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Death Records & Obituaries

A

Abbott, John
Adams, J. E.
Anderson, Levy
Armstrong, Sarah
Austin, Inis
B

Ballance, Cyrus
Bamburge, Julius
Banzet, Gus
Bates, Elbert
Baxter, John
Bell, Henry
Bethune, Duncan
Boley, Henry
Boley, Infant
Bonham, Mary
Bright, James
Bristow, Harry
Brown, W. H.
C

Cameron, Matilda
Campbell, John
Carlton, Clifford
China Jim
Chittenden, Samuel
Claflin, William
Clark, Marilla
Clark, Valentine
Cobb, Infant
Cobb, Osee
D

Dacey, Jerry
Davis, Ben
Dean, Theodore
DeMoss, James
Dore, Amy
Duncan, George
Dustin, Infant
E

Edgar, Child
Elliott, Rossie
Elliott, William
F

Fag, Richard
Fields, Nannie
Fisk, Melvina
Fisk, Nathan
Flageolette, Frank
French, J. W.
French, T. D.
G

Gentry, James
Gillenwater, Joseph
H

Hamblin, James
Hannah, George
Hiatt, William
Hilton, Carrie
Howell, Jimmie
Humburd, Lanna
I - J

Isaacs, James
Jackson, Martha
Johnson, John
K

Keeton, Unknown
Keller, Phillip
Kimball, Martha
L

Laurance, Child
Lee, Infant
Lee, Unknown
Lockwood, Alonzo
Lockwood, Harry
Lockwood, Robert
Luce, Jacob
Luce, Ruhama
M

Mael, Infant
Manwaring, John
Masikers, George
McCann, Harry
McDowell, William
McEwin, Nat
McNeil, A.
Miller, John
Montain, James
Moore, Infant
Mueller, Henry
N
O - P

Officer, Mary
Parry, Jeff
Pendleton, Rice
Perry, John
Phillips, J. H.
Pope, Madie
Pruitt Family
Q - R

Ran, Caleb
Randig, William
Rappe, Louis
Reeves, Elizabeth
Reynolds, Charles
Roberts, J. J.
Robinson, Frank
Rousman, Infant
S

Sargent, Mattie
Schmidt, Oscar
Schodt, Otto
Scroggins, Thomas
Shaw, Enos
Shepherd, James
Snyder, Orville
Stevens, Henry
T

Taber, Clark
Turk, Edward
U - V

Unknown, Domingo
Vancil, Rosa
Vancil, William
Vineyard, Elizabeth
W

Whitworth, Dellis
Wickham, Joseph
Wilson, Lulu
Wilson, Perry
Wilson, Homer
Woolsey, George
X - Y
Z

Zook, Moses

 

Vancil, William

John Day Valley Ranger

William Newton Vancil Obit.

William Newton Vancil was born May 8, 1869 a few miles north of Milton, Oregon and passed away at the Blue Mt. General Hospital, Prairie City, Oregon.   December 19, 1943 at the age of 74 years, seven months and 11 days.

In 1870 he went with his parents to Couse Creek. Six miles south of Milton and grew to manhood there, attending school in the school house which his father and other residents of that vicinity built.

He was married on July 9, 1896, to Miss Rosa Gibson of Milton, Oregon.  They farmed near his birthplace until about 1910 then they moved to Freewater, Oregon where he had a second hand store and in 1914, they moved to Athena, Oregon where he had a livery barn.  A little later they moved to Bear Valley and then to a ranch near Canyon City where they have lived ever since.

Surviving are his wife Rosa Vancil, and the following children Dan O. Vancil, Freewater, Calif., Mrs. Florence Schouten, Seneca,Or,  Ray Vancil, Jackson , Calif.; Alva Vancil, Mc Call Idaho. Mrs. Delia Herburger, Canyon City, Mrs. Hazel Bergstrom, Lakeview, Wesley Vancil, Canyon City, Dallas and Virgil of the armed forces. Melvin Vancil,  Dayville and Cecil Vancil John Day, 15 grandchildren and two sisters Mrs. Ann Carney of Milton, Oregon and Mrs. Lilly Huntley, Stanfield Oregon

Funeral services were held from the Driskeill Mortuary chapel, John Day, Wednesday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. Mrs. Josie Bach.  Interment was in the Canyon City cemetery

Source: Unknown
Contrbiuted by Alva James

Vancil, Rosa

John Day Valley Ranger

Rosa Alice Vancil

Final rites were held Sunday for Miss Rosa Vancil of John Day, resident of eastern Oregon the past 66years. The late Mrs. Vancil died at 9:25 o’clock Friday morning at the John Day medical center and hospital where she has been a patient 14 days.  Death was due to a heart ailment, which she had suffered several months.  At the time of her death, she was 74 years, 3 months and 28 days old.

Services were held at the chapel of Driskill’s mortuary in John Day at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.  Officiating was the Rev. Fred L. Waller, pastor of the Community Methodist church of John Day.  Burial was made in the Canyon City cemetery.  Pallbearers were Charles W. Brown, William Grant and Niles Sproul of Canyon City and C.E.Gunther, Fred Lemcke and William Ste Marie of John Day.  Out of town relatives attending the final rites were Mr. And Mrs. Cecil Vancil of Grants Pass, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Vancil of Ione, Calif., Mr. and Mrs. Alva Vancil of Emmett, Idaho, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Vancil and family of Mt Vernon, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Harral of Pondosa, Mr. And Mrs. H. E. Bertgstrom of Lakeview, Mr. And Mrs. Harlan Schouten and sons of Portland, Mrs. Ora Wallace of Connell Wa., Mr. And Mrs. August Moroaco of Umpine, Miss Linnie Carney of Milton-Freewater, and Bert Gibson Walla Walla, Wa.

Rose Gibson, daughter of Horatio and Charlotte Hubler Gibson, was born June 29, 1880 of Earlton, Kansas. With her parents, she traveled from Kansas to Milton in Umatilla county in 1880.  The trip across the plains of the Midwest was made by covered wagon.

The marriage of Rosa Gibson to W.N. Vancil was solemnized July 9, 1896 at Milton.  To this union 13 children , nine who survived. The couple resided in that area until June 1915 when they moved to Grant County.  Mr. Vancil died December 19, 1943 in Canyon City.

The deceased was a member of the Ellis Tracy Unit No. 77, American Legion Auxiliary.   Her membership listed her as Gold Star Mother, Her son, Dallas, having been killed during World Was II.

Her survivors are three daughters.  Mrs. Jerry (Florence) Harrol of Pondosa, Ms William (Della) Boethin of Canyon City, and Mrs. W.E. (Hazel) Berstrom of Lakeview: 6 sons, Raymond of Ione, Calif., Alva of Emmett, Idaho, Samuel of John Day, Melvin of Mount Vernon, Virgil of Pendleton and Cecil of Grants Pass; 29 grandchildren; 6 great-grand children, three sisters, Mrs. Ora Wallace, Connell Wash., Mrs. Della Nelson, Colfax, Wash, Mrs. Pearl Fairwather, Spokane, Wash., and a brother Bert Gibson of Walla Walla, Wash and two nieces, Mrs. Linnie Carney of Milton-Freewater and Mrs. August Moraco of Umpire

Source: Unknown
Contributed by Alva James

Montain, James

HOLD UP MAN KILLED

Helena, Mont., March 8-A special from Canyon City, Oregon, says that James Montain, a Montana man, attempted to hold up a saloon and was killed by Bud Greenwell, the proprietor.

Source: Stevens Point Daily Journal (Stevens Point, WI) - Thursday, March 8, 1906
Contributed by Shauna Williams

French, J. W.

Pete French Reported Killed.

A report from Canyon City, Oregon, is to the effect that J.W. French, better known as Pete French, has been shot and killed by one of his neighbors in a dispute about land. French was one of the largest land and cattle owners in the State of Oregon. Some years ago he married a daughter of the late Hugh J. Glenn, who was a candidate for Governor of California at the time of the adoption of the new constitution, and the man for whom the county of Glenn was named.

Source: Daily Nevada Journal (Reno, NV) - Monday, December 20, 1897
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Snyder, Orville

OREGON MOB LYNCHES PRISONER

Canyon City, Ore., Dec. 28-Orville Snyder, who killed Arthur Green near Junction bar in a row on December 24 and had given himself up to the authorities, was taken from Deputy Sheriff Casady while on his way to the county jail, by five masked men who shot him to death.

Source: The Sheboygan Daily Press (Sheboygan, WI) - Tuesday, December 28, 1909
Contributed by Shauna Williams



Lynched Near Hamilton

Ollie Snyder was lynched the day after Christmas by five masked men near Hamilton which is about 15 miles from Canyon City.  Snyder killed a man named Green because of a row over the shooting of a dog.  After the killing he stood the sheriff and a posse off all night but surrendered in the morning.  As he was being brought to jail by the sheriff, five masked men took him from the officers and riddled him with bullets.

