Biographies


A

Andrews, Lorrin H.
Apperson, J. T.
B

Baizley, George
Barin, Louis
Barlow, William
Boring, William
Brownell, George (1)
Brownell, George (2)
C

Campbell, James
Clark, John
D

Dannals, Reuben
Dey, Benjamin
Dimick, Grant
Dimick, Walter
Duncan, Robert
Dye, Charles
E - F

Eastham, O. W.
Eby, Oscar
Elliott, Earl
Elliott, William
G

Gibson, Henan
Gleason, Parsons
H

Hayes, Gordon
Hedges, Gilbert
Hedges, Joseph
Hunsaker, J. T.
Hurley, George
I - J

Johnson, W. Carey
K

Kelly, James
L

Latourette, D. C.
Latourette, Mortimer
Loder, John
M

McBride, T. A.
McBride, Thomas
Meinig, Paul
Meldrum, John
Myers, John
N

Nachand, Henry
Noyer, Peter
O
P - Q

Phillips, Newton
Porter, Leslie
Prosser, George
R

Randall, Tom
Rasmussen, Laurtis
Reed, John
Revenue, Edward
Rook, John
Roots, James
Ryan, Thomas
S

Schuebel, Christopher
Sharp, Robert
Simpson, Ben
Smith, John
Smith, Melvin
Smith, Robert
Smith, W. H.
Starkweather, W. A.
T
U - V

U'Ren, William
W

Wait, Aaron
Wait, Charles
Wilbur, A. C.
X - Y - Z


 

Andrews, Lorrin

Lorrin H. Andrews, one of the representative farmers of Clackamas county, residing on a fine farm one and a half miles south of Oregon City, is a native of the State of Ohio, born March 31, 1837. His father, John Andrews, was born in the State of Connecticut in the year 1801, his ancestors being early settlers of New England. His father married Miss Charlotte Moore, a native of Massachusetts, born in 1802. Twelve children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, eleven of whom were reared to maturity, and all but four are now living. The father was reared on a farm and educated in the Western Reserve College of Ohio, and became a Presbyterian minister and spent his entire life in preaching the gospel of the living God. This good man died in his seventy-seventh year in Iowa, and his wife passed away when eighty-four years of age in Florida, at the home of one of her sons. They left their children the heritage of a good name.
            Our subject was the ninth of the family, and was educated at the Hudson College, after which he took a business course, graduating from the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College in Chicago. Since that time his life has been devoted chiefly to farming. His first farm of eighty acres was located in Mason county, Illinois, in addition to which he had town property and a home in Mason City. From that latter place he removed to Iowa, in 1868, and purchased 320 acres in Cass county, which he improved, residing on it for eight years, during which time he made of it a valuable farm. Owing to failure of health he was obliged to sell his property and come to Oregon, making the trip in 1877. After his arrival his first home was at Woodburn, Marion county, where he resided for five years, endeavoring to recover his health. He then came to Oregon City and purchased 145 acres of land, which forms a portion of his present holdings. It was a portion of the old Vance donation claim. Since this time he has added to his possessions until he owns 382 acres at this place, 220 acres near Oswego. At one time he owned the 160 acres tract that is now the town of Tremont, and he still owns 100 lots in the town of Lorrinton, joining the town of Woodstock,-all surban towns of Portland.

            In 1865 he was married to Miss Martha E. Phinney, a native of Massachusetts, born in 1840, a daughter of Dr. M.C. Phinney, of Maine. To this union three children have been added: Charles P., at home; Lyman B. and Henry A., at college in Corvallis. Mr. and Mrs. Andrews and children are members of the Congregational Church at Oregon City, in which he is one of the Deacons. He has been a Republican since the organization of the party, but has not been a politician, as he has never sought nor desired office. He and his family are very highly regarded by all their neighbors, while he is esteemed for his integrity and entirely deserving of his prosperity, which has been brought about by his own efforts.

Source: An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Nachand, Henry

Henry Nachand, a highly respected pioneer of Clackamas County, Oregon, now a prosperous citizen of Park Place, was born in Peoria, Illinois, November 7, 1842. His father, John Nachand, was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1811, and grew to manhood in his native country. In 1836, he emigrated to New York, and resided variously in Ohio, New Orleans and Indiana, working at the wagon maker’s and carpenter trade. In 1837, he married Miss Catharine Shafer, a native of Alsace, Germany, to whom, in Illinois, were born one child, the subject of this sketch. In the spring of 1847, the father, with his wife and little son, the latter in his fifth year, started across the plains in Oregon. They traveled in a covered wagon, with three yoke of oxen and one yoke of cows, the latter of which were utilized in the double capacity of a team and to provide nourishment for the family. They came with a large company, and, aside from being annoyed by the Indians, who tried to steal their cattle, they had a safe journey. Arriving at their destination, in November, the father settled on a portion of the straight donation claim, located on the banks of the Willamette river, a mile and a half below Oregon City. On this he built a log cabin, and commenced to work his trade. As time passed, and his means allowed, he added to his land, and engaged in the production of vegetables of all kinds, later, adding the production of fruit to his other enterprises, for all of which he found a ready and remunerative market in Portland and Oregon City and in San Francisco. In 1849 the gold excitement took them by land to California, where he worked in the mines for a short time, and in 1850, he was at work at his trade in that State, at Sacramento, when the great flood of that year drove them out of that city into the country. On September 9, 1849, in Sacramento, their Mary was born, who is now the wife of Mr. Theodore Himmler, and resides on her father’s old homestead, which is a beautiful place, surrounded with the large and productive  fruit trees, which were planted by the industrious pioneer of 1847. In 1852, the family returned by sea to Oregon, where the father resumed his former occupation, being greatly prospered in his undertaking, and accumulating an ample fortune for himself and family. In July, 1885, this truly good man died, aged seventy-five years. He was extremely popular with his neighbors and with all who knew him, because of his quiet, industrious and kindly ways, and his death was universally lamented. His worth wife survived him but two years, as if, after a companionship of so many years, she could not survive his loss. She expired in August, 1887, in her eightieth year, sincerely mourned by her family and friends, to whom she endeared herself by the practice of all Christian virtues, heightened by the natural expression of a loving heart.

            Their son Henry, the subject of our sketch, was raised on their fruit farm, and attended the Oregon City schools, and, since attaining manhood, has made fruit culture his business.

            On December 1, 1871, he was married to Mrs. Lucinda Candel, a highly estimable lady, and the widow of Mr. Frank Candel. Her maiden name was Perkins. They had three children: Henry Edward, Ralph W., and May Isabell. Their happy married life, however, was destined to be of short duration, for on July 4, 1880, the young mother and her sixteen months old baby daughter both died, leaving the husband and father truly bereft. He has since devoted his life to his surviving children, who, by their natural intelligence and activity, bid fair to reflect credit on their father and their state.

            He is a Democrat in his political views, and takes an interest in the affairs of his county and State. He has served on the School Board in his native town, discharging his duties in that capacity with ability and integrity.

            His whole life has been spent in Oregon, and he is thoroughly wedded to her cause, his faith in her marvelous development and future great destiny being most implicit, which prognostications she bids fair to amply realize.

Source: An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Randall, Tom

Tom P. Randall, one of the most energetic and prosperous business men of Oregon City, was born in Clackamas county, November 22, 1863, and is the son of Judge Noble W. Randall, an honored pioneer of Oregon (see sketch of his life in this book). The subject of this sketch was the seventh child, and was raised and educated in Oregon City, graduating later at the business college in Portland.

            Soon after this he began to handle real estate on his own account in a small way. His ventures proving successful, he tried larger deals, which were also eminently successful, and finally platted two additions to the city of Oregon City, one on the Mt. Pleasant tract, and the other, a tract of sixty-three acres, called the Bolton tract, both of which were desirable, and increased rapidly in value, netting Mr. Randall a fair sum of money. He has since then made various paying investments, among other being a stockholder in the Oregon City Transportation Company, one of the most prosperous enterprises in this vicinity. This company have built two steamboats, the Altona and Ramona, which are making six trips a day between Portland and Oregon City, carrying freight and passengers, and are doing a thriving business.

            Mr. Randall has passed all the chairs in the I.O.O.F. He is a member of the Board of Trade and President of the City Council, and is First Lieutenant of Company F, N.G.O., State Militia.

            He takes great interest in the welfare of the city in which he was raised, and in the welfare of his native State, being deservedly proud of both, and would go to any laudable length to advance their prosperity. With such ardent champions it ceases to be a matter of wonderment that Oregon should have made such magnificent strides in commerce and the arts, now proudly holding her position in the vanguard of the glorious Sisterhood of States.  

Source: An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Roots, James

James W. Roots, one of the most prominent farmers and horticulturists of Clackamas county, was born in Chatham, England, February 18, 1849.

            His parents were James and Sarah (Holeday) Roots, both of English descent. In 1853, they emigrated to New York,  thence removing to Illinois, where they resided for a couple of years. In 1857, they went to Kansas, where they preempted land, passing through all the trials and vicissitudes of pioneer life, besides experiencing the added trouble of conflicts with border ruffians, and Indians, and the ruffians mobbed him off his lands, because of his free-soil principles and his efforts to make Kansas a free State. By his courage and ability, however, he finally secured his land, to which they again returned. On the breaking out of the war, his sympathies were thoroughly aroused, and he offered his services to the Government, enlisting in the Thirteenth Kansas regiment, in which he served bravely and efficiently for two years, or until he became disabled, and in consequence was honorably discharged. In 1865, he sold out his possessions in Kansas and removed to Missouri, where he aided in running the Bushwhackers out of the country.

            In 1869 he and his family crossed the plains to Oregon. They had three wagons and several mule teams, and were well armed with guns, revolvers and knives, being prepared to fight their way through, if necessary. His wife and four children comprised the family. On the way they fell in with other emigrants, making eighteen wagons in all. A part of them were attacked by Indians, with whom they had a sharp fight, and who got away with one of their men, from whom they never heard afterward. On arriving at Fort Kearny, they were retained there until other emigrants came up, as it was not considered safe for them to proceed. Their number was increased to forty-five wagons, and all who were not well armed, were supplied by the fort with Spencer rifles. They then pursued their journey, crossing swollen streams without bridges, sometimes using from five to ten spans of mules and horses to one wagon and floating the bed of the wagon up as high as the standards, getting the clothing and provisions wet. It took two days to cross South Platte and the same to cross North Platte, and they had to exercise every precaution against a sudden attack by the Indians. At night when they went into camp, they would form a corral with their wagons, and their animals were pastured until dark and then driven within the inclosure. A guard was diligently kept until day light, when the stock were again driven out to pasture. They were obliged to feel their animals the best they could, as their own safety and final journey depended on their teams’ strength.

            On the east edge of the Black Hills a fearful storm overtook them. The wind was something terrific, while the thunder re-echoed among the hills, until the earth fairly seemed to tremble; over all this the lightning came in blinding sheets, the intense light of which was succeeded by appalling darkness. Tents were blown down and covers torn from wagons by the wind, while the drenching rain completed the general devastation. The women were in the tent, while the men outside were trying to hold it down, to keep it from blowing away. On that fearful night a tiny emigrant entered on its worldly pilgrimage, adding its distress to that engendered by the destructive storm. The storm however passed away with the night, and the morning found all injured. Three children were born on this memorable journey to Oregon. Provision became very scarce in the latter part of the journey, and money, too.

            On arriving in the State, Mr. Roots and his family settled on land in the Clackamas county, taking possession in the fall of 1869, and on which the father still resides in peace and plenty, in a good home, supplied with all the conveniences that money can provide. He has been thrice married, the present companion of his old age being a nice little lady, who was his first boy love in England, many years ago. He is now in his seventy-fourth year, and enjoys the good will of all who know him, because of his true worth and genial character.

            His son, the subject of our sketch, spent the most of his time from twelve till twenty driving team, freighting west of the Mississippi river and experiencing a great many hardships in that capacity. He was in his twentieth year when he crossed the plains. He drove a team from Kansas, and on the journey, after providing for his team for the night, he has on some occasions taken a blanket, and lain down in the tall grass at a distance, being fearful of being attacked and killed by the Indians.

            When on the plains, he and a companion left the train at Sinkey creek, to go to the Silver City mines, to see what they could do there. When they arrived there, there was no work and no water to work the mines, and they pursued their way to Canyon City. Two days of this part of the journey was spent without food, the last of which was also devoid of water, there being nothing but sand and sage brush. His feet became a complete blister from walking in the hot sand, and their suffering was intense, and at other times, in the Blue mountains, they had to pick berries to eat to keep from starving. His companion died from the effects of this journey. This is only one of the many instances of hardship which the early pioneers endured, and which have made them richly deserving of all future prosperity.

            On arriving in Clackamas, he homesteaded 160 acres of land, located half a mile west of the present site of Clackamas Station. This land was then covered with a dense forest of huge fir trees, some of which were eight feet in diameter and 300 feet high. It was an Herculean task to clean up the property and prepare it for farming purposes, and only those similarly situated can realize the toil and perseverance necessary to accomplish it. After the trees were trees[sic] were felled, they made a dense pile on the ground, which was burned, thus leaving the work but barely commenced; for great stumps remained, the roots of which extended like sinewy ropes, twenty feet and more in every direction, all of which had to be carefully removed before the ground could utilized. All of this was industriously accomplished, and Mr. Roots has today, one of the finest farms in the county.

            A short time after he settled on the place, a terrific wind storm blew down much of the timber, strewing the roads and surrounding country with fallen trees. The following year a fire got into this fallen timber, which threatened to destroy everything they had. His family fled for refuge, and he and his neighbors fought the fire, finally succeeding in saving the house, but the fences and all other buildings were destroyed.

            Mr. Roots worked for fourteen years in the paper mill of the Clackamas Paper Company, part of the time occupying the position for foreman and millwright. This mill was two miles and a half from his home, which distance he walked, going at noon and returning at midnight, for five years, when he rode back and forth.

            He, at first raised only vegetables and hay on his farm, but as soon as possible, began the production of different kinds of fruit, in the cultivation of which he has been very successful, now having one of the finest fruit farms in the State. On commencing  life on this place, he was $100 worse off than nothing, and now owns about a thousand acres of choice farming lands, about a hundred town lots, a large and comfortable residence, good barns for his grain and stock, and other buildings, all surrounded by trimly kept grounds, to which is added an orchard, second to none in the country. These are a wonderful tribute to the great thrift of the man, as well as to the productiveness of the soil.

            He was married on May 20, 1871, to Miss Eliza Ann Hickey, who crossed the plains in the same train as himself, which goes to show that no journey is too long or laborious for Cupid to undertake. Miss hickey’s father, Hugh A. Hickey, was a highly esteemed pioneer, who died in 1888, leaving a faithful wife and family to mourn his loss. The mother still survives. To this marriage have been born four children, three daughters and one son: Hattie S., Thomas A., Myrtle T., and Amy L., all born in Oregon, and reflecting credit on their native county and State.

            Mr. Roots is a prominent Republican in politics, taking a commendable interest  in the affairs of his State and country. He is a respected member of the A.O.U.W.

            Thus has intelligent and persistent effort been rewarded with prosperity, and what is more desirable, the good-will of all right-minded citizens.    

Source: An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Gibson, Henan

Henan S. Gibson, County Superintended of Instruction of Clackamas county, is a native of the State of Iowa, born in Monmouth, Jackson county, February 2, 1862. His ancestry were Irish and Scotch, who came to Virginia in the early history of that State, and since which time there has been some mixture of English and Dutch blood. His grandfather, Harmon Gibson, removed to the Western Reserve in an early day, engaging there inf arming, but later removed to Iowa, where he continued in the same occupation. He was a Wesleyan Methodist, and lived to be eighty-six years old. The father of our subject, James Gibson, Jr., was the third in a family of nine children. He was married in Iowa Mrs. Emily Garrison in 1861. In 1867 they started across the plains with ox teams, and settled in Clackamas county, three miles east of Eagle Creek. Here Mr. Gibson took a homestead of 160 acres and here he has since resided.

            Our subject was five years of age when he arrived in Oregon. He attended the public schools for three months in the year, and the rest of the time, until he was nineteen, he worked on his father’s farm. At this time he went to Pierce Christian College, California, at which he graduated in 1884, accomplishing a five year’s course in three years, standing high in lla(?) his examinations. After  leaving school he taught in Colusa county, California, eight months, then returned to Clackamas county, where he has taught thirteen terms, and for two years held the principalship of the Clackamas school.

