Biographies for Malheur County Oregon

A

Amidon, Charlie
B

Beam, Edward
Beers, Ransom
Beers, William
Biggs, Dalton
Blackaby, J. R.
Bradley, Eber
Brooke, William
Brown, Cassius
Brown, George
C

Carlton, William
Clement, Roswell
Clinton, Elbert
Clinton, George
Cole, Emory
Cole, Joshua
Corsen, John
D

Davis, Charles
Davis, James
Dinwiddie, Joseph
Divin, Robert
Dunbar, David
E

Eastham, Harry
Edwards, John
Eldredge, Henry
F

Farley, James
Fletcher, Thomas
Ford, James
Fraser, Edmund
G

Glover, G. B.
Gray, Garrison
Greer, R. D.
H

Hart, Richard
Hatfield, James
Hayes, George
Hickey, George
Hope, Isaiah
Hope, Milton
Hurley, Julien
I - J

Jones, Charles
K

Kelley, Joseph
King, Almer
King, Gilbert
King, William (1)
King, William (2)
L
M

Mack, Alva
Madden, James
Mangin, William
McCain, James
McGregor, Andrew
Minton, William
Morehead, Cornelius
Morfitt, William
Moss, Alvin
N

Nichols, George
O - P

O'Neill, Frank
Parks, William
Pullen, William
Q - R

Rieger, Erwin
Rutherford, Richard
S

Shea, Albert
Shea, Jeremiah
Smith, Charles
Smith, George
Sproul, Andreas
T

Tague, Joseph
Tietsort, Henry
Turner, Archibald
Twycross, Ebenezer
U - V

Van Gilse, Robert
Van Limburgh, William
W

Walter, James
Ward, George
Ward, Herbert
Wheeler, Russell
Worsham, Robert
X - Y
Z



Walter, James

James A. Walter – About five miles southwest from Ontario, is the farm and home of the subject of this article.  It is a place of eighty acres, well improved, skillfully tilled, has fine buildings, good orchards  and a vineyard, and in connection with the care of this estate, Mr. Walter is operation a dairy and manufacturing a good quality of butter, which is readily sold in the markets.  In person Mr. Walter is a man of principles, stands well among his fellows, possesses good ability, and has made a success of his labor, starting with his bare hands and now has a good property accumulated.  He was born in Wayne, county, Indiana, on February 14, 1854, being the son of Henry and Lovier (Lee) Walter.  He grew up on a farm, received a good education from the common schools, and remained with his parents until 1880 having removed with them to Henry county, Indiana, in 1875.  When he stepped out for himself, he came by rail to Reno, Nevada, and in the fall of 1884 came across the country with reams from there to Malheur county, locating in Malheur valley, and doing his first work as a wage earner in this new country.  The settlers were few then and the country open and he selected a farm near where Yale stands, but later closed out the farm business and for three years he acted as salesman through the country for the Payette nursery.  In 1894 he purchased the improvements of a man and filed a homestead on the eight above described.

On January 10, 1896, occurred the marriage of Mr. Walter and Miss Lillie M. Steele.  She is a native of Arkansas, whence she came across the plains with her parents twenty-five years ago, settling in this county.  The parents are now deceased.  To Mr. and Mrs. Walter there have been born three children, Maud, Ora M. and Orville.  Mr. Walter’s mother died in the east, and the father came to this country in 1887, and here he died in 1894.  Our subject is a member of the K. of P., Armour Lodge, No. 69.  He is a man of integrity and sterling worth of character and has manifested substantial qualities constantly, which have given him a fine prestige among his fellows.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 587
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Beam, Edward

Edward Beam – This young and enterprising farmer and stockman of northern Malheur county is one of the men whose life has been largely spent in this section and he is a real product of the west and a credit to his county, both because of his worthy labors which are being crowned with a good success and because of his own intrinsic worth which stamps him a man of ability and uprightness.

Edward Beam was born in Missouri, on January 18, 1874, being a son of William W. and Sarah (Lafton) Beam.  In the year of his birth the parents came to Lower Willow creek, in this county, crossing the plains.  Two years later they went to the Willamette valley, and two years subsequent to that they returned to this county and located where out subject now lives.  Here Edward was educated and spent his time in learning the arts of tilling the soil and raising stock.  He has been brought up in the county and is familiar with it resources and history and is well known as a young man of sterling qualities and he has the confidence of the people.  Mr. Beam is considered one of the substantial citizens of the county, and the brilliant success that has attended his efforts is abundant proof of both his industry and his ability.

The marriage of Mr. Beam and Miss Eucibia McPherson, a native of California, was solemnized near Vale, on September 18, 1899, and they have two children, Arthur W. and Nettie F.  Mr. McPherson was an early pioneer to California and  came to the territory now embraced in Malheur county in 1888.  Mr. Beam is always active in the welfare of the county and takes a great interest in the politics of the county and state, being ever allied on the side of progress and upbuilding.  He is rightly numbered with the leading men of his section and is on whose efforts have aided materially in the making of Malheur county.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 586
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Amidon, Charlie

Charlie E. Amidon - This well known and representative farmer and stockman is a substantial and enterprising citizen of Malheur County, dwelling near Ontario, five and one-half miles southwest, where he has a fine farm of one hundred and eighty acres, well tilled and improved with buildings, orchards, and so forth in addition to which he owns one hundred acres of land in another place, besides other property. The birth of Mr. Amidon occurred at Glenn, Allegan County, Michigan in 1860, August 23, being the son of Edson and Electa (Tracy) Amidon. The father enlisted in Company B, Thirteenth Michigan in October, 1861. He was transferred to Sherman’s Army and was with that celebrity on the famous march to the sea. Before going, he was home on a furlough, on account of the measles. Upon his return to the army after his furlough he was promoted as corporal and he did valiant service in the battles of Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Atlanta, and many others as well as numerous skirmishes. He served until the last disloyal gun was silenced, and then received his honorable discharge, after four years of war toil.

Our subject was reared on a farm educated in the common schools and at the age of twelve went with his parents to Grand Island, Nebraska. Two years later the family returned to Wayne County, Michigan and from there he went to Glenn, his birthplace. He lumbered in the woods and in the spring of 1883 he went to Elgan, Illinois, from which place he returned to his home and prepared for the trip to Baker City, whither he came in 1884. From Baker City he came to Ontario which was then a side track and two buildings, then he worked at different occupations and raised some stock for a time. In the spring of 1892 he filed a desert claim on eighty acres where he lives now.

Mr. Amidon married Miss Martha J., daughter of Thomas and Mary J. Steele on December 30, 1896, and they have one child, Alva Tracy. Mrs. Amidon’s parents crossed the plains in 1877, from Arkansas and settled in Grant county, this state, where they died soon after. Mr. Amidon is a charter member of the A. O. U. W. and is a man of good standing among his fellows and respected by all who know him.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 587
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Turner, Archibald

Archibald W. Turner - The subject of this sketch is one of Malheur County's heaviest property owners, having an estate of eleven hundred and sixty acres of fine soil and very valuable as a hay producer. He is one of the prominent men of the country, a man of fine capabilities, and highly respected and esteemed by all. Mr. Turner was born in Boone County, Missouri, on February 1, 1827, being the son of James and Sarah Turner. He was reared on a farm, gained his education in the primitive log school house of the time and at the native place on October 7, 1848, he was married to Miss Nancy March, a native of the same place. In the spring of 1851 he started with his wife and one child to San Francisco, going via New Orleans and Nicaragua. While on the sailing vessel from the Isthmus the little one sickened and died and was buried in the ocean. Owing to tedious delays he did not arrive at San Francisco until March, 1852, and then went direct to Yuba County, near Marysville, where he procured a farm and vent to raising the fruits of the field. He also raised stock and continued there until 1862, at which time he came to Walla Walla and then to the Salmon River mines. He returned to The Dalles to winter and in the spring of 1863 went to Idaho City, where he followed mining until 1866. After that date he came to Old Eldorado near Malheur, and engaged in lumbering, where he spent three years and then in 1869, Mr. Turner came to the vicinity of his present estate and took up a homestead, and there turned his attention to raising sheep. Later he sold his sheep and raised cattle. He now has, as mentioned above, one of the finest estates in the County, being three miles southeast from Dell. He handles much stock and many tons of hay each year. He has a large, two-story, ten-room house, fitted up tastily, and a large barn and all the buildings, equipments, orchards and stock to make rural life comfortable, enjoyable and interesting. In politics Mr. Turner is a stanch Democrat of the Jeffersonian type and a man with the courage of his convictions.   To Mr. Turner and his estimable wife there have been born six children, as follows: Kelton, deceased; Samuel C., deceased; John P., married to Elizabeth Allen and living near Dell; Ellen, wife of M. Grimes, of The Dalles; Laura, deceased ; Martha, wife of J. Barrett, of The Dalles. On June 16, 1863, Mr. Turner was called upon to mourn the death of his faithful wife, and on the same day the daughter died, and they two sleep in one grave. Mr. Turner is now enjoying the golden days of his career amid the comforts of his large estate, the kindness of friends and the esteem of the entire community and he is one of the capable and wise men of the region.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 555
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Pullen, William

William H. Pullen is one of the prominent men of Malheur County, being both a successful business man and property owner and popular County official. He was born in Illinois, on March 1, 1845, being the son of William and Mary (Wells) Pullen, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Liverpool. When thirteen, he went with his parents to Texas, remaining there until 1867, and then returned to Illinois, where he engaged in farming until 1872. At that date a move was made to Pawnee County, Nebraska, and that was his home until 1880. He next located in Coos County, Oregon, where two years were spent and another move was made to Jackson County, whence one year later he returned to Coos bay and remained there five years. We next see Mr. Pullen in Wallowa County where he engaged in the mercantile pursuit at Lostine. Four years after this venture, he sold out and went to the lumbering business in Paradise, the same County. It was 1897, when Mr. Pullen came to Malheur County and bought one hundred and twenty acres of fertile land one-fourth of a mile from Owyhee. He has also eighty acres in Idaho and his land is well improved. In 1900 he was called by the people to act as County assessor, his name appearing on the Republican ticket and in the spring of 1902 he was re-nominated.

The marriage of Mr. Pullen and Miss Harriet J. Cross, a native of Illinois was solemnized in Texas in 1866 and the following named children were born to them, Henry, in Coos County; Mary J., wife of Daniel Barklow, of Coos County; Elizabeth, wife of lrmir Miller, of Curry County: John E., of Malheur County; Ella, wife of Walter Applegate, of Malheur County: Richard, in Malheur County; Dora, wife of Robert Minton. In Coos County, on January 21, 1881, Mrs. Pullen died. On October 14, 1881, Mr. Pullen married a second time, the lady being Lucinda Whetstone, a native of Indiana, and the nuptials occurred in Jackson County, and three children have been born to them, Jesse W., Thomas J., and Eva L. Mrs. Pullen's parents came to Oregon in 1871. Mr. Pullen is affiliated with the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 90, of Ontario and he is one of the well known and highly respected men of our County.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 555
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Moss, Alvin

Alvin S. Moss - This enterprising and substantial stockman and farmer of Malheur County is located nine miles northeast from Rockville. Idaho, and is one of the pioneers of this section and has labored with assiduity and sagacity here since the early eighties and is now rewarded with abundant prosperity and a goodly showing, gained by his thrift and careful labors. Mr. Moss was born in Illinois, on September 10, 1857, the son of Sardus B. and Ceria E. Moss. At the age of eight years he went with the balance of the family to south-eastern Kansas and there grew up. He gained his education there and labored on the farm with his father. In 1879, he came to Colorado and two years later, he came thence to Malheur County, locating where his estate now is. He has one half section of good land and over one hundred head of cattle, besides many horses. His estate is well improved and he is counted one of the wealthy and substantial men of his section.

In political matters, Mr. Moss is always active, taking great interest in the affairs of the County and state, while in educational affairs he is found in the place of the intelligent citizen. It has never been among the ventures made by our subject that he should embark on the matrimonial sea, choosing rather the quieter joys and walks of the celibate.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 556
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Parks, William

William Parks - One of the oldest pioneers of Malheur County and a man of excellent capabilities, being possessed of practical ability and judgment, and a keen discrimination that have made him a very successful business man and one of the leaders in the realm of finance in this section, the subject of this article is abundantly worthy of recognition and especial mention among the prominent men of Malheur County and this portion of Oregon, being also a man of worth and personal virtues.

Mr. Parks was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 7, 1845, being the son of Abraham and Jane Eliza (Vanderhoof) Parks. He was deprived of his mother when an infant but received his education and grew to man-hood in his native place. It was in 1859 that he crossed the plains to California, locating in Eldorado County where he engaged in farming until 1864. Then he came to Silver City, Idaho and there took up mining until 1871, when he made his way to Jordan valley, now in Malheur County. He at once took a home-stead and gave his attention to farming and stock raising. He was successful in that line and now he owns four hundred acres of fine, well improved and irrigated land adjoining the town of Jordan Valley. He has fine buildings and a large hand of cattle. In 1895 Mr. Parks engaged in the mercantile business, and as in his other undertakings, so in this, he was blessed with abundant success, because of his untiring efforts and wise management and careful business methods. He operated in company with J. R. Blackoby and in 1901 he sold out and is now interested in the Jordan Valley Mercantile Company. Mr. Parks is one of the real builders of the County, both in an industrial and commercial line, being one of the leading financiers of the County today. He has an interest in the Ontario Bank and is also interested in various other places.

The marriage of Mr. Parks and Miss Julia West was solemnized in Jordan Valley in 1879, and they have become the parents of five children: George, a member of the Jordan Valley Mercantile Company; James W.; Hollister; Guy; Mona. Mr. Parks has seen all the hardships incident to frontier life, being here and open to the dangers of the Indian outbreak in 1878, as also in other lines and times he has braved the dangers and en-countered the hardships, but in all he has triumphed and is one of the most substantial, well respected men of the County, being looked up to by all and holding an enviable position of prestige.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 556
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hart, Richard

Richard H. Hart - This capable and enterprising stockman and farmer of the vicinity of Jordan Valley is one of the substantial men of Malheur County, and is numbered with the earliest pioneers who broke sod in this section, and it is to his credit that he has constantly labored for the welfare of the country and its up building in a worthy manner ever since that time. Mr. Hart was born in Indiana, on April 18, 1849, the son of John K. and Eliza Hart. When he was one rear of age, his parents removed to Iowa and there he received his education and remained until he had reached his majority. 1871 was the (late when he came to Malheur County and located a pre-emption where his estate is now located, being one-half mile west from the village of Jordan Valley. He now has one of the tine estates of the County, well improved and producing abundant dividends annually. In addition to this generous holding he has eight hundred and forty acres of land on Cow creek. Mr. Hart has two hundred horses, and as many cattle and is one of the leaders in the realm of raising stock, being both expert and progressive in this work. He was here during the Indian outbreak in 1878 and rendered excellent service for the country, acting as scout and bearer of messages. Also in the time of the rubbery, he was efficient in aiding the officers.