Source: Malheur Enterprise (Vale, OR) – Saturday, January 1, 1910
Vineyard, Elizabeth

Mrs. Elizabeth Vineyard, the wife of M. M. Vineyard, who resided on the east side of the valley, near Long Creek, died early last Monday morning from peritonitis, after an illness lasting nearly two months.  The lady was first the victim of an attack of appendicitis, which ailment was succeeded by that which resulted in her death.  Mrs. Vineyard was a native of Indiana, and came West in company with her husband and family, and finally located in Grant County, in the early part of this year, for her health, when she was taken sick and died. She leaves a widower and five children.

Source: The Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Monday, December 14, 1896
Carlton, Clifford

Clifford Carlton Drowned

Clifford Carlton, aged 9, was drowned at Columbus, while playing on a scow, last Thursday, says the Dalles Chronicle.  He and another boy of about his own age were on the scow waiting for a mane to come who was going to take them to Grant’s.  In a few minutes after the boy had left the house Mrs. Hicinbothem, the lady he was stopping with, went down to the beach to find him, but was informed by his companion that Clifford had gone in swimming.  Mrs. Hicinbothem immediately rand for assistance, and soon a large number of people gathered at the river’s edge to search for the lost boy, but all efforts to find him resulted in failure.  His father, Mr. Emerson Carlton, is now living in Grant, Or.,  Friday morning again a large number gathered to search for the lost boy, and dragged the river, but were as unsuccessful as before.

Source: The Oregonian (Portland, OR) – Monday, August 6, 1896
Contributed by The History of Today
Dacey, Jerry

Prairie City, Or., Oct. 24 – (Special) – Jerry Dacey, a pioneer miner of this district in Grant County, died at the home of Patsey Daily near this place the last of the week.  He was a prominent Mason and Oddfellow, and the remains were interred by members of these orders from all parts of the county.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Wednesday, October 25, 1905
Clark, Valentine

DIED.  Valentine, a two-year old son of J. N. Clark, was drowned in John Day’s river on the 23d of last month.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Monday, September 6, 1875
Contributed by Unknown FoFG: 68.98
Bell, Henry

Henry Bell died at Granite of pneumonia on election day.  He was a stranger there, and was an old miner.

Source: East Oregonian (Pendleton, OR) – Saturday, June 9, 1900
Robinson, Frank

A Woman Kills a Sheep-herder in Self Defense.

A woman by the name of Sklenska, living in Grant county, killed a sheep herder, by the name of Frank Robinson, by shooting him through the head.  Robinson stopped at the house of Mr. Skalenska and ordered breakfast, which the woman speedily procured.  Her husband was away from the home at work, several miles distant, earning the necessary sustenance of life, while she remained at home to look after the place.  After finishing his meal, Robinson produced a flask of whiskey and invited Mrs. Skalenska to partake, which she promptly refused to do.  Robinson took several drinks, and became quite talkative and made some improper proposals to her, whereupon she ordered  him out of the house.  He then attempted violence, when she ran out of the house, the man following her.  Finding him persistent she returned to the house and seizing a revolver, shot at him as he was entering the door, the ball striking him in the face.  Robinson then started for his horse, but returned and told her he was not afraid of her bullets.  She fired again as he was turning to leave, the ball striking him in the back of the head, when he fell to the ground, Mrs. Skalenska then went to Mr. Branson, Justice of the Peace, and gave herself up, telling him what she had done.  Mr. S. was sent for, and in company with the constable, went to the house where they found Robinson still living, but unconscious.  He was properly cared for until he died.  After hearing Mrs. S’s. testimony, she being the only witness, the Justice discharged her.

Source: The Oregon Scout (Union, OR) - Saturday, September 26, 1885
Chittenden, Samuel

Samuel Chittenden, an old resident of Grant county, died at his home in Prairie City on the 4th inst.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, January 21, 1882
Bonham, Mary

Two little girls, twin daughters of Mrs. Bonham, residing near Mount Vernon, Grant county, fell from a cliff near the house, one being instantly killed and the other seriously injured, though hopes were entertained of saving her life.  It is supposed the little innocents were gathering flowers near the edge of the cliff, when one, stumbling caught the dress of her sister, and both were precipitated to the rocks below.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, June 12, 1880



A Sad Accident – On last Friday, two little twin sisters, children of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bonham, of Mt. Vernon, were out playing and wandered some distance from the house and finally found their way to the top of a very large rock, one side of which was about 40 feet high.  The little ones approached the edge of this rock, and in attempting to go home, fell off, and one of them was so injured  that she only lived about four hours.  The other one had her arm fractured and a very deep and ugly wound in the forehead.  She is in this city now and in a very fair way to recover.  Inasmuch as the fall was nearly 40 feet perpendicular, it is a mystery that both were not instantly killed.  Mr. Bonham was absent on the road between here and The Dalles, and the news will be heartrending to him.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 5, 1880
Parry, Jeff

A homicide occurred at Prairie City, Grant county, recently, a well known resident, A. E. Starr, shooting and killing a young man named Jeff Parry.  The cause given is that the latter had refused to marry the daughter of the former, with whom he had been keeping company.  The girl is but 16 years old and all connect with the affair have heretofore been persons of good repute.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, November 19, 1881
Contributed by The History of Today
Luce, Jacob

Died

Died, near Canyon City, Grant county, Oregon, March 6th, of kidney disease, Jacob Luce, aged 70 years, 11 months and 3 days.

And thus another of the pioneers of Oregon has crossed the river of death.  Born in Muhlenburg county, Kentucky, in 1808, he resided there until 1843 when he removed with his family to Iowa, and settled in Mahuska county near Oskaloosa.  But reports of the beauty of the country of the far Oregon reached him, and here he came arriving in 1852.  He located about ten miles west of Eugene where he lived until a few months ago, when ill health induced him to remove to Eastern Oregon, in the hope of improving his condition by change of climate.  But all of no avail.  He leaves a wife, and seven children – who have all arrived at the years of maturity – to mourn his decease.

He received what was called at that time in the State of his birth a more than average English education.  His mercantile business was swamped in the financial crisis of 1837, since which time he followed farming for a business.  A tall, blue eyed man, hardy and muscular, type of the Englishman, he was well fitted for the hardships and dangers of a frontier life.  Though his father was a slaveholding Democrat, he became a free-soil Whig and afterward a Republican.  But he is past all the small things of this life – dying with his wife and children holding his hands and his head, his soul went out upon the wise sea of the Forever, weak, but trusting in God.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, April 12, 1879
Pendleton, Rice

Killed by Indians

The Grant County News has the following in regard to the finding of the remains of a man supposed to be Rice Pendleton, formerly of this county: “On the 29th day of April last, or one week since, having occasion to go to the house of Mr. John Brisbois in company with Mr. Joseph Hodson we were surprised and almost horrified to learn as soon as we arrived there, that the remains of a white man had been found by Mr. Brisbois on the 21st of April, and buried on  the 24th.  Mr. B. being alone, went to Beaver creek to get some one to assist him in burying the remains.  Mr. James Rage and Mr. Philander Mann came over and assisted in the performance of the last sad rites.  Mr. Brisbois is confident that the remains are those of a man by the name of Rice Pendleton, formerly a resident of Lane county, at or near Eugene City.  Supposed to be about 48 years of age.  A member of Eugene Lodge No. – I.O.O.F., also a granger.  Mr. Brisbois and Oliver Hyde had seen his card taken from his Lodge and read the same.  Mr. Brisbois was not positively certain as to his Christian name, but knew it to be Rice, Reis or Reese.  Deceased has a sister living at or near Eugene or Oregon City.  There is no doubt but what he was killed by the Indians as they passed through on the 27th or 28th of June last.  He either did not know that the Indians were hostel, or came to warn Brisbois and the Hyde Brothers of their danger.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, May 31, 1879



Another Victim of Indian Cruelty

Dayville, Ogn., May 6th, 1879
Editor News – On the 29th day of April last, or one week since, having occasion to go to the house of Mr. John Brisbois in company with Mr. Joseph Hodson we were surprised and almost horrified to learn as soon as we arrived there, that the remains of a white man had been found by Mr. Brisbois on the 21st of April, and buried on the 24th.  Mr. B. being alone, went to Beaver creek to get some one to assist him in burying the remains.  Mr. James Rager and Mr. Philander Mann came over and assisted in the performance of the last sad rites.  Mr. Brisbois is confident that the remains are those of a man by the name of Rice Pendleton, formerly a resident of Lane County, at or near Eugene City.  Supposed to be about 48 years of age.  A member of Eugene Lodge No. ---- I.O.O.F., also a Granger.  Mr. Brisbois and Oliver Hyde had seen his card taken from his Lodge and read the same.  Mr Brisbois was not positively certain as to his christian name, but knew it to be Rice, Reis or Reese.  Deceased has a sister living at or near Eugene or Oregon City.  There is no doubt but what he was killed by the Indians as the passed through on the 27th or 28th of June last.  He either did not know that the Indians were hostile, or came to warn Brisbois and the Hyde Brothers of their danger.

