Ernest Vivian born July 24, 1875 and married Susie Philips and Juliette Melvina born January 12, 1878. Graduated from Female Seminary June 1, 1898. Married May 10, 1902 Abraham Vandyke Robinson born April 18, 1878.

A. V. and Juliette Melvina Robinson are the parents of: Hubert Spencer, born April 2,1903; Lulu Elizabeth born March 18. 1903 Abraham Vandyke born August 9, 1911 and Juliette Melvina Robinson born January 26. 1914. Abraham Vandyke Robinson was elected Court Clerk of Rogers County, Oklahoma in 1918 and 1920. Mrs. Robinson's Cherokee name is, Cowana and she belongs to the Deer Clan.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Brannon, Mrs. O. O . — Lucile Sarah, daughter of Owen Henry and Ida Lorena (Stephens) Haworth was born at Tulsa, Monday, October 3, 1887- Educated in the Public Schools and Scarrett College. Married at Tulsa in 1906, Orval O. Brannon, born Oct. 28, 1883 in Martin County, Ind. They are the parents of Mary, born Nov. 3, 1907 and Thomas Brannon, born Jan 30, 1910.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Ida Lorena, daughter of Spencer Scago and Sarah (Hicks) Stephens was born March 13, 1865- Graduated from Northfield Academy, Northfield, Connecticut in 1884. Was an instructor in the first school opened in Tulsa. She married June 11, 1886 Owen Henry Haworth born April 27, 1858 in Kankakee County, III.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Bible, John Adam—John Adam, son of William Henry and Mary E- (Locker) Bible was born October 13, 1872. Married at Claremore July 1, 1895 Ella, daughter of Freedom E. and Louisa (Hill) Brinker, born Nov. 1, 1877 in Shelby County. Illinois. They are the parents of: Katie, born in Talala March 30, 1896 and Maude Bible, born May 8, 1900, married at Nowata, Charles A. Carter and is now living in Kansas City, Mo.

Mr. and Mrs. Bible are members of the Church of God and are progressive farmers near Talala, Oklahoma.
History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley

Thompson, Lewis Kell - Lewis Kell, son of Joseph Lynch and Frances (Kell) Thompson, was born in Delaware District October 10, 1873, educated in the Cherokee National Schools and at Vinita. Married December 25, 1898 to Nellie H. Stilley, daughter of Samuel and Lucy F .Stilley, born Nov. 16, 1880 in Delaware District now Mayes County, Oklahoma. They are the parents of: James Robert, born October 24, 1901; Lewis Leroy, born May 11, 1905; Nellie Glennis, born January 4, 1913 and Dainie Jaunita Thompson, born December 12, 1916. Mr. Thompson is a farmer near Pensacola, Okla.

Emily Duncan married Alexander Kell and their son, James, married Elizabeth Edgington and they were the parents of Frances Kell who married Joseph Lynch Thompson.History of the Cherokee Indians and their legends and folk lore - 1922 - Submitted by Tina Easley




 

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