The marriage of Mr. Hart and Miss Harriett Luella Moore, a native of Iowa, was solemnized in Indianola, Iowa, in February, 1879, and they have three children, Gertrude, Ruth, and Ethelyn. Mr. Hart always evinces an intelligent interest in the affairs of the state and County and is a patriotic and capable citizen who stands well with his fellows and has done a large amount 'for the advancement of the County.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 557
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Ford, James

James C. Ford - This well known and enterprising stockman has been a man of frontier life, spending his days since a lad in the various pursuits incident to pioneering, and especially has he been occupied in raising and handling stick, being one of the best posted and most skillful stock men in this County of stock men, and abundant success has been his since he has inaugurated action for himself.

Mr. Ford was born in Arkansas, October 15, 1856, being the son of William Ford. His mother died when he was an infant and he was taken by his father to Tennessee and when the war broke out, the father sent this son to friends in Illinois and joined the ranks to fight for the Union. At the close of the war the father died and our subject was left an orphan. He was filled with determination and courage and soon we find him in Texas, riding the range and becoming familiar with the hardships of the cowboy and all the lore of handling and breeding cattle successfully. He worked for the noted Chisum Company and made several drives from Texas and Mexico to the north. It was 1879 when he came to this country. He was engaged first with Ryan & Lang. driving cattle for three years to Montana after which he made a drive for Mayberry from The Dalles to Wyoming. He next operated for Con Shea, being Fireman for him for three years and then he retired from riding the range and went into business for himself. He now has a fine ranch of five hundred and sixty acres of fertile land on Sucker creek six miles west from Rockville. He has good buildings; the estate well improved raises hay, grain and alfalfa, and also has a fine herd of Hereford and Shorthorn cattle. Being an experienced stockman, Mr. Ford understands the value of raising the best and doing so in a skillful manner.

On November 25, 1888, Mr. Ford married Miss Fannie, daughter of Charles and Mary (Wilson) Smith, who, are mentioned in this volume. Mrs. Ford is a native of Salem, Oregon, and she is a woman of many virtues and graces and presides over the comfortable rural home with becoming dignity, while this worthy couple are valuable members of society, being esteemed by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 557
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Shea, Albert

Albert J. Shea - While the older members of the pioneer staff are retiring one by one, it is pleasant to note that there are younger men of courage and enterprise to take up the worthy labors of these estimable men, who opened this country for settlement, and to prosecute them with an untiring zeal and a sagacity that is sure to win in the battle of life. Among this wide awake class, we are con-strained to mention the subject of this article, who has made a name and place for himself in the ranks of the leading stockmen of Malheur County, being justly entitled to the position he holds, because of his merit and worth, and because of his brilliant achievements.

Albert Shea was born in Owyhee County, Idaho, on February 4, 1872, being the son of Cornelius Shea, the well and widely known stockman of this country. The senior Mr. Shea was one of the heaviest stock owners west of the Rockies and one of the keenest and most energetic operators that ever handled cattle. He sold out his immense herds in 1897, and is now living with his family in San Francisco. He is a native of Canada and came to this section in 1867. Reverting more particularly to our subject, we note that he was educated in San Francisco and also on the farm and in the saddle in Eastern Oregon and Southern Idaho. He knows the cattle business from the ground to the completion, and is making a commendable showing as a worthy son of a wise father. At the present time, Mr. Shea is living on his estate of three hundred and sixty acres of fertile land, in the Jordan Valley, where he operates his herds of cattle and bands 0f horses. He is one of the wide-awake men of the County and is well known and esteemed by all.

The marriage of Mr. Shea and Miss Celia Cornners, a native of Owyhee County, Idaho, was solemnized in Portland, Oregon, on December 12, 1896, and they have one daughter, Genevieve.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 558
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Davis, James

James T. Davis - One of the worthy pioneers of this County, a man of ability and executive force and unswerving integrity, the subject of this sketch is now one of the leading citizens of Nyssa, and a prominent man in Malheur County. He lives one mile northwest from the town of Nyssa, having a 'farm of one hundred and twenty acres, well improved and handled in a skillful manner, which is a good dividend producer.

James T. was born in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, on October 25, 1850, being the son of Hamilton and Saline Davis. In 1862, the father and the oldest son came across the plains with ox teams and in 1865, our subject and his mother came the same journey with horse teams. They both made the trip without serious accident and when the mother arrived in Boise, the father was there to meet them and the reunited family made their way to the Willamette valley where they settled in Polk County. Four years later, they removed from that place to Umatilla County and in 1874, our subject went from the home in that County to Boise valley, Idaho, and later re-turned to his people, who had in the meantime migrated to Baker City. The reports which he brought from the Boise valley caused all to move there and engage in raising stock. Our subject went thence to Emmett, Idaho, and there married Miss Lulu Brinnon in May, 1881. In 1895, Mrs. Davis was called away by death. In 1885, Mr. Davis came from Idaho to Ontario and there engaged in the livery business, handling also and shipping many horses to various markets. Later he located an island just below the Riverside ferry as mining land, selling the same at a good advantage. Then he bought the land where his home is at the present time and this has been transformed into a valuable farm. Among other productions, he raises much alfalfa hay and has a comfortable home.

Mr. Davis contracted a second marriage, the lady becoming his wife at this time being Miss Laura, daughter of Mrs. A. J. Lewis, who makes her home with them at the present time. The date of this wedding was February, 1898. Mr. Davis takes an active part in politics, being allied with the Democratic Party and he is a good citizen and a well respected and upright gentleman.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 558
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Nichols, George

George Nichols - No more worthy class of people ever stepped beneath the folds of the stars and stripes than the doughty, courageous, intelligent, capable and sturdy pioneers, who braved dangers, endured hardships, performed the arduous labors incident to their lot, and wended their way into the wilds of this western country, to beat back the savages and make here the abodes of civilized men. As a worthy one among this illustrious number, we are pleased to mention the subject of this sketch, who is now one of the substantial and enterprising citizens of Malheur County.

Mr. Nichols was born in New York, on October 22, 1841, being the son of Asa and Mary Nichols, who brought their son at the age of five to Kalamazoo, Michigan. There George was educated, grew to manhood and on May 10, 1861, he responded to the cry of patriotism then sounding through the land, by offering himself as one to fight for his country. He was enrolled in Company K, Second Michigan, under Capt. Charles S. May. He was in the battle of Bull Run, at the siege of York-town, fought at Fair Oaks and several other engagements, and was wounded at Fair Oaks. On account of disabilities resulting from this, he was discharged on February 3, 1863. He returned to his home, and soon after he was in the west. He assisted to build the U. P. R. R. in Nebraska and in Utah; in 1868 he went to White Pine, Nevada. Teaming and mining occupied him there and then he went to Paradise Valley, and then came through this country to British Columbia on a prospecting tour. In 1879, he went to the Wood river country, in Idaho, and then in 1894 he came to his present place, which is located seven miles east of Jordan Valley. He has a fine ranch, all irrigated and well improved and which returns abundant crops to his skillful husbandry. Mr. Nichols is a prominent member of the G. A. R., in Bailey, Idaho, Post No. 61, and he is secure in the esteem and confidence of his fellows. Mr. Nichols has never embarked on the matrimonial sea, and is content in the quiet joys of the celibatarian's life.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 559
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Morehead, Cornelius

Cornelius G. Morehead - A native of the Web-foot State, the son of about the earliest pioneers of this state, raised amid its environments, both eastern and western Oregon, the subject of this article is thoroughly an Oregonian and a typical representative of its energetic and progressive citizens. Cornelius G. was born in Linn County, Oregon, on June 26, 1865, being the son of Robert M. and Martha (Curl) Morehead. The parents came with ox teams to Oregon in 1848 and settled in the Willamette valley and the father being a millwright, built the first mill of the state. It was located at Salem and was built in 1849. In 1869, the family removed to Jackson County; Oregon, and in 1872, they came to Prairie City, Grant County, this state. There the father erected the Strawberry flour mills and in 1879 sold out and Went to Weiser, Idaho. He built a mill there and in 1887 he returned to the Willamette valley, where he died in 1890. Mrs. Morehead is still living in Douglas County, this state. Our subject was educated in the schools of the various places where lie lived and in 1884 he started for himself. He raised stock in Idaho until 1888, then sold out and came to Malheur County and engaged with the Oregon Horse and Land Company, where he wrought for a number of years. During this time he made several trips to different markets with stock. In 1901 he purchased his present place, a farm of eighty acres, one and one-fourth miles west from Nyssa. His farm is well improved and produces abundance of alfalfa hay and other fruits of the field. He has a comfortable residence and a young orchard and is fast making his place an abode of rural comfort and attractiveness. In addition to his property, Mr. Morehead has a good bunch of cattle and devotes considerable attention to handling them.

The marriage of Mr. Morehead and Miss Elizabeth, daughter of David R. and Jane Ehrgood, was solemnized on April 21, 1899, and two children have been born to them, Alma Pearl and Ruby Edna. In political matters, Mr. Morehead is allied with the Republican Party and manifests an intelligent activity and interest in the affairs of the County and state.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 559
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Morfitt, William

William Morfitt - To this worthy veteran of many a struggle with the savages on the frontier, as well as in many of the battles of life in the wild country, being a pioneer of the state of Oregon, and having led a life of activity in the forefront of the progress of civilization, having done well his part in all this good work, we are pleased to grant a consideration in this volume of Malheur County's history, both because of this prominent part that he has taken in the County and in its leading industries and developments, as well as for his worth as a man and citizen.

Mr. Morfitt was born in Yorkshire, England, on April 17, 1838, being the son of James and Susana Morfitt. In 1842 the father brought his family to the United States, landing in New York and thence to the site of Chicago, where he located the first foundry of that now famous city. In 1847 he came with his family across the plains to Oregon. Enroute they were attacked by the Indians several times once on the Rogue River, where four savages were killed but no loss of life among the immigrants. Before that, in the Modoc country, they lost half of their cattle by the red- skins. At the mouth of the Yam Hill River the livestock was left and the father came to Oregon City by canoe. There he located, it being a village of few people, and there he opened a foundry the very first that was ever erected in the territory of Oregon.

Our subject received a good education from the schools the various places where he resided, perfecting himself as a civil engineer. In 1849 he with his father, went with the rush of the gold miners to San Francisco in a sail boat and in the spring of 1850 he returned to Oregon.  In 1855 our subject enlisted in the Clackamas Company to fight the Indians in the Yakima war. After that he followed farming until 1867 when he removed to Grant County and thence to Boise. Idaho. In company with a Mr. Libby, Mr. Morfitt built the first bridge across the Boise River at Boise. Eighteen hundred and sixty-eight marks the date when Mr. Morfitt came to upper Willow creek and located the first ranch there. He farmed and raised stock there until 1883, when he came to the site of the present Ontario, and in company with Messrs. Virtue, Smith and Richardson, located the town of Ontario, he surveying the land. He still owns one hundred and twenty acres of this land. His home place is located one and one-half miles south-west from Ontario and consists of forty acres. He has the finest farm house in the County and barns and outbuildings and all tasty improvements to match. His place is well supplied with water and has a fine orchard. It is a model of thrift and beauty in every respect. Mr. Morfitt is vice president of the Owyhee Ditch Company and stockholder in the same and also a stockholder and director in the Nevada ditch company.

In politics Mr. Morfitt is a Democrat and takes an enthusiastic part in the advancement of educational interests. The marriage of Mr. Morfitt and Miss Juliette Worsham occurred in Clackamas County, on March 1858, and they became the parents of six children, as follows: James, Robert, William L., Cyrus W., Charles H. and Iona. In 1893 Mrs. Morfitt died. In 1899 Mr. Morfitt was married a second time, the lady becoming his wife at this time being Elizabeth M. Carlisle, a native of what is now Malheur County, and they have been blessed by the advent of two children Julian and Ashton. Mr. Morfitt served as scout for General Howard during the Bannock war.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 560
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Carlton, William

William C. Carlton - This worthy gentleman is one of the substantial citizens of Malheur County and one of the thrifty stock- men and farmers of the vicinity of Rockville, his estate of two hundred and twenty acres of good land lying seven miles west from that place. Mr. Carlton was born in Maine in 1834, being the son of Amos and Mary Carlton. He received his education from the County in the schools of his native state and there remained - until 1854 when he came via Panama to San Francisco, and thence to Indian valley in Sierra County, where he at once engaged in the fascinating labor of mining. In 1860 we find him in Oregon, and then in Walla Walla, whence he returned to The Dalles and then visited his home in Maine. Returning again to California, he went to Los Angeles County, and thence to Boise, Idaho, where he engaged in wagon building until 1882, at which time he located his present home place as a homestead. Mr. Carlton has devoted his time and energies to raising stock, cattle and horses, and to general farming, from that time until the present, having achieved a good success in these endeavors. In addition to these labors, Mr. Carlton has also operated a blacksmith shop, gaining a good trade from the surrounding neighborhood. He has the prospects of a line coal mine on his lands, which will make them exceedingly valuable.

The marriage of Mr. Carlton and Mrs. Phoebe Basil, a native of Iowa, was solemnized in Boise, Idaho, in 1871, and they have six children, William A.; Laura M., wife of John Howard, of Pleasant valley; Alice, wife of Frank Beech, of Owyhee County, Idaho; Charles; Oliver; Robert. Mr. Carlton is a member of the A. F. & A. M., of Boise. For one term, Mr. Carlton served as County assessor and discharged the important duties of that office to the satisfaction of all. He is always interested in the affairs of the County and takes an active part in politics, being allied with the Republican Party. For two and one-half years, he has been postmaster of Carter post office and he is a man in whom his fellows have confidence and is highly esteemed by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 560
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Greer, R. D.

R. D. Greer - It is with pleasure that we. are enabled to grant consideration in this volume of the history of Malheur County to the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he is one who partakes of die real spin of the pioneer and since he is a man of excellent qualities and since he has wrought in this vicinity for the substantial progress and up building of the same for many years.