It may be proper to say that the locality indicated is known as the upper South Fork Valley and lies between Bear Valley and Beaver Creek.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 10, 1879
Ran, Caleb

Caleb Ran, an old and respected citizen of Grant county, was kicked by a horse ten days ago, from the effect of which he died.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, July 5, 1879



Serious Accident – Last Sunday morning while Mr. Caleb Ran was handling a stable horse he became vicious, wheeled and kicked, striking Mr. Ran in the side just below the ribs, from the effects of which he died on Monday morning about six o'clock.  From the time he received the injury until he died, his sufferings were intense.  Mr. Ran was one of he heavy cattle dealers of this county, and had accumulated quite a large fortune.  He was near 56 years old at the time of his death, and was born in Nova Scotia.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Luce, Ruhama

Died

At Canyon City, Grant county, Oregon, August 24th, 1879, Mrs. Rhuhama Luce; aged, 74 years, 6 months and 15 days.

Rhuhama Luce was the daughter of Wm. Polly Buckles; and was born near the city of Baltimore in the year of our Lord 1805.  She came with her parents to the State of Kentucky, New Chingburg county, and settled near the present town of Skilerville, on the Green river, in the year 1811.  In the year 1827 she married Jacob Luce.  In 1843 she removed with her husband and children to the then territory of Iowa and settled near the present town of Oskaloosa.    She there joined the Methodist Episcopal church, in 1845, and was a devoted Christian until her death.  In the year 1853 she, with her family and a number of friends and neighbors, crossed the plains to Oregon, and settled near Eugene City where they remained about twenty-five years.  Last Autumn she and her husband concluded to break up house keeping and go east of the mountains and live with their children the balance of their days which was, indeed, short, her husband dying on the fifth of March; preceding her five months and nineteen days.  She leaves seven children and twenty-five grand children to mourn her loss.

Fare you well most and loving mother.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, September 13, 1879



Obituary

Died at the residence of Chas. Belshaw, her son-in-law, in this county, Rhuhama Luce, widow of Jacob Luce, on the 24th of August, 1879.  Decease3d was born Feb. 8th, 1805, being seventy-four years, six months and fifteen days old at her death.

Rhuhama Luce was the daughter of Wm. And Polly Buckles, and was born near the city of Baltimore in the year of our Lord, 1805.  She came with her parents to the State of Kentucky, New Chingburg county, and settled near the present town of Skilerville, on the Green river, in the year of 1811.  In the years 1827 she married Jacob Luce.  In 1843 she removed with her husband and children to the then territory of Iowa ans settled near the present town of Oskaloosa.  She there joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 1845, and remained a devoted christian until her death.  In the year of 1853 she, with her family and a number friends and neighbors, crossed the plains to Oregon, and settled near Eugene City, and there remained about twenty-five years.  Last Autumn she and her husband concluded to break up house keeping and come East of the mountains and live with their children the balance of their days which was, indeed, short, her husband dying on the fifth of March; preceding her five month and nineteen days.  She leaves seven children and twenty-five grand children to mourn her loss.

Fare you well most and loving mother.    Wm. Luce

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, September 6, 1879
Wickham, Joseph

Death of Mr. Wickham

In a recent issue of the News under the caption of Notes from the Mines there appeared a paragraph, that Mr. Joseph Wickham, an old time resident in these parts, was engaged in placer mining at the Snake river diggings.  From a correspondent in that region we now learn that poor Joe, who was then spoken of a being in luck has been overtaken by a sad fate.  Mr. W's claims are situated in Alturas County, Idaho, on the northern bank of Snake river, about one above Salmon Falls.

Opposite this point on the Cassia county side of the stream, there is a trading post patronized by the miners in the vicinity.  Wickham and a man in his employ, named William Henry had occasion to visit the store on the 9th inst. and delayed their departure for the claim until night of the following day.  On their return they were accompanied by a Mr. Kelley.  Nearly midway of the stream, which at the crossing place is nearly three hundred yards [  ?  ] a frail skiff, un-[  ?  ] weather [  ?]

[Rest of the story has been cut off.]

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 24, 1879
Cobb, Osee

Osee has Climbed the Golden Stair

Died, of Pneumonia, at John Day City, May 31st, 1879, Osee S., infant son of Chas. B. and Mary E. Cobb, aged two months and eleven days.

The funeral service took place at the Grange Hall in John Day City.  Rev. A. Eads officiated.

Little Osee has bee removed to a more congenial atmosphere.  The Angel of death has opened the portals of Heaven and taken little Osee in, to mingle his sweetness with the angels, and share the tender glories of the Golden City.  Below are given a few expressive lines written by the grief stricken mother, and read by Mr. Eads at the close of the funeral Services.  They will touch a responsive chord in the hearts of other mothers who have bowed in sorrow over the delicate forms of their little ones.

Our baby is an angel fair,
Beyond all earthly woe.

No pain nor sickness enters there,
Nor death, the cruel foe.

Our little angel dropped asleep,
And we laid him down to rest
With his little dimpled hands
Placed upon his breast.

One more harp is turned in Heaven,
Mingled with the Angels fair,

And if we out hearts to Christ will give,
We shall meet our darling there.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Hamblin, James

Died – In Portland, Oregon, May 19th, 1879, James Hamblin, formerly of this place.  He was about 60 years of age.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Campbell, John

Died – At John Day City, June 4th, 1879.  Mr. John T. Campbell, aged 36 years.  He was buried under the auspices of the Masonic Fraternity on June 5th.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Edgar Child

Died – In this city, June 5th, 1879, youngest child of Mrs. George Edgar.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Adams, J. E.

Suicide – Mr. J. E. Adams, an old settler of this county, committed suicide by hanging himself on last Wednesday night, at the warm springs, about 13 miles below this city.  Mr. Adams was formerly a resident of Green county, Mo.  No cause is given for his rash act, except that he has been an invalid for a few years past.  He attempted to commit suicide a few months since, but without proving fatal.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 7, 1879
Perry, John

Killed – On last Tuesday afternoon while a man by the name of John Perry was working in a placer mine about three miles up Canyon Creek from this place, the bank caved in on him and he was crushed  to the ground.  Some Chinamen got him out but he was unable to speak until about 11 o'clock at night, when he told those watching him that could not live, after which he became unconscious and died about 1 o'clock of the same night.  He has no relatives in this country.  The funeral services took place on Wednesday.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, July 26, 1879
Boley, Henry

Died – In this city on Thursday, August 7th, 1879, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Boley, aged four days.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, August 9, 1879
Fag, Richard

Died – In this city on the 27th of August, 1879, Richard Fag.  “Dick” was the unfortunate sheep herder spoken of a few weeks ago.  No doubt he has dear friends who will be pained to hear of his death.  He has a brother in Portland, we are told.  Copy.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, September 6, 1879
Schodt, Otto

Died – At Prairie City on Aug. 31st 1879, Otto Schodt.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, September 6, 1879
Gillenwater, Joseph

Sad Accident – From Mr. J. J. Roberts we learn that J. C. Gillenwater Jr.; who lives about five miles above Prairie City was kicked by a stallion on last Monday night and after much suffering, death relieved him from pain on Tuesday, Sept. 23d.  The grief stricken parents have the undivided sympathy of the whole community.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, September 27, 1879
Roberts, J. J.

The Daily Bee says, “Mr. J. J. Roberts, of Prairie City, was kicked by a stallion Sept. 22d, and died next day.”

The above will be sad news to Mr. Roberts as well as to his boarders.  The same paper places the Princess Mine in Baker instead of Grant county.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, October 11, 1879
Austin, Inis

Died – At Middle Fork on the 6th inst., Inis V., aged 2 years and 4 months, daughter of Minot and Dilla Austin.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, October 11, 1879
Wilson, Perry

Died – On the morning of October 23d, 1879, at the residence of his parents on Long Creek, Perry, son of Prior A. and Sarah Jane Wilson, aged five years, eleven months and six days.

He was a kind child; loved by all and a general favorite among his brothers and sisters.  In his great agony of pain he would frequently engage in singing to his younger sisters to quiet them in their pains common to that dreadful disease, diphtheria.

East Oregonian, Albany Democrat and Mountaineer, please copy.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879
Wilson, Lulu

Died – On Long Creek, October 25th, 1879, Lulu, daughter of Prior A. and Sarah Jane Wilson, aged four years, nine months and twenty two days.

She has gone to accompany her little brother who was always pleasant and pleasing to her in their rambels [sic] and ploys.  The family have the sympathy of the whole community, in this their and bereavement.  Mountaineer, Albany Democrat and East Oregonian please copy.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879
Masikers, George

Died – At the residence of P. A. Wilson, on Long Creek, on the 22nd of October, George B. Masikers, of diphtheria, aged 19 years.

Mountaineer please copy.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879
DeMoss, James

Died – At Susanville, Ogn., on Oct. 28th, 1879, Jas. T. DeMoss aged about 30 years.  “Jimmie” was a native of Baltimore and intended to pay his parents, who now reside there, a visit this winter.  He leaves many warm friends here.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879
Hannah, George

Died – In this city, Saturday, Oct. 25th, 1879, Geo. Hannah, George was buried Sunday and his funeral was largely attended.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879
Fisk, Nathan

Mr. N. W. Fisk was buried last Thursday and was followed to his last resting place by, perhaps, the largest concourse of people that ever attended a funeral in Grant County.  His obituary notice will appear next week.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 1, 1879



Obituary

Nathan Willis Fisk, who departed this life on the 29th day of October inst., was at the time of his death, 59 years, 4 months and 10 days of age.  He was highly respected by all who knew him for his honestly, kindness, integrity and truth.  Was more willing to give of his earthly goods to feed the poor than to receive a reward therefor.  He was a firm believer in Christianity and died in the Christian faith.  He leaves a family, wife and ten children, with numerous relative and friends to mourn his loss.  Our loss, though falling heavily, we trust is his eternal gain.