            In March, 1892, Mr. Gibson was nominated by the Republican party as their candidate for Superintendent of Schools. He made a successful canvass, and is now filling the office creditably. Mr. Gibson was married August 4, 1886, to Miss Bertha Martin, a native of Iowa, born April 8, 1865. She was the stepdaughter of Mr. John Glover, an Oregon pioneer of 1847, and she was educated in Clackamas county, where she became a successful teacher. She is now her husbands deputy in the office of Superintendent. Mr. Gibson is a member of A.O.U.W., in which he has been Recorder. Both he and his accomplished wife are people of refinement and education, very unassuming in manners, but enthusiastic in school work and highly esteemed through the entire county.

Source: An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Phillips, Newton

Newton Phillips (1852-1904)

 Newton was one of the first white children born on the shore of Lake Michigan.  After the first white woman and man came to that part of Lake Michigan there were no neighbors nearer than White River, excepting the Indians.  About six weeks after the first families arrived, Dr. Phillips and his father came to that area.  It was a lonesome time for all.  The Great Lake on one side and the wilderness on the other side.  The Indians were generally friendly and not difficult to get a long with except when intoxicated.  They would occasionally get possession of some firewater and then pandemonium was let loose.  There were no roads through the woods only Indian trails.  At certain periods some family’s only provisions were potatoes and salt.

 

Children of Newton & Mary (Hills) Phillips:

Almon Ray 1885-1954; Vera Anna 1880-1936; Loranda Emeline 1895-1956; Thomas Verne (1893-1894)

Contributed by Mrs. Carole Dick

Dey, Benjamin

BENJAMIN CLIFFORD DEY. Benjamin Clifford Dey, a member of the Portland bar, practicing as senior partner in the firm of Dey, Hampson & Nelson, has spent his entire life in this state, having been born in Oregon City, December 29, 1879. His father, Thompson Dey, was a native of Seneca county. New York, born in 1832. He joined the Union army during the Civil war, going into the service from Wisconsin with the Engineers division. He was married in Wisconsin to Miss Mary Ellen Lamphere and in 1874 they removed to Oregon, settling first at New Era, near Oregon City, where Mr. Dey established a flouring mill. In 1878 he took up his abode in Oregon City and there resided until 1888, when he went to Santa Cruz, California, there passing away June 17, 1892. His widow survived him for several years, her death occurring November 9, 1909, in Oakland, California. Benjamin C. Dey obtained his early education in the public schools of Oregon City and continued his studies in Santa Cruz. Following his father's death he came to Portland and completed a high school course here. He then again went to California, becoming a student at Stanford University, from which he was graduated in 1905 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In June, 1906, he was admitted to the bar in Oregon and entered upon the active work of the profession, being associated tor eleven years with W. D. Fenton. In 1917 he formed a partnership with Alfred A. Hampson and in 1918 R. C. Nelson was admitted to the firm, the style of Dey, Hampson & Nelson being then assumed. For fourteen years Mr. Dey has been a representative of the Portland bar and although advancement in the profession of law is proverbially slow, no dreary novitiate awaited him. He soon gained recognition in a growing practice and for many years his clientage has been extensive, making his law business one of substantial profit. He has also become general attorney in Oregon for the Southern Pacific Company. On the 15th of November, 1911, in San Francisco, Mr. Dey was married to Miss Hazel Sobey, a daughter of Dr. A. L. Sobey, a native of England. Their children are three in number: Dorothy, Benjamin C. and Franklin H. Mr. Dey is a republican in his political views and in the club circles of the city he is well known, representing the Arlington, University and Press Clubs, and he is also identified with the Chamber of Commerce. In a word he is associated with all those interests which are of vital significance in promoting the city's growth and advancement and in upholding its best interests.

Source: History of Oregon: Volume III
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company Chicago - Portland; 1922
Starkweather, W. A.

HON. W. A. STARKWEATHER

Who is now serving his second term as State Senator from Clackamas County, was born in Preston, Connecticut, February 16, 1822. He was raised on the farm, but received the benefits of a very fair education, mostly derived from the common schools, aided by an occasional attendance at some select school. He prepared himself for teaching and followed this profession as a means of livelihood for a number of years. He left his native place in 1846 and went to Ohio and taught about two years in the schools of Redding and Lockland. He came to this coast in 1850, having crossed the plains. He remained but a few months in California and came to Oregon, in the fall of 1850 and was with Governor Moody and others in the surveying party that located the meridian line in 1851. He took up a donation land claim near Scio in the following year, on which he remained until 1854, when he removed to Clackamas County, where he has since resided. He spent several years on a farm, and in 1861 went into the United States Land Office at Oregon City. He was elected a member of the House and attended the session of 1854-5, and has been so often a member of that body since that date that the data is forgotten. He was elected State Senator in 1878 for the term of four years. He was married to Miss Eliza Gordon in 1853 In 1857 he was elected as a member of the State Constitutional Convention Mr. Starkweather is an uncompromising Republican and stands high in his party. As a legislator he is an indefatigable worker and watches with zealous care the interests of his constituents and the entire State. Mr. Stark- weather is a fine-looking old gentleman, with flowing white beard, prominent features, penetrating eyes and a well-shaped head. He occasionally indulges in debate, but is not given to airing his eloquence and is highly esteemed by all who know him.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Myers, John

HON. JOHN MYERS

Among those most prominent in the front ranks of the Democratic party is Hon. John Myers, Senator from Clackamas County. He is clear-headed, and watches carefully every measure brought forward. He is a fluent speaker, a strict parliamentarian, possessing a retentive memory and is a strong partisan. He is considered a good financier, and, in connection with the revenue laws of the State, has given the subject careful study. He is of heavy build, with clear cut features, and his opinions on any subject never fail to receive the careful consideration of members of both political parties. He was born in Howard County, Missouri, in 1830, and was raised on a farm. He enlisted in the Mexican war in 1847, and was connected with the quarter master's department for about a year. Returning home in 1848 he remained there until the spring of 1852, when he started for California, arriving in Stockton in October of the same year, where he engaged in mining and trading until January, 1857, when he was appointed Sheriff and was afterwards elected to the same office. Impressed with the idea that Oregon offered superior advantages to young men, he moved here, arriving in Oregon City in August, 1860. While on a previous visit he was married to Miss Sarah J. Hood, of Oregon City. He settled there and entered the mercantile business, in which he has been engaged ever since. He was elected Sheriff of Clackamas County in 1868, and represented that county in the State Senate of 1872, 1874, 1876, 1878, and has just been re-elected for another four years' term, his record in this respect indicating very forcibly the esteem and confidence reposed in him by the citizens of the county he so ably represents. He has a family of ten children, with one daughter married. He is a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and has always contributed liberally to its support. He has attained the honorable position of Past Master in the Masonic order and has always been a successful business man, and is to-day one of the most influential men of Oregon City, the citizens holding him in high esteem as one of their leading merchants.
 
Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Wilbur, A. C.

HON. A. C. WILBUR

There is, perhaps, no member of the House better acquainted with the routine of legislative business than Mr. Wilbur. In his youth he had the advantage of a liberal college education, has had previous experience as a member of the legislature, and is, therefore, one of its most serviceable members. He is a quiet gentleman and a superior counselor, but is either too modest or lacking in confidence sufficient to play the orator or logician before the multitude. He is one of the Representatives from old Clackamas county, which constituency he also represented in 1880. Mr. Wilbur was born in New York in the year 1834, received the common school training of those days, and finished at Jefferson College, in Washington County, Pennsylvania. He immigrated to Oregon in 1870, and settled in Clackamas County, where he has since remained. Although Mr. Wilbur has always been a staunch Republican, he is by no means an extremist, and is always willing to examine any measure of legislation in all its lights, and do that which is best for the people of the entire State. Mr. Wilbur is an active member of committee on roads and highways.
 
Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Sharp, Robert

HON. ROBERT J. SHARP

This gentleman is eminently a self-made man. His entire career has displayed a force of character and indomitable energy, which in the long run never fails to land the possessor of these qualities on top. He represents Clackamas County, and although not a frequent speech maker, is a hard worker and is ably representing the interests of his section, while devoting his native energy and talent to the interests of the whole State. Mr. Sharp belongs to the positive school of legislators, and whatever he advocates may be depended upon as the honest convictions of the man— a rough and ready quality undoubtedly acquired through a varied experience with the world and the necessity of earning everything he possesses. He was born in Burlington, Iowa, March 10, 1844, and went with his parents to Henry County in 1848, in which year his father died. He attended school for a few years and afterwards learned the carpenter's trade. At the breaking out of the war young Robert, who was then only seventeen years of age, and whose forefathers had all fought for their country, imbued with that spirit of daring and patriotism which is so characteristic of the American lad, en- listed in Company G, 11th Iowa Infantry, under Capt. Samuel McFarland. He fought during the entire war, and was tinder Generals Halleck and Grant at the battles of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth and the Vicksburg campaign in 18G8, and in 1864 he served under Sherman in the Atlanta campaign, and accompanied that gallant General on his march to the sea; he also fought in the campaign of the Carolinas. He was mustered out of service at Louisville, Kentucky', and returned to Iowa, where he attended school for one year; then he removed to Kansas in 1865, where he remained eight years. While in Kansas the Indian war broke out, and young Sharp immediately fell into line and fought it out with Custer. He came to Oregon in 1874 and settled in Clackamas County, where he still resides, engaged in farming. Mr. Sharp was a member of the last Legislature and while a member of the House made a good record. He was married in 1869 to Miss Phoebe Freeman.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Noyer, Peter

HON. PETER S. NOYER

In the early days of the Republic sterling worth was a much more common element in the political character than it is now. This is a sad confession to make, but “pity 'tis 'tis true, and more’s the pity." Hard-headed, practical common sense has been the chief characteristic of some- of the greatest statesmen that America ever knew. Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln and General Grant were of tins class; men who had very little to say, but very much to do, and what they did do they did thoroughly and well. Coming down into the humbler paths of life we find individuals of the same type who would have acted in precisely the same manner had they accepted the responsible positions of the statesmen we have named. In this category we feel justified in placing the name of Hon. Peter S Noyer the whole-souled representative from Clackamas County. The subject of this notice was born in Richland County, Ohio, October 19, 1837 and in 1840 moved with his parents to Illinois. In 1845 the family went to Texas, where young Peter received the advantages of a common school education. In 1853, attracted by the great gold discoveries, he went to California, by the way of New Orleans, Nicaragua and San Francisco to the gold mines. He remained there till May, 1855, when he immigrated to Oregon and located in Clackamas county. In 1857 he was married to a most estimable young lady, named Miss Delilah C. May, who came with her parents from Illinois in 1847. In 1862 Mr. Noyer traveled through the wilds of Eastern Oregon and Western Idaho, which territory was at that time infested with marauding bands of hostile Indians, but he fortunately escaped with a sound scalp and no regrets. In 1874, as recognition for his services to the grand old Democratic Party, he was elected a member of the Legislature, and in 1882 he was returned. He has been a life-long Democrat of the Jackson school, and his probity and character are above suspicion.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Kelly, James

HON. JAMES K. KELLY

The subject of this sketch has held most of the places of honor and trust at the disposal of the people of this State, and now that old age is creeping on it is befitting that he be relieved of the irksome duties of public life and devote his entire attention to the practice of the high and honorable profession in which he occupies so prominent a position. He was born in Center County, Penn., in 1819, and until he attained the age of sixteen years his life was spent upon a farm. He entered Princeton College, New Jersey, in 1837, and graduated in 1839, soon afterwards commencing the study of law at Carlisle Law School in Pennsylvania under Judge Reed, and was admitted to the bar in 1842. He opened an office in Lewiston, Penn., where he remained until 1849, when he started for California via Mexico. He remained in the mines for a short time and came to Oregon in 1851 and settled at Oregon City. He was appointed one of the Code Commissioners in 1853, and in the same year was elected a member of the Territorial Council, of which he was a member for four years, during which time he was President of the Council two sessions. He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the Volunteer Infantry in the Yakima Indian War of 1855-6. In 1857 he was elected member of the State Constitutional Convention from Clackamas County, and in 1860 was a member of the State Senate. In 1864 he was the Democratic candidate for Congress, but was defeated by Hon. J. H. D. Henderson. He was also candidate for Governor in 1866; at the time Governor Woods was elected in 1870 he was elected United States Senator, when he served his full term. In 1878, on the formation of a separate Supreme Court, he was appointed Chief Justice, which position he held until the general election of 1880, when, although the Democratic party candidate, he suffered defeat. Since that time he has settled down to private life and enjoys a lucrative practice in his profession. He is a hard worker and has been a deep student and is thoroughly versed in law. He is tall, somewhat stoop-shouldered, wears only a mustache as a facial ornament, his eyes are set well back in his head, and he has a broad, expansive forehead.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Johnson, W. Carey

HON. W. CAREY JOHNSON

Prominent among the self-made men of Oregon is he whose name heads this sketch, and who has been a prominent character in business and political circles for many years past. He first saw the light of day in Ross County, Ohio, October 27, 1833, mid received the benefits of a common school education, when with his father, Rev. Hezekiah Johnson, he came to Oregon in 1845 and settled in Oregon City, where he has resided ever since. He commenced learning the printer's trade and worked on the case in Oregon City for several years. In 1854 he commenced reading law with Wait & Kelly, and was admitted to the bar September, 1855, which in view of the fact that he worked at the case four days each week and taught an evening school a good portion of the time to earn money to pay his expenses, may be considered a very judicious outlay of time and talent. On arriving at the age of maturity he gave all of his hard-earned savings, with the exception of twenty dollars, to his then aged father, and started in anew to earn a name and fortune for himself. He was elected City Prosecuting Attorney in 1858 and City Recorder in 1859. He was meanwhile establishing a lucrative practice in the profession of law and steadily advancing; to the front rank of the legal fraternity. In 1862 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for the Fourth Judicial District. In 1865 and 1866 he held the highly responsible position of special attorney, under the venerated Hon. Caleb Cushing, to investigate and settle the affairs of the Hudson Bay and Puget Sound Companies. He was elected State Senator in 1866 to fill a vacancy, and during that session rendered valuable service as Chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He is now the senior member of the well-known legal firm of Johnson, McCown & Macrum, with offices at Oregon City and Portland. As an attorney at law Mr. Johnson stands high in the profession. He is an earnest student, a careful reader and a deep thinker. He is a fine-looking gentleman, of ordinary height and build, very black whiskers and mustache, prematurely bald, a clear black eye and always neatly dressed. He has been several times honored with the complimentary vote of his party friends for U. S. Senator, and during the exciting contest just closed received the votes of the "solid sixteen." He was married on Christmas of 1868 to Miss Josephine De Vore, a graduate of the Willamette University and one of the most intelligent ladies in the State. They have a family of three children who are already developing minds of far more than ordinary brilliancy. Mr. Johnson has a beautiful residence in Oregon City, and his home life amid such surroundings cannot be otherwise than pleasant.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Barin, Louis

HON. LOUIS T. BARIN

A well-known and highly-esteemed resident of Clackamas, is an active, energetic citizen and a gentleman that takes a lively interest in the welfare and prosperity of our fair young State, of which he has been a resident for over a score of years. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1842, and came to Oregon when he was twenty years of age and settled in Oregon City, where he took up a piece of government land and for the first few years interested himself in improving it. He enlisted in Company E of the First Regiment Oregon Cavalry, and was elected First Sergeant, which position he held for three years, receiving an honorable discharge at the end of his term of service. Returning to Oregon City he commenced the study of law in 1869, in the office of Johnson it McCown, and was admitted to the bar in 1872, and in the same year was elected a member of the House of Representatives from that county. His wedding took place during the session, the bride being Miss Josephine H. Harding, of Oregon City. He was elected City Prosecuting Attorney in 1874, and was re-elected in 1875. During the years 1877 and 1878 he was Mayor of Falls City, and was considered an efficient officer. He received the appointment of Register of the United States Land Office in January, 1878, under President Hayes, and was re-appointed by President Arthur in February, 1882. He is of the average build, rather heavy set, and an active politician. He prides himself on being an uncompromising Republican, and has stood by his political principles in times and places that try men's hearts. He is still in the prime of life and has a bright future before him.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

McBride, T. A.