Mr. Greer was born in Ohio, on September 28, 1850, being the son of Guin and Elizabeth Greer. In 1866 he came with his parents to Lancaster County. Nebraska and there he received the completion of his education and gave his attention to farming. He first came to Malheur County in 1875, and then two years later returned to Nebraska, only to come west again in 1880. Settlement was made at Emmett, Idaho, and twelve years he labored there, then removed to Weiser, where he operated in the lumbering industry and then moved to Ontario, and there embarked on the mercantile sea. He continued in a successful business there until 1900, when he sold his interests and came to his present place, one mile south-east from Owyhee post office. He has one quarter section, well irrigated and improved and productive of good dividends annually. Mr. Greer is active in the affairs of the County and has ever been allied on the side of progress and enterprise.

The marriage of Mr. Greer and Mrs. Alice L. Conley, a native of Michigan, was solemnized in 1872, at Lincoln, Nebraska, and they have one daughter, Myrtle. By her former husband, Mrs. Greer has one daughter, now the wife of Frank Davis, of this County. Mr. Greer is one of the leaders in the establishment of the Owyhee ditch and has always been dominated by a keen foresight and perception which has given him abundant success in his endeavors. Fraternally, he affiliates with the W. of W., in Ontario.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 561
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Dinwiddie, Joseph

Joseph M. Dinwiddie - This well known pioneer and responsible and leading business man and stockman of Malheur County is one of the prominent citizens of the town of Jordan Valley and is a man of sterling qualities of worth and integrity, being possessed of excellent capabilities which have wrought with a winning hand in the business and financial realm of our County for many years.

Joseph M. was born in Indiana, on September 1, 1851 being the son of Daniel and Elsie Dinwiddie. In 1853 his parents came with the noble .band of pioneers who crossed the plains in those days, and located in Linn County, Oregon. That was their home until the time of their death. There also our subject received his education and grew to man-hood's estate. It was in 1875 that he started out for himself, and at once went to Klickitat County, Washington, and engaged in the stock business. He made a success, but in 1880 he determined to try the vicinity of Jordan Valley, and accordingly came hither with his herds and here he has been one of the prominent citizens since that time. He now has a fine estate of one section of fine land adjoining the town of Jordan Valley, and it is well improved with good buildings and all conveniences for handling it in a first class manner Also he owns twelve and one-half acres in the village and operates a first class hotel and livery barn. Mr. Dinwiddie is also one of the leaders in the realm of stock raising, for he has about three hundred and fifty head of horses and a large band of cattle, having been successful in this line and continuing at it constantly since his first residence here.

The marriage of Mr. Dinwiddie and Miss Laura E. King, a native of Walla Walla, Washington, was solemnized in Jordan Valley in '884, and they have become the parents of four children, Zora, Elsie, Davis, and William Rufus. Mr. Dinwiddie enjoys the distinction of being one of the leaders of the County, a man of substantial qualities and whose labors establish him to be a man of excellent worth and reliability and wisdom.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 561
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Cole, Joshua

Joshua L. Cole - As one of the real builders of Malheur County, being a pioneer of the west in a very early day, the subject of this sketch is justly entitled to consideration in the volume of history now being made and it is with pleasure that eye are enabled to recount some of the items of a long and useful career, wherein he has always been a prominent figure in the progress of the County, the welfare of his fellows and in the prosecution of the business in his hand. At the present time Mr. Cole is the president of the first bank of Vale, being an incorporated state bank, with a capital of fifty thousands dollars and half that amount paid up.

Mr. Cole was born in Ripley County, Indiana on March 29, 1832, being the son of William and Sarah J. (Clark) Cole. The father was a native of Virginia, but was taken to Kentucky in a very early day before even any wagon roads were made in that state. There he was raised and married and his first four children were horn there also. He went thence to Indiana, and in 1858 he migrated to Minnesota in which place he died in 1862. The mother was a native of Maryland and died in Iowa in 1842.

Our subject was reared on a farm, received a common school education in the primitive log school house, and on April 1, 1856, was married to Miss Malinda, daughter of John B. and Nancy (McLaughlin) Wise. To this union there were born three children, as follows: Leonard, married to Hattie Bond, and living in Huntington, Oregon; Emory, married to Barbara Kennedy, living on lower Willow creek; Eldora, wife of James Moody of Huntington. In 1860, Mr. Cole removed to Scott County, Minnesota, and in the spring of 1864, he went thence on the arduous trip across the plains with ox teams, the journey being completed in good time without serious trouble with the Indians, and the landing point was Boise, Idaho. Until 1868 we find Mr. Cole in that section of the country and then a move was made to what is now Malheur County, and four years later he came to lower Willow creek where he embarked in raising stock. Mr. Cole acquired title to one thousand acres of land, which was known as the J. L. Cole ranch throughout the entire country, and there lie raised large herds of stock. In addition to the stock, Mr. Cole handled a large apiary, having as many as five hundred swarms of bees at one time. They brought a handsome return as he had large fields of alfalfa. In the spring of 1901 Mr. Cole sold his ranch and stock to his son, Emory, and he removed to Vale where he had a handsome residence. He was instrumental in starting the bank above referred to and as its head and manager, he has made a Fine success in this business equal to his unbounded success in his former enterprises. He has a fine two story stone building in a prominent location in the town and handles a large business, having the bank quarters fitted up in fine shape.

On June 18, 1896, Mr. Cole was called upon to mourn the death of his wife. On May 21, 1898, Mr. Cole contracted a second marriage, the lady of his choice at this time being Miss Emily, daughter of William H. and Sarah J. (McLaughlin) Blackwell of Ripley County Indiana, and a relative of his first wife. In politics Mr. Cole is a stanch Republican, and lie cast his first vote for John C. Fremont and has staid with the party since that time. He and his wife are devoted members of the Methodist church, as was also the former wife and they are warm advocates of the faith and supporters of the same. It is of note that when Mr. Cole came to Boise there were no houses there, the town being one of tents and he has always been in the vanguard of the pioneers laboring wisely and faithfully for the advancement of the country and the up building of good industries, while in his walk he has shown forth those qualities of commendable virtue which have made him a light and example in the community, Where today he is highly esteemed and beloved by all, he and his wife being leading members of society.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 562
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Smith, Charles

Charles Smith - This worthy pioneer and substantial citizen of Malheur County, is deserving of a place in any compilation that purports to give the history of this section, since his labors have been here for many years toward the development and progress of the country, and since he is a man of ability and has achieved a goodly success as the re-ward of his labors and thrift.

Mr. Smith was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 18, 1835, being the son of John and Susan Smith. At the age of eight he went with his parents to Illinois and there remained until 1854, when he came across the plains with his brothers, in an ox train, to Siskiyou County, California, and there engaged in mining. He made some good discoveries and later, 1858, went to the Cariboo mines at the time of the Fraser river excitement, whence he returned to Portland, then to Salem, and there followed his trade of brick mason. In 1878 he removed to Jackson County and remained three years and then vent to Mugginsville, California, where he mined until 1880. The next year he came to Malheur County, and located the place where he now lives as a homestead, ten miles northwest from Rockville, and devoted himself to farming and stock raising. His place is under the irrigating ditch and well improved and he has a good band of stock. Mr. Smith mines some, being interested in several good properties.

The marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Mary, daughter of John and Frances Ramsey, was solemnized in Salem, on November 9. 1865, and they have become the parents of three children. William W. residing in Malheur County; Fannie, wife of Mr. Ford, a stock-man of Malheur County; George V. Mrs. Smith's parents crossed the plains in 1863, and her father died in Salem in 1875, but her mother is still living in Malheur County. Mrs. Smith was born on May 11, 1865. She has some fine relics, as gold rings and so forth, the gold of which she pounded out of the rocks with her own hands in California.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 563
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Beers, William

William P. Beers - To the esteemed and distinguished gentleman and worthy pioneer, whose name initiates this paragraph, it is fitting that a consideration be granted in the history of Malheur County, since he, perhaps more than any other one man, has been instrumental in making the County what it is today, and also in the development of the other sections adjacent. Mr. Beers has done the lion's share, and in all this excellent labor and the achievements of his brain and hand, there have ever been manifested noble qualities of the typical man, and the courageous and intrepid pioneer, while his masterful ability has always placed him as leader among his fellows and rightly, ton, for success has always been the result of his keen perception, sagacity, and assiduity.

William T. Beers was born in Wayne County, Indiana, on August 18, 1842, being the son of enterprising and leading parents. The family came to Burlington. Iowa, when our subject was quite young and eight years later they removed to Scott County, and three years subsequent to that we find him in Decatur County. In these various places William P. was educated and when the call came in 1862 for the loyal hearts to take up the cause of their country, young Beers was one of the first to press to the post of duty and he en-listed in the Thirteenth Missouri Calvary where he fought in many battles and did arduous military duty until the time of his honorable discharge. Four years and five months were spent in this service and during this time he participated the battles of Springfield, Blue Mount, and also others among which was one on the plains, his regiment being stationed for a time at Fort Collins, in Wyoming. In 1866, he crossed the plains to Helena, Montana, then went to the Bitter Roots and ruined and in 1868 bought a freight outfit and did business between Fort Benton and Carrinne and Virginia City, making also three trips to Fort Hall, and then he came to the Snake and wintered near Idaho City. Then three years were spent in Nevada, and soon thereafter we find him in Silver City, Idaho, and after some more freighting to that city he sold his outfit and bought a portion of his present ranch, in 1874. The next years he assisted to erect a telegraph line from Winnemucca to Silver City, and also bought another freight outfit and moved mining machinery to Silver City, being in partnership with the well known John Catlow. Mr. Beers was here during the Indian outbreaks and his house still shows some of the bullet holes from the savages' rifles.

Mr. Beers owns what is known as the Ruby ranch, which is located fifteen miles west from Jordan Valley, being, one of the first stage stations in the country. The ranch consists of three thousand, five hundred acres of fine land, being one of the best ranches in the entire state. Mr. Beers has about eight hundred head of cattle and three hundred head of horses. He used to handle about four thousand cattle but has now a less number and some of the finest specimens in the range. He has one thousand acres of fertile meadow land and is really the stock king of this country. Mr. Beers is actively interested in political matters and al-ways is progressive and aggressive, although dominated by wise caution, and he holds to the principles of the true Jeffersonian Democracy.

The marriage of our subject and Miss Mary F. Annawalt was solemnized on the ranch where they now live in 1877, and they have five children, Ethel E., William E., R. Leone, Nellie B., and Ruby. Mrs. Beers is a native of Kansas City, Missouri.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 563
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Brown, Cassius

Cassius H. Brown - It is very acceptable to have the privilege of giving in epitome the salient points of the career of the esteemed gentleman whose name is at the head of this article. Mr. Brown, familiarly known as Judge Brown is one of the pioneers of this County and has always been much interested in its welfare, prominent in politics, a leader in the advancement of the cause of education, a prominent citizen and property owner and a large-hearted, genial, upright, capable, and talented American citizen.

The birth of Cassius H. was on December 27, 1852, in a log cabin in Mt. Hope, McLean County, Illinois, being the son of George W. and Eleanor (Kenyon) Brown. This was in the Mt. Hope colony and the father enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Seventeenth Illinois Infantry, being second lieutenant under General A. F. Smith. He participated in the battles at Nashville and Belmont and in many skirmishes. But just before Sherman started to the sea, the elder Brown w. as taken with pneumonia and died at Pulaski, Tennessee. His enlistment was on July 12, 1862. In 1869 our subject, after having gained a good education in the common schools, went to Henry County, Illinois, and in the fall of the following year he went to Iowa, but soon returned to Henry County. In February, 1873, he came to Plumas County, California, following farming and driving stage until the spring of 1879, when he went to Reno, Nevada, and clerked in a store, then went on the coast survey for the United States. In the spring of 1886, he went to Lyon County, Nevada, and in the fall of 1881, he came to his present place, which is nine miles west from Ontario, in the White settlement. He has a fine two hundred and forty acre farm, well irrigated, and improved in a good manner. He owns a large interest in the Nevada ditch and was one of the promoters of that fine institution, having been an officer in it for some time. His party were the first settlers in this vicinity. Judge Brown was one of the very first who advocated the raising of alfalfa and he was one of the first persons. who demonstrated that the Malheur valley was a successful fruit country, having now an elegant twenty acre orchard of all varieties indigenous to his climate.

In 1892, Mr. Brown was elected as county judge on the Republican ticket, being the first incumbent of that office elected by that party. He served with efficiency and satisfaction to the public for four years. Judge Brown was chairman of the Republican County convention in 1896-98 and 1900, and in 1898 and 1900 he was a delegate to the state convention and was a member of the state central committee. His grandfather Kenyon was a candidate for congress against Judge David Davis in Illinois, and in Atlanta, Illinois, our subject had the pleasure of seeing Abraham Lincoln. Fraternally, Judge Brown is popularly affiliated, being a Mason at Beckwith, California, in Hope Lodge, No. 234, and he has served for several years as secretary. In 1880 he was a charter member of the Hope Lodge, No. 22, in Mason Valley in Nevada, and the first master under the charter. He was a member of the Washoe Lodge, No. 28, at Payette, Idaho, when he came hither. In 1898 he be-came a charter member of Acacia Lodge, No. 118, at Ontario, and he was the first master for two years. He was a charter member of the Eastern Star, Chapter No. 69, of Ontario, and was the first worthy patron which position he is still filling.

Judge Brown has always taken an active interest in school matters and has served as clerk for many years. In addition to his handsome holdings already mentioned, the judge has an interest in the Vale Milling Company, and also is one of the incorporators of the Ontario Cemetery Association.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 564
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Blackaby, J. R.

Hon. J. R. Blackaby - Malheur County can boast of many distinguished pioneers who have made brilliant success in both the financial world and in the political realm, and one of the prominent men of this influential number is the gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, and who stands as one of the real builders of the County and is also one of the largest general merchandise operators within her borders at the present time, his store being located in Jordan Valley.