As the Autumn leaves were fading and falling from the fruit trees which his own hands had aided in planting so passed he away.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 8, 1879
Woolsey, George

Died – In this city, Nov. 15th, 1879, George Jackson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Woolsey, aged 3 months.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 22, 1879
Rousman, Infant

Died – In this city, Nov. 14th, 1879, infant babe of Mr. and Mrs. George Rousman.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 22, 1879
Wilson, Homer

Died – At Monument, Oregon, on the 18th of Nov., 1879, Homer Vilott, son of Mrs. Sarah Jane Wilson, aged 15 years, 2 months and 16 days.

He is the third child that this family have lost within the last few weeks; and they have the sympathy of their many friends.

Mountaineer please copy.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 29, 1879
Dean, Theodore

Died – In this city on Wednesday, December 3d, 1879, T. P. Dean, aged 70 years.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, December 20, 1879
Stevens, Henry

Murder Most Foul

John Darby kills Henry Stevens In his own Bed with a Hatchet!

It is our duty as a Journalist to give the news of the day, but if we thought that such a case as the one we are now called upon to report should ever again present itself to us we would lay down our pen and take passage for heathedom.  But perhaps the like will never be known again.  The facts, in the main, are as follows:

About noon on Friday, January 9th, Darby met Stevens and asked him “if he had any whisky” Stevens said “yes, come down to the cabin and I will treat you.”  They went to Henry's cabin together and about one o'clock some man went to see Stevens and upon opening the door Darby raised up and asked “what in ---- he wanted, and he'd better get out ---- quick.”  About three o'clock a noise was heard inside and some one entered and found Darby on the floor besmearing his head in a pool of human blood, while on the bed lay Henry Stevens horribly beaten, bruised and bleeding.  The dying man told full particulars, which are too foul for even the Police papers to print.  It appears that Darby attempted to commit an unnatural and unmentionable crime upon Henry and when he offered resistance the hatchet was wrenched from him and in turn beaten by his assailant; thus bleeding and dying the poor, old man was at the mercy of this, worse than, hell-hound for near three hours.

The Coroners Jury returned a verdict that Henry Stevens came to his death by blows received from a hammer or hatchet in the hands of John Darby.  Darby has been in irons ever since.  Mr. Stevens was buried on Sunday last.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, January 17, 1880
Manwaring, John

Died – Near Prairie City on January 14th, 1880, John Manwaring.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, January 24, 1880
Hilton, Carrie

Died – At her home near this city, on Sunday February 8th, Mrs. Carrie E. Hilton, aged 17 years, three months and 19 days: Her funeral was the largest ever attended here.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, February 14, 1880
Baxter, John

Died – At Granite Creek, on the 10th inst. Mr. John Baxter.  Mr. Baxter was an old miner in the history of this county and was at the Monumental mine when he died.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, February 14, 1880
Zook, Moses

Died – At Prairie City, recently, Moses Zook.  Mr. Zook will be remembered as an old citizen of the Olive Creek District.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, February 28, 1880
Bristow, Harry

Homicide – At a School Meeting on North Fork, on Monday, 2nd inst., a man by the name of Harry Berstow and Gid. Beacham got into a quarrel about some cattle and after a few words Berstow threw his coat, drew his revolver around in front, at which time Beacham took a view of his peril and drew his revolver and shot Berstow in the abdomen killing him almost instantly.  It is said that Berstow was considered a desperate man.  An examination was held this week before McHalley, J. P., Col. Curry appearing for defendant, the result we have not heard yet.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, March 13, 1880
Hiatt, William

Died – In this city on Saturday, March 6th, 1880, Wm. Hiatt.

Deceased was born May 7th, 1830, and emigrated to this coast at an early day; and for a number of years has been a resident of Canyon City.  He was always known as a free and generous man, and done much in his day toward building the School House in this city and many other institutions in our midst.  He was one of the original men who instituted and put in order the cemetery where he now rests.  Peace to his ashes.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, March 13, 1880
Sargent, Mattie

Died – Near Prairie City, on Wednesday, March 10th, 1880, Mrs. Fred Sargent.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, March 13, 1880
McNeil, A.

Died – At Mountain Creek, this county, on  the 18th inst., Mr. A. McNeil.  He had been to a neighbor's and on his way home fell from his horse dead.  He was an old settler and well known in this vicinity.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, March 27, 1880
Claflin, William

In Memorium

William Phillip Claflin was born Feb. 5th, 1829.  He moved to Indiana in 1832- or – 3, where he remained till 1852, when he came to the West.  He had lived in Oregon about sixteen years when he died, April 27th, 1879, leaving a wife and three small children to mourn the loss of loving husband and father.  But their loss is his gain; for he died happy, believing in the redemption which is in Christ Jesus.

He was one of Grant County's oldest and most respected citizens.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, April 17, 1880
Lee, Unknown

A little child of J. W. Lee's, of North Fork, was scalded to death recently by falling into a pot of hot water that had been left in the little one's way.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, April 24, 1880
Turk, Edward

E. E. Turk, of This City, Commits Suicide

On last Thursday evening about 7 o'clock and 20 minutes the citizens of this quiet town were thrown into a fever of excitement by the announcement that E. E. Turk had shot himself.  At the time the shot was fired we were setting in front of the Hotel and Mr. Williamson called our attention to the pistol report, and at the same time H. Stanislasky stepped to the store door and called for help and Messrs. Bryer, Woolsey and T. Howard being near were soon at the side of the dying man.  We arrived on the spot at about the same instant and found Ned lying at full length on the floor, in the room in the rear of the store room.  He was bleeding fearful, and pools of blood were near his head, and in less than 15 minutes his spirit had passed to its maker.  On examination it was found that the ball had entered his right temple and passed through the brain causing almost instant death.

The particulars show that he had been much depressed all day and in the evening was in the store at his desk and after a deep study of a few minutes passed to the room at the end of the store, and while passing Stanislawsky asked him how he felt and received the answer 'no better'.  He opened the door, went in, shut the door and soon after fired the fatal shot.  Mrs. Turk and Stanislawsky were the only ones in the store at the time.  A coroners jury was summoned and after taking testimony rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts

The following letter explains itself:
Canyon City April 29th, 6:30 A.M.

Dear Bro. Hazeltine – Last night I was robbed of Lodge funds – amounting to over Four Hundred dollars – God knows I would not wrong my Lodge out of a cent.  If I do not recover it to-day I am lost.  Remember me kindly to the members of my Lodge.  Last night I did not sleep a moment thinking over my misfortune, but I hope I will not suffer much longer.  I have but few friends and you are one of them.  God bless you and look out for my little ones.  This is my last.

Yours in F. L. & T.

E. E. Turk

The funeral services will take place from the Odd Fellows Hall to-day at 2 o'clock, P.M.

He leaves a wife and six small children.

Below is found Dr. Howard's testimony:

My name is J. W. Howard, age, 37 years, occupation is Doctor of Medicine residence, Canyon City, Grant County.

I was acquainted with the deceased during his life time.

His name was E. E. Turk, his occupation was that of a merchant, his residence, Canyon City, Grant County, Oregon.

I was called to this room this evening, about 7 ½ o'clock, having been called to see Mr. Turk, by Stanislawsky, he saying that Turk had shot himself in the head.

When I arrived here, he was dying.  He was totally unconscious and lived but a short time after I arrived.  I have not yet examined the wound thoroughly and would not be able to describe the wound of the deceased, without further examination I will proceed and make an examination, if you desire.

The witness then proceeds to examine the wound and gives the following description of the same:

Upon examination of the wound of deceased, I find that a ball has entered the skull at a point on the right side, corresponding to the articulation of the frontal, temporal and parietal bones; ranging obliquelo upward and backward, traversing the cerebrum, making its exit on the left side of the head at a point of the parietal bone at about its central portion.

I find the skull to be crushed between the points of entrance and exit.

I find from appearances that the weapon was discharged at or very near the head; the hair and scalp showing evidence of powder burn.

I am satisfied that this wound caused the death of the deceased.

J. W.  Howard, M.D.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 1, 1880
Cobb, Infant

Died – In John Day, on Tuesday, April 27th, 1880, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cobb.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 1, 1880
Dustin, Infant

Died – Near this city, Tuesday last, infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. M. Dustin.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 8, 1880
Keller, Phillip

Mr. Phillip Keller, an old resident here, was eating supper at the city Hotel on last Sunday evening, and from some cause, after a few struggles, dropped dead in his chair.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 8, 1880
McDowell, William

The measles are raging at John Day.  On last Thursday Mr. and Mrs. Wm. McDowell, of that place, buried one of their children.