HON. T. A. M'BRIDE

The subject of the following sketch was born in Yamhill County, Oregon, in 1847. His father was the late Dr. Jas. McBride, well known to all old Oregonians, and whose memory is still venerated by all who ever knew him. He was one of the leading men in the Territory, and his daily walk was always in the direction of everything that was pure and noble, and, being a man of far above average ability, his example and teaching have been lasting in their effect. His sons inherited their father's ability and uprightness of character and all of them are a credit to our young State. His brother, Hon. Geo. W. McBride, is the leading merchant of Columbia County and speaker of the House in the Legislature of 1882, where he made a reputation that will favorably compare with any of his predecessors. The subject of this sketch was educated at McMinnville college and there received a good English education and laid the foundation for a classical course, which has been steadily built upon ever since, until his acquaintance with the dead languages will favorably compare with that of any man in Oregon. He was admitted to the bar in 1870 and has practiced law in Oregon ever since, with the exception of two years, which were spent in the same profession in Utah. He was the first Republican every elected to the Legislature from Columbia county, and that in the face of a large Democratic majority. He owed his election solely to his great personal popularity, not only among Republicans but also Democrats. In that Legislature Mr. McBride made quite a reputation as a debater, and his speeches and witty repartees are often referred to by those who heard them. In 1881 he removed from St. Helens to Oregon City, where he has practiced law to the satisfaction of his clients and remuneratively to himself. He has recently been appointed by the Governor Prosecuting Attorney of the Fifth Judicial District, a position he is well qualified to fill. He is studious and is destined to take a position in the front ranks of the members of the profession. Mr. McBride has a pleasing address, a great deal of magnetism and makes friends of all with whom he comes in contact. As a companion, he is both entertaining and instructive, and as a friend, one whose fidelity is beyond question. Few men possess as many good qualities as are to be found in the person of Mr. Thos. McBride.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Simpson, Ben

HON. BEN SIMPSON

In the armed band of State builders, who, catching the earliest rays of that regal star which the prophetic spirit of poesy discovered long ago as the leader of advancing civilization, followed its course to the western verge of the continent and laid the foundations of the ultimate pillar of Union, few are deserving of more honorable mention than Hon. Ben Simpson, at present holding the important office of United States Postal Inspector for this district. He first saw the light in the grand old commonwealth of Tennessee in the year 1818. His parents immigrated to Missouri in 1820, and in that then bold border State he resided until 1846, the year of his departure for Oregon. In the interval, 1839, he was married to a young lady named Wisdom, whose death two years later left him a widower, with one child, John Thomas, as the fruit of their brief union. In 1843 he was married to Miss Nancy Cooper, a grand-daughter of Colonel Cooper, the companion and ally of Daniel Boone in the settlement of Kentucky, and who afterward settled in Missouri and built what was known as Cooper's Fort, in Howard County, a famous citadel of the pioneers in the early Indian wars. In 1846, as soon as the skies began to clear, accompanied by his wife and three children John T., Sylvester C. and Sam L. - he set out on the memorable journey across the plains, borne, with all his household goods and gods, by slow but true and patient oxen. He acted as captain of his company, numbering about one hundred and fifty souls, on the long and weary route, and they crossed the Cascades in October, by the Barlow road, arriving at Foster's, on this side, the 15th of the month, nearly six months from the time they left Missouri. Inured to hard labor from his earliest boyhood, and bold, aggressive and persevering by nature, Mr. Simpson was little daunted by the frowning aspect of fortune on his arrival in Oregon: a wilderness to encounter, a young family to care for, no money in his pocket and little food in the larder; but, having found shelter for his household, shouldered his ax and sought and found a job of rail-making in order to secure the necessaries of life. The winters of '46 and '47 were spent at Oregon City. Early in the spring of the latter year he removed to French Prairie and engaged in husbandry. Thence, in 1848, he went to Clackamas City and gave his attention to lumbering and merchandising, succeeding well in both branches of business. Then came the Whitman massacre and the Cayuse war. Mr. Simpson promptly volunteered and served under Colonel Gilliam, and participated in the first general battle at Well Springs. While residing at Clackamas City he was elected to the Second Territorial Legislature as a member of the House. About this time the rush to California began, and Mr. Simpson made a sailing voyage to San Francisco, then a cluster of dirty tents and rude shanties, taking with him a cargo of lumber, which he sold at fabulous figures. On his return he sold out his business in Clackamas City and moved to Parkersville, where he also engaged in merchandising and the manufacture of lumber. During the time he built and launched at Fairfield — a little town on the river, in Marion county — the second large steamer ever constructed above the Falls— the Oregon. While at Parkersville he was elected to represent Marion County in the House, and afterwards in the Council of the Territorial Legislature. To follow up his legislation at this point, we note that he was a Representative from Polk at the outbreak of the war, and assisted in the election of B. F. Harding to the United States Senate. In the Legislature of 1872 he was a Representative from Benton County and strongly championed the cause of the successful Senatorial candidate, Hon. J. H. Mitchell. Beyond this his business and official experience has been varied and extensive. He served several years as post sutler and Indian trader at Fort Yamhill, during the time that the present General Phil. Sheridan was attached to the post as a Second Lieutenant and Post Quartermaster. He was afterward appointed Indian Agent for the Siletz Reservation, where he served for eight years acceptably, before the wild tribes had lost the verve of the war-trail. At the close of his official term he went to Yaquina Bay and erected the steam saw-mills at Oneatta and resumed the old line of goods and lumber, building two handsome schooners to ship the latter product to San Francisco. He, also, at one time owned a saw-mill at Santiam City, sold dry goods and groceries in Salem, and has, in fact, led an active and enterprising life. He was appointed Surveyor General of the State in 1872, and held the position four years. Mr. Simpson has nine children by his present wife, four daughters and five sons. Three daughters and two sons are graduates of the Willamette University. Sometimes the favorite and again the jest of fortune, he is still at the front in the strength of a storm-toughened age, a fast friend and a fearless foe, giving yet the promise of many years of usefulness.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Rook, John

JOHN ROOK

Editor and proprietor of the Oregon City "Enterprise," is one of the rising men of Oregon. He was born at Barnstaple, England, in December, 1848. He received his education in the schools and academy of his native city, and afterwards at the Wesleyan College, Taunton. He then went to Les Audelys, France, where he studied for some time longer. He returned to England and entered a merchant's office in Swansea, South Wales. He next embarked in business at home, and shortly after we find him a clerk in a London railroad office. Mr. Rock's father had lived in America for some years, and his glowing accounts of the country, together with the reading of American newspapers, fired the young man's mind with the idea of coming to the United States. He landed in New York City, in 1870. After a very brief stay in western New York he drifted to Illinois and thence to Iowa. He reached Oregon in 1872, and the conviction resolutely settled itself upon his mind that he struck the desired spot. After teaching school for six years in various parts of this State, he settled at Oregon City and for a brief while was engaged in buying wheat. All his life, since early manhood he had been a scribbler for one paper or another. In 1878 he visited Europe, and upon his return he assumed the editor's chair of the "Enterprise," which he has ably filled. Mr. Rock is a Republican in politics, and his editorial utterances are carefully read by most of the leading men in the State.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Brownell, George


HON. GEORGE C. BROWNELL. Among the distinguished lawyers and lawmakers of Oregon George C. Brownell is numbered, and for the third term he is serving in the state senate, leaving the impress of his individuality upon the legislation which has been enacted during the period of his connection with the general assembly. A native of the Empire state, he was born in Willsboro, N. Y., August 10, 1858, the second in the family of seven children born unto Ambrose and Annie (Smith) Brownell. Of English ancestry, the Brownell family was founded in New England at an early period in the development of this country. The father of our subject was a native of New York, born in Essex County, whence he removed to Columbia County, where his last days were passed. He was a mechanic, but at the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations in order to aid in the preservation of the Union as a member of Company F, One Hundred and Eighteenth New York Infantry, which was assigned to duty with the Army of the Potomac. He took part in a number of engagements and on one occasion was severely wounded. His wife was a native of Addison County, Vt.

After acquiring his literary education in the public schools and in academy, George C.  Brownell took up the study of law under the direction of Charles L. Beale, member of congress living in Hudson. N. Y., and in Albany, in 1882, he was admitted to the bar. He entered upon his professional career in Frankfort. Kans., where he engaged in practice with marked success, winning prestige at that bar, and in public affairs he was also prominent, serving as mayor of Frankfort in 1884-85. On the 6th of January, 1886, he removed to Ness City, Kans., and the same year was appointed attorney for the Denver, Memphis & Atlantic Railroad, extending from Chetopa, Kans., to Pueblo, Colo. A large private practice was also accorded him in recognition of his skill and ability in the line of his chosen profession, and for two years he served as county attorney of Ness County, Kans.

Since June, 1891, he has been a resident of Oregon City and a practitioner at its bar, and today a distinctively representative clientage is accorded him in recognition of his capability. He has broad and comprehensive understanding of the principles of jurisprudence, possesses a keenly analytical mind, prepares his cases with great care and precision and therefore seldom fails to gain the verdict desired. But Mr. Brownell has not confined his attention solely to the practice of law, having been a factor in the lawmaking body of the state. In 1892 he was made the nominee of the Republican Party for state senator, but declined to accept the nomination because he had been a resident of the state for less than a year. He was, however, in the county convention, made chairman of the delegation to the state convention and was chairman of the Republican central committee of Clackamas County and had charge of the convention that year. In 1894 he was nominated for the position of state senator by acclamation and defeated Hon. W. A. Stark weather, who had been a member of the first constitutional convention of Oregon and was an ex-representative and a former register of the land office, Mr. Brownell being elected by a plurality of three hundred and twenty-seven. In 1898, after the most bitter contest that had occurred in the county in years, he was re nominated by acclamation, covering every one of the thirty-six precincts of the county, and in the June election he defeated Hon. W. S. Wren by two hundred and thirty-eight votes. In the special session of 1898, he was chosen by the Republican caucus to present the caucus man, the Hon. Joseph Simon, to the joint assembly as the candidate for United States senator. In 1900 Mr. Brownell received the unanimous endorsement of the Republicans of Clackamas County for member of congress. In 1902 he was a third time nominated for state senator by acclamation and after a hard Contest before the people defeated the Hon. George W. Grace, by a plurality of six hundred and ninety-five. During the session of 1901 Mr. Brownell took an active part in the election of a United States senator, and it was he who on the fortieth ballot, when hope of electing a senator was about gone, presented the name of John H. Mitchell, who was later elected. Again during the session of 1903-04, when Mr. Brownell was serving as president of the senate, he was successful in having his candidate for United States senator, Hon. C. W. Fulton, elected, and in the speech made by Senator Fulton directly after the deciding ballot had been cast, he gave Senator Brownell the full credit for what he had accomplished.

Mr. Brownell has been a very active and valuable member of the upper house of the state legislature and his labors have been a potent factor in framing legislation enacted during his terms of service, He was the author of and introduced into the senate the initiative and referendum resolution to amend the state constitution: was the author of the law which provided that supervisors should be elected instead of appointed; and at each session be introduced a bill to authorize the calling of a constitutional convention to revise the organic law of the state and finally secured the passage of the bill through the senate in 1901, but it was defeated in the house by two votes. He was also the author of the bill to elect precinct assessors, instead of county assessors, and this also passed the senate, but was defeated in the house by a vote of two. He introduced the bill, and secured its passage through the senate, exempting to every laboring man that was the head of a family thirty days wages from attachment and execution for debt, and this passed the house and became a law. In the senate Mr. Brownell offered resolutions for the appointment of a committee to investigate the handling of school funds of Oregon and was made the chairman of the committee, whose report gave a shortage of $31,000 in the school funds, and thus prevented other fraudulent use of money appropriated for educational work in the state. On May 20, 1903, Mr. Brownell delivered the address of welcome at the state capital as chairman of the committee on behalf of the senate and House of Representatives of Oregon.

In Rockland, Mass., Mr. Brownell was married to Miss Alma C. Lane, a native of the Bay state. They have two adopted sons, Howard and Ambrose, the former a law student. Mrs. Brownell is a member of the Presbyterian Church and Mr. Brownell belongs to various fraternal organizations, holding membership relations with the Knights of the Maccabees, the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Improved Order of Red Men.

While not engrossed with his labors as a legislator, Mr. Brownell finds that his time is fully occupied with a large and growing law practice of a distinctively representative character. He is especially strong as a trial lawyer, being a forceful, eloquent speaker, whose deductions follow in logical sequence and whose analyzation of a cause and the application of the points of law which apply thereto is correct and comprehensive.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company
Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Smith, W. H.

CAPT. W. H. SMITH. A veteran of the Civil war and a representative of one of the oldest families of Clackamas County, Captain Smith is now spending his last years in ease and retirement at his beautiful home in Park place. Retiring in nature, he has never cared for the emoluments of public office, preferring rather to give his whole time and attention to his own business interests. A native of Ohio, his birth occurred in Washington County, December 14, 1840, a son of John A. Smith, who was born in Parkersburg, W.Va., where for a time he lived after reaching mature years, but later removed to Ohio. In 1855 he settled in the northern part of Missouri, and ten years later found him bound for Oregon with a large party who were also seeking a home in the undeveloped northwest. The journey across the plains was made with ox teams. The encounters with the Indians were many and thrilling. Indeed they were compelled to organize the band into a military train, of which Captain Knight was made the commander and F. M. Dodson orderly sergeant. Soon after reaching Oregon, Mr. Smith settled in Clackamas County, taking up a homestead from the government. Here he resided until 1878, when he sold out and removed to Pomeroy, Wash., where he purchased a tract of land and here he lived the balance of his life, passing away at the age of eighty-four years. His wife, Eliza B. Brewer, whose birth occurred in Ohio, was a daughter of Peter Brewer, a native of New York. His death took place in Lewis County, Mo., when he was about eighty years of age. He was a farmer and participated in the war of 1812.

In Washington County, Ohio, where his birth occurred, Captain Smith spent the first fifteen years of his life, attending the public schools and thus gaining a good foundation for the many busy and useful years before him. The five years previous to the breaking out of the Civil wars were spent in Missouri on a farm. When the call for troops was made, Captain Smith was not slow to respond, and in May, 1861, he enlisted in the Home Guards of Colonel Moore. Later, however, he enlisted in the Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, the latter company being consolidated with the Second Missouri Cavalry, and was afterwards known as Company L. From private he advanced to orderly sergeant, and later was made first lieutenant, and finally was brevetted captain, commanding company L, Second Missouri Cavalry. During his service he was engaged in encounters at Cape Girardeau and Pilot Knob; was in Price's raid in Independence, Mo., in 1864, also in the battle of Mine Run. His experience with the James Boys and Quantrill’s men was one that will always be remembered. After four years of noble service spent in defense of his country, he was mustered out, April 7, 1865.

Soon after the close of the war Captain Smith made the trip to Oregon via the plains. His first employment was found in a saw mill on the Clackamas River, near Oregon City. Here he remained for about twenty years, during which time he assisted in changing the mill to a paper manufactory. Feeling convinced that the growing west offered a good field for investment; he purchased the Buck donation claim, which consisted of one hundred and seventy acres. At one time he owned fifteen acres in what is now Park place and laid out an addition which was called Smith's addition to Park place.

On May 7, 1871, occurred the marriage of Mr. Smith with Miss Louise Rivers, a native of Canada. Her father, Israel Rivers, was born in New York, of French descent, his parents going to Canada when he was a young man, and there he engaged in the lumber business. After rearing his family the father took his wife and children and started for the west, locating for a time in Illinois and Kansas, but finally settled in Clackamas County in 1866, and here they still reside. Captain and Mrs. Smith have three living children, as follows: Charles E., a resident of Park place; Fred W., graduated from the Park place high school, the Corvallis College and the Portland business college, and is now employed as a railway mail clerk; Katie, the wife of Paul Freytag, who is engaged in the grocery business in Oregon City.

In political belief Captain Smith is a Republican and for thirty years has served his district as school director. Fraternally he is a member of the Blue Lodge, A.F. & A.M., the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Union Veterans Union.