Mr. Blackaby was born in Iowa, on April 12, 1861, being the son of Bernard and Emeline Blackaby. There he grew to manhood and there also he received his primary education, completing the same when he graduated from the college in Keokuk, Iowa. That was in 1880, and immediately he came west. locating in this County and engaged in farming and teaching school. Three years were spent in the work of the educator and four as deputy clerk of the County and four years he served as postmaster in Jordan Valley. In 1898 the people recognizing his abilities, rewarded him with a term in the state legislature, where he did excellent work, serving on important committees and taking part in beneficial legislation for the entire state. Eighteen hundred and ninety-one was the year when he embarked on the mercantile sea and now he has one of the largest stocks of goods in the entire County and he is the recipient of a large patronage, drawn to his stores by his deferential treatment of all customers and his care of the interests of those who trade with him. He carries a well assorted stock and one can get anything that is in the realm of general merchandise and be assured that it is the best; and when once a person becomes a customer of Mr. Blackaby he is sure to remain. Mr. Blackaby is one of the organizers of the Bank of Ontario of Ontario, Oregon, and is now and has been since its establishment its vice-president. He is one of the financiers of the County and has demonstrated his ability in a worthy manner.

The marriage of Mr. Blackaby and Miss Mary J. Bauch, a native of Van Buren County, Iowa, was solemnized in that County on October 11, 1882. They have five children, Otto C., Earl, Larue, William J., Jay R. Mr. Blackaby is a member of the 1. O. O. F., Jordan Valley Lodge No. 158, and of the K. O. T. M. Mr. Blackaby, by reason of real worth and the merits of his achievements, is counted one of the most influential and prominent citizens of the County and he is also one of the men always arrayed on the side of advancement and progress.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 565
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Ward, Herbert

Herbert J. Ward - This capable and progressive gentleman is one of the leading men of this vicinity, being a well-to-do and prominent farmer and was one of the promoters of the valuable Owyhee ditch, being an incorporator and one who led the enterprise to a successful issue. Mr. Ward was born in Quebec, Canada, on April 12, 1856, the son of George P. and Elizabeth (Sherman) Ward. He spent his youthful days in the invigorating exercise of farm work and in gaining a good education from the public schools. At the age of twenty-two he left the parental roof for the world of labor and trial. His first work for himself was fireman on a locomotive and in due time he had mastered the engineer's art and was installed as an engineer of a steam shovel and then handled an engine on the road. In 1880 he came to Oregon, engaging in the sheep business. It was at this time that he began the agitation of the Owyhee ditch proposition and was among the very first who conceived the plan. He has steadily labored and planned for this valuable consummation and now he has a tine quarter section well watered from this canal. It was in 1894 that he settled on the land now his farm, taking it by the homestead act. It is situated two and one-half miles southwest from Nyssa and is one of the tine farms of the country. He has large fields of alfalfa, tine orchards, a valuable residence with barns and outbuildings to match and shade and ornamental trees and tasty grounds. Mr. Ward has added forty acres by purchase, which gives him a very valuable estate. He has several thousand sheep and is one of the leaders in that industry.

The marriage of Mr. Ward to Miss Sylvinia, daughter of James and Sarah McConnell, was solemnized on November 16, 1896, and one child, George P., was born to them on February 16, 1898. Mrs. Ward's parents were formerly of Ontario, Canada, but went to New York and in 1885 the father died. The mother, with eight children, came to Caldwell, Idaho, and is now living at Owyhee. Mr. Ward came to this country with practically no means and he has won the meed of good success and a generous competence for the industry and wise management that he has bestowed here.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 565
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Jones, Charles

Charles M. Jones - It is gratifying to be privileged to put in print an epitome of one of the brave men who fought, as did the subject of this sketch for the honor of the stars and stripes and the safety of our free institutions when the foul hand of treason sought to deface all and destroy the homes of freedom. In addition Mr. Jones has always shown him-self in the walks of life to be upright and capable and has done a noble part in the advancement and development of the resources of the country.

Speaking more particularly of his personal history, we note that his birth occurred in Hickman County, Tennessee on August 13, 1836, being the son of Stephen and Jane Jones. He was reared amid the environments of a farm and gained his education from the schools held in the log cabins of the clay. Our subject remained at home until he had reached manhood's estate, and in October, 1857, he was married to Miss Emily M. Downey in Searcy County, Arkansas, and soon thereafter went to Marion County, in Arkansas. And there, when the war broke out, he offered his services for freedom's cause. The date of his actual enlistment was August 6, 1862, at which time he was mustered into Company C, First Arkansas Cavalry, in the volunteer army. He was under Colonel Harrison and was soon de-tailed as musician in the regimental band. He participated in many skirmishes and did his share of hard service until August 23, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. He is now a member of the A. P. Hovey Post, G. A. R., at Ontario. Immediately following his discharge, he returned to his home and family and in 1875 he brought his family, having eight children, across the plains with ox teams, to the vicinity of Prairie City, Grant County. Two years later, he came to Ada County, Idaho, and thence to Washington County. It was in 1892 that he came to the vicinity of Ontario and went to farming and in 1899; he purchased his present place of forty acres, one mile west of Nyssa. He has it well improved and raises abundance of alfalfa hay, cutting as high as eight tons to the acre each year. His is farm has abundance of water from the Owyhee ditch.

To Mr. and Mrs. Jones there have been born the following children: William A., deceased: David J.; Mrs. Emma Langley of Santa Cruz, California; Andrew J., of Washington County, Idaho; John R., traveling agent; Mrs. Laura Stacy, near Vale; George W., deceased; Ada, deceased; Erastus E.  Mr. Jones is beginning the golden years of his life and he is well entitled, because of his faithful labors to enjoy in quietness the portion that he has gained, being respected by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 566
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Shea, Jeremiah

Jeremiah Shea - One of our early pioneers, whose worthy labors have done much toward the development of the resources and the substantial progress of Malheur County, is named at the head of this article and he is eminently fitted to be accorded consideration in this volume of his County's history, since he is a man of good standing, influential and prominent, has always been a progressive and patriotic citizen, is possessed of integrity and a stanch character and is held in high esteem by all of his fellows.

Mr. Shea was born in Canada on March 31, 1847, and there he was educated and remained until he had arrived at manhood's estate. Then he engaged in lumbering until 1872, at which date he came to this country and engaged with his brother in the stock business. Afterward He went to South Mountain and operated a meat market, then migrated to Silver City, and went into the livery business, and from there he furnished horses to the fleeing settlers at the time of the Indian outbreak in 1878. In 1883 we find him in Wagontown, keeping hotel, where he spent a number of years and soon afterwards he was on Cow creek engaged in the stock business. In 1887 Mr. Shea re-moved to Jordan creek and bought a ranch and two years later bought his present ranch home three miles east from Jordan Valley. He has four hundred and eighty acres of valuable land and large herds of horses and cattle. Mr. Shea also owns a stage line to De Lamar and Daisy from Jordan Valley, and he has been County assessor for a time.

The marriage of Mr. Shea and Miss Mary Fenwick, a native of California, was celebrated at Wagontown, in 1877, and they have nine children, named as follows: John, Maggie, Sarah, Neal, Agnes, Ellen, Guy, Ilene, and Eugene. Mr. Shea is one of the prominent men of the County, and also one of the heavy property owners and is a stanch, upright and patriotic citizen and esteemed gentleman.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 566
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
McGregor, Andrew

Andrew McGregor - This doughty end intrepid frontiersman, now one of the leading farmers and stockmen of his vicinity, having a fine estate eight miles vest from Ontario, which is the family home, and being a man of prominence and capabilities, has accomplished much in the development of the County and we are pleased to accord to him a representation in the history of Malheur County.

Mr. McGregor was born in Glasgow, Scotland on June 28, 1845, being the son of Duncan and Marguerette (McIntyre) McGregor. The father was born in Inverness, north Scotland, on February 14, 1800 and the mother was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 27, 1805. In 1846 the family came to America in a sailing vessel, being six weeks on the trip. Landing in New York, they made their way to Boston, where the father worked at block printing and dyeing in a calico factory. In 1849 marks the date when they came to the vicinity of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and there on August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Twentieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, being mustered in at Camp Randall, Madison, Wisconsin, and went thence to the barracks at St. Louis, and served under General Schofield in the First Brigade, Second Division, Army of the Frontier. He participated in the battle of Prairie Grove; Arkansas, December 7, 1862, was in the third siege of Vicksburg in 1863, took part in the battle of Yazoo, Atchafalga, Fort Morgan, Alabama, Spanish Fort, the siege of Mobile, and many skirmishes and received an honorable discharge on July 14, 1865, at Galveston, Texas. Following the war he returned to this home in Wisconsin, and followed logging for a time, and on July 3, 1869, he was married to Martha M., daughter of James W. and Caroline Davis, Who Were natives of the state of New York. Our subject then went to Kewaunee County, Wisconsin, and in 1871 removed to Meeker County, Minnesota, and there farmed and lumbered until 1876. In 1877 he drove a team across the plains to Boise and the following year he was with Colonel Green under General Howard after the Indians, a few of whom they cantered on the head waters of the Salmon. At one time, Mr. McGregor owned the site of the Natatorium in Boise. It was 1879 that his wife and tour children joined him at Boise and in 1882 they came to the vicinity of Ontario, and there he paid fifty dollars for a willow cabin and dirt floor for his family. Eighteen hundred and eighty-six marks the date of his removal to his present place, eight miles west from Ontario, as mentioned above. His place is excellently improved with buildings, orchards, fences, shade trees, irrigating ditches, and all things necessary to make a rural place comfortable and profitable. He has another farm two and one-half miles west from Ontario. Mr. McGregor is a member of the A. P. Hovey Post No. 21, of the G. A. R. at Ontario. He is also a member of the Armor Lodge, No. 69, K. of P., of Ontario.

To this worthy couple, there have been born ten children, as follows: Isabella, wife of H. T. Rusted, of Ontario; Minnie, wife of H. C. Ross of Nyssa; Andrew; Robert; Maggie, deceased; Harry; Martha, wife of A. Wellington of Dell; Eva; James; John. In addition to the property holdings mentioned above Mr. McGregor has a good band of cattle and fifty stand of bees, which provide abundance of honey from the fine alfalfa fields. He is a man of prominence and ability and enjoys the esteem and confidence of the entire community.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 567
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Sproul, Andreas

Andreas L. Sproul - The well known representative of business in Ontario, whose name initiates this paragraph is a man of enterprise and intelligence, being at the present time the incumbent of the post office, where he has served the interests of the people since March 20, 1899, and has demonstrated, as also, in all his career, his ability, faithfulness, and integrity. Mr. Sproul was born in Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, on February 18, 1863, being the son of Samuel and Mary (Litch) Sproul. He was favored with a good education from the common schools and at the age of fourteen went to sea, and at the age of seventeen years he was promoted to the position of captain, his vessel being the David J. Adams, plying between Digby and Boston. Later, he and his brother purchased the same vessel and rechristened it the Annie M. Sproul, having a sister of that name. The brother still owns and operates the vessel. At the age of twenty-three our subject sold his interest in the ship and came west to Grant County, Oregon, arriving there in the spring of 1887. He located near Dayville and went into the sheep and horse business, which he continued uninterruptedly until 1895. At that date he sold his sheep, but still owns a hand of horses. He had acquired real estate interests in various places in Malheur County, and has made this County his home since 1892. On March 11, 1893, Mr. Sproul took to himself a wife, the lady being Miss Ella, daughter of Lewis and Martha Dale, of Missouri. Mrs. Sproul was teaching in Caldwell, Idaho, previous to her marriage. In 1894 Mr. Sproul removed with his family to Ontario and there opened the Ontario Livery and Feed Stable, which he successfully operated until 1899, when he sold, being appointed postmaster at that time. Mr. Sproul was one of the locaters of the Owyhee ditch, being one of the incorporators of the company and filled the office of director until he sold his interests. He owns considerable real estate in Ontario, and also improved property and is one of the prominent men of the town, being always interested and active in political matters. He has served as councilman of the town and at the present time has received the nomination on the Republican ticket as sheriff of the County and he is well liked and highly esteemed wherever he is known. Mr. and Mrs. Sproul have one child, Harold.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 568
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Gray, Garrison

Garrison J. Gray - To the prominent and esteemed citizen of Malheur County whose name appears above we grant a representation in the history of the County, since he is to-day one of the leading men domiciled here, has always labored for the up building of the County, is a man of integrity and uprightness, and receives the commendation of his fellows. Mr. Gray's grandfather, John Gray, was said to be the last living soldier from the Revolution. He was a drummer boy at Bunker Hill and saw his father fall, then seized his sire's musket and fought until the struggle closed. He worked for General Washington after the war. He died near Hiramsburg, Noble County, Ohio, in March, 1868, lacking only two months of being one hundred and five years of age. His stepdaughter, Mrs. Nancy Thomas, is now living at the age of ninety years on the farm adjoining that old homestead.

Our subject was born, in Noble County, Ohio, February 23, 1830, being the son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Gorby) Gray. When five years of age he was taken with his parents to Athens County, and the following year, 1836, his mother died. In 1839 he went with his father to Jones County, Iowa, thence to Linn County and then to Cedar County, in which last place, at the age of eleven, he attended his first term of school. The next year they removed to Muscatine County and one year thereafter he tied his earthly possessions in a red handkerchief, clad in simple clothes and with a straw hat which he had braided himself, started forth into the wide world to seek his fortune. His first day's travel led him to Muscatine and the next stop was Bloomington, and there he visited his sister, who was working at the house of Judge Williams, a brother of Judge George Williams, of Portland. Thence he went to his brother, in Jones County, and there attended school. The next spring he carried the mail from Dubuque to Iowa City on horseback, then went to Rock Island, Illinois, and broke prairie sod with oxen. He kept zealously at work with his books and at the age of twenty had a certificate and was back in his native place in Ohio teaching school. In the spring of 1851 he went with a company to Fort Leavenworth, and then paid fifty dollars for the privilege of driving an ox team across the plains to Huntington. Thence our subject, who was a carpenter, John Weston, a clerk, George Cowne, a printer, and Isaac Hamilton, a farmer, each provided with twenty-five pounds of hardtack, made their way afoot to The Dalles in ten days, arriving on August 13, 1851, the very day that the first steamboat made its way to that town, under the direction of Captain Wells. He went to Portland on the Captain's row boat, and in that town refused a job with pay at three dollars per day and town lots at twenty-five dollars each in the heart of Portland as pay. He went to Astoria, saw Major Halleck, Generals Grant and McClellan, then went to Salmon and the winter of 1852-3 attended the university at Salem, known as the Willamette University. He taught school in Oregon and California and followed carpentering in the summer until 1860, when his industry and frugality had gained him a nice little holding of property. In 1863 we find him in the Idaho mines and at Fort Boise he was in charge of the carpenter work of the post and was there when the town was laid out. He kept a stage station seventeen miles below Boise and sold five thou-sand dollars worth of vegetables from his ranch, and in 1867 he went to Albany, and having made a snug little fortune, he retired. In 1871 he desired more activity and took a large bunch of cattle for the Idaho mines and stopped and took a homestead at lower Willow creek, where he now lives, having a good farm of four hundred and eighty acres, an elegant two-story and one-half ten-room dwelling, with pure spring water piped into it, a finely improved estate, and a large holding of stock. He has also plenty of water for irrigating, one hundred swarms of bees, a five-acre orchard of choice varieties and is a leading and prosperous citizen. His estate is located three miles southwest from Dell, of which he was the first postmaster, continuing for fifteen years. He received his commission in this office from General Grant.