Died – At John Day, on the 26th, William Lawson McDowell, age, 9 months, 6 days.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 29, 1880
Anderson, Levy

Died – At Prairie City, May 30th, 1880, Mr. Levy Anderson.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 5, 1880
Johnson, John

Died
At his home, on Jan. 14, 1888, John Johnson, aged 22 years, 4 months and 24 days.  To the bereaved parents and relatives, friends extend their heart felt sympathies.  Farewell Johnny.  Peace be to your ashes.  Weep not dear Mother, trust in God and be comforted.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, January 19, 1888
Reynolds, Charles

A report was brought to town that Chas. Reynolds died at Quartzburg, near Prairie City, last Saturday night, and was buried Monday.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, January 12, 1888
Clark, Marilla

Died – In this city on last Tuesday evening, Mrs. M. C. Clark, wife of W. H. Clark.

Mrs. Clark was aged 30 years and 8 months.  She was a loving wife and a devoted mother.  She leaves four children and a husband to mourn her sudden and untimely death.  Mr. Clark and children have the sympathy of this community.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 26, 1880



The funeral sermon of Mrs. W. H. Clark will be delivered by Rev. R. G. Hawn at the M. E. Church at 11 o'clock to-morrow.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, July 3, 1880
Abbott, John
Bethune, Duncan


Two miners, Duncan A. Bethune and John Abbott, were instantly killed in the Union shaft Friday morning by the falling of a wall plate, which slipped from the 900 foot level and struck the men at the 2,500 foot level.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, July 10, 1880
Shaw, Enos

Died – On Long Creek, July 3d, a son of Mr. Shaw, aged about 7 years.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, July 17, 1880
Lockwood, Alonzo

Drowned – On last Monday evening about half past five o'clock the citizens of this city were startled by the report that Alonzo Lockwood was drowning in the swimming hole below town.  Many citizens were soon at the place and every effort was made to find the boy, as he had sunk to the bottom before aid could be called.  It seems that Chas. Dustin, a typo of this office, Geo. Currey, Jr., and Alonzo Lockwood had gone to the hole to take a swim.  George did not go in the water, but Charlie and deceased did.  They had hardly entered before, from some unknown cause, perhaps the rupturing of his lungs, as the water was very cold, Alonzo began to sink and had gone down before the other boys knew what was the matter, at which time George rode up to town for help and Charlie proceeded to aid his companion, and was taken down once with the drowning boy.  When aid arrived he was no more.  A number of the citizens made vigorous efforts to dive and find him, but until Geo. Gundlach rode up to his store and procured a grab hook and returned, and by dragging the hole with it, was he found and brought to shore.  Dr. Howard was on hand but after examination he was fully satisfied that life was totally extinct.  The boy was taken to the Masonic Hall and was there worked with, but to no purpose.  It was a sad affair as his father, deputy sheriff of this county, was, and is yet lying very low, and the boy was only a few days before summoned home to see his sick father.  He was about 17 years old and was his mother's pride and his father's hope.  He leaves a father, mother, three smaller brothers and a sister, as well as many friends to mourn his untimely death.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the whole county.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, July 24, 1880
Woolsey, Safrona

Died – In this city, on Wednesday, Aug. 4th, 1880, Mrs. John Woolsey.   The departed leaves a husband and two children, besides many friends to mourn her loss.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, August 7, 1880
Rappe, Louis

Died

Fort McKenney, Wyoming
Aug. 5th, 1880

S. H. Shepherd, Sir :- Louis Rappe died yesterday morning, caused by bursting of the main artery of the heart.

The deceased was formerly a resident of Grant County.  Came to this Territory in '76.  Was in charge of the Post saw mill at the time of his death.  Was highly respected by all who knew him.

I believe he has some relatives near Prairie City, if such is the case, and if they need any information concerning him, I will comply to those wishes.

Respectfully Yours,
Peter McGinnis

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, August 28, 1880
Reeves, Elizabeth

Died – At Bloomfield, Iowa, on Monday Aug. 23d., 1880, Mrs. Elizabeth Reeves, wife of A. S. Reeves.

Thus has departed the last sister of the editor of this paper.  She goes to the unseen future to rest with our dear mother and five loving sisters, who have gone before.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, September 11, 1880
Shepherd, James

Died – In Keosauqua, Iowa, on Tuesday, September, 14th, 1880, at 1 o'clock, p.m., Father James Shepherd, aged 89 years and six months.  He was buried on the 15th in the honors of Masonery.  A full obituary will appear next week.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, October 2, 1880


Father James Shepherd

The subject of this notice was born in the state of Maryland on the 15th day of March, 1800. He moved to Clinton County, Ohio, with his parents in 1803, where he resided till 1827. March 7th, 1821, he was united in marriage to Jane Sherman with whom he lived a joyous and happy life till Sept. 22nd, 1870, when death came and took his companion from his side after a journey of almost fifty years together. In the spring of 1872, he emigrated from Ohio and settled in Sangamon county Illinois, remaining there till October, 1844, when he again went west and located in Keosauqua, Iowa. While living in Illinois, he held several positions of honor and trust, having been several times elected assessor and collector of Sangamon county, and was Colonel of the State Militia for several years. He was an intimate of both Douglass and Lincoln, and he had on several occasions met and discussed the political issues of the day with Mr. Lincoln and other whig speakers on the stump. In 1840 he became a resident of Springfield, Illinois, and assisted in the editorial department of the "Illinois State Register." In July, 1843, he fitted out an office and sent his oldest son, J. M. Shepherd, and J. L. T. Mitchell, both young men, and practical printers, with the office to Keosauqua, Iowa, where he had been and made all necessary arrangements for the starting of a paper to be called the Iowa Democrat. The name of the paper was changed by the publishers, however, and was called the Iowa Democrat, and Des Moines River Intelligencer, and run as an independent paper, Mr. Mitchell being a whig. In July, 1844, he again visited Keosauqua and bought the interest of Mr. Mitchell and started the paper on its second year as a democratic paper, as it was first designed. In October, 1844, he moved to Keosauqua with his family, and continued the publication of the "Iowa Democrat," which was the only paper off the Mississippi river and south of Iowa City, till 1850, when he sold the office. In 1860, he with his son, J. S. Shepherd; (now editor of the Corydon Democrat,) bought the Des Moines News office at Keosauqua, which paper they continued to publish till 1865, when they sold the office and went out of the publishing business. Col. Shepherd was a prominent politician in his younger days; was elected to the territorial council in 1846, and in later yard was several times supported by his party for the legislature and other positions.

He was extensively known in Southern Iowa, having been engaged in the hotel business at Keosauqua for many years, when travel by stages was the only mode of conveyance.

He united with the M. E. Church about the year 1836, and continued a consistent and zealous member till the hour of his death. In 1872 he was licensed to preach, and the latter years of his life he dedicated almost wholly to the work of the Divine Master. He was also an honored and worthy member of the Masonic order, having been a worker in speculative masonry for upwards of forty years. He was a charter member of Keosauqua Lodge, No. 10, and was its Master for Many years. He was also a R. A. Master and a member of the council. He filled the office of Junior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, and was Deputy Grand High Priest in 1864. He was a lover of the institution and his counsel was sought by the brethren of the fraternity on many ritualistic points and disputed ancient landmarks. He was always warmly greeted when present at the meetings of the Grand Lodge, and was called a "father in Masonry," as well as a "father of Israel."

He was the father of thirteen children, six daughters and seven sons. The six daughters have been called hence one by one, till they have all gone before, the last one proceeding him only two weeks, and two sons were taken away in their infancy leaving five sons, two of whom live in Oregon, to mourn his departure.

He made two trips to the Pacific coast, one in 1870, and again in 1878 returning the last time in October, 1879. His last hours were like the still waters of the Jordon, calm--not a ripple on the face--and the breath of life passed away like the strains of sweet music--he went to sleep in the arms of Jesus, who, he said a few hours before, was his hope and his salvation, and all was bright beyond. His remains were laid away by the side of his companion, in the cemetery at Keosauqua Iowa, by the masonic fraternity, under the direction of Keosauqua Lodge, No 10 on Wednesday afternoon, September 15th, 1880.

J. S. S.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, October 9, 1880
Officer, Mary

Died – Near Prairie City on Sept. 23d, Mrs. E. C. Officer – nee Steele.  She left two babies two weeks old.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, October 2, 1880
French, T. D.

Edward Murphy, tried at Pendleton last week for the murder of T. D. French, near Jefferson last spring was found guilty of murder in the first degree.  He was sentenced on the 13th instant, to be “hanged by the neck until he was dead” on Wednesday, the 5th day of January next, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, November 20, 1880
Jackson, Martha

In Potosi, Wis., Nov. 6, 1880, Mrs. Martha A. Jackson, wife of C. M. Jackson.

Death has again visited our community and taken form the scenes and associations of this life, one of its most esteemed and useful members – Mrs. Martha A. Jackson.