While Captain Smith has led a life of retirement, he has nevertheless neglected none of the duties of good citizenship and at all times he has been found ready and willing to do his share. No movement calculated to be of benefit to his adopted state or county has went by without his firm and active support. He is a type of citizenship which stands for all that is good and pure. His record is an honorable one and with those who know him his word is as good as his bond.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company
Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Meldrum, John

HON. JOHN W. MELDRUM. From an early period in the history of America the Meldrum family has been identified with its growth, and it is a noticeable fact that its members have been associated with the pioneer element, William Meldrum, who was of Scotch Irish descent, settled in Kentucky as early as 1804, while that state was yet in its infancy and unredeemed from the wilderness. At a later date he became a pioneer of Illinois, settling near Carrollton, where he passed the remaining years of his busy life, John, a son of this pioneer, was born in Shelby County, Ky., in March. 1808, and became a stonemason and builder, following that occupation both in Illinois and Iowa.

As early as 1845 the Meldrum family started on the long and difficult journey across the plains. The family consisted of John Meldrum, his wife, Susanna Depew (Cox) Meldrum, and their four children. Starting from Council Bluffs, Iowa, in April, they followed the Platte and Green river route, and landed at Oregon City in October, 1845. The third in order of birth among the children was John W., who was born near Burlington, Iowa, December 17, 1839. From the age of six years he has been a resident of Oregon. Almost his earliest recollections are therefore of the far west, with its pioneer environment and sparsely settled communities. The hardships and privations incident to opening up a home in the wilderness he experienced while yet a boy, and in his later years he has looked back upon the past with a keen appreciation of the changes which time has wrought in our population, improvements and well being. His education was such as the early schools of the state afforded, but has been supplemented by self-culture and habits of reading and close observation. His father had a claim near Ilwaco, Wash., and for a time he remained there, assisting in clearing the land, but about 1856 he returned to Oregon City. The next few years witnessed a number of changes in his life. For a time he taught school, for two years read law, and for four years worked in the Florence and other mines.

About 1865 Mr. Meldrum’s attention for the first time began to be turned to surveying. For a period of twenty consecutive years, excepting only one year, he was employed as United States deputy surveyor, and meantime worked in every part of Oregon, as well as in Idaho. In 1888 he was elected county surveyor of Clackamas County, and two years later was honored with the office of county judge, which officer was at that time ex-officio chairman of the board of county commissioners. In this position his knowledge of engineering was brought into practical use in the betterment of the county roads, then everywhere in a deplorable condition during all except the summer months of the year. Realizing that no permanent improvement could ever come under the labor tax system of working the roads, then employed, he devoted his energies to the abolishment of that system, and the substitution of the money tax system in his county. But it was not until the middle of his term, in 1892, when a new commissioner, R. Scott, of Milwaukee, whose ideas on road building coincided with those of the judge, came into the board, that it was possible to make the change. As soon as practicable thereafter the change of systems was made, and although considerable opposition was encountered at first, especially in the country districts, it soon became evident from the amount of actually permanent improvement already accomplished on the county roads that the new system of working the public highways was much better and it has been employed in the county since that time. The result has been greatly improved roads, the benefits of which the people, from actual experience, have learned to appreciate, and many who at first opposed the change now bless the judge who was instrumental in bringing it about.

The judge has a comfortable country home on the banks of the Willamette River, one-half mile below the mouth of the Clackamas River. On September 25, 1872, in Oregon City, the marriage of the judge and Miss Georgiana Pope was solemnized. Mrs. Meldrum is a native of Oregon City, and a niece of Governor Abernethy. They are the parents of three children, namely: Charles E., of Oregon City; Eva S., a teacher in the high school of the same place; and David T., a student at Cornell University.

During 1898 Mr. Meldrum was appointed special agent for the general land office, examining surveys in Nevada and Wyoming, where he remained for ten months, filling the duties of his office. In 1902 he was elected county surveyor of Clackamas County, which office he is now filling. The experience of his past surveying expeditions adapts him admirably for his present position, and he is filling it to the satisfaction of the people of the county. Since 1869 he has been associated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is also a member of the Encampment, besides having filled the chairs in the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of which he is still a member. For ten years he has been a member of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Oregon City, in the work of which he is warmly interested, as well as being a generous contributor to its maintenance. From the time of casting his first vote he has been a stanch Republican, and was one of the four delegates at large from Oregon to the St. Louis convention which nominated McKinley and Hobart. He is a member of the Pioneer Society and the Oregon Historical Society, and is at all times interested in anything pertaining to pioneer days in Oregon.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company
Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Smith, John

SMITH, JOHN H.

John H. Smith, auditor of Klickitat county and one of its most widely and favorably known citizens, as well as one of its early pioneers, resides in the city of Goldendale. A native of Missouri, he was born in Scotland county, June 20, 1847, the son of William D. and Mary (Owens) Smith. The father was a native of Kentucky, born in the city of Versailles in the year 1826. His parents were among the earliest pioneers of the Blue Grass state. William D. was a millwright by trade and until 1875 operated a mill in his native state. Then he went to California, where he farmed two years, after which he went north to Oregon and settled in Clackamas county in the spring of 1877. During the next three years he followed agricultural pursuits in the Webfoot state. He became a settler of Klickitat in 1880, following farming and stock raising until his death, August 16, 1900. Mrs. Smith was likewise a Kentuckian, born in 1829. When a young girl she removed with her parents to Missouri, and in that state attended school and at the age of eighteen, was married. Mrs. Smith survives her husband and is at present living with a daughter in Goldendale. She is of Scotch-Irish descent; he was of Irish ancestry. John H. Smith is the second oldest child of a family of eleven children, all of whom are still living. He was reared upon the farm, receiving a good education in the schools of Missouri. With his parents he went to California in 1875 and to Oregon two years later, continuing to assist his father upon the farm. However, he did not tarry long in Oregon, coming almost directly through to the Klickitat country in the spring of 1877 and filing upon a homestead two miles southeast of Centerville. With the exception of several years spent in the mercantile business at Centerville, Mr. Smith has assiduously devoted himself to farming and stock raising during most of the remaining years he has lived in the county, meeting with an enviable success. He opened a general store at Centerville in 1887 and conducted it until 1892, when he satisfactorily disposed of it. The next two years he served the county as assessor, retiring from office to give farming and sheep raising more attention.

Mr. Smith was married at Centerville, February 16, 1882 to Miss Ella Sparks, a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Fowler) Sparks. Mr. Sparks brought his family to Washington from Kansas in the spring of 1876 and with his wife is at present a resident of Chehalis, Washington. Mrs. Sparks was born and married in Kansas, and is the mother of ten children. Mrs. Smith was also born in Kansas, 1861, being the year of her birth. She received her education in the schools of Klickitat county and at the time of her marriage was twenty-one years old. Mrs. Smith passed many years ago to her eternal home, revered by all who knew her, and leaving three children to mourn her loss: Fred A., born near Centerville, February 25, 1883, now attending the University of Washington; Grace M., born Independence Day in the year 1886, who recently was graduated from Klickitat Academy, and Edna L., born October 30, 1888. Mr. Smith’s brothers and sisters are all living, Thomas J., the eldest in Salinas City, California; Fred A., at Benicia, California; Edward S. at Toppenish, Washington; Mrs. Sarah H. Teel, in Spokane; Robert L., Ludwell B., Singleton D. and David C. all live near Centerville; Mrs. Mary A. Hamilton in Goldendale and Mrs. Emma L. Hamilton in Oregon City, Oregon. Fraternally, Mr. Smith is connected with the Masons, Knights of Pythias, A. O. U. W., Woodmen of the World and the Order of Washington. He is one of the most influential Democrats in this section of the state, and as an illustration of his popularity at home it is only necessary to state that he was elected to his present office in November, 1902, in one of the strongest Republican counties in the state; he received five-eighths of all the votes cast. Besides his property in Goldendale, Mr. Smith has other large holdings, including the home ranch of 280 acres of as fine wheat land as lies in the valley. He is generally conceded to be one of the most faithful and capable officers that ever served Klickitat county. He commands the esteem and friendship of all who know him and is worthy in every respect to be classed as one of Klickitat’s foremost citizens.

Source: An Illustrated History of Klickitat, Yakima and Kittitas Counties with an Outline of the Early History of the State of Washington
Interstate Publishing Company, 1904, Page 385
Transcribed by FoFG

Hurley, George

HON. GEORGE J. HURLEY needs no introduction to the people of northern Washington.  He is at the present time state senator of Okanogan, Ferry and Douglas counties.  He was elected to this office in 1902, his name appearing on the Republican ticket.  During the session of the legislature just past, he was instrumental in putting through the bill arranging the proper valuation of mines, and also introduced some excellent legislation on highways.  He framed and introduced the libel bill, which was vetoed by the Governor.  Mr. Hurley also brought forward an excellent bill relative to handling sheep in the state, which was not made a law.  He is a very active state senator, and is looked upon by his colleagues as a man of energy, talent and erudition. 

George J. Hurley was born in Oregon City, Oregon, on September 18, 1859, being the son of Richard and Marly (McCarver) Hurley.  The mother’s father, Mr. McCarver, who was an early pioneer to the Pacific coast, laid out the town of Tacoma.  The father of our subject came to Oregon in 1857, having left New York city in 1845.  The intervening time was spent in Mexico.  Oregon City was the family home until 1863, when they moved to Idaho, and ten years later came back to Oregon, and are now residing in Portland.  They are the parents of seven children, our subject being the eldest.  The others are:  Minnie L. Terry, Annie M. White, Belle F. Cavaline, Carrie L. Pease, Leta and Elmer S.

Our subject was educated in the public schools of Lewiston and at the early age of fourteen, began life for himself as a cabin boy in the employ of the Oregon Steamship and Navigation Company.  During the succeeding years, he has been alert in his research for information, and the result is that he is broad minded and well informed, with a good practical education.  After his services as cabin boy, he was freight clerk and then rode the range for three years.  During the Bannock war, he and twelve others were corralled in a stronghold for six weeks by the Indians.  After this, we find him in the employ of the Northern Pacific, and later at Sprague, handling general merchandise for the firm of Sprague & Fairweather.  During the construction of the Northern Pacific, he was with Nelson Bennett as clerk.  In 1887, he came to Okanogan county and took up general merchandising with I. T. Keene.  During this time, he was one of three delegates from Okanogan county to the admission convention at Ellensburg when the admission of the state of Washington was agitated.  When the new county of Okanogan was set off in 1887, Mr. Hurley, Guy Waring and William Granger were appointed by the state legislature to locate the county seat and select the proper officers, to remain in office until the first general election.  In 1894, Mr. Hurley was in British Columbia, then went south for two years, later returning to British Columbia in 1897, and in 1898 he came to where Republic now stands.  For one year he was manager of the Republic Trading Company, and has since engaged in other business. 

Mr. Hurley is a staunch Republican, and always takes great interest in the affairs of his party.  In 1883 he was elected city clerk of Ainsworth, was twice county commissioner of Okanogan county, was mayor of Ruby five terms, and city clerk of Republic for three terms.  In all this public life, Mr. Hurley has shown marked uprightness and integrity.

In 1889, Mr. Hurley married Miss Ella Cook and to them one child has been born, Clarence Webb.  Mr. Cook was killed by the Indians in Montana in 1867.  He was the father of seven children.  Fraternally, Mr. Hurley is affiliated with the I.O.O.F., the Eagles and several other orders.  His wife is  a member of the Rebekahs.  Their son, Clarence Webb, was the page for the president of the senate during the last term of the legislature, and the youngest on the floor.

Source: An Illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the State of Washington
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904
Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

Baizley, George

GEORGE F. BAIZLEY is game warden of Ferry county, and an active and conscientious officer.  He was born in San Francisco, California, October 20, 1859, being the son of S. E. and Ellen (Dailey) Baizley, natives of Massachusetts.  In 1849 the parents came by way of Cape Horn to California, where the father operated in the navy yard for years.  They were in San Francisco in 1868 at the time of the great earthquake, then moved to Vallejo, where the mother died in 1871.  Later the father came to Portland, Oregon, and worked in the ship yards, where he was killed in 1881.  Mr. Baizley has two sisters living, Nellie Yates and Marion Ricker.  There were seven children in his father’s family, but all the rest are deceased.

George F. was educated in Vallejo, California, and when fourteen shipped on the Black Hawk merchantman and went to New York.  There he transferred to the Champlain, coming back to California, but was wrecked on Farloan island, near Golden Gate, where he was rescued by the schooner Mendocino.  Returning home he remained four years and then came to Walla Walla.  During the Nez Perce war he did excellent service as messenger.  On one occasion he came from where Grangeville now stands, to Lapwai, and found the bodies of Lieutenant Rams and seven soldiers, which were later brought in by government wagons.  He has some very exciting experiences in that war.  When it was over, he settled down to handling cattle for Lang & Ryan.  In 1882 he took a herd to the Northwest Territory, but all were lost during the hard winter.  He came across from Crow’s Nest Pass and swam every river from Canada to Sandpoint, whence he made his way to Spokane, and again entered the employ of Lang & Ryan.  He was sent to Cheyenne, removed thence to Crabcreek, Washington, and later was at Pendleton.  After this, we find him in the Coeur d ’Alene country, then on the sound, and in 1890 in Fairhaven, whence he went to Snohomish in 1892.  He was in business there for a year, then came to Leavenworth, Washington, and later to Lewiston, whence he came in 1897 to Republic, where he now lives, having a good home besides other property.

In 1890 Mr. Baizley married Miss Lucy Fryer, whose parents crossed the plains with the Whitman party in the ’forties.  The father died in Oregon in 1893, and the mother died at Tacoma.  They were the parents of the following children:  Katie, Dora, Fanny and Lucy.  They had some very trying times with the Indians in the pioneer days, and endured many hardships.

Mr. Baizley is an active Democrat and always labors for the advancement of his party.  He is a member of the Eagles and a man of good standing in the community.

Source: An Illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the State of Washington
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904
Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

Porter, Leslie

Leslie Llewellyn Porter, LL. B

Born at Portage, Columbia County, Wisconsin, June 20, 1859. Fitted at Oshkosh State normal school. Taught school for a time, before entering U. W. Law School in 1885, from which he graduated in 1888. Was a member of the E. G. Ryan society. Since graduation, he has been an attorney at Oregon City, Oregon, at the same time owning and largely editing the Enterprise of that place. Mr. Porter has been police judge and member of the city council of Oregon City, and is at present a State senator. On September 5, 1899, he married Miss Ora Spangler, a graduate of the Oregon Agricultural College.