Mr. Gray and Miss Sarah A. Moore, a native of Ohio, were married on February 1, 1855, and six children have been born to them: Martha A., deceased; Ida I., wife of B. L. Jones, of Vale; Elizabeth E., wife of B. Emmons, of Eugene; Mary B., wife of Dr. O. M. Dodson, of Baker City; David L., deceased; Rosetta, wife of H. C. Bowers, of Baker City. On January 20, 1885, Mrs. Gray was called away by death. On September 6, 1886, Mr. Gray married Miss Sarah I. Wales, of Roodhouse, Greene County, Illinois, and they have three children, Ethel, Elmer Roe and Edith. On June 17, 1899, this lady died. Mr. Gray and both of his wives were members of the M. E. church. He is affiliated with the Masons. In the early times Mr. Gray had difficulties, as had all the settlers, with the Indians and many are the hardships which he and his were called upon to endure. In 1897 Mr. Gray went to his old home in the east and had a joyous time in renewing old acquaintances.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 568
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hope, Milton

Milton G. Hope - It is with pleasure that we are enabled to incorporate in the volume of the history of the County of Malheur an epitome of the career of the estimable gentleman, careful and capable business man, and sturdy pioneer of this section, since he is a man of ability, has shown commendable zeal in the development of the country, has gained' a handsome holding in this County, is a man of sound principles, and well known for integrity and uprightness.

The birth of Mr. Hope occurred in Brookville, Vernon County, Wisconsin, on August 31, 1859 his parents being George W. and Emeline (Williams) Hope. The account of the father's noble service in the war of the rebellion, the mother's moves to Kansas and so forth, are mentioned in another portion of this work and need not he repeated here. Our subject was educated in the common schools and later took a course in the Institute at Atchison, Kansas. He went with his mother to Kansas, Brown County, in 1870, in 1873, went to Norton County, and in 1880 he went to Colorado, and the following year, his brother, Isaiah, mention of whom is made in this book, came and they went into partnership, in which they have continued since. In 1882 they came to Wood River, Idaho, and the next year they came to Malheur County, each entering a homestead in the vicinity of Vale. In 1887 they started a merchandise establishment with a capital of one hundred dollars, and here was brought out the real metal of the brothers for it was but a short time before their fair and deferential treatment of patrons brought them such a large trade that they had a fine store and about forty thousand dollars' worth of goods. Such is their business record in short and in part. In addition to this commendable showing they have large interests in the First Bank of Vale, own seven hundred acres of land and sixty acres on which are situated the famous hot springs known now as the Hope Geysers, which have heretofore been a landmark since the white men first came to this country. Politically, Mr. Hope is a stanch Republican, casting his first vote for James A. Garfield in Colorado and walking sixteen miles to the polls. He has served on the school board for thirteen years thus manifesting his untiring zeal for the welfare of the educational interests of the County. He has been mayor of the town for two terms and for eight years he was postmaster. It is of note that in 1887-8 our subject was in business with his older brother, John A., but finding the need of further training in the school he sold out and went to the institute mentioned above and after that graduated from the Bryant & Chapman Commercial College Of St. Joseph Missouri, then followed the successful career that has been outlined.

The marriage of Mr. Hope and Miss Emma H., daughter of Francis and Sarah J. High occurred at Norton. Kansas, and three children have been born to bless the happy household: Leslie L. Elizabeth, and the baby, not yet named. Mr. Hope is past grand of the I. O. O. F. Vale Lodge. No. 100, and was first chief patriarch of Malheur Encampment of Vale. Mr. Hope is to-day one of the men who enjoys the respect and esteem of the population of Malheur County and is entitled to much credit for the enterprising labors which he has performed here, and the zeal manifested for the welfare of the town, schools, and County in general, while his own large business interests as vice-president of the First Bank, manager of the Vale Milling Company of which he and his brother own one-half interest, and numerous other industries, are attended to with the same care, geniality, keen foresight, and good practical wisdom that have always characterized him in all his walk.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 569
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hope, Isaiah

Hon. Isaiah W. Hope is one of the most prominent men in Malheur County today, and he has been a leader here for many years, having started in the mercantile business with his brother in an early day and building up one of the mammoth establishments of the west, while also in many lines of industry he has brought the fine talent of which he is possessed into play with the gratifying result that he has achieved a general round of success in the realm of merchant, general developer of the country, organizer of the Vale Commercial Company, promoter of various leading industries of the County, banker, and representative of his County in the state legislature, in which latter position he has the distinction of being the only man who has received a second term at the hands of the people; thus it is seen that Mr. Hope is deserving of a prominent mention in the history of Malheur County, where he stands esteemed by all both for his work and for his own intrinsic worth.

Isaiah W. was born in Brookville, Vernon County, Wisconsin, September 28, 1861, being the son of George W. and Emeline (Williams) Hope. His father was one of the martyrs of the Civil war, enlisting in the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Volunteers in the spring of 1862 He was under Sherman in the siege of Vicksburg, was sent to the north to fight the Indians in the Minnehaha massacre, returned to go with Sherman to the south, and was taken sick and sent to the hospital at Memphis, Tennessee, where he died in the spring of 1863. In 1870 our subject went with his mother and the rest of the family to Brown County, Kansas, and in 1873, they went to Norton County, where the mother took up a soldier's claim and is living there at the present time. In July, 1881, Mr. Hope came west to Colorado, entering into partnership with his brother, Milton G., with whom he has labored ever since. In 1883 they came to Bellville, Idaho, and the following year they came to Vale. They each entered a homestead and with their bare hands they commenced the work of improvement. In 1887 they started a mercantile establishment with one hundred dollars capital and they have merited the patronage of the people because of fair and honorable treatment, and the patron-age came and the result has been that at the present time the Hope Brothers have a stock of from thirty to forty thousand dollars worth of finely assorted merchandise, and a fine large stone store. In 1902 they incorporated under the name of the Vale Commercial Company in which they hold a half interest. They also own an interest in the Vale Milling Company, and have seven hundred acres of land, besides sixty on which are located the famous Hope Springs. They are interested heavily in the First Bank of Vale.

In 1890 Mr. Hope married Miss Lillie B., daughter of Fred and Hannah Gellerman, near Vale, and to them have been born the following children: Norma E., Irma D., Mazie. In 1894 Mr. Hope was elected on the Republican ticket to represent this County in the state legislature and at the expiration of his term was promptly re-elected. He is a member of the state central committee, and chairman of the County committee. Mr. Hope is member and past grand of the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 100, of Vale: is also past chief patriarch of the Malheur Encampment of Vale. He and his wife are member of the Rebekah and she is past grand while he has served as secretary of the I. O. O. F. for several years. Mr. Hope was educated in the common schools and then has perfected himself in that greatest of all schools, practical business on the American frontier. He and his brother were the original locators of the Malheur Oil Company and hold large interests in that concern. Mr. Hope has forty acres adjoining the town of Vale and intends soon to erect a residence there.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 570
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Mangin, William

William M. Mangin - The subject of this article is one of the oldest pioneers of Jordan Valley, a man of ability and worth. one who has wrought here with assiduity and sagacity since the early days, is now recognized as one of the prominent men of the County, has ever maintained an unsullied reputation and manifested a stanch character of uprightness and integrity, and in business circles has won a success that is a credit to any man, therefore he is deserving of a prominent posit don in the history of his County and it is with pleasure that we accord him such at this time.

William Mangin was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on March 16, 1830, being the son of James and Elizabeth Mangin, natives of Ireland and Nova Scotia respectively. Our subject received his education at his native place and at the early age of sixteen years he embarked on the schooner, Boston, which went to Newfoundland to load with codfish for Gibraltar; thence to Madrid where they loaded with fruit and wine for America. Returning to Boston, he then went to Mobile for a load of cotton, then transferred, after a summer spent on the bay, to another ship, the Dublin, and went with a cargo of cotton to Liverpool. Re-turning to New York, he made another trip to Liverpool, then made several trips to foreign countries, as West Indies, France, and many others. In 1856 he arrived in San Francisco, sailing on the good ship, Wild Duck, and spent some time on the bay, and then in 1858 came to the timber regions of Puget Sound, whence he went to Fraser river experiencing some exciting times with the Indians. It was as early 1872 when he came to Jordan Valley. He had a brother living here then, who died in 1874. Our subject took a homestead and at once went to farming and raising stock. He has been eminently successful in these lines and now has one of the finest farms in the County of Malheur, it being located one mile east from Jordan Valley, and consisting of four hundred and eighty acres of fine fertile land. He has a large bunch of cattle and is a leader among the stock men. In 1878 when the savages were on the war path, Mr. Mangin was of inestimable service in defending the settlers and he has always shown the qualities of worth and bravery.

The marriage of Mr. Mangin and Martha Kellog, widow of John Kellog a pioneer of 1872, was solemnized in 1883.  By her former husband, Mrs. Mangin has four boys, Warren J., Joseph M., Edward C., and George A. It is with pleasure that we have reverted to the career of Mr. Mangin during his entire stay in this County, for it has been passed with credit to himself and advantage to all concerned, while he numbers as his friends all who may have the pleasure of his acquaintance.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 571
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Bradley, Eber

Eber L. Bradley – this capable gentleman, better known as Judge Bradley, is one of the prominent men of this county, having been in the vicinity of Malheur, where he now resides, for many years, and taking always a leading part, both in the development of the country and in the manipulation of governmental affairs, in all of which he has discharged faithfully and well the duties devolving upon him, and now as one of the venerable patriarchs, stanch pioneers, and patriotic citizens, he is held in high esteem and admired by all.

Mr. Bradley was born in Butler county, Ohio, on July 31, 1829, being the son of Eber M. and Elsie (Rinearson) Bradley.  He went with his parents to Des Moines county, Iowa, in 1843 and in 1851 he came across the plains in a train of thirty wagons drawn by oxen.  He passed through the territory now occupied by Baker and Malheur counties and went on to Oregon City.  He followed packing for a time and then took up a merchant’s life at Jacksonville, Oregon.  Later he packed to Yreka and other points, and in 1855 sold out and the following year visited the spot where the city of Spokane now stands.  Thence he returned to Umatilla and The Dalles and that fall he enlisted in Company C., of Oregon Volunteers, to fight the Indians.  He was under Captain James K. Kelly, afterward colonel and now ex-state and United States Senator.  He participated in several skirmishes and was detailed to appraise the government property, being also clerk in the quartermaster’s department, and later was honorably discharged.  After this he was again on the mercantile sea with Professor Post and also interest in steamboating on the Willamette.  In 1860 he closed out this business and went with a pack train to British Columbia, and the following spring he was in Oro Fino and Pierce City merchandising and mining.  Here he was robbed of about nineteen hundred dollars.  Later he closed out and went to work for Wells Fargo, carrying the express from Lewiston to Florence.  In 1863 Mr. Bradley was deputy sheriff under Captain Fisk and in this capacity he had charge of the famous murderers of McGruder, who were finally hung.  Later he was in Walla Wall, and in 1864 he was in Boise, and in 1867 he came to Malheur, where he still lives.  He at once engaged in mining and has lived here continuously since that time, being always one of the prominent men of the section, as he is today.  While in Oro Fino Mr. Bradley was elected the first county clerk of Shoshone county, Idaho, the date being 1863, and he ran on the Republican ticket.  In Boise he was deputy sheriff under Pinkham, and in Malheur he has been notary for the past twenty years, serving a number of terms as justice of the peace.  He had charge of the Malheur Indian Agency from 1882 to 1886 and also of the Malheur and Camp Harney reservation.  In 1880, in 1890 and in 1900 Mr. Bradley acted as census enumerator.  Mr. Bradley owns the hotel in Malheur, has several other valuable buildings and also some good mining property on the Mormon Basin creek.  He is highly esteemed wherever he is known and is one of the substantial and upright men of the county.  Mr. Bradley is one of the veterans of the Indian wars and was always ready to go to the front in time of impending danger.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 594
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Eldredge, Henry

Henry S. Eldredge - The subject of this article has done much toward the industrial development of Malheur county, and is one of the prominent business men in the town of Vale at the present time, being owner and operator of the Glen livery barn, where he has fine, large rigs and good stock, taking an especial care for the comfort and welfare of his patrons; he owns and operates the blacksmith shop, having also a large tract of land in the vicinity of the town, while in all these enterprises he manifests a commendable business sagacity, a worthy integrity and maintains an unsullied reputation among his fellows.

Mr. Eldredge was born near Northfield, Minnesota, On May 23, 1862, being the son of Charles K. and Cornelia E. (Carter) Eldredge. While still a child he was taken by his parents to Beaver Falls, in his native state, and there the father followed milling. Our subject was educated in the graded schools and in 1882 he came with his father to the west, traveling through by train to Granger and thence by teams to Baker City and passing through this portion of Malheur. In Baker City Henry S. learned the blacksmith trade and more or less during the time from that date until the present he has been engaged in the king of all trades. In various places he has wrought at the forge, has traveled considerably, and at the time of the great fair in Chicago he visited that city. Mr. Eldredge had two hundred and eighty acres of land, but recently sold a portion and bought the livery mentioned above. He has a good trade both in the barn and in the shop, and is considered one of the substantial business men of the town.