Martha A. as born in Pike, on of the Mississippi counties of northern Missouri, Oct. 3, 1831.  She was the eldest of a family of four sons and five daughters of F. H. and Mary Ann Bonham.  In the year 1840 the family came to Wis. and settled in a locality called Hurricane, in the town of Lancaster, Grant county, eight years before this became one of the states of the American Union.  The family has since become widely separately, the father at 74 and the mother at 68 years of age, still living in the town of Lancaster, one sister in the town of Potosi, one in Iowa, and one sister and three brothers in far away Oregon.  One brother and one sister have gone before her to the eternal home.  She was married to Mr. Jackson in 1846 and they settled on a farm he still owns five miles north of this place.  She was the mother of eleven children, two sons and nine daughters, two of whom, a son and a daughter, she has followed to the grave.  Three daughters are married and are residents of the town; and the other children are members of the home circle.  In 1869 her religious feelings became quickened and she made a public profession of faith in Jesus Christ, and joined the Free Baptist church in that neighborhood.  Upon coming to reside in the village of Potosi she at once identified herself with the cause here by becoming an important helper among Christian people; and desiring, after a time, a truer and more consistent avowal of her discipleship, she presented herself to the Congregational church and was received into its fellowship Feb. 17, 1880.  During the past year she continued to fail in health, and the best medical skill was set at naught by the ravages of an apparently incurable disease.  Not many days since she became worse and sank rapidly, expiring last Saturday afternoon, November 6, 1880.  - Lancaster Herald.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, December 4, 1880
Armstrong, Sarah

Died, at her home near Prairie City, Nov. 23rd, 1880, of Pleuro Pneumonia, Mrs. Sarah Ann Armstrong, wife of Alexander Armstrong, aged thirty-two years and six months.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, December 4, 1880
Howell, Jimmie

Prairie City Items
May 3d.

Died, April 26th, of Measels, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Howell.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, May 6, 1882
Cameron, Matilda

Died, in Canyon City, Sept. 2, 1886, of consumption, Mrs. Matilda Cameron, wife of J. A. Cameron.  Funeral took place on the afternoon of the following day, followed by a large concourse of friends.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, September 9, 1886
Mael, Infant

Died, April 25, 1887, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Mael.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 28, 1887
Kimball, Martha

Died, April 13th, 1887, near Dayville, Martha, daughter of C. F. and B. E. Kimball, aged six years.  About three months ago her clothing caught fire from an open fireplace, and she was badly burned, which caused her death.  The parents wish to tender their thanks to all who aided them in their troubles and distress.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 28, 1887
Fisk, Melvina

Mrs. Melvina E. Fisk is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hardman, who have resided in the John Day valley since 1868.  Their daughter, Melvina, was born in Lebanon, Linn county, in this State, October 19, 1856, which makes her nearly thirty-one years of age.  She and her now bereaved husband, W. R. Fisk, were married April 7th, 1872, and now leaves to his care and future guidance five children, three boys and two girls, the youngest, being a boy, three years old.

The death of Mrs. Fisk was brought about by too much exertion on her own part.  Dr. Rinearson was in attendance from the beginning of the sickness, on Wednesday last, and called to his aid for consultation, Dr. Howard, of your city.  All that medical assistance could do, and nothing was left undone, was of no avail and about 2 o'clock p.m., Sunday, Mrs. Fisk was no more of the earthly throng.

Preparations had been made for a time of gayety in this place to day by the Odd Fellows, but owing to the sad accident and death of Mrs. Fisk, who belongs to a branch of the order; the day was spent by the order in performing one of its sacred duties – burying the dead.

The Funeral

At 12 o'clock to-day the school bell was sounded, the Odd Fellows and Rebekas met at their hall, and headed by the Canyon City and Prairie City Brass Bands, marched to the family residence of the deceased, and after the necessary deliberations proceeded to Grange hall, where the services of the Order were held.

The latter hall was crowded to its utmost capacity and there were many who could not gain admission.

Headed by the Brass Bands, the funeral proceeded by slow step to the graveyard, where after appropriate exercises and singing, the beloved daughter, the kind and loving wife, the dutiful mother and kind friend's mortality was left to moulder in the grave; her spirit in trust and belief, rests in the bosom of her Father and her God.

The funeral, conducted by the I.O.O.F. throughout, was the largest ever witnessed here, the procession being fully half a mile in length and marching in close file at that.  There was very large circle of mourners to pay a last tribute of respect to deceased.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 28, 1887
Ballance, Cyrus

Cyrus Ballance, a man of about forty years old, who has been employed by John Wolfinger the past three years, died at Mr. Wolfinger's farm on Indian creek last Saturday morning.  His death was the output of a protracted drunk.  Mr. Wolfinger was owing him enough to meet all demands of burial and other incidental expenses.  Dr. Rinearson was the physician in attendance.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 28, 1887
Banzet, Gus

Died, at Prairie City, Jan. 22, 1888, Gus Banzet, brother of Albert Banzet of that place.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, January 26, 1888
Boley, Infant

Died, Feb. 3d, 1888, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Boley.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, February 9, 1888
Keeton, Unknown

Died, at their home on Pine creek, in the Malheur country, the wife of Robt. Keeton.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, February 16, 1888
Lee, Infant

Long Creek Correspondence
Long Creek, March 9th, '88

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Lee died last Thursday.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, March 15, 1888
Laurance, Child

The little child of Mr. and Mrs. Buck Laurance, which was about two years old, was drowned yesterday, by falling into the spring.  The funeral will take place to-day.  The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the entire community.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, March 22, 1888
China Jim

A Dead Chinaman

China Jim Shot and Killed by Antone Moura

Last Saturday a homicide was enacted a short distance from John Haycock's ranch, on the John Day river, resulting in the instant death of a Chinaman, by the name of Jim, who was at the time engaged in herding sheep for David Luce.  He was killed by Antone Moura, a native of Portuagl, who was herding his own sheep near the scene, the crime, we understand, being the outgrowth of a quarrel about the sheep range.

Jim was shot in the stomach, with a rifle, the ball passing through his body and lodging in the spine, and the supposition is that death was instantaneous, and that the Chinaman did not see the person who fired the shot, as he was walking up a hill, while his assailant was at the top, just over the brow of the hill.

After the tragedy, Moura came to town and gave himself up to the sheriff, and upon a preliminary examination, was held to answer for the crime of murder in the first degree.  His partner was placed under $250 bonds to appear as a witness.

A jury was empaneled on Monday, Wm. Miller acting Coroner, and verdict rendered to the affect that deceased came to his death on March 24th, from the affects of a gunshot wound inflicted by Antone Moura.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, March 29, 1888
McEwin, Nat

A young man named Nat McEwin, living near Haystack, met with a sad death on Thursday of last week.  He was taking a team from the field where he had been plowing, and one of the horses becoming unruly, jerked McEwin off his feet – the young man unfortunately having the rope wrapped around his hand – and was thus dragged to death.  He was a very steady, hardworking, young man, and the sympathy of the entire neighborhood is with his aged mother.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, March 29, 1888
Randig, William

Died, in Canyon City, April 7, 1888, Wm. P. Randig, native of Prussia.  Mr. Randig has been employed in the meat market of Wm. P. Gray for several months, and was owner of a tract of land in Bear Valley.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 12, 1888
Miller, John

Died, at his home, twelve miles up Canyon Creek, of lung fever, on April 27, 1888, John B. Miller.  Mr. Miller was an old pioneer of this county, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.  He leaves a number of relatives and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.  The funeral occurred at this place on Sunday last, conducted by Rev. J. H. Wood, when the remains of the deceased were followed to their last resting place in the Canyon City cemetery, by a large concourse of mourners.


In Memoriam

Died, at his residence on Canyon Creek, April 27, 1888, John B. Miller, aged 54 years four months and five days.

Obituary

John B. Miller was born in the State of Illinois on the 22nd day of December, 1833.  In the year of 1847, being then a boy of 14 years, he left his native State and crossed the plains, arriving in Lane county, Oregon the same year.

From the year of 1847 until the year of 1863, John continued to reside in that county.  In the year of 1863 the gold excitement caused John to leave his home in Lane county, being then in the prime of his manhood, he came to this county, which at that early day was a part of Wasco county, arriving on Canton Creek in the Summer of 1863.

From that time until the date of his death he has been a resident of Grant county, and honored by all who knew him.  By his industry he had built himself a comfortable home on Canyon Creek, and there ceased his earthly labors.  Few men have died here whose loss will be so sincerely and deeply mourned as he who is the subject of the notice.  His death has case a cloud of sorrow over this community and many a silent tear was shed by those who knew him best.

During his long residence in Grant county he so conducted himself as to win the confidence, friendship and esteem of all who knew him.

By his death we are reminded that a good citizen, an honest man, a true friend, a kind and affectionate brother has departed from our midst forever.  Yet the name of John B. Miller will live in the minds of the people of Grant County until they are called to meet him in the great unknown beyond.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, May 3, 1888
Bright, James

For His Money

J. M. Bright, of Harney Valley, Found Murdered

Supposed To Have Carried Money

From parties who came in from Harney valley last Monday, we learn of a murder which occurred on Rock Creek, about six miles from Cow Creek, sometime the latter part of last week.

James M. Bright, a resident of the valley, and a steady, industrious man, was the victim.  He frequently carried large sums of money about his person, and this fact confirms the universal belief that money was the object which moved the arm of the slayer.  Mr. Bright followed the avocation of peddling during he summer months, and would take his team to the railroad and bring back a load to sell, returning with whatever freight he could pick up on the way.