Source: The University of Wisconsin: Its history and Its alumni (1836 – 1900)
Edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites -pages 732-736 (1900)
Transcribed by FoFG mz

Brownell, George

GEORGE C. BROWNELL
Residence, 602 llth Street; office, Oregon City. Born August 10, 1857, at Keesville, Essex County, New York. Son of Ambrose B. and Annie (Smith) Brownell. Married September 20, 1876, to Alma C. Lane. Came to Oregon in July 1891. Was admitted to the bar of Kansas in 1880 and to the bar of Oregon in November 1891. In May 1903, when Theodore Roosevelt came to the Coast, Mr. Brownell was selected by both Houses of Legislature to deliver the address of welcome. In 1903, prior to such a movement being made in any other state, he procured the passage of a resolution in the Legislature demanding the nomination of Theodore Roosevelt for President. Was Right of Way and Bond Attorney for Denver, Memphis & Atlantic Railway Company from 1886 to 1888. In 1888 was elected County Attorney for Ness County, Kansas, and upon expiration of term of office came to Oregon. Was Mayor of Frankfort, Kansas, 1884 and 1885. Chairman Republican County Central Committee, Clackamas County, 1892. Elected State Senator 1894-1898 and in 1902; 1903 was elected President Oregon State Senate.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Clark, John

JOHN F. CLARK
Residence and office, Oregon City, Oregon. Born August 23, 1862, in Lawrence County, Missouri. Son of Peter F. and Margaret Jane (Marsh) Clark. Came to Oregon September 14, 1874. Married September 8, 1897, to Olivia Jacobs. Attended McMinnville College from 1883 to 1888, Scientific and Classic course, receiving degree A. B. and B. S. Later received degree of A. M. Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1897. Practiced his profession in Oregon City to date. Member of the Oregon City Commercial Club; I.O.O.F.; B.P.O.E.; Artisans; W.O.W. Secretary County Central Committee. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Campbell, James

JAMES ULYSSES CAMPBELL
Residence, Oregon City, Oregon; office, same. Born August 29, 1866, on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Son of John and Mary (McDougall) Campbell. Married August 4, 1901, to Anna C. Paulding. Received his education at Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, P. E. Island, Canada. Came to Oregon in September, 1888. Was admitted to the bar of Oregon in October 1893, and began practice in Oregon City. January 1, 1895, he entered into partnership with George C. Brownell, which lasted until 1900. From 1900 to 1904 was Deputy District Attorney. Served three years in O.N.G. Served in Second Oregon United States Volunteers during Spanish-American war, in Philippines, being twice promoted and honorably discharged on muster out of regiment. Delegate to Republican National Convention in Chicago, 1904. Elected to Legislature in 1907 and re-elected in 1909. Judge Fifth Judicial District, to which office he was appointed May 1, 1909. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Wait, Aaron

JUDGE AARON E. WAIT
Judge Aaron E. Wait was the first Chief Justice under the organized State of Oregon. He was born in Franklin County, Massachusetts, December 26, 1813. His ancestors were nearly all military men and his father died while in the service of his country, in the “War of 1812,” shortly after the birth of the subject of this sketch. Judge Wait was raised partly by his grandfather and later by an uncle, with whom he lived until he was fourteen years of age. He was then apprenticed to a broom maker and worked at the trade for four years, saving his earnings. During the latter part of his apprenticeship he was enabled to attend school. When he was twenty years old he went to the State of New York, and thence to Flatbush, Long Island, and obtained employment as assistant teacher in Erasmus Hall. After a time he returned to Massachusetts and remained until 1837, when he started West, going as far as Centreville, Michigan, which was then considered a long ways west from Massachusetts. Here he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1842, becoming secretary to Gov. John S. Barry of Michigan. After a residence of ten years in Michigan he started West again in 1847, with a train of forty wagons going to Oregon. On the way he overtook his friend Judge Lancaster and family, and the two then left the train with their wagons and outfits and came the remainder of the journey together, arriving at Oregon City, then the chief centre of population of Oregon. Judge Wait immediately began the practice of law, at the same time assisting in the publication of the first newspaper of Oregon, “The Oregon Spectator,” which was published at that place. In 1849, in the midst of the excitement of the “gold fever” in California, Judge Wait went to that state and engaged for some time in placer mining. He returned to Oregon in the early ‘50’s and resumed the practice of his profession. In 1859 he was elected a Justice of the Supreme Court and became Chief Justice under the State Government in Oregon.

After retiring from the Supreme Bench for more than thirty years Judge Wait did not actively engage in the practice of law, but devoted his time mostly to the management of his extensive land holdings in the States of Washington and Oregon, and lived the greater portion of the time on a 600-acre farm in Clackamas County, not far from Portland. In 1891 he removed from his farm to Portland, where he resided until the time of his death. Judge Wait was one of the thrifty, hardy pioneers of the state, and although somewhat peculiar in some of his habits and ways, his life work is intimately interwoven with the early history of the state. He died on his farm in Clackamas County in December, 1898.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kim Mohler

McBride, Thomas

THOMAS A. McBRIDE
Residence, Oregon City, Oregon’  office, Salem, Oregon.  Born November 15, 1847, in Yamhill County, Oregon.  Son of James and Mahala (Miller) McBride.  Married February 7, 1874, to Mary E. Merrill.  Educated at the common schools of Oregon and at McMinnville College.  Admitted to the bar at Salem in October, 1870, and began the practice of his profession at Lafayette, Oregon, in the same year.  Removed to St. Helens in 1872 and practiced there until 1877, when he removed to Salt Lake City and practiced there until 1880 then returned to Oregon and engaged in the practice of law at Oregon City, in partnership with the late E. L. Eastham; continuing the partnership until his election as Circuit Judge in 1892.  Member of House of Oregon Legislature, 1876, District Attorney, Fifth Judicial District, 1882 to 1892, Judge Fifth Judicial District, 1892, to May 1, 1909, on which date he was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.  Member Illihee Club.  Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown

Latourette, Mortimer

MORTIMER DILLON LATOURETTE
Residence, 1308 Main street; office Oregon City.  Born November 27, 1881, at Oregon City.  Son of Charles D. and Sedonie B. (Shaw) Latourette.  Married July 29, 1908, to Edna M. Daulton.  Early education received at the public schools of Oregon City; one year at Portland Academy; two years at the University of Oregon.  Admitted to the bar at Salem in 1904.  Treasurer of the City of Oregon City for four and one-half years.  Democrat.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown

Loder, John

JOHN W. LODER
Residence, corner Ninth and Center streets; office, Stevens building, Oregon City.  Born June 19, 1871, at Paynesville, Pike County, Missouri.  Son of Conrad and Annie M. (Halley) Loder.  Married September 10, 1902, to Grace E. Riley.  Came to Oregon with his parents at the age of five years, and received his early education at the common schools of Oregon, at McMinnville College, from which he graduated in 1894 with B.S. degree; at Columbian University (now George Washington University), Washington, D.C., from which he graduated in 1896.  Admitted to the bar at Salem in October 1896, after which he worked for four years for Clackamas Abstract Company.  Member Masonic and I.O.O.F. fraternities and of Oregon City Commercial Club.  Democrat.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown

Dimick, Walter

WALTER A. DIMICK.
Residence and office, Oregon City, Oregon. Born in Hubbard, Oregon, August 30, 1879. Son of George W. and Rhoda L. (Gleason) Dimick.  Married to Oro D. Caples July 18, 1906. Received his early education in the public schools of Hubbard, Oregon; later attended Pacific University at Forest Grove, Oregon, graduating in 1902 with degree of B. S. Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, October 13, 1904.  Formed partnership with Judge Grant B. Dimick, which continues to date. City Recorder 1905 to date; member of State Legislature, 1908 to 1909; member of Oregon City Commercial Club; I. O. O. F., K. of P., Elks and Red Men  Republican.

Spurce: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kathy Childs

Dimick, Grant

GRANT B. DIMICK.
Residence and office, Oregon City, Oregon.  Born March 4, 1869, at Hubbard, Marion County, Oregon. Son of John B. and Almira (Eberhard) Dimick. Married May 3, 1896, to Verene Wolfer. Educated at the public schools of Marion County until 1889, after which date he attended the State Normal School at Monmouth, Oregon, for two years and one year at the Baptist College at McMinnville, Oregon. In 1895 was admitted to the bar at Salem, and in 1896 located at Oregon City. In 1899 he formed partnership with O. W. Eastham, under the firm name of Dimick and Eastham. This was dissolved in 1903 and in 1904 formed a partnership with W. A. Dimick under the firm name of Dimick & Dimick, which continues to date. Member of the Oregon National Guard for three years. Mayor of Oregon City four terms, 1900 to 1904. In 1904 Presidential Elector. In 1906 County Judge of Clackamas County to date. Member of Oregon City Commercial Club. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kathy Childs

Eastham, O. W.

O. W. EASTHAM.
Residence, Oregon City; office, Oregon City. Born December 17, 1874, in Marion County, Oregon. Son of William F. and Ann (Cleaver) Eastham. Married September 19, 1899, to Daisy B. Andrus. Graduated from Portland University in 1896, with A. B. degree. Admitted to the bar of California in 1898 and to the bar of this state in the same year. Has practiced his profession continuously since that time. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kathy Childs

Eby, Oscar

OSCAR D. EBY.
Residence and office, Oregon City, Oregon. Born November 4, 1872, in Linn County, Oregon. Son of David and Elizabeth (Barger) Eby. Married November 13, 1898, to Jennie Moore. Educated at the common schools of Linn County and at the University of Oregon, until 1892. Studied law with Robert A. Miller in Oregon City in 1902. Admitted to the bar at Salem October 13, 1904, and to the United States Circuit Court and United States District Court for District of Oregon, February 24, 1909. Was Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Clackamas County under Gilbert L. Hedges, 1907-8; Chief Deputy County Clerk's Office, 1901-2. At present member Board of Education of Oregon City. Member Board of Directors of Willamette Valley Chautauqua Association. Director and Treasurer Clackamas County Fair Association. Member Commercial Club, Oregon City. Member United Artisans. Democrat.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kathy Childs

Dye, Charles

CHARLES HENRY DYE.
Residence, 902 Jefferson street; office, corner Eighth and Main streets, Oregon City. Born August 23, 1856, at Fort Madison, Iowa. Son of Henry and Jane (Michlewait) Dye. Married July 13, 1882, to Eva Emery. Early education received in the public schools of Lee County, Iowa. Attended Denmark Academy at Denmark, Iowa, and graduated in 1878, afterwards entering Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, in Fall of 1878, from which he graduated in 1882 with the degree of A. B., and in 1885 with degree of A. M. He afterwards entered the University of Iowa and graduated in 1889 with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar at Iowa City, Iowa, in June, 1889. Came to Oregon in 1890 and was admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1890. Deputy District Attorney for Clackamas County, 1894 to 1896. City Attorney, Oregon City, in 1897-8. Representative in legislature, 1907-8. President Oregon City Board of Trade in 1907.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Kathy Childs

Schuebel, Christopher

Christopher Schuebel.
Residence, 714 Jefferson street, Oregon City; office, Oregon City Bank building.  Born September 12, 1866, at Ashland, Pennsylvania.  Son of Robert and Rosamond (Hornshuh) Schuebel.  Married June 23, 1892 to Agnes W. Beattie.  Came to Oregon with his parents in 1878, and attended public schools in Clackamas County for about six months.  Studied with Sprague Correspondence School of Law for about a year and a half while working in the mills at Oregon City.  Admitted to the bar at Salem, June 27, 1897.  Elected Justice of the Peace two terms at Oregon City, 1896 and 1898.  Member Oregon City Commercial Club, A.O. U. W.,W.O.W. and Royal Areanum fraternities. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by J. Wirth

Hayes, Gordon

Gordon E. Hayes
    Residence, Oregon City, Oregon; office, same.  Born March 27, 1859, at Oregon City.  Son of Henry  E. and Sarah A. (Woodruff) Hayes.  Educated at the Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon, 1876-7.  Admitted to the bar in 1884 and has practiced his profession continuously since that time, in Oregon City.  Has served as State Senator and as County Judge of Clackamas County.  Member of Commercial Club, of K. of P. and Elks fraternities. Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Hedges, Gilbert

Gilbert Lawrence Hedges
    Residence, High street, near Sixth; office Weinhard building, Oregon City, Oregon.  Born January 19, 1874, at Canemah, Oregon.  Son of Joseph and Ellen Judith (Allen) Hedges.  Married October 3, 1904, to Dorothy H. Chase.  Educated at the public schools of Clackamas County, Oregon; attended Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, for three years; entered Yale University in the fall of 1902, graduating in 1906 with A. B. degree.  Two years later graduated from law department of the same university with LL. B. degree.  Admitted to the bar of Oregon in October, 1908.  Member of Lower House Oregon Legislature 1901.  District Attorney Fifth Judicial District 1907-8.  Democrat.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Hedges, Joseph

Joseph Eugene Hedges
    Residence, 510 Adams street; office, Weinhard building, Oregon City.  Born June 2, 1864, at Canemah, Oregon.  Son of Joseph and Ellen Judith (Allen) Hedges.  Married June 7, 1894, to Lillian Bray.  Until sixteen years of age attended the public schools at Canemah and Oregon City, then spent two years at the Bishop Scott Grammar School in Portland.  For five years taught in the above named grammar school, and then entered the Academic Department of Yale University at New Haven, Connecticut, graduating from same in 1891 with A. B. degree.  Admitted to the bar at Salem June 2, 1892.  Immediately became member of the firm of O’Neill, Hedges & Thompson, which lasted two years, when Franklin T. Griffith was admitted to the firm, the name the being O’Neill, Hedges, Thompson & Griffith.  In 1895 the firm became Hedges & Griffith and since 1908 has practiced alone.  State Senator from district composed of Clackamas County from 1906 to 1911.  Member University Club of Portland.  Democrat.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Latourette, D. C.

D. C. LATOURETTE
Residence and office, Oregon City.  Born Oregon City, November 14, 1856.  Married in October, 1882, to Ella Scott.  Educated at public schools of Oregon and later at Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon, from which he graduated in 1878.  Was professor of mathematics in McMinnville College, McMinnville, Oregon, from 1878 to 1880.  Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1882, and began the practice of law in Oregon City in partnership with Charles D. Latourette, under the firm name C. D. & D. C. Latourette, from 1882 to 1910.  President Commercial and First National Banks, Oregon City.  Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Smith, Robert

    ROBERT S. AND MELVIN SMITH. The proprietors of an excellent blacksmith shop in Sandy are Robert S. and Melvin Smith, who are numbered among the worthy citizens of Clackamas county.  They were born near Clay Center, Kansas, Robert S., August 2, 1886, and Melvin on August 3, 1888, their parents being Alexander and Eliza (Ross) Smith, the father a native of Ireland and the mother of Pennsylvania.  The parents were married in Kansas, where they have since resided, the father being one of the early settlers and the owner of eighty acres of rich land there.  In his family were twelve children:  William, of Roseberry, Idaho; David, of Broughton, Kansas; Mary, of Seattle, Washington; Robert S.; Melvin; Kenelm of Boring, Oregon; Oliver, Sarah, Jennie and Alexander, Jr., all of whom are at home; and Elizabeth and Edward, deceased.

    Robert S. Smith was reared under the parental roof, dividing his time between his studies in the district school in winter and working on his father's farm in summer.  He afterward obtained a business college education.  He remained at home until he was eighteen years of age, when he started out in life for himself and went to British Columbia, where he was employed for two years in a flour mill.  He then took up the trade of blacksmithing, which he followed for two years there, and afterward continued in different kinds of work until 1909, when he started a shop at Boring, Oregon, which he operated until November 1, 1911.  At that time he came to Sandy and opened a shop with his brother Melvin, which they still conduct.

    On the 17th of April, 1911, Robert S. Smith wedded Miss Vera Cross, who was born in Washington, September 14, 1890, a daughter of John L. and Sarah Cross, the mother a native of Missouri and the father of New York.  Her parents were married in Washington, where they resided until 1903, when they removed to Oregon.  The mother is now living in Boring, the father having passed away March 28, 1911.  In their family were four children, of whom Mrs. Smith is the youngest.  The others are:  Mrs. Effie Little, of Fruitland, Washington; William H., of Spokane; and Claude F., of Boring, Oregon.  Mrs. Robert S. Smith was educated in her native state, having completed a high-school course there.

    Melvin Smith grew to manhood on his father's farm, receiving his early education in the district schools, and at the age of sixteen started out on his own account, working on a farm in Kansas, where he was employed for two years.  He then went to Alberta, Canada, but after a short time removed to British Columbia, remaining there one year.  He later attended school in St. Paul, Minnesota, for one year, subsequent to which time he came to Oregon, settling at Pleasant Home, where he resided for over a year.  He afterward took up the trade of blacksmithing in Portland, being employed there for seven months, when he went to Boring.  Here he continued in his trade for a short time and then came to Sandy, entering into partnership with his brother in the shop which they are now so successfully operating.

    In politics the brothers are republican, and fraternally Robert S. Smith is identified with the United Artisans of Sandy.  Melvin Smith is a member of the Triple Tie Benefit Association of Kansas.  Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Smith belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, while Melvin is affiliated with the Presbyterian church.  The brothers are progressive and enterprising and work in the utmost harmony in the development and control of an extensive and growing blacksmithing business.  They are always reliable in both their business and social relations and during their residence here have won the friendship and high regard of all with whom they have been associated.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated
Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Reed, John

    JOHN WESLEY REED, who is a well known contractor and builder in Estacada, Clackamas county, was born near Cleveland, Ohio, November 11, 1863, a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Calhoun) Reed.  The parents, both natives of Ohio, were married in that state, and a few years later removed to Iowa settling in Mahaska county, where the mother passed away in 1874.  About eight years later the father removed to Norton county, Kansas, where he resided until his death in 1907.  In their family were eight children, the two eldest of whom died in infancy.  Those who grew to maturity are:  Florence, the wife of David Rowley, of Norton county, Kansas; Albert Clinton, who died in Kansas, at the age of thirty-five years; John Wesley, of this review; Ida, the widow of Edward Dobbe of Norton, Kansas; George P., of Billings, Montana; and Charlie E., of Norton county, Kansas.