The marriage of Mr. Eldredge and Miss Euphemie F., daughter of William R. and Sophia Shimp, of Ontario, was celebrated on July 1, 1895, and to them was born one child, Opal V. On March 22, 1900, Mr. Eldredge was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife by death. Mr. Eldredge is happily affiliated with the W. of W., Arcadia Camp, No. 364, of Ontario; with the Maccabees, Council Tent, No. 15, of Council, Idaho. It is of note that Mr. Eldredge's father located the land of a portion of the site of Vale. The father died on April 19, 1886, but the mother is still living in Monon, White county, Indiana. Mr. Eldredge is well liked among his fellows, is a man of stability and capabilities, and it is quite fitting that he should be accorded a representation in this volume of our county's history, since he has wrought here faithfully for the advancement of the county's interest.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 594
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Kelley, Joseph

Joseph C. Kelley, one of the young business men of Malheur county, was born January 3, 1870, at Idaho City, Idaho, his parents being Joseph and Margaret (Thompson) Kelley, pioneers of that state. Joseph Kelley, senior, was a native of Farmington, Iowa, and was among those who in the early fifties sought the golden sands of California. After spending several years in California, in the middle sixties, Mr. Kelley again emigrated, going to Idaho and establishing himself in business as a mechanic at Idaho City. Here, in the closing days of 1870, the silver cord was broken and all that was earthly of the departed pioneer was laid at rest. A little while later the family removed to Oregon, settling near Nyssa, in this county, and in 1877, Mr. Kelley having meanwhile become the wife W. K. Stark, the family again chose a new home, this time on Willow creek, where the subject of this sketch grew to manhood's estate. The mother passed into the life beyond in August, 1897. Of the immediate family now living there are but two, Joseph and his brother, Melville D. Kelley. a prosperous ranchman residing on Willow creek.

Mr. Kelley remained at home, engaged in ranching and stock raising, until 1898 when, having learned the saddler's trade, he came to Vale and opened a small harness and saddle store. From a small beginning the business has grown to one of considerable size. He is the sole saddler and harness dealer at the county seat, and his business occupies new and commodious quarters.

In 1900 Mr. Kelley was nominated for the office of county treasurer by the Republican party and was elected over his opponent. William Plughoff, fusionist, by a majority of one hundred and nineteen votes. He was accorded a renomination this year and was victorious a second time, his majority over H. B. Donahey being two hundred and seventy-one, or nearly double that he received the first time he appeared in the political arena. Mr. Kelley is a member of the strong fraternal organization, the Odd Fellows, belonging to Vale Lodge, No. 100; he is also a Mason, belonging to Arcadia Lodge, No. 118, in Ontario. He is a master Mason and also he has served the Vale Lodge of the I. O. O. F. as noble grand. Mr. Kelley is also as yet, a member of that largest though most noblest of all orders, the Bachelors.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 593
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Tague, Joseph

Joseph H. Tague - It is with unfeigned pleasure that we are privileged to recount somewhat of the career of the estimable gentleman and patriotic citizen who is mentioned above, since he is a man of good standing, a well-to-do agriculturist and stockman of Malheur county, and has the honorable distinction of being one of the brave men, who hazarded life and limb for the safety of our beloved union and the promotion of good government. He was born in Ripley county, Indiana, on July 13, 1841, being the son of Lemuel and Ann (Buchanan) Tague, the mother being a second cousin of James Buchanan, the President of the United States. Our subject remained at the home place until the cruel war of the Rebellion broke out and then he promptly enlisted in the Sixth Indiana Infantry, Company H. This was in the summer of 1861, and he was among the very first of the three years' volunteers. He served under Rosecrans and then under Thomas. He took part in the battle of Lookout Mountain, also that at Green river and in many skirmishes, doing the part of the true and valiant soldier. He received a wound from a bayonet, in his eye that cost him its sight. He served three years, and one year and three months of this time was on a gunboat. He was honorably discharged and is now commander of the Sedgwick Post of the G. A. R., at Huntington, No. 4. Many were the hardships and deprivations that fell to his lot in the army and many times he suffered from hunger in addition to all the other woes of war. Following the war Mr. Tague went to his native place in Indiana. He had two brothers who served in the Third Indiana Cavalry and one was wounded severely.

The marriage of Mr. Tague and Miss Martha E. Wise was celebrated in Ripley county, Indiana, in 1865, and in 1877 they removed to Gibbon, Nebraska, entered government land and settled down to farming. In 1883 he removed to Council Bluffs and then in 1893 he came to the west via train and located at his present home place, where he purchased a quarter section, three-fourths of a mile southeast from Dell. He has a good farm, well irrigated and improved, having a comfortable house, barn and other buildings. Politically Mr. Tague is allied with the Republicans and is also very active in the promotion of educational facilities. To Mr. and Mrs. Tague have been born the following children: Nancy A., wife of B. Parks, of Nebraska; Lavina, wife of R. Boswell, of Malheur; Minnie, wife of A. Derrick, of Dell; Rosa, wife of P. Flaherty, of Omaha; Carrie, wife of E. Kendall, of Huntington; Bertha, wife of H. Lockett, of Dell; Villa, wife of O. McCauley, of Huntington; Joseph H., Charles R. and Emery. Mr. Tague is a man of good standing among his fellows, has made a fine record in the world as a business man, soldier and citizen and is highly esteemed by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 592
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Rutherford, Richard

Richard S. Rutherford - As a man among men, possessed of integrity, ability and perseverance; as a soldier, whose steady and constant service in the struggle for the punishment of treason and the wiping out of the insult to the stars and stripes was valiant and brave; as a business operator, whose wisdom and enterprise have been well manifested: the subject of this sketch stands, and it is fitting that a representation of him be granted space in this volume of Malheur's history.

Richard S. was born in Armagh county, near Belfast, Ireland, on February 22, 1840, being the son of Thomas and Amelia (Parks) Rutherford, who emigrated to this country when this son was eighteen months old. They settled in Quebec, Canada, whence in 1848 they came to Niagara county, New York. In 1852 they removed to Tuscola county, Michigan, and few years later our subject started in life for himself, his first move was to Scott county, Missouri, where he lived until the breaking out of the Civil War. At that particular time he was in charge of a plantation. On the tenth day of August, 186l, he offered his services to fight the battles of the nation, enlisting in Company H, Eighth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, being in the Fifteenth Army Corps under General Logan and in Sherman's Division. He went in as a private and helped with good will to fight the battles of Ft. Donelson, Corinth and Shiloh and then was promoted to the position of head wagon master for the Fifteenth Corps train, with a salary of one hundred and twenty-five dollars a month. Then he participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Jackson, Atlanta, Chattanooga, and Lookout Mountain, then on August 20, 1864 he received his honorable discharge at Atlanta. He returned to Michigan and in twenty days was back again to the scene of fighting and this time was installed its master of the hospital wood train at Nashville, Tennessee, where he received a salary of one hundred and fifty dollars per month. During this time he was appointed as captain of a special company when Hood surrounded Nashville. He served until the close of the war, then was honorably discharged and returned to Michigan. He was fortunate during the entire service, being in the hospital but one week and that on account of the mumps.  Soon after returning to his old home in Michigan he was married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Robert and Mary F. Turner, the wedding occurring on June 14, 1866. Mrs. Rutherford is a native of Canada and of English extraction. He operated a hotel for a short time and then, in 1867, went to Georgetown, Colorado, and shortly after started the mining town of Silver Plume. He handled a pack train, and mined until 1876 and then went to California, thence to Nevada, and in 1878 came to Waitsburg, Washington. Eighteen hundred and eighty was the date he removed to Boise, Idaho, and three years later he came to Ontario. He opened the Rutherford, a first class hotel, and operated it until 1892, when it burned down and then he removed on to his farm, which he had taken as a soldier's homestead, and there he remained until January, 1902, when he sold out and retired to Ontario. Here he has a fine residence in the heart of town, with ample grounds and tasty buildings.

To Mr. and Mrs. Rutherford there have been born eight children, as follows: Roy S., married to Buelah Arnold; Benjamin F., married to Daisy Henshaw; Charles E., deceased; Ray W., deceased; Adrian A.  Also John, Edwin and Clara the three oldest, who are deceased. Mr. Rutherford is a past grand of the I. O. O. F., Ontario Lodge, No. 90; of the encampment and of the A. F. & A. M.. Acacia Lodge, No. 118, and of the G. A. R., Alvin P. Hovey post of which he is post commander. He and his wife are members of the Rebekah; and Eastern Star, and also are allied with the Congregational church, while in political matters Mr. Rutherford is a Republican.

Mrs. Rutherford's parents were Robert and Mary (Franklin) Turner, and Benjamin Franklin is one of her ancestors on her mother's side.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 592
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Farley, James

James H. Farley has led a life of activity and filled with enterprising and various labors, during which, also, he has manifested those rare qualities of integrity, up rightness, and perseverance, which together with his wise methods of procedure and Industry, have given him the competence of a prosperous business man and owner of real property. James H. was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on October 15, 1858, being the son of Patrick and Catherine Farley, who settled at Dubuque when it was but a small hamlet, being natives of New York state. The father served three years in the Civil war, participating in numerous battles and at the close was honorably discharged. Our subject went with his parents to Kelsey, Massachusetts, and after the war they all removed to St. Louis, where the father went to railroading on the Illinois & St. Louis Railroad where he held the position of road minister for nine years and at the time of his death, in 1892, he was general manager of the entire road. Our subject learned railroading, beginning as a Menial, then operated as engineer, and later retired from it and handled a stationary engine in Kansas City. Following that he went to work on a horse ranch near North Platte, Nebraska, remaining there until 1881, then migrated to Granger, Idaho, worked on the railroad a short time and then came to where Ontario now stands. Not liking the country he went to Olds Ferry, operating the same for a time, and then to the Grande Ronde valley in 1882, where he took a timber claim near Elgin and operated a saw mill. Later he sold this property and then we find him in Seattle, whence he went to Walla Walla, and from that point to Ontario. He engaged to run an engine for the mines on Snake river, and in 1900 he purchased the entire property of the Ontario Livery and Feed Stable, consisting of barn and full equipment. He now handles a first-class livery, probably the largest in the entire country, and his rigs are first-class, his horses of the best and an untiring care for the welfare of his patrons is manifested by him constantly. In addition Mr. Farley handles coal, does a general dray and teaming, business, and handles a good farm of five miles south-west from the town. He also owns twenty acres adjoining Ontario.

The marriage of Mr. Farley and Miss Martha, daughter of Jesse and Catherine Darr was solemnized at Weiser on November 17, 1884, and they have become the parents of five children: Jesse, Kate, Lulu E., James H., deceased, and Opal M. Mr. Farley is affiliated with the I. O. O. F., Ontario Lodge, No. 90, also with the A. F. & A. M., Acacia Lodge, No. 118, and with the K. of P., and the A. O. U. W., while he and his wife are members of the Rebekahs and the Eastern Star.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 591
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Madden, James

James E. Madden - This well known and representative business man is one of the prominent citizens of Ontario, where he owns and operates a fine, large livery and feed stable having fine and comfortable rigs and good horses, and manifesting a careful supervision for the comfort and safety of his patrons. Mr. Madden was born in Perry county, Ohio on May 31, 1849, being the son of Hezekiah and Mary Madden, natives of Ohio, also. While still a child he was brought by his parents to Putnam county, in the native state, and in 1863 they came thence to Mills county, Iowa. He was reared on a farm, having but limited opportunity to gain educational training, but by dint of hard labor and making the best of the log school house privileges, he received his training. In 1874 he came to The Dalles and one year later returned to Iowa, where, in 1876, July 29, he contracted a marriage with Miss L. A. Barnett. They remained there two years on the home place, then bought a farm and tilled it until 1882, in which year he moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, purchased a farm and remained there until 1887. The last year mentioned was the time he migrated to Oregon, locating at Westfall, on Bully creek, Malheur county. He engaged in sheep raising, but later sold them and bought cattle and in the severe winter of 1889 and 1890 he lost nearly all his stock, as did many of the stock men. He was not to be discouraged, however, and went at the business again until he had regained his losses, and in 1899 sold out and came to Ontario, where he purchased eighty acres of land adjoining the town and began improving it. He has a fine six-room residence, land all fenced, good orchard, barns and out buildings, and the place is well supplied with water for irrigating. He owns stock in the Owyhee ditch, whence he gets his water supply. In addition to his farm and other property Mr. Madden has a livery and feed stable in Ontario, as stated above, and he does a good business.

To Mr. and Mrs. Madden there have been born nine children, as follows: Arthur, deceased, Perry, John H., Charles, Nona, Ethel, Nina, Joseph A., Robert E. and Pleasant. Mr. Madden is deserving of much credit or the faithful and enterprising manner in which he has labored in this county, and it is with pleasure that we have been enabled to do him this consideration, since he is well esteemed by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 590
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
King, Gilbert

Gilbert L. King - It is now our pleasant privilege to recount the items of the career of the prominent and capable gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, who is to-day one of the leading men in Malheur county, being not only crowned with abundant financial success as the result of his industry and wise management of the resources that came to his hands, but also a man of prominence in educational lines in younger days, and at the present time a fluent public speaker and well informed man of ability and culture.

Gilbert L. was born in Jefferson county, New York, on February 9, 1848, being the son of Lorenzo D. and Julia Ann (Schryver) King. While a child he came with his parents to Dodge county, Wisconsin, and grew up there on the frontier, gaining his education at first from the common schools and thorough reading. On February 4, 1864 patriotism stirred young King to offer his services in the Third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Company G, being the Twentieth Corps, under Joe Hooker, a part of Sherman's Army. He participated in the battle of Resaea and in several skirmishes, being wounded in his leg. In July 1865, he was honorably discharged and returned to Wisconsin, thence to Mason county, Illinois, where he taught school for a time. In 1869 he went to Webster City, Iowa and engaged in the grocery business, but sold out in 1879 and repaired to Bloomington, Illinois, where he took a course of two years in the state normal school. He then taught school in McLean County, the same state, and in 1874 he went to work for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, having also labored for them some previous to 1869. He had mastered telegraphy in his course at the normal and from 1874 until 1897 he was in the service of this company at various places on their line as station agent. He came to Ontario in 1885, being the first agent here, and in this position he remained until 1897, when he resigned and removed on to his farm, a rich tract of land adjoining the town on the west. It is one of the best in the county, has a fine house, twenty-acre orchard of all varieties of fruit indigenous to this section, and supplied with plenty of water for irrigating purposes. Mr. King has a large band of cattle. In 1899 he opened a real estate and insurance office in the town of Ontario, and he does a good business now in these lines, handling a number of the leading companies. He is also secretary and stock-holder in the Nevada and Owyhee ditch companies. Mr. King commenced life with no capital in finances, but with good ability and a resolute purpose to succeed, and he has done so in an admirable manner, both in financial enterprise, being possessed of much wealth, and also in maintaining an untarnished reputation throughout his busy career, being also highly respected and esteemed by all who know him.