The facts in the case, regarding the murder, as near as we have been able to learn, are that the man was on his way from Ontario to Harney with what goods he had left over after peddling along the road, and while on Rock creek, on the road from Drewsey, he was shot through the heart with a rifle by some one concealed by the roadside.  His team was found – it was supposed the next day – a few rods ahead, still attached to the wagon, but one of the horses down, and blood on the wagon seat and one of the single trees, where the unfortunate man had fallen when shot.  Further search revealed the body of Bright hidden in a clump of bushes, underneath a pile of rocks, with a ghastly wound in each side of his breast where the bullet had gone through, but no money about his person, nor could any be found among his effects.

The road between Drewsey and Harney is scarcely ever traveled, and the bold highway assassin knowing that Mr. Bright was in the neighborhood, and knowing also that he was likely to have considerable money about him, laid in wait for his unsuspecting victim, and committed the fearful deed, realizing that the chances for his capture and punishment were few.  In that thinly populated country his opportunities for escape were indeed many, but we hope to see the citizens take the matter in hand and not rest until the wretched offender of the laws of God and man is made to feel the just punishment which the nature of his crime demands.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, May 10, 1888
Phillips, J. H.

Died

At his home in Canyon City, May 10, 1888, Mr. J. H. Phillips, a native of Cornwall, England, aged 77 years, 7 months and 3 days.

Deceased came to this camp during he early gold excitement, and built for himself and estimable wife a comfortable home, at which they have resided since.  He was loved and respected for his generosity, and leaves a large circle of friends to mourn his departure.

The funeral occurred Saturday, from the Catholic church, and was attended by a large concourse of people.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, May 17, 1888
Pope, Madie

A little daughter of Jas. Pope, living down the river, died of scarlet fever last week.  She was aged about four years.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, May 24, 1888
Scroggins, Thomas

Long Creek Lyrics
Long Creek, May 25th, '88

The funeral of the late T. F. Scroggins was attended by everybody in the vicinity.  The Masonic brethren from Canyon City and John Day were unable to attend.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, May 31, 1888
Lockwood, Robert

Murder Most Foul!

Robert Lockwood, Deputy Sheriff and Jailer, Assassinated.

Pat McGinnis and Buccaroo Jim Escape

Have Been Captured, and Will Expiate their Crime on the Gallows!!

Scarcely within the history of this county has the community been thrown into such a fervor of excitement as was occasioned by the killing of jailer Lockwood by the prisoners confined in the county jail, on the evening of July 5th, and their subsequent escape from confinement, and recapture.

As was his custom, Mr. Lockwood went to the jail about 9:30 in the evening to see that everything was all right.  Residents of the vicinity of the Court house heard two shots fired shortly after that hour, in rather rapid succession, which attracted no attention at the time, but which afterward proved to be so full of import.  Becoming alarmed at his prolonged absence from home his wife made inquires, and search was instituted.  His office door was found unlocked, and then the horrible truth flashed upon the searchers.  A light was procured, and they entered the jail corridor, the door of which was ajar.  There they met the object of their search, lying in the doorway to the iron cell, cold in death, with a ghastly wound in the back of his head, and the two prisoners to whom he had always been so kind and attentive were nowhere to be found.

This was near one o'clock in the morning, and after caring for the remains of the deceased the citizens were aroused and searching parties sent in every direction after the escaped prisoners.  Upon the convening of the County court in the morning a reward of $500 each was offered for the capture and return of the prisoners, and Sheriff Gray offered a reward of $250 each, making in all, $1,500.  Towards evening Joe Combs came to town after reinforcements, reporting that McGinnis was hiding in the brush near Alex Fisher's ranch down the river.  Every man and boy in town who could procure a gun joined the party, and about 60 or 70 persons repaired to the scene of action, arriving there shortly after dark.  Fisher's family were in communication with the culprit, having given him breakfast that morning, and were cooking something for him to take with him as soon  as night should fall.  Upon being promised a sum of money they divulging his hiding place, and in company with Joe Ivey, Hank Workins and Bill Whit persuaded McGinnis to come out of his hiding place, when he was taken into custody.  Hank loaded the prisoner on his buckboard, and passing the guard at the bridge, with his team on the run, came to town and delivered him to the sheriff.

A party went in search of the Indian, also, and as they has supposed, he took a course direct for the Indian camps in the Malheur.  As an extra precaution they had placed guards around the camp and captured the arms and cayuses.  “Buccaroo Jim” was found about six miles from Indian John's camp, about 16 miles from Drewsey.  He was first seen by Joe Prewett, and when he discovered that he was pursued he hoisted a white flag.  There were about six persons in this party, and they arrived here with him late on Sunday evening.

McGinnis had been confined in prison since last May, on a charge of horse stealing, and the Indian was awaiting the action of the next grand jury, charged with the murder of J. M. Bright in Harney valley.  Before each knew the other was captured they told conflicting stories in regard to the killing of the jailer and their escape.  Pat McGinnis even attempted to make believe that Lockwood committed suicide.  All will come out before Court meets in November, as one or both of them will make a confession and all will be plain enough.  Should sufficient proof be obtained these two fiends will end their miserable existence on the gallows, and justice will prevail.  They will have a fair and impartial trail – we predict by an intelligent jury, for good and responsible men learned a lesson at the Spring term of Court, 1887, and will not make or express an opinion merely for the sake of escaping jury duty, but will use their influence to see that justice is meted out to offenders of the laws of God and man.

The coroner's Jury, held by N. Rulison, acting coroner, found that the deceased came to his death on the night of July 5th, from a pistol shot inflicted by Pat McGinnis or “Buckaroo Jim,”  prisoners confined in the county jail.

A post-mortem examination was held and the bullet which killed him found in the front part of the brain, a little to the left of the center.  It entered just under the occipital bone in the center, and cut the spinal cord.

LATER – The Indian has made a statement to the effect that McGinnis did the shooting, and showed in what manner it was done.  A preliminary examination is being held before Justice of the Peace N. Rulison, but up to the hour of going to press nothing of importance has been ascertained, farther than the facts above stated.

Robert Lockwood had acted in the capacity of deputy sheriff of Grant county for eight years, and prided himself upon his record as an officer.  It was rather a singular fact that after that long a time he should meet death in the very last hours of his service in that capacity.  Mr. Gray had taken charge of the office that very day, but retained Mr. Lockwood until the day following.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, July 12, 1888


The remains of Robt. Lockwood were interred in the city cemetery on Saturday, July 7, under direction of Homer Lodge No. 78 Ancient Order of United Workmen.  He was born in Australia, and was aged 45 years.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, July 12, 1888
Duncan, George

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Duncan's son, who it will be remembered was accidentally shot by his cousin over on Beech creek some three years ago, after suffering all this time from the wound, died at his home in John Day last Thursday night and was buried Friday afternoon in the Canyon City cemetery.  His age was something over 21 years.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, August 16, 1888
Gentry, James

Willie Gentry of whose sickness we made mention last week, died Thursday, and the funeral rites were observed of Friday.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, August 16, 1888


Died, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Trowbridge, of typhoid fever, James William, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Gentry, aged 22 years, 1 month and 19 days.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, August 16, 1888
Whitworth, Dellis

Died, at his home on the upper South Fork, Aug. 27, 1888, of consumption, Dellis Whitworth, aged 26 years, 7 months and 10 days.  The request of the deceased was that he be buried at Canyon City and his  remains were brought in Tuesday, and the funeral occurred Wednesday morning.  He leaves a mother and two brothers and many friends to mourn his loss.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, August 30, 1888
Brown, W. H.

Homicide at Burns

Report comes from Burns of the killing of W. H. Brown of that place by Wm. Page on the evening of Sept. 8.

The particulars, as near as we have been able to learn, are to the effect that during the day Saturday there had been trouble between the two men, and several times Brown had exhibited a knife, with the remark that he would “stick that into Bill Page before midnight.”

About 6 o'clock they met in the saloon, and hot words ensued.  Page told Brown to go away, as he (Brown) was too old a man for him to have any trouble with.  Remonstrances were of no avail, and Brown knocked him down.  Page rose and commenced shooting.  Four of five shots were fired, either one of which would have proven fatal.

Page was placed under arrest and being closely guarded.  He will have an examination before, the justice of the peace to-day at Burns.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, September 13, 1888
Isaacs, James

Tuesday morning of last week D. L. Shirk shot and killed a lad named Jas. Isaacs in Catlow valley.  Shirk came into town Thursday evening and gave himself up to the proper authorities.  Justice Rulison placed him under $5,000 bonds to appear at the preliminary trial next Monday, that being considered as early as witnesses could be obtained.  He gave bonds for his appearance, and left.  A great deal could be said regarding the case, but we make no comments, trusting the law will deal justly with all.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, September 27, 1888
Davis, Ben

Ben, son of W. B. Davis of Prairie City, was kicked on the head by a horse last week and for several days his life was despaired of.  At last accounts he was in a very critical condition.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, October 18, 1888
Elliott, Rossie

In memory of little Rossie Raymond, infant son of W. C. and Annie Elliott, who died September 26, 1888, aged 11 months and one day.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, October 18, 1888
Elliott, William

ELLIOTT – At his home in Strawberry valley, near Prairie City, Oct. 27, 1888, of lung fever, after a few days illness, Mr. Wm. C. Elliott.

Mr. Elliott was one of the pioneer settlers of Grant county, and by his taking off the entire community loses an exemplary citizen, and his faithful wife and orphaned little ones feel their loss bitterly, for to them no one can be as the affectionate husband and father.