    John Wesley Reed acquired a common-school education, and at the age of eighteen started out in life on his own account by working on a farm in Iowa, for three years.  He then moved to Wisconsin, where he took up the carpenter and contracting business, which he followed ten years.  Subsequently he operated a barber shop for a number of years, and afterward returned to the contracting and building business, remaining in the same until 1901.  He later farmed for two years, and in 1903 came to Oregon, settling at Estacada, where he purchased the two first lots of the city, and built its first building.  He has erected one third of the buildings now in the town of Estacada, which has a population of over five hundred.  At one time he operated a furniture store there and also was interested financially in a general merchandise store.  He erected and stocked the largest general merchandise store in Clackamas county and opened and conducted a drug store in Estacada.  He was one of the charter members of the State Bank of Estacada and was president of that institution until it changed owners in 1906.  He was one of the active organizers and is the manager and leading shareholder of the Estacada Telephone and Telegraph Company.  He owns much real Estate in Estacada, some timber land and several tracts of farm land adjoining the town.

    In 1893 Mr. Reed wedded Miss Lucy M. Oakley, who was born in Monroe county, Wisconsin, a daughter of Henry and Lucy (Barlow) Oakley.  Her father was a native of Pennsylvania, and her mother of Wisconsin, and they were married at La Crosse, Wisconsin, where the mother passed away, and where the father is yet living.  In their family were seven children:  Nola, who is a school teacher; Mrs. Reed; Clinton and Affa, of Wisconsin; Mary E., a teacher; Milton G., of Newburg, Oregon; and June, who is also a school teacher.  Mr. and Mrs. Reed have become the parents of five children:  Rachael, who was born in 1895, and is attending high school; Russell, born in 1899; a child who died in infancy; Mary Alice, born in 1906; and Florence June, born in 1908.  Mrs. Reed is an educated lady, and for nine years previous to her marriage taught school.

    In his political views John Wesley Reed is republican, has always taken an active part in local party affairs and served as mayor for three terms.  He has given active and helpful service in educational movements, and has been a member of the school board for six years.  Both he and his family are earnest workers in the Congregational church.  Mr. Reed has led a busy and useful life and is accounted one of the good substantial residents of Estacada.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated
Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Duncan, Robert

ROBERT A. DUNCAN, who is the manager of the general merchandise store of the firm of Duncan & Cruse Brothers at Estacada, was born in Washington, May 1, 1878, the son of James and Carrie B. (Burton) Duncan. The father was a native of Scotland, and the mother of the state of California, and they were married in Washington, the father having come to America in 1854. On his arrival in this country he first settled at New York, and there was employed in railroad work until 1878, when he removed to Washington, where until I893 he was superintendent of the rolling stock of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He then came to Oregon settling in Clackamas County, where he is living retired. In his family were five children: Charles, who is a farmer near Estacada; Edward, deceased; Robert A., of this review; Lillie. deceased; and Isabel, who is attending high school at Portland.

    Robert A. Duncan received his early education in the public schools, and started out in life for himself at the age of fourteen, when he went into partnership with his father in the grocery business at The Dalles, Oregon. Selling the grocery store after two years he located in Portland, where he worked for six months in a sawmill. Subsequently he went to Idaho where he engaged in packing from Boise City to Thunder Mountains, and at the same time he operated a general mercantile store at Thunder Mountains. Two years later he returned to Portland, and for one year attended the Holmes Business College, after which for two years he was employed in fancy card writing and drawing. Then being accidentally hurt he was forced to retire from active work for two years, after which he went to Kansas City, Missouri, and traveled for the Peate Brothers Manufacturing Company for two years. He was then a traveling salesman for the Hunt Baking Powder Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, but after one year was again in the employ of the Peate Brothers Company of Kansas City. Two years later he returned to Oregon, settling at Estacada, where for one year he was in the government forest service, and then engaged for himself in the real estate and bond business in Portland. In July 1911, he bought a share of the Cruse Brothers general mercantile store, which has since been operated under the firm name of Duncan & Cruse Brothers, and he is now the general manager of the same. Mr. Duncan still handles real estate and has options on various tracts of land, one of which is a fourteen thousand acre cattle ranch in eastern Oregon, and he also owns numerous stocks and bonds.

    In his political views Mr. Duncan is a republican, but he has never sought nor desired office, preferring to give all his time and attention to his business affairs. Fraternally he is a member of the Lone Pine Lodge, No. 53, A.F.&A.M., and is now serving as junior warden of the same. He is identified with the Estacada Garfield Grange, is a member of the Homesteaders Order at Des Moines, Iowa, and has filled all chairs in the local lodges of these two orders. He is a popular merchant, a well known and highly honored young man in Estacada, and all interests which tend to promote the public welfare receive his endorsement and support.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Rasmussen, Laurits

LAURITS F. RASMUSSEN, who is the proprietor of a general merchandise store at Wichita, in Clackamas County, was born in
Denmark on October 11, 1866. His parents were Lars P. and Katie Rasmussen, both of whom died in Denmark, the mother passing away in 1879 and the father in 1887. Lars P. Rasmussen was the youngest of twenty-three children born to his parents. He was the father of the following children: Hans, who was born in 1856; Martin, who was born in January 1859, and is a brick mason by trade; Marie, born July 22, 1862; a child who died in infancy; Laurits F.; and Hansine born in 1869. The children who are now living reside in Denmark, with the exception of the subject of this sketch.
 
    Laurits F. Rasmussen was educated in Denmark and remained in his native country until April 22, 1888, when he came to America, arriving in May of that year. He then came directly to Walla Walla, Washington, reaching that state on the 21st of May. He worked on farms in that neighborhood for eleven years, and during this time purchased eighty acres of land in Oregon and resided on the same for three years, after which he sold out and was engaged in the lumber business until 1897. At that date he again took up farming, making a specialty of raising fruit. After two years he moved to Portland and was for a short time again engaged in the lumber business and later was in the employ of the police department for a time. Subsequently he was engaged in a wholesale grocery store in Portland for seven years. On August 1, 1911, he opened up his general merchandise store at Wichita, which is the only mercantile store in the town. He is here meeting with excellent success and has an extensive patronage.

    On the 14th of November, 1900, Mr. Rasmussen married Miss Lydia A. Rivers, a native of Clackamas County, Oregon, and a daughter of Israel and Hannah N. Rivers, both of whom are deceased. The father passed away in September 1907, and the mother in 1909. Mrs. Rasmussen is the youngest of a large family of children. To Mr. and Mrs. Rasmussen has been born one son, Peder, whose natal day is September 2, 1901.

    Politically Mr. Rasmussen is a democrat and he served as road supervisor of Umatilla County for two years and as deputy sheriff for two years. Fraternally he is a member of the Eagles, the Foresters of America, the Shepherds of America, the Companion of Foresters and he also belongs to the Danish Aid Society of Portland. He is a faithful member of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Rasmussen has never regretted the fact that he sought a home in America, for he has here met with good success. He has ever been active and energetic and his advancement in life is not the outcome of propitious circumstances but the honest reward of labor, good management, ambition and energy.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Boring, William

WILLIAM H. BORING, an honored veteran of the Civil War, is now living retired at Boring, which city was named in his honor. He was born in Greene County, Illinois on February 26, 1841, his parents being Dorsey and Susanna (Melvin) Boring, the father a native of Maryland, and the mother of Tennessee. They were married in Illinois, where the father resided until his death, which occurred in 1852. The mother died in 1884. Throughout his entire life the father  followed the occupation of farming. In his family were three children: George, of Clarence, Missouri; one who died in infancy; and William H., of this review.

    William H. Boring grew to manhood in his native state and received a common school education. He remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age, when he enlisted for service in the Civil War, joining Company D, of the Thirty-third regiment of Illinois Infantry. The line of movement of his regiment during the war was a very interesting one. He was in the following places in engagements: Fredericktown, Missouri; Cash River, Arkansas: Fort Gibson, Mississippi; Jackson, Mississippi; Black River Bridge; the siege of Vicksburg; and the battles of Oppolusus Bayou; Fort Esperanza, Texas; and Mobile, Alabama. At the expiration of his term of service, in 1863, he reenlisted in the same regiment with which he served until the close of the war. During his service he was wounded six times and now receives a pension of seventeen dollars per month. At the close of the war Mr. Boring returned to Illinois and operated his father's farm for five years. In June 1874, he came to Oregon and settled in Clackamas County, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of timberland. He resided on this farm until January 1911, when he retired from active life. He now resides in a beautiful home in Boring, which town was named in honor of him when it was started in 1901, at the time of the building of the 0.W.P. electric line.

    In 1867 Mr. Boring wedded Miss Sarah Wilder, the daughter of Samuel and Margaret Jane Wilder, the father a native of Tennessee and the mother of Kentucky. The parents were married in Illinois, in which state the father was engaged in farming. The mother died November 14, 1868, and the Father on June 3, 1893, in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the work of which they took an active part. In their family were six children, of whom Mrs. Boring is the eldest. The others are: Frances, who now lives in Kansas and is the wife of Bruce Baker; William, who is a Methodist minister and is president of the Lew C. Webb Deaconess College, of Washington, D. C; Milton, of Baldwin, Kansas; Jennie, who is the wife of S. L. Bay of Richmond, Missouri; and Oscar, a resident of Bloomington, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Boring have been born two children, but the younger, Elsie, died in infancy. The elder. Orville Wilder, was born in 1879. He is a graduate of the normal course of the Portland University and in 1905 married Miss Lucy Parrott, who was born in Minnesota and came to Oregon with her parents when a child. The father died in 189S but her mother is now living near Boring. Mr. and Mrs. Orville Boring have two sons: Lester L., born June 12, 1906; and Orville W., born October 31, 1910.

    Mr. Boring and his family are active workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has ever been an active and progressive man and especially deserves mention in this work as an honored veteran of the Civil War. He stands as an advocate of all that tends to advance the welfare of his community along material, social, political, intellectual and moral lines and is a worthy representative of the highest type of American citizenship.

Source:  The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Meing, Paul

PAUL R. MEINIG.  Among the citizens of Sandy who through their energy, industry and public spirit, reinforced by natural ability, have become prominent in the commercial and civic circles of the city is Paul R. Meinig.  His business interests have always been of a character that has contributed not only to his individual success but also constituted an important factor in general progress.  A native of Germany, he was born on the 17th of April, 1869, his parents being F. A. and Bertha Wilhelmina (Fischer) Meinig, both of whom were also natives of Germany.  They came to America in 1870, settling at Cape Girardeau, Missouri.  After residing there for five years, during which time Mr. Meinig operated a flour mill, he disposed of his mill and the family came to Oregon in October, 1876, settling at Sandy.  For the first few years he engaged in agricultural pursuits, having purchased eighty acres of land, but later he bought a small store, which also served as the postoffice.  He was the first postmaster of Sandy and served in that capacity for two years.  Although he continued conducting this store he also purchased a flour mill, which he managed in connection with his mercantile business until the time of his death, which occurred February 23, 1902.  The mother is still residing upon the old home place with one of her sons, Otto.  To the parents four children were born:  Paul R., the subject of this review; Albon O., an agriculturist and mill owner of Sandy, who is married and has one child, Milton; Clara F., who is residing with her mother; and Otto H., who is also living at home with his mother.

    Paul R. Meinig received his education in the public schools of Clackamas county, Oregon.  As he was the eldest son, it was frequently difficult for him to find time to attend school, his father requiring his assistance in the various pursuits in which he was engaged.  After the father's death he started in business on his own account and he and his brothers took charge of the mercantile store which the father had formerly conducted.  Until two years ago he remained in partnership with his brothers but at that time purchased his brothers' interests and has since been sole owner.  He has demonstrated his ability to deal with the public and has also shown that he possesses unusual capabilities in business transactions.  He owns sixty acres of land within the town limits, his store building and residence, a two-story warehouse and the public hall building.

    On the 21st of October, 1896, in Marmot, Oregon, Mr. Meinig was married to Miss Marie Aschoff, whose birth occurred in Kansas, September 25, 1873, and who is a daughter of Adolph and Dora (Gein) Aschoff.  She was the eldest of nine children, the others being:  Ernest J., of Junction City, Oregon, who is married and has one child, Otto, whose birth occurred February 20, 1909; Amelia, who is married to Harry Bramhall, of Troutdale, Oregon, and has two children, Marie and Florence; Otto, a resident of Marmot, Oregon; Henry, also of Marmot, who is married and has two children, Virgil and Chester; Emma, the wife of Harry Thomas, of Gresham, Oregon, and the mother of two children, Maxine and Clifford; Margaret, who makes her home in Portland; and Carl and Gustav, who are residing with their parents.  Mrs. Meinig was brought to Oregon by her parents from Kansas March 16, 1882.  Her father was a farmer and stock-raiser in Kansas for eleven years.  Both he and his wife are natives of Germany.  To Mr. and Mrs. Meinig three children have been born:  Gertrude, whose birth occurred October 1, 1897, and who is at home and attending school in Sandy; and Frances and Alfred, born June 5, 1900, and December 7, 1902, respectively, both of whom are attending school.

    In politics Mr. Meinig has always given his support to the republican party and he is one of its most active members in Sandy.  He has held the office of road supervisor and since the incorporation of the town in August, 1911, has served as its mayor.  He has also been clerk of the school board for a number of years.  He is one of the public-spirited men of Sandy and his interest in its upbuilding and growth has been responsible for much of its success.  The postoffice is located in his store and he is at present acting as postmaster.  He holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the United Artisans.  His record measures up to the full standard of honorable manhood and those who know him recognize in him a citizen whose loyalty to the public welfare has never been questioned, while his integrity and honor in the private affairs of life are matters familiar to all with whom he has been associated.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated; Volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Revenue, Edward

    EDWARD A. REVENUE, an agriculturist who resides on his farm one and a half miles northeast of Sandy, Clackamas county, was born July 15, 1864, a son of Francis and Lyddie (Lawrence) Revenue.  After receiving his education in the public schools and occupying his leisure hours by caring for the duties which came to hand, Edward A. Revenue started out on his own account at the age of eighteen years.  His first position was with the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company as a member of the construction crew.  He was thus employed during the winter of 1882 but subsequently cleared land under contract.  In 1883 he removed to Baker county, Oregon, and after remaining there for one year returned to Portland, where he was employed at various occupations before working for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, at Tacoma.  He also worked in the Coeur d'Alene mines in Idaho and subsequently for the Southern Pacific Railroad Company.  Later he was engaged in logging on the Columbia river and for nine years he roamed through the country before returning to the farm, where he remained until his father's death, which occurred June 1, 1909.  His father deeded the farm to him, which was part payment for the labor he had previously given in aiding in its cultivation and since he has been the owner of the property he has continued to improve and develop it.

    On the 13th of October, 1895, Mr. Revenue was married to Miss Myra Flynn, whose birth occurred March 2, 1879, and who is a daughter of Nelson A. and Jane (Mooney) Flynn.  The father was born September 21, 1841, and during his early life lived in Wood county, West Virginia.  While still a resident of that state he joined Company E, First West Virginia Cavalry, for service in the Civil war.  Being wounded before his first year was completed, he was discharged but later joined the state guard and served until the close of the war.  In the fall of 1865 he went to Hancock, Illinois, where he resided for eight years before returning to West Virginia.  After two years he removed to Missouri and made his home in that state for seven years and after a three years’ residence in West Virginia settled in Kansas.  He lived in the Sunflower state for five years on a homestead claim but in April, 1883, came to Oregon.  After making his home in Sycamore for two years where he was postmaster, he located in Cherryville upon a homestead claim of forty acres, upon which he resided for thirteen years.  Mrs. Flynn was born on the 31st of March, 1843, and her marriage occurred December 25, 1862.  After her death Mr. Flynn retired from active work and has since lived with his daughter Mrs. Revenue.  Unto Mr. and Mrs. Flynn nine children were born:  Gilmore N. and Vira A., both of whom are deceased; Alice M., who is the wife of L. B. Trullinger, of Lents, Oregon, and the mother of one son, Roy M.; Noah W., of eastern Oregon, who is married and has seven children, Ira, Clyde, Benjamin, Celia, Orville, Jessie and Leslie; Minnie J., who became the wife of D. W. Douglas, of Cherryville, Oregon, and has three children, Vira, Alice and Waldo E.; Mrs. Revenue; George, a resident of Oregon; Sarah, who has passed away; and Ira, of Hood River, who is married and has three children, Louis, Arlie and an infant son.  To Mr. and Mrs. Revenue two children have been born, one of whom died in infancy.  The surviving member of the family is Alice Ruth, who was born March 14, 1899, and is attending school.