The marriage of Mr. King and Miss Isabella Easton occurred on September 14, 1875, in Hall county, Nebraska. They have six children: Edward L., Arthur S., Ira N., Edna L., Alice, Homer G. Mr. King is a past master and member of the Acacia Lodge, No. 118 of the A. F.& A. M., of Ontario and has represented his order in the grand lodge; he also belongs to the Eastern Star. In politics Mr. King is a Republican and often his eloquence is heard on the platform in political contests.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 590
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Fraser, Edmund

Edmund A. Fraser - The young and eminently successful gentleman whose name appears above is one of the leading men of Malheur county, being the owner of a controlling interest in the Malheur Mercantile Company, a large general merchandise establishment of Ontario, which does an immense business not only from the country adjacent to Ontario, but also from the interior of Malheur and Harney counties. Our subject was born in Woodstock, Canada, on September 2, 1870, being the son of George and Sarah (Sheperd) Fraser. He attended the common school, and at the age of twelve was ready to enter the Upper Canada College of Toronto, whence he graduated in the spring of 1886. His parents came to Indiana and he came, at the age of eighteen years, to Ontario. April, 1888 was the date of his landing here and he soon was in the employ of Kissel, Shilling & Danielson, of the Oregon Forwarding Company, in the capacity of bookkeeper and clerk. In this position, he performed faithful service until 1900, when he purchased the controlling interest in the R. D. Greer Mercantile Company, changing the name to the Malheur Mercantile Company, which is incorporated. Mr. Fraser is manager and secretary of the company, and they carry a large stock of goods in dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, hardware, gents furnishings, and in fact in every line which is used in the vast territory, whence comes the many hundreds of patrons that visit their commodious store, one of the finest in this section of the country. In addition to their large store building, they have two spacious warehouses filled with goods. The firm is a very popular one of the country, and our subject is among the very leaders of the business world of eastern Oregon. The fair treatment always extended to patrons, the spirit of accommodation, and the wise business methods used in selecting and purchasing goods, makes this firm one of great prominence and accounts for its unbounded success and the credit for this pleasant state of affairs is largely due to the wisdom and ability of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Fraser is also a director of the Owyhee ditch and one of the directors of the Ontario opera house, having stock in both companies.

The marriage of Mr. Fraser and Miss Ida, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Holland, was solemnized on October 4, 1899, and they have been blessed by the advent of one son, Edmund A., Jr. Fraternally Mr. Fraser is identified with the I. O. O. F., being past grand of the order, Lodge No. 90, at Ontario; and is a Master Mason and treasurer of Acacia Lodge, No. 118, A. F. & A. M.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 589
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Van Gilse, Robert

Robert van Gilse - The capable and educated gentleman, of whom we now have the privilege of writing, is one of the leading fruit men of the entire northwest, being better fitted, doubtless, than most in this industry in the entire country, for in addition to the practical experience in handling nurseries and fruit farms themselves, he has received from some of the leading horticultural schools of Europe the best theoretical and practical training that is now the privilege of a man to secure.  It is with great pleasure, therefore, that we grant space here for an epitome of his interesting career. And it would give us gratification if in brief we were privileged to publish for the benefit of the fruit men of Malheur county, his valuable experience in these lines.

We will revert to the personal history of our subject and we note first that in the pure Anglo-Saxon country of Holland is his birth-place. Middleburg is the spot and June 18, 1873, is the date. His parents were J. A. and Mary van Gilse. The father is editor of one of the most powerful journals of Holland and is a member of the Congressional body of the country, being a leader in those halls as else, in the field of journalism. Our subject attended the common school until twelve years of age at Rotterdam, then entered the Horticultural College at Amsterdam in which noted institution he finished with credit a three years' course, graduating with distinction. Immediately succeeding this, he spent two years in practical work in the nurseries in Holland and England, being conversant with the methods employed in nurseries in both of these countries. 1892 is the date when he landed in New York and immediately he started thence for the west, landing in Payette, where he at once started a nursery. In the skillful and successful prosecution of this enterprise, the was engaged until 1896 when he sold and took a trip to Holland. In the spring of 1897 he returned and bought one hundred and sixty acres south-west from Ontario six miles. He here opened a nursery and also devotes much attention to producing fruit for the market as well as much alfalfa, having sixty-live acres of the latter and as much of the former. He has all kinds of fruit, has improved his farm in a fine manner with all buildings necessary, and has also plenty of water for irrigating. In addition to this, Mr. van Gilse has another quarter section where he is now living, two and one half miles northwest from Nyssa. This farm is newer than the other, but is well improved and has twenty-five acres planted to alfalfa and one hundred and twenty to orchard. This with his other farm makes one of the finest orchards in the entire country. And on account of the time needed in attention to this vast amount of market fruit, Mr. van Gilse has closed out his nursery stock. He is a man of great energy and in addition to this commendable work he has succeeded in bringing to this country a colony of his people and they are fast becoming the most substantial and worthy citizens of the state.

The marriage Mr. van Gilse and Miss Trien Teases occurred on April 29, 1900, and one child is the fruit of the union, Mary. Mrs. van Gilse is also a native of Holland. We are glad to note the energy and skill that have been displayed by this worthy citizen in the progress of the interests of our county and truly Malheur county owes much to his arduous and wisely bestowed labors within her precincts. Fraternally, Mr. van Gilse is affiliated with the A. F. & A. M. Arcadia Lodge, No. 118, of Ontario, and also with the K. of P. Armour Lodge, No. 69. He is active in the interests of good government, being allied with the Democratic Party and is central committeeman of the Nyssa precinct. Our worthy President said recently of a friend, "He is a man who has done thing." Such may well be applied to our subject. He has done things and his works proclaim him the man whom men recognize as a benefactor of the country and of his fellow men. Mr. van Gilse was the moving spirit in inaugurating the rural free delivery system.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 588
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Clement, Roswell

Roswell W. Clement - Among the leading agriculturists of Malheur county is to be mentioned the subject of this sketch, whose life has manifested a worthy record of honest and rigorous endeavor, dominated with sagacity and tempered with prudence and display of affability and genial bearing toward all. In Middleville, Barry county, Michigan, on January 5, 1862, occurred the happy event of the birth of Roswell W. Clement, his parents being Judge James T. and Lucy (Hayes) Clement. The family came to Osage, Iowa, while our subject was a small child, and thence they removed to the vicinity of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1868. In these various places Roswell W. was reared, receiving a good education from the common schools. 1881 marks the date when they again removed toward the west, this time journeying with teams, one of which our subject drove the entire distance, to Payette, Idaho, making the trip in eighty days.  Here on September 11, 1884, Mr. Clement married Miss Harriet, daughter of John and Melissa Neal, and a native of Denver, Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Neal were early pioneers of the Payette Valley, coming thither from Denver, in which town they also were among the first settlers and lived there when flour retailed at fifty dollars per sack. To Mr. and Mrs. Clement there have been born four children named as follows: Martha Ethel, James R., Walter and Buell J. Mr. Clement came to his present place, which consists of one hundred acres of valuable land six miles southwest from Ontario. in 1895. He purchased the land when it was raw and at once began the work of improvement with the happy result that now he has it producing abundant crops. He harvested as high as three hundred and fifty tons of alfalfa hay in one year, besides much other fruit of the fields. He has plenty of water for irrigating, has good buildings, a fine orchard, and a shade and ornamental grove that adds great beauty and value to his rural home. It is of note that Mr. Clement came here without financial resources and now he is one of the wealthy men of this section of the county, and he is to be credited with having gained it all by hard labor and wise management of the resources placed in his hands. Politically, he is allied with the Democratic party and takes the interest that becomes an intelligent citizen in the affairs of politics, while in educational matters he is ever zealous and always labors for the advancement of the cause.

Mr. Clement's parents reside in the Payette Valley. The father freighted with ox teams from Kelton, Utah, to the Payette Valley in early days before the railroad was built.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 588
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Minton, William

William Franklin Minton - It is with pleasure that we essay the task of epitomizing the salient points in the interesting career of the estimable and enterprising gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, and it is very fitting that such be granted space in the history of Malheur county, since he has labored here for the up building of the county and has wrought with wisdom and energy for this end, while also he has spent much time on the frontier and in other places, always, however, manifesting that same energy and capability in furthering the chariot of progress and building for the generations to come.

Mr. Minton was born in Cape Girardeau county, Missouri, on November 25, 1856, being the son of Willis J. and Martha S. (Coker) Minton. When he was a lad of seven he was taken by his parents to Cedar county, and in 1874 went with his parents to Pueblo, Colorado, and thence he went to Florence, Colorado, and there followed farming for a time. There also he was married on August 14, 1880, Miss Minerva Jackson becoming his wife on that occasion. In 1884 he removed with his family to New Mexico, securing a farm, which he tilled until 1889. In the last year mentioned he came via the Southern Pacific to San Francisco and thence on the steamer “State of California” to Portland. Soon we find him in Walla Walla and then in Spokane, Washington, later in Butte, Montana, whence he went to Tacoma, remaining there until 1891, occupied as foreman for the Tacoma Contracting Company. After this he was in Spokane again then at Boise and finally he came to Nyssa entered land and went to improving it. He with others saw the advisability of the ditch and so started the Owyhee Ditch, which has added so much to this country. In 1902 Mr. Minton sold his valuable farm, which was covered by that ditch, and he has property in Nyssa, where he is about to build a fine residence. Politically he is a Democrat and is active in the realms of good government and political matters.

To Mr. and Mrs. Minton were born two children, Samuel P. aged eighteen years and Eskel P. aged sixteen years. On December 14, 1889 Mrs. Minton was called by death from this realm, being in Durango, Colorado, at the time. Mr. Minton is the oldest of nine children, having five sisters and three brothers the entire number living in the west. His father was born and reared in the state of Missouri and his mother was a native of Kentucky, and they were married about 1853. From Colorado they came west and the mother died at Goldendale, Washington, on June 20, 1900, and the father is still living in North Yakima, that state. Our subject has, in addition to the property above mentioned, some fine placer mines in the Dry Buck country, which he is now working.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 586
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Cole, Emory

Emory Cole - Among the leading stockmen and agriculturists of Malheur county, and a man of great energy and executive force, the subject of this sketch is properly accorded a place in the volume of our county's history, and since, also, he is one of the principal land owners of the section, and is, withal, a man of good ability, sound principles, and integrity. Emory was born in Scott county, Minnesota, on December 2, 1862, being the son of Joshua L. and Malinda (Wise) Cole. In the spring of 1864 the family crossed the plains with ox teams to Boise, consuming six months in the trip and having no serious trouble except the general hardships and deprivations of such an arduous undertaking. Settlement was made at Boise, which was then but a hamlet of a few cabins, and there they remained until 1868, when another move brought them to the vicinity of Malheur, where mining was the industry followed until 1872. Then a move was made to upper Willow creek and the father took up stock raising, and later the advantages of the present home place of our subject, live miles northwest from Dell, became evident, and accordingly they came there. Our subject continued to work with his father until December 20, 1883, when the happy event of the marriage of Mr. Cole and Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin F. and Lucy J. (Russell) Kendall, a native of the Grande Ronde valley, Oregon, was celebrated. But then on March 23, 1891, death came and took thence the wife, and Mr. Cole was alone.

On December 23, 1895, Mr. Cole contracted a second marriage, Miss Barbara, daughter of William and Isabell (Russell) Kennedy, and a native of Malheur county, then becoming his wife. Two children have been born to them, Ray and Clifford. Mr. Cole now owns the old home place of his father, which originally was two hundred acres, but now is two thousand and forty acres. This mammoth estate is productive of lucrative returns to its owner. He raises great quantities of alfalfa hay, has an orchard of fine selected fruits of all varieties known to this climate and handles a large band of cattle. In addition Mr. Cole handles about five hundred swarms of bees. The forty acres' orchard and the fields of alfalfa make abundant feeding ground for these honey makers, so that they are a source of revenue. The home is a comfortable residence of eight rooms, while a commodious barn, good outbuildings and tasty and substantial improvements add heath and comfort to the rural abode. Mr. Cole manifests the part of an intelligent citizen in his activity in the realm of politics, being allied with the Republican party and always laboring for those measures which conserve the best interests of the people. Mr. Cole's mother died in 1896, and the father is now residing in Vale said is president of the First Bank in Vale. Our subject is rightly ranked with the prominent men of the County, and his standing is an enviable one, being held in esteem and admiration by all, both for his worth and real integrity.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 585
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Edwards, John

John S. Edwards - The subject of this article is one of Malheur's foremost men in the realm of stock raising and agricultural pursuits, which are the wealth of our County, and he has labored in the section since an early day, having the distinction of being one of the first pioneers and real builders of the County. John S. was born near Oskaloosa. Iowa, on November 25, 1849, being the son of Thomas D. and Barbara E. (Rinehart) Edwards. In 1854 the parents came with ox teams in a large train to Lane County, Oregon, passing through the territory of what is now Malheur and Harney Counties. Some stock was stolen on the road, but no other trouble befell them. In Lane County the father entered government land and settled down to farming. Until the spring of 1871 the subject of this sketch lived with his parents and then came to where Vale now stands, there being but one cabin there then. Two years later he came to the vicinity of his present home and engaged in stock business. Mr. Edwards now has about nine hundred acres of land, four hundred of which is fine bottom land and the remainder grazing land. He has the ranch well improved, occupies a fine two-story residence, has good barns and outbuildings, a fine orchard, and also owns a large band of horses and some cattle.

The marriage of Mr. Edwards and Miss Sarah F., daughter of George W. and Rebecca (Lamb) Smith, of Union, Oregon, was celebrated on July 27, 1876, and they have become the parents of the following children: Thomas O., deceased; Nora M., deceased; Pearl E., attending the normal school at Weston; Harry A.; Alma R.; Phil E.; Irma E.; Clarice B.; and Willard R. Mrs. Edwards was born in Monroe County, Iowa, and crossed the plains with her parents in 1864 with ox teams, the family settling near Island City, Union County , Oregon, where the father died on June 7, 1892, but the mother is still living there. Mr. Edwards' mother died on May 19, 1883, at the old home place in Lane County, and his father passed away at Eugene, this state, on October 5, 1894.