The funeral Monday was conducted by Hobah Lodge, I.O.O.F., of which he was a member, and a large concourse of friends followed his remains to their final resting place in the Prairie City cemetery.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, November 1, 1888
Mueller, Henry

MUELLER – Henry Mueller, at his home on Beech creek, this county, Oct. 29, 1888, of pneumonia, aged about 38 years.

Deceased was unmarried, but leaves a sister to mourn, who came from Germany to make her home with her brother a few years ago.  A “man among men” has been called to the great beyond, and whoever knew him will cherish his memory.

The remains were interred yesterday in the Canyon City cemetery.


Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, November 1, 1888

Humburd, Lanna

Died, at Caleb, Or., Oct. 28, 1888, old lady Humburt, mother of Mose Hart, Mrs. Russell, and Wm. And Jack Humburt.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, November 8, 1888
Dore, Amy

Died

DORE – At her home in Canyon City, Nov. 1, 1888, Amy, wife of A. C. Dore, aged 37 years.

About 24 hours after becoming the mother of the three baby girls Mrs. Dore was called from earth to mingle with the happy throng in a better land.  The funeral took place Saturday from the M. E. church, under direction of Homer Lodge, A.O.U.W., and was largely attended by the numerous friends of the departed.  One of the little ones having died, it was placed in the grave with its mother.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, November 8, 1888
Bates, Elbert

The little three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bates of Prairie City died during the week, of lung fever, and was buried in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Prairies City last Monday.  The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of every one in this their sad bereavement.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, December 13, 1888
Flageolette, Frank

Died, Dec. 18, 1888, at his home in Prairie City, of pneumonia, Mr. Frank Flageolette, a respected and worthy citizen of that place.  Mr. Flageolette has been sick for some time, and gradually grew worse until death claimed him.  The funeral occurred yesterday, conducted by the Masonic and Odd Fellow societies, of which he was an honored member.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, December 20, 1888
Taber, Clark

Pioneer Dead

Clark Taber, Red Boy Mining Man Passed Away

A telegram received in this city yesterday announced the death of Mr. Clark Taber in Portland at 7 o'clock the evening previous and the news passed from one friend of the deceased to another.  Expressions of sorrow were heard on every hand for Clark Taber had indelibly imprinted with all his many friends of scores of years in this community a lasting friendship and loyalty that will go into eternity.

A few weeks ago Mr. Taber underwent an operation at the Portland Sanitarium at Mr. Tabor and it was thought for a time that he would recover but old age could not withstand the shock.

Mr. Taber was aged about 70 years and came to Baker county nearly 40 years ago, settling in the Sumpter and Granite districts where he engaged in mining and in merchandising.  He was one of the first locators and owners of the widely known Red Boy mine.  After several years of development of that property, together with Oscar O. Benson, deceased, he admitted E. J. Godfrey as a partner.  The property was successfully operated and about ten years ago the property was sold to a foreign corporation, now owning it for a sum that made Taber, Godfrey and Benson a comfortable fortune each.

Mr. Taber then removed to Portland where he has since resided with his daughter.  He invested his money in real estate and was quite successful, his estate at the time of his death being considerable.

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, July 9, 1908
Moore, Infant

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Moore died at their home near Mt. Vernon Tuesday.  The child had always been weakly, the organs of circulation not having properly developed.  It is also learned that the young son of Mr. Moore is also quite ill.

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, January 24, 1904
Schmidt, Oscar

Untimely End

Oscar Schmidt Died in Early Manhood's Promise

The death of Oscar Schmidt at his home in Bear Valley last Thursday morning was inexpressibly sad.  It is not, as has so often been said that Death loves or shuns a shining mark.  The choice of the great Harvester whose name is Death, falls with a blunt and seemingly cruel disregard of social worth and position.  And this time the selection was one of ranked high in private life and public esteem.

Although always sorrowful, death has always its alleviating circumstances.  When the very young die, the care, expense and Solicitude of development have only just begun.  When the very aged are gathered, the costs may have been long recompensed.  But when the pride and strength of young manhood is made to bow before the grim Reaper, it is only the courage in a life well spent and hope in a country through whose portals Death alone can lead, that can assuage the grief of relatives and friends.  And when Oscar died this courage and hope were always present, in word and in attitude.

The commonly accepted philosophy that it is necessary to have bitter enemies if one is to have warm friends, was disproved in his life.  He had no enemies, but many have been proud to own him their friend.

Pecullarly a product of the best pioneer and social culture forces, his business was mainly on a frontier farm while his social environment was among the friends of his childhood in Canyon City.  Almost everybody knew him, and many the bright young men and woman who were heard to say when they learned of his fatal illness, “We played together when we were children.”

Although never rugged, his health had seemed especially secure and it was with much surprise and sorrow that news of his serious illness was received.  More than a week before the untimely end he had injured himself lifting a heavy load.  This injury produced an internal hemorrhage which resulted in death.

Oscar Schmidt was born in Canyon City on the 27th of July, 1876, and died in Bear Valley on the 14th of January, 1904, at the age of 27 years. The funeral services were held in the Episcopal church of which he was a member, at 1:30 o'clock, Saturday p.m., conducted by Rev. E. Hayes, of the M. E. church.  With calm fortitude Oscar had made these arrangements complete, even to the selection of six of his closets friends as pallbearers.  He had named Henry and Wm. Gregg, Chas. Gray, Mark Rullson, Elmer Overholt and Edward Southworth to assist in these last rites, all of whom performed the sad duty.

His body was laid to rest in Canyon City cemetery according to the ceremonies of the I.O.O.F. lodge, of which he was a member.

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, January 24, 1904
Lockwood, Harry

Death of Baker Citizen

Body of Harry Lockwood Found in Powder River

Harry Lockwood, a well known resident of Baker City, was found dead in Powder river last Friday afternoon.  The body was only half under water and the gruesome spectacle was discovered by a small boy, Paul Correll, as he was on his rounds delivering newspapers.  It was thought that either murder of suicide stood back of the sad and untimely end, but a coroner's jury did not so find.

The latest theory advanced to account for the death is that of an epileptic stroke, to which it is said the unfortunate man was subject.

Mr. Lockwood was a representative of the American Homeseekers' association.  He was also a prominent lodge man and carried heavy old line policies as well.  His entire insurance is said to be about $10.

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, September 10, 1903
Pruitt Family

Many Afflictions

Latest Fatality in the Family of Mr. Puitt

The family of W. H. Puitt, a well known resident of Prairie City, has been the victim of a long train of fatalities, and was recently called upon to mourn the death of one of its youngest and brightest members.  And death came suddenly, too, as though in keeping with the unexpected, sometimes violent, taking off.

Early Tuesday morning, of last week, Hub Puitt was seized with an attack of typhoid and on the next day he died.  Relatives were hastily summoned but before they arrived death had approached; they were four hours behind the dread messenger.

On July 4th a brother of the deceased was fatally shot in a row and a few days afterward a sister suddenly expired.

The next serious misfortune was not fatal, although a half dozen blasts were exploded within a few feet of the unprotected body of another brother, Willis Puitt, in the Dixie Meadows mine diaster.  The fact that he was not instantly killed seems a miracle, and may be taken to mean that however harsh the fates may be there is yet a more potent and kindlier power that still refuses to permit a condition so hopeless that it is ever possible to say “this is the worst.”

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, September 10, 1903
Unknown, Domingo

Died Under Blistering Sun

With Leg and Shoulder Broken, no Help Comes

A most painful and distressing death on the range is reported from the Owyhee country.

A Spaniard by the name of Domingo was driving through one of the most lonely stretches of road in that section when his horse evidently lurched and threw him out of the buckboard in which he was traveling.  His leg was broken and his shoulder crushed in the fall, so that he could neither walk or crawl.  In spite of his frightful predicament the Spaniard retained consciousness and tried to drag himself through the sage brush to find water.

In his effort, however, Domingo failed and after two days of untold agony in the blistering sun, died  of his neglected wounds.

Source: The Grant County News (John Day, OR) – Thursday, September 10, 1903
McCann, Harry

Harry McCann, a pioneer mining man well known in this county, died in Baker City last Friday, of cancer of the stomach.  Mr. McCann had been afflicted a long time, and his death was not unexpected.

Source: The Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, January 21, 1892
Bamburge, Julius

Mr. Julius Bamburge, who was formerly with Durkheimer & Bro at Prairie City, died at Baker City on Wednesday, January 27.  His disease was a complication of ailments which served to reduce his strength until he was unable to combat, and fell a victim to the grim destroyer.  Julius was beloved by his associates, and his many friends in this county will receive news of his death with sad hearts.  He was buried by the Odd Fellows, of whose noble order he was a faithful member.

Source: The Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, February 4, 1892
Fields, Nannie

Died, at her home down the river, Sunday, Feb. 21, 1892.  Mrs. Nannie Fields.  Deceased came to the John Day Valley with he husband Harvey Fields in mining days when settlements were few.  Industry and honesty of purpose, characterized her life work until scourged by afflictions and in the loss of her mind.  She – all that is mortal – rests in the cemetery near the old Gundlach place on the river.

Source: The Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, February 25, 1892

 

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