    Although Mr. Revenue is in sympathy with the greater number of the policies of the republican party, he casts his vote for man or measure rather than according to the dictates of the party machine.  He has never sought nor desired office but takes a citizen's interest in the political welfare and civic government of Clackamas county.  He has ever been diligent and industrious and the word fail has no place in his vocabulary.  His life in all of its various relations has been of such character as to command the respect and esteem of those with whom he has been associated.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated; Volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Barlow, William

WILLIAM BARLOW. In this great northwestern country, with its boundless possibilities, and but imperfectly developed resources, its remoteness from the cradle influences of New England, and its diversified interests beckoning the traveler from afar, the large hearted, courageous and farsighted pioneer is revered for what he has accomplished, and for the strength and hope which his sterling characteristics have infused into all departments of activity. At the present time there is in process of writing a history of the Barlow family, different members of which have made perceptible inroads into the opening of Oregon, and who, in their attainments and characters, are representative of the most far reaching and helpful pioneer ship. Pending the completion of this interesting narrative, it is a pleasure to enumerate the salient points in the careers of the best known members of the family, with reference especially to their association with the state of Oregon.

    Very early records credit the Barlow’s with, emigration from Scotland and with settlement near Plymouth Rock; Mass. Virginia became the home of the later members of the family, in which state the paternal great grandfather, John, was born, and where he enlisted for service in the Revolutionary war, in time attaining to the rank of captain. His son, William, the paternal grandfather, was also born in Virginia, and after going into Kentucky with Daniel Boone to fight the Indians, liked the state so well that he forthwith settled therein. In Nicholas County he owned a large farm, and reared a large family, his death occurring at the age of sixty-five years.

    Samuel K. Barlow, the father of William, and son of William, was born in Nicholas County, Ky., and in his youth learned the tailor's trade. When twenty-eight years old he removed to Indiana, but later took up his residence near Peoria, Fulton County, just at the close of the Black Hawk war. Subsequently he pioneered where Chicago now stands, but because there was no prophet to advise him, refused to pay $400 for the property upon which now towers one of the greatest centers of activity in the world. At that time the prairie around and bordering on Lake Michigan was unbroken by farm houses or barns, and in the woods there roamed game of various kinds, as yet un-frightened by the gun or wily scheme of the pale faced hunter. Ignoring the chance to buy up the future site of Chicago, Mr. Barlow started from Fulton County to cross the plains, March 30, 1845, his means of transportation consisting of four teams of three yoke of oxen each. With his family he traveled alone to Independence, Mo., where the band was increased to one thousand wagons, and divided up into different companies. Mr. Barlow was captain of the company bearing his name, and faithfully guarded the interests of his charges through all the dreary months on the trail. The way was via the Platte and the Sweet Water rivers, the journey being rather a pleasant one, and singularly free from annoyances of Indians or the ravages of disease. Slowly the cavalcade moved into the Willamette valley, travel stained but hopeful, and ready to do and dare to an extent unappreciated by people under any other circumstances.

    William Barlow helped vary materially to build the first wagon road over the Cascade Mountains. Previous to 1845, all immigrants coming to western Oregon came to The Dalles and were conveyed by bateaux clown the Columbia to the Willamette valley. Mr. Barlow's father determined to make the route one continuous journey by land. He and William Rector blazed the route and S. K. Barlow's family and a few helpers followed. Upon William Barlow, the oldest son, devolved much of the responsibility and work of the undertaking he and John M. Bacon were the first men to test the road. Following the blazed trees made by the pathfinders, they made the trip on foot to the Foster settlement, where provisions were procured to take back to the hungry women and children who were struggling with the difficulties of the new mountain road. The road was eighty miles long; sixty-five miles of it were cut through the primeval forests and canyons of the mountain slopes. The late Judge Matthew P. Deady, of the United State Supreme Court, said of it: The construction of the Barlow road contributed more toward the prosperity of the Willamette Valley and the future state of Oregon than any other achievement prior to the building of the railways in 1870.

    Christmas eve, 1845, Mr. Barlow arrived with his family in Oregon City. He had been successful in Illinois, and had money with which to start life in the west. He bought a hotel for which he paid $2,000, later sold to his son, William, and also took up a claim of six hundred and forty acres near the city, which he eventually sold for $5,000. Later he bought six hundred and forty acres, upon a portion, of which the town of Barlow has since been built and named in his honor, and this land he sold for $6,000. In the meantime he had purchased land in Canemah, and thither he repaired to spend his last years, his death occurring there at the age of seventy-two years. Mr. Barlow was one of the splendid personalities which illuminated the pioneer days of Oregon, and who, by his fine grasp of existing opportunities, furnished a worthy example to all would be promoters of western interests. He was fashioned somewhat on the Cromwellian order, was of Scotch ancestry, and fearless almost to audacity. He despised lies and soft people, and never stooped to a small meanness during the course of his long and well ordered life.

    While living among the crude conditions of Indiana S. K. Barlow married Susanna Lee, who was born in South Carolina, and whose father, William Lee, was born in Ireland. Mr. Lee's father was a colonel in the British army, and fought for the crown for seven years. In time he changed his tactics and fought against rather than for England, for which evidence of insubordination he was captured and imprisoned in a dungeon for a year. After his release he sent his two boys, William and Frank, to America, and William settled in Charleston, S. C. where he enlisted for service in the Revolutionary war. He was a lieutenant of artillery and during the first engagement at Charleston a shell burst, causing him to be crippled for life, and cutting short his military service. Nevertheless, he lived to a good age, for he was sixty at the time of his death in South Carolina. His widow and her children removed to Kentucky, and later to Indiana, settling near Vincennes, but the mother finally removed to the vicinity of Indianapolis, and died there.

    William Barlow, son of the pioneer, was born ten miles west of Indianapolis, Ind., October 26, 1822, and was reared in Indiana and Illinois. He was the second oldest of the five sons and two daughters born to his parents, and like the rest of the family availed himself of such education as was procurable at the little log subscription school house. He came across the plains with his father, and bought six hundred and forty acres of land near the Clackamas River, and within six miles of Oregon City. After disposing of this land at a profit he went on the Molalla River and bought a section of land upon which he planted fifty acres in wheat. In 1848 he sold his property to Matthias Sweagle, a friend of the old days in Indiana and Illinois, who paid him $2,000 in gold. What this amount of money meant may be best judged when it is known that it was very .scarce at that time, and that what little currency was to be had included English, Canadian, Mexican and various other kinds. Later Mr. Barlow brought up in Oregon City, where he bought wheat, made it into flour, and after getting in a supply of one thousand barrels of the latter commodity talked it over with his partner and decided that one ought to buy the other out. As no Barlow ever thought of backing down, the flour was soon under the exclusive ownership of the Barlow side of the house, and a rise in the price of flour enabled him to sell at an enormous profit. This happy chance proved the beginning of the success of Mr. Barlow, and placed to his credit what was then a comfortable competence.

    In 1849 Mr. Barlow left his flouring business and went down to the mines of California on horseback, and during his absence from home collected a varied assortment of experience, albeit his success as a miner did not reach large proportions. The Indians showed him a great deal of unsolicited attention, and while endeavoring to turn them from the error of their ways he was compelled to acknowledge their superiority of numbers and fighting prowess, and retreat to a safe haven. His object par excellence was to regain possession of a fine riding horse of which the red men had relieved him, but it is feared the horse had henceforth a much bedecked and savage master. After his flour sale Mr. Barlow bought the Lovejoy donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres on the hills back of where Canemah now stands, and afterward he went into partnership with A, F. Hedges in laying out the town of Canemah. The partner went to New Orleans in 1850, bought an engine for a steamboat and saw mill, and a fine stock of general merchandise, and when he returned Mr. Barlow took the stock of goods and saw mill, and the partner took the boat, and all went merrily and successfully to the advantage of all concerned. The land back of Canemah increased in value and sold at a large profit, and the way of the pioneers was brightened by more than anticipated success.

    Upon purchasing his father's place at Barlow Prairie in 1852, Mr. Barlow was practically free from other business obligations and in a position to devote all of his time to the cultivation of his fine property. A modern residence was unfortunately burned in 1884, but Mr. Barlow at once arranged for a larger and more commodious residence. No more beautiful rural residence contributes by its harmony and appropriateness to the agricultural well being of Clackamas County, nor is any farm more admirably managed or finely cultivated. Located on the Southern Pacific railroad, it has its own way station and warehouse, and whiles essentially a country home, is in close proximity to town interests. At one time Mr. Barlow was asked to put up $2,500 and thus become half owner of the land upon which Portland has since been built, the other man in the case, Dan Lonsdale, having paid $5,000 for it in leather. He afterwards traded a portion of the same land for the leather with which he had bought it to a tannery located on the property, Mr. Barlow was deterred from entering into this transaction through the advice of his father, to whom he went for counsel, and whose opinion he valued more than that of anyone else in the world, Mr. Barlow has been foremost in all public enterprises in his locality, his force of character, akin to that of his father, forcing him unwittingly into all that has called for strength and concerted action.

    He early saw that the climatic conditions of his adopted state were suitable for orchard culture and next to Mr. Llewellan of Milwaukee, was the first to establish an apple nursery. In 1852 he imported from Illinois, by way of the Horn, a bushel of black walnuts and a fine grove of bearing trees attest the success of this experiment. In public enterprises, Mr. Barlow's name was among the originators of the Oregon State Fair, the first woolen mill in Oregon, the building of the first telegraph line, and in 1860 he gave up his residence and part of his farm for the establishment of barracks for the First Oregon Volunteers. In 1861 he moved to Oregon City and was enthusiastic in sanitary organizations for the Union boys. Mr. Barlow was engaged in mercantile pursuits in the county seat for ten years, when he returned to the Barlow farm, where he has resided continuously for thirty-two years.

    He is a Republican in political affiliation, and has served as county commissioner and assessor, and was nominated representative from Clackamas, but resigned on account of sickness. His political enthusiasm led him to give an inaugural ball and dinner in honor of Lincoln's first inauguration. When Col. E. D. Baker arrived in Oregon, Mr. Barlow drove him to Salem in his family carriage. This carriage is now a historical relic, having been shipped to Governor Abernethy via the Horn in 1859. Mr. Barlow purchased it on its transit and has owned and used it ever since.

    Mr. Barlow often expresses his sentiments in regard to two great political movements of the last decade in these words: There is just as good material in a woman to make an honest and intelligent voter as there is in a man, and there is just as good material in silver to make an honest dollar as there is in gold. He is fraternally associated with the Masons, and bears the distinction of being the oldest living member in Multnomah Lodge No. 1, the first lodge organized on the coast.

    In 1852 Mr. Barlow married Mrs. Martha Ann Partlow Allen, of which union there have been born three children, of whom Mary is one of the well known educators of the state, and is possessed of great natural talent for her chosen occupation. Jennie, the second daughter, is deceased; and Cassius U. is managing his father's farm, and is an exceedingly capable and popular member of the younger generation of Oregon promoters. Mr. Barlow is now eighty-one years old, but possesses a keen memory of all his pioneer exploits. A habit of reading formed in youth is a great solace to him in his old age. His wife died in 1901, and his two children are now administering to the comfort of his declining years.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Wait, Charles

CHARLES N. WAIT, attorney at law and agriculturist of Clackamas County, was born in Oregon City, this county, February 10, 1856, and bears a name prominently identified with the jurisprudence of the state of Oregon. His American ancestors were connected with the early history of the extreme eastern states, his paternal great-great-great grandfather, Benjamin, having been born in Connecticut, from which state he emigrated to Hatfield, Mass. This remote forefather was never wanting in physical or moral prowess, and because of his bold frontier experiences was known as an Indian annihilator. His fighting ability seems to have been inherited by his son, John, who was a soldier in the Whately Company, under Capt. Henry Stiles, and afterward a sergeant in Capt. Russell Kellogg's company, on the Bennington alarm. Joel, the son of John, followed the martial fortunes of Washington during the Revolutionary war, and was in both the Hatfield Company, commanded by Captain Graves, and the company of Captain Murry.

    Judge Aaron E. Wait, father of Charles N., and first chief justice of the state of Oregon, was born in Whately, Franklin County, Mass., December 26, 1813, a son of Aaron Wait, also a native of Massachusetts, and a soldier during the war of 1812. Aaron Wait married Sarah Morton, a native of Whately, and daughter of Solomon Morton, representative of a prominent Massachusetts family. Four children were born of this union, Eunice, Clementine, Charles G., and Aaron E., the latter the youngest of the family. Aaron Wait died when his namesake son was an infant, and his wife afterward married again, in consequence of which the lad lived with his grandfather until his fourth year, and then with his uncle until he was eight years old. His education was difficult of attainment owing to the lack of necessary funds, and was chiefly acquired while serving an apprenticeship of four years at the broom maker's trade in Hatfield, Mass., his spare money defraying the expenses attached to his schooling. For some time he subsequently engaged in teaching in New York, and in 1837 removed to the state of Michigan, where he studied law in Centerville, St. Joseph County, and was admitted to the bar of Michigan in 1842. Before leaving the state he was the military secretary to Governor John S. Barry.

    Accompanied by Judge Lancaster, Mr. Wait made preparations to cross the plains in 1847, there being forty wagons in the train and a large number of stock. The journey was not attended by any disastrous occurrences, although terrific storms made progress difficult at times. It is recorded that Judge Wait made a deep impression upon the Indians with his glasses, which he wore for nearsightedness, and which the red men believed to endow him with almost supernatural powers, permitting him to see enormous distances and through practically everything. The judge persisted in watching the cattle and horses at night, and came near dealing out the death penalty to a would be horse thief, who, however, dropped into the tall grass when he found he was discovered, and managed to sneak away to safety. Arriving in Oregon, Mr. Wait settled in Oregon City, and here he entered upon the practice of law with ex- Senator James K. Kelley, with whom be remained for a number of years. In 1849 he varied his practice by going down into California on a little seventeen ton vessel, intent upon claiming a share of the gold for which thousands were striving. He was fairly successful as a miner, his largest find in one place during the course of a day being $60, and his largest all around find in a day was $100.

    Upon returning to Oregon Judge Wait became connected with the Cayuse War Commission, which up to that time had accomplished practically nothing. His service was marked by extreme fairness to all concerned, and he audited nearly all of the war claims, and every claim he allowed was met precisely as he had made it. The judge practiced under the provisional and territorial laws of Oregon, and was elected to the circuit bench in the fourth judicial district and later served as the first chief justice of Oregon, immediately after the admission of Oregon as a state in 1859. He held many important offices within the gift of his fellow townsmen, practically his only defeat taking place after his nomination to the senate in 1862. From a large legal practice Judge Wait gradually drifted into real estate speculations, and, as seems natural with so many active men, chose to spend his later life amid the peace and quiet of farming enterprises. In 1876 he removed onto his six hundred acre farm near Canby, remained there for eight years, and then went back to Portland, where he lived until 1897. The same year he returned to the Canby farm, where his death occurred December 13, 1898. He was a very large land owner, had two thousand acres in Jackson County. Ore., his Canby farm of six hundred acres, and enough other Oregon land to make up five thousand acres. In Washington he owned one thousand acres. No finer type of the gifted and substantial citizen has invaded the ranks of law and agriculture in Oregon and to none has been accorded more universal esteem, or generous appreciation of splendid personal characteristics. Judge Wait married Mary Ann Sprenger, who was born in McConnelsville, Ohio, a daughter of a merchant who was born in Germany and came to the United States as a young man, settling in Pennsylvania. From the latter state Mr. Sprenger removed to McConnelsville, Ohio, from where he immigrated to Linn County. Ore. his death eventually is occurring on his donation claim at an advanced age. Of the first marriage of Judge Wait three children were born, of whom Charles N. is the only one living. Of the second marriage contracted by the judge three children were born, but only one matured, Anna Evelyn, the deceased wife of Frank Hanford, of Seattle, Wash.