In addition to the other enterprises which he is so capably managing, Mr. Edwards has a large interest in the Simmons group of mines, a valuable property at Cornucopia. He is one of the leading men of the county, has ever conducted himself in a commendatory manner, displaying excellent wisdom, integrity and faithfulness, and is now secure in the esteem of his fellows and well known and admired throughout the entire county.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 584
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Davis, Charles

Charles D. Davis - This worthy pioneer and capable citizen of Malheur county is one of the well known farmers of the vicinity of Ontario, having a farm of eighty acres two and one-half miles northwest from Ontario which is well improved with comfortable buildings, orchards, etc., having also a good supply of water for irrigating. Mr. Davis is a native of Douglas County, Nebraska, being born on November 23, 1855, and the son of Charles B. and Jane (Platt) Davis. The father was a veteran of the Mexican war, participating in many battles and skirmishes and, being honorably discharged at its close. He was a native of Ohio, but went into the war from Iowa. Following his discharge, he removed with his family to Nebraska and settled in Douglas county. In 1861 he again pressed to the front and served his country, enlisting for a three-years' period. In 1864 the elder Davis came across the plains with his family, locating in Boise first, when few people were there and bacon cost fifty cents per pound. In 1868 he removed to the vicinity of Malheur City and being a lawyer, he practiced there and in Baker and Eldorado. In Baker City he was called hence by death, in 1875.  In 1873 our subject removed to Lower Willow creek and engaged in the stock business. In the spring of 1880 he came to the Malheur river and took land and three years later he came to his present place, taking a quarter section, of which he sold half. He produces much alfalfa hay each year. At various times he has also been engaged in mining, as well as the stock business.

On September 3, 1877, occurred the marriage of Mr. Davis and Miss Jane A., a daughter of Joseph A. and Clementine Morton, and they have been blessed by the advent of seven children to their home, as follows: Lillie, wife of C. A. Haygood, of the vicinity of Vale; Kate, wife of Frank Carmen, near Ontario; Charles; Nellie; Nora; George and Adrian. Mrs. Davis' father lives near Ontario. Mr. Davis' mother has passed away, the date being 1880, as also his father, as mentioned above. Mr. Davis is a member of the A. O. U. W., in Ontario. He started in this country with no money and possessed of good health and a resolute will. He has made a commendable showing and has accumulated a good property. It is of note that Mr. Davis says at the time the site of Ontario was surveyed, he assisted to grub the sage brush from the streets.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 584
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Smith, George

George W. Smith - Among the substantial and enterprising citizens of Malheur county is to be mentioned the gentleman whose name is at the head of this article. He is a man of uprightness and has labored here with energy and skill for many years in the endeavor to bring this section into a state of development and also to enhance the condition of his own exchequer. Mr. Smith was born in Carter county, Kentucky, on November 16, 1836, being the son of Clayborn and Cloa (Luck) Smith. He went with his parents to Rudolph county, Arkansas, and soon removed there to Lawrence county, in the same state. At this place both parents died, George being but a small child at the time. Thus early left an orphan, he learned some of the hardships of life and lived in various homes in the neighborhood, where he attended the district school as he had opportunity. He was in Arkansas during the war and many dangers and not a few hardships were his to endure. In 1869 he went to Grayson county, Texas and there followed the art of farming until 1879, at which time he went to Salt Lake City and the following spring he continued his journey to the Salmon River Mines, where he prospected and mined and cut wood until 1884, when he came to his present place, three miles northwest from Ontario, locating a quarter section there. He settled down to improve the place, building a comfortable residence, outbuildings, planting an orchard, and so forth. He sold eighty acres subsequently, and now makes his home on the other eighty. Mr. Smith has also a number of stands of bees, with sufficient stock for the farm. When he came here there were but a few houses in Ontario, and settlers were far apart, he being one of the early pioneers of this vicinity. When he came to this country he was not blessed with any financial resources, but by careful labor, wise management and thrift he has been able to make a comfortable home and gain a competence. Mr. Smith is a member of the Methodist church and is devoted to the faith, being active in its precepts and manifesting a life of uprightness and integrity.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 583
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Mack, Alva

Alva P. Mack - This enterprising and intelligent gentleman is one of Malheur County's leading agriculturists, being a man of good ability and possessed of thrift and those talents which make the successful man, which in its full degree he has demonstrated himself to be, for he came to Ontario in 1890 with less than twenty dollars in finances, and by his own endeavors he has amassed a goodly holding of valuable property; his estate of one hundred and twenty acres, which is highly improved and excellently tilled, lies four and one-half miles southwest from Ontario. It is a model rural home, and shows in every detail both the wisdom and the untiring energy and industry of its proprietor. He produces abundance of alfalfa hay each year, has a good band of cattle, a fine orchard, raising also considerable corn, which yields fifty bushels to the acre. The farm has good buildings including outbuildings, a commodious barn and a residence of modern architectural design of nine rooms and kept in a tasty and beautiful manner. In fact everything about the premises or Mr. Mack indicates a wide-awake, careful, yet vigorous man in charge and he is justly entitled to the position of leader in his line of business, which is accorded to him by his friends.

Reverting more particularly to the personal history of our subject, we note that he was born in the vicinity of Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, on January 14, 1868, being the son of Edward C. and Sarah (Talmage) Mack. The father was a native of Michigan and served for one year in the Civil War, after which he returned to his home in his native state and lives there still. Our subject was reared on a farm and received his education in the public schools. His home was with his parents until the spring of 1890, when he was led by a stirring and adventurous spirit to seek for himself a home in the west. Accordingly he came hither, and as said above when he landed in Ontario less than twenty dollars lined his pockets. He at once sought employment from the Oregon Forwarding Company, and for six years his face and form were familiar as one of the leading salesmen of that mammoth establishment. At the end of that period he had saved enough money to purchase his present valuable estate, which has already been noted.

On July 4, 1891 the marriage of Mr. Mack and Miss Lulu, daughter of Elbridge and Lois E. (Kentfield) Wellington, and a native of Clinton county, Michigan, was solemnized near Ontario. To our subject and his worthy wife there have been born five children, as follows: Lloyd A., Merle E., Ella M., Gerry E., and Lois E. Mr. Mack affiliates with the K. of P., Armour Lodge, No. 69 of Ontario while he and his wife are faithful members of the Methodist Church.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 583
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Clinton, Elbert

Elbert H. Clinton, Deceased - It is true that the worthy pioneers whose familiar figures were seen among us so many years are now one by one passing from these scenes to the rewards of another world and it is eminently proper that such as the subject of this article should be granted a memorial in the volume that chronicles the history of the county where he labored and endured, manifesting always these pleasant virtues and principles that characterize the true and typical man.

Elbert H. Clinton was born in New York, in 1834, and ten years later his father's family came to Wisconsin, whence they went in 1852, to Iowa, and soon thereafter to Sacramento Valley, California. Our subject was in all these journeys, and in 1863 he came to Silver City and thence to Jordan Valley, being one of the very first white men who settled in this vicinity. He took land and went to farming and raising stock, and success from the start attended his industry and wise management of his business. This business occupied him until the time for him to depart the cares and labors of earth. This sad event occurred in January, 1900, and with sincere mourning among a very large circle of friends, this worthy pioneer and good man was consigned to his last resting place. he was a man of energy, and always manifested great interest in the affairs of the county, being a leading and influential citizen, respected by all and worthy of the confidence that was reposed in him by the people.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 582
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Dunbar, David

David Dunbar - In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the leading citizens and stockmen of Malheur County, and it is with pleasure that we chronicle the salient points in his interesting and active career, wherein he has ever manifested integrity, ability and industry. David Dunbar was born in Ontario, Canada, near Kingston, on February 5, 1849, being the son of James and Eliza Dunbar. He was reared on a farm with his parents and gained his education from the common schools of that province. In July 186[?] he was called to mourn the death of his mother and in the fall of that same year stood forth from the parental roof to do battle with the forces of this world alone. He went to New York and thence by steamer to San Francisco arriving in that city in thirty days. He worked during the winter on the Union Pacific railroad at Truckee, Nevada. Sometime after this he joined a wagon train and made his way to the Idaho Basin. This was in 1867 and he mined for a time and then freighted from Kelton, Utah to Silver City, Idaho after which he purchased a band of horses and took them to Montana and sold them, purchasing a band of stock and work cattle. These he brought back to Silver City, selling the cattle for work there, and brought the stock cattle to the vicinity of Ontario. He had wintered previous to that time near where Ontario now stands. He located his present place of two hundred acres on Snake river, which is now well improved, and also his place where he now lives, six miles west from Ontario. This farm contains one hundred and sixty acres of good land, well improved, and furnished with plenty of irrigating water. He also owns a fine residence of modern design on a block of lots in Ontario, which is the family home during the school season. In 1880 Mr. Dunbar made a trip to Laramie, Wyoming, with a band of cattle, shipping them to Chicago, and thence he went to, his old home in Canada, and made a visit to his father, remaining over one winter. In the spring of, 1881 we find him again in Oregon, bending his energies to the prosecution of the stock business, which he has followed since that time with the wisdom and thrift that have given him great success. Mr. Dunbar is selling off his range stock, and is devoting himself in breeding thoroughbred Shorthorns, and raising abundance of alfalfa hay for them.

On March 30, 1891, Mr. Dunbar married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of George and Margaret (Calder) Manson. Her parents are deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Dunbar there have been born three children, named as follows: Margaret, Ralph and Helen.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 582
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Clinton, George

George W. Clinton - A veritable pioneer of the pioneers, and a man of sterling qualities of worth and substantiality, while his excellent achievements mark him one possessed of more than ordinary ability for business enterprises, the subject of this article is to be mentioned with the prominent men of Malheur county and is well worthy of the prestige and esteem that he enjoys.

Mr. Clinton was born in New York, in 1837, being the son of Alexander and Margaret (Balfour) Clinton, natives respectively of Maryland and Pennsylvania. In 1844 the family removed to Wisconsin, and in 1859 they took up the arduous journey across the dreary plains beset with great danger and hardship. In due time they arrived at the Sacramento valley and there engaged in farming. In 1864 our subject made his way into the wilds of this country, locating first at Silver City, then coming to the place where Jordan Valley now stands. He located land and went to raising stock and farming. For twenty-four years he labored on and then sold his possessions and for a period afterward his time was equally divided between this place and California. At the time of the Indian outbreak in 1863 he lost heavily, the savages stealing his horses. The parents of our subject both died in California and also all of a family of eight children but George W. At the present time Mr. Clinton is living on his fine estate of twelve hundred acres of fertile land located twelve miles west from the town of Jordan Valley, where he handles large bands of stock, cattle and horses, and is one of the heavy property owners of the county.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 581
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
O'Neill, Frank

Frank O’Neill - The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O'Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the "Harvest Queen." a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O'Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. Thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were born to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Logan and Francis P. In 1882, very soon after landing in Malheur County, Mrs. O'Neill was called away by death.

Mr. O'Neill contracted a second marriage, the date being October 12, 1886, and the lady Mrs. Anna Jackson, who had by her former husband three children. Frank O., Mrs. Mary B. Madden and George W. To this second marriage there have been born two children, Mable E. and Elsie M. Mrs. O'Neill came across the plains with her husband, Stephen Jackson, and three children from the state of Wisconsin in 1882. They located where Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill now live, fifteen miles west from Vale, on the Burns and Ontario stage line, at what is known as the Hot Springs stage station. Mr. Jackson was murdered there, an account of which occurs elsewhere in the volume.

Our subject owns his ranch on lower Willow creek, and they own another quarter near where they live, in addition to the family home. They are worthy and capable citizens and are secure in the esteem and favor of their fellows, being upright and possessed of integrity.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 581
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Brown, George

George G. Brown - This representative agriculturist and patriotic citizen is one of the leading farmers of the vicinity of Nyssa, having a quarter section of good land, which is his family home, two miles west from that town. Mr. Brown was born in Platt county, Missouri, on January 22, 1850, being the son of George and Jemima (Harris) Brown. In March 1855 the family went to Doniphan County, Kansas and the father was one of the early settlers of that section. He was a pro-slavery advocate and was through the exciting times of that period. In 1867 they removed to Newton County, Missouri, and in 1869 the father died there. Our subject grew to manhood on a farm, gaining his education as best could be done from the scanty opportunity of the common schools, which, however, was made the most of by our subject.

On March 15, 1874, in Newton county, occurred the marriage of Mr. Brown and Margaret D. Cary. In 1878 they removed to Grayson County, Texas and there Mr. Brown devoted his energies to farming and stock raising until 1886, at which time he returned to Newton county, Missouri, and two years later came thence to this country across the plains with teams and wagons. He had his wife, four children and mother on the trip and one hundred days were consumed in making it. They arrived at Long valley, Idaho. without serious accident and there Mr. Brown engaged in raising stock. It was in 1891 that Mr. Brown removed his family to his present abode. He entered a homestead and began the toil of making a fertile farm and comfortable home from the wilds of nature. He has succeeded in a great manner and has a valuable place. He secures water from the Owyhee ditch, has the farm well tilled, has a good residence, fine orchard, and secures a good return annually from the abundant crops raised.

Mr. Brown is affiliated with the K. of P., Armour Lodge, No. 69, of Ontario, and in political matters holds with the Democratic party, being active in the interests of the country and laboring always for the advancement and upbuilding of the same. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown have been born the following named children: Carrie B., wife of Ira Rutledge, near Nyssa: Daisy, wife of John Ray, living near Nyssa; Effie, wife of N. Minton, living near Nyssa; William Edward; Francis; Georgia.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 580
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Van Limburgh, William

William J. van Limburgh, Jr. - It gives us pleasure to speak in this connection of the talented and enterprising young gentleman whose name appears above, and who has come to us from the busy land of Holland to make one of the stanch American citizens, being of the pure Anglo-Saxon blood whence comes the leading men of the day. He is now one of the well-to-do farmers of the vicinity of Arcadia, owning a tract of eighty acres two miles southwest from that place. William J. was born in Rotterdam Holland, on September 12, 1878, being the son of William J. and Jelerma van Lindburgh. The father was a very wealthy and prominent citizen of Holland, being president and chief owner of the famous Basalt Mining Company of Rotterdam. The mines are located in Germany and Belgium and produce a fine grade of stone for building and paving. This gentleman made a trip to the United States to visit his son in 1900 and he was very favorably impressed with the country. He also spent one month in Washington, D. C. visiting the ambassador, Baron Gevars. Returning to his native country, Mr. van Lindburgh continued in his business until May 9, 1902 when he was taken very suddenly ill and passed away. He was in his fifty0ninth year. The mother is still living on the old homestead in Holland.

Our subject grew up in Rotterdam, received his primary education in the common schools and then