    The education of Charles N. Wait was acquired in the public schools of Portland, which training was supplemented by a course at the Bishop Scott grammar school. His first business experience was as general timekeeper on construction with the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, whose employ he entered in 1880, and with who he remained for eight years. In 1888 he became chief clerk of the money order department of the Portland post office, and, owing to close confinement and consequent effect upon his health, resigned at the end of two years. For the following two years he acted in the capacity of deputy United States marshal under John Myers, after which he entered the law department of the Oregon State University, from which he was duly graduated with honors. In June, 1891, Mr. Wait began to practice in Portland, and in 1897 removed to the old homestead in Canby, since which time he has combined the management of the large estate with the general practice of law. He is a Democrat in political affiliation, and has taken a prominent part in the affairs of his party in Oregon. For one term he was deputy city attorney of Portland, and he was secretary of the state central committee when Cleveland was last elected. Also Mr. Wait has been mayor of Canby for one term. He is fraternally associated with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of which he is past master; the Warner Grange, of which he is past master; the Elks; the Red Men; and the Knights of Pythias.

    The first marriage of Mr. Wait was contracted in Clackamas County with Laurena J. Marks, who died July 20, 1891, leaving one son and two daughters. October 2, 1895, Mr. Wait married, in Washington, Wilhelmina Woicka, who was born in Portland, and whose father, William, a jeweler by trade, was born in Germany. Mr. Woicka came to America as a young man, and died in San Francisco, Cal. Of this union there have been born two sons, Aaron E. and George N.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Ryan, Thomas

THOMAS F. RYAN

Residence, Ryanolia Fruit Farm, Gladstone; office, Masonic building, Oregon City.  Born April 9, 1859, at Centerville, Kent County, Rhode Island.  Son of James and Elizabeth (Kenna) Ryan.  Married February 24, 1897, to Inez N. Marshall.  Educated at Centerville, Rhode Island, common and grammer schools and graduated at Holyoke High School, Holyoke, Massachusetts.  Came to Oregon September 1, 1881.  Admitted to the bar at Salem, May 7, 1900.  Mayor, City Recorder, Water Commissioner and Chief Engineer Water Department, of Oregon City.  For fourteen years director and school clerk of Oregon City school district.  County Judge, Clackamas County for eight years.  Republican State and Congressional Committeeman for twelve years.  President Commercial Club, Oregon City. Member Masonic, I.O.O.F., A.O.U.W., W.O.W., Elks, Grange fraternities.  Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company; Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Elliott, Earl

EARL E. ELLIOTT, who is extensively engaged in the general merchandise business at Eagle Creek, where he is also postmaster, was born at Damascus, Oregon, on the 13th of August 1877, a son of Eli and Ophelia A. (Caton) Elliott. His paternal grandparents were natives of Tennessee and his mother's parents were born in Kentucky. The father was one of nine children and the mother was one of a family of seven. Mr. and Mrs. Eli Elliott were married in 1861, and to their union seven children were born: Albian R. of Powell Valley, Oregon, who is married and has three children, Ruby, Harold and Elsie; John C. of Damascus, Oregon, who is married and has four daughters, Nellie. Bernice, Mabel and Geneva ; Edward L., also of Powell Valley, who is married and has four children, Ray, Ruth, May and William; Frank W., who is living in Alaska; Earl E., who is the subject of this review; Lulu M., who is the wife of Charles Simmons of Gresham, Oregon, and the mother of three children, Allen, Earl and Edward; and Florence I., who is the wife of H. F. Wihlon of Powell Valley, and has two children, Esther and Frances.

  Earl E. Elliott acquired his education in the public schools of Damascus, where he studied until he was thirteen years of age. At that time his parents removed to Powell Valley and he entered the schools of that district and was a student there until he was twenty-one years of age. After graduating he taught school in Highland, Clackamas County, for two years before entering upon a normal course at Monmouth College. Following the completion of his college course he went into his father's store in Powell Valley as a partner. He remained there until 1904, but in that year removed to Eagle Creek and opened a general merchandise store. Since his advent into the commercial circles of Eagle Creek he has built up a large business, carrying a complete stock of general merchandise. In addition to his store he has also interested himself in real estate and is at present the owner of not only his store and residence but also a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, ninety acres of which have been brought under a high state of productivity, while the balance is in timber. This farm is located three miles east of Eagle Creek and is valued at twenty thousand dollars. When he came to Eagle Creek Mr. Elliott had only thirty-five hundred dollars in cash, but after beginning business his finances at once began to increase. During the first year he did about eighty-five hundred dollars worth of business and he is now doing from fourteen to fifteen thousand dollars worth per year. He has sold more than one hundred thousand dollars worth of goods during his eight years he has been conducting his store, and during all that time has so managed his business that he has made himself one of the most valued citizens of the community. He seems to possess natural ability for dealing with the public and because of his careful study of the needs and requirements of his customers be has made his store one of the most important assets of the commercial enterprises in Eagle Creek.

  On the 23d of January 1902, Mr. Elliott was married to Miss Mary E. Jones, a daughter of N. J. and Annie (Bartlett) Jones, of Kansas. In politics Mr. Elliott gives his support to the democratic party, and although he is thoroughly alive to the issues of the day and is a sympathizer and supporter of the policies of his party he has never sought nor desired office as a reward for party fealty. For twelve years he has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Gresham.

Source:  The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated volume IV
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (1912)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

U'Ren, William

WILLIAM SIMON U'REN

Residence, 615 Fifth street; office, Oregon City Bank building, Oregon City, Oregon.  Born January 10, 1859, in Lancaster, Wisconsin.  Son of William Richard and Frances Jane (Ivey) U'Ren.  Married March 6, 1901, to Mary Beharrell.  Educated at the public schools of Nevadaville, Central City,  Blackhawk, Colorado, until 1868, then at Cheyenne, Wyoming, at Plum Creek, Nebraska, and at Lancaster, Wisconsin.  Attended Denver Business College, Denver, Colorado, in the evening during the winters of 1878 and 1879.  Admitted to the bar of Colorado at Denver in January, 1881.  Came to Oregon in 1889.  Was elected to Legislature from Clackamas County, Oregon, in June, 1896.  Formed partnership with C. Schuebel in January, 1901.  Member American Political Science  Association, of Oregon City Commercial Club, of National Municipal League.  Republican.

Source: History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company; Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Prosser, George

GEORGE W. PROSSER.   George W. Prosser was born in Des Moines, Iowa. December 20, 1846, and crossed the plains in 1852-53 with his father and mother. They wintered at old Fort Hall, and left there the following spring, arriving in Clackamas county, Oregon, on the 25th of June, 1853. He with his father first settled eleven miles east of East Portland. They abandoned that claim, and took up a claim three miles west of Oswego; and the subject of this sketch discovered and opened the iron mines now owned by the Oregon Iron & Steel Company, on said claim. Mrs. Prosser, his mother, sold out this property to Hawley, Dodd & Co., of Portland, Oregon. Then he commenced business on his own account at Oswego, and has lived in that vicinity ever since.

In 1880 he was elected to the Oregon legislature on the Republican ticket, and served two years. He is now one of the directors of the Oswego School District, No. 47, and is also postmaster of that town. He is at present doing a large business in the general merchandising line, and is one of the staunch and progressive men of that section, always ready and willing to promote the interests of the county and town he lives in. Mr. Prosser is a married man, and has a family of one daughter.

Source: History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington; Volume II
Portland, Oregon. North Pacific History Company, 1889
Dannals, Reuben

REUBEN DANNALS, one of the pioneers of Clackamas County, was born in Greene County, Ohio, October 23, 1829, and is the second oldest son of the four sons and five daughters born to Reuben and Hannah (Wyckel) Dannals, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and the east.

    From his native county of Bedford, Pa., the elder Reuben Dannals removed with his parents to Ohio, and later to Illinois and Iowa, coming to Oregon in 1865. Settling in Linn County, he farmed for several years, but at the time of his death, in 1883, at the age of eighty-two years, was living a retired life. All of the children of the family were obliged to work hard from early morning until late at night, and Reuben performed his share with willing heart and capable hand. As might be expected, he had little time for either leisure or study, and his education has been a matter of his own acquiring during later years. He was one of the most enthusiastic of the little band who crossed the plains in search of larger opportunities. Although there were eighteen wagons from their own neighborhood in Iowa, the Indians were so very troublesome that they were obliged to fall in with a freight train for protection during the most dangerous part of the journey. Three ponies were stolen during the dawn of one morning, and they had many other experiences which added zest and interest to the journey.

    When the family arrived in Clackamas county Mr. Dannals bought, on his own responsibility, one hundred and forty-two and one half acres of land, a part of which he soon after sold, and at present his possessions consist of eighty of the original acres, besides one hundred and sixty acres at Highland, this state. He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising, and has met with great success in his chosen occupation. With him across the plains came the wife of Mr. Dannals, formerly Hannah Colson, who was born in Ohio, and whom he married in Iowa. Three children have been born into the family of Mr. and Mrs. Dannals, of whom Charlotta is the oldest: Hiram is the second child and only son; and Minnie is the youngest. Mr. Dannals is a Democrat in politics and is fraternally associated with the Grangers. He enjoys the respect and good will of all who know him, and his integrity and public spiritedness have never been questioned.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Apperson, J. T.

Biographs of the Members of the Senate
Clackamas

J. T. Apperson of Clackamas County was born in Hopkins Co., Ky., Dec. 23d ’34 and emigrated to Oregon in 1847; has been for many years engaged in steam-boating.  Was at one time Sheriff of his county and is a popular gentleman and a very dark complected republican.

The East Oregonian (Pendleton, OR)
Saturday, October 5, 1878

Elliott, William

William Elliott-This now venerable citizen of our state, whose form and character are familiar to many in Western Oregon, was born in Knox county, Indiana, September 14, 1815.  Losing his mother by death when but a child of five years, he was received by an uncle, and remained in his family, removing with him to Missouri in 1820, and not leaving his kind relatives until he had attained his majority.

In 1836 he became a volunteer soldier under A. J. Morgan, of Fort Leavenworth, to prosecute the war in Florida, and in this service experienced many sharp encounters.  After his return in 1838 to Missouri, he was married to Miss Nancy, the daughter of John Sconce, a pioneer of Missouri from Kentucky.  She was born in Grason county, Kentucky, June 11, 1816.

Mr. Elliott then engaged in farming until 1846, when he was seized with the impulse that affected the most daring and impetuous of the Western people to make new homes and a grander state beyond the shining Rocky Mountains, and in 1846 joined the train of eighty wagons bound for the wonderland of Oregon.  He had as companions in this company Messrs. J. Brown, William Parker, Benjamin Schrum, Z. Grippel, and many others will known in our state.  Continuing with a detachment of some thirty of the wagons, Mr. Elliott and his family made a successful and speedy trip, not, however, without danger and hardship, arriving at Oregon City early in October, being of the second company of that year to pass the Barlow gate.  The same season he went out to the Molalla, and with the oxen he had brought across the plains broke and seeded to wheat twelve acres of land.  In the February following he entered the Donation claim still designated by his name in Clackamas county.  This place he developed with the untiring patience of the early Oregon farmer, and lived upon it for a full quarter of a century.  During all this time he was active and earnest in the development of public enterprises, building up Christian institutions, and taking especial interest in common schools, being one of the first to subscribe money for building a proper house for school purposes and for paying the teacher.  During the Cayuse war he was one of the party that engaged in the Abiqua war, and feels perfectly satisfied that, if the citizens had not acted promptly in that affair, the Indians would have risen throughout the Willamette valley and massacred many innocent families, as the fighting men were mainly absent in the Cayuse country.  He was also a volunteer under Colonel Kelley in the Yakima war.

In his farming operations, Mr. Elliott has ever been very successful and progressive, being one of the first to encourage the importation of Devon cattle and of improved breeds of sheep.  He took an active part in forming the State Agricultural Society, and, when it was necessary to liquidate the indebtedness of the concern, stood as one of the thirty to furnish the means.

In 1872 they sold the old place and removed to Canemah.  In 1888 Mrs. Elliott died, and Mr. Elliott at present makes his home with his eldest daughter, Mrs. Captain Apperson, of Oregon City.  At this pleasant old town he spends the declining years of his life in looking back upon the great changes wrought by the labors of himself and his old comrades, and in looking forward to the still greater improvement yet to come.

The large family that he has raised and educated for the state are in every way an honor to himself, and are citizens of recognized public merit.  The following are their names: M. A., wife of Captain Apperson; John W., Eliza, wife of Doctor White; Robert, deceased; and Ella, wife of Captain Sanborn.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II,
1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever

Gleason, Parsons

Parsons Gleason-Mr. Parsons Gleason is one of the oldest and most venerable of our pioneers now living, having been born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1799.  At the age of six years he moved with his father to Western New York, and as the age of twenty-one went out to Indiana, and three years later had drifted as far as the Indian Territory, and was with the missionaries for three years among the Osage Indians.  Three years later he went on to Indiana, making his home at South Bend.  In that state he married and made his residence, forming a great attachment to the old military hero and political chieftain, W. H. Harrison, with whom he became intimately acquainted.

In 1851 he made the great journey across the plains to Oregon, thereby becoming one of the earliest settlers in our state.  He made his home at the place first humorously called “Hard Scrabble,” but later translated as “Needy,” in Clackamas county.  Here he has passed a long, active and honorable life, and still lives at the age of ninety.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II,
1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever

Hunsaker, J. T.

J. T. Hunsaker-This pioneer of 1846, one of the most substantial and upright men of our state, who has borne his full share of the burden and heat of the day in building up Oregon, was even from the first upon the advanced wave of American civilization, having been born at Jonesboro, Illinois, in 1818, and having assisted in laying the foundations of that giant state, and devoting his energies to the development of a farm.

He was moved, however, by the attractions of the more distant West, and in 1846 joined the train of Captain Keith bound for the then almost fabulous Oregon.  The company was found to be so large as to travel best in detachments; and the journey was safely performed across the mountains and deserts, and happily ended at Oregon City September 13th.  Mr. Hunsaker located his first claim on the Molalla, and raised a crop in 1847, but soon abandoned this site for another at Scappoose, where, in addition to agriculture, he had the opportunity to engage in lumbering.  In 1849 he sold the mill erected there, and resided a short time at Oregon City, but soon established a more permanent business in the lumber line at La Camas.  His operations, there were terminated by a destructive fire, which consumed his lumber in the yard, and all but destroyed his mill.  By the great loss thus entailed, since there was no insurance in those early days of our state, he was obliged to abandon milling.  Returning to Oregon City, he purchased near that town the old McGruder place, and developed there one of those Willamette valley fruit farms which have become the envy and wonder of the immigrant and traveler.  There he lived until 1881, taking an active part in all public enterprises, and rearing a large family of sons and daughters, who stand among those younger Oregonians that the state feels justly proud of.  Their names will be recognized as of honorable and enterprising people, and may here be stated as follows: Horton (deceased), Josephine (deceased), Mary A., Araminta (deceased), Jacob, Sarah, Lycurgus, Katherine, Martha C., Alice, John and Emily.  Of those still living, all are residents of the Pacific Northwest.

Mr. Hunsaker’s wife dying in 1873, he was married, secondly, in 1878, to Mrs. M. A. Campbell of Eugene, and some years since made a new home at Woodburn, Oregon, buying the Lander farm one mile south of that pleasant village, whose location at the junction of the Oregon & California and Willamette Valley Railroads insures for it a prosperous future.

There, upon one of the handsomest and most productive farms in the state, the old pioneer is passing the autumnal years of a busy and fruitful life, enjoying the results of his early industry, and having the full confidence and respect of his community, and indeed of the whole state.  He is one of those men whom Oregon will always remember and be glad to honor.

Mary Collins, who became the wife of J. T. Hunsaker, was born near Louisville, Kentucky, October 3, 1820, and in 1836 emigrated with her father’s family to Illinois, and on the 7th of December of the next year was united in marriage to Mr. Hunsaker, coming with him to Oregon, as narrated above, and performing with great cheerfulness and devotion the duties that fell to the lot of the wife and mother in the early days of our state.  It was the women even more than the men who made Oregon; and their names like those of the upright of old are to be kept in everlasting remembrance.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II,
1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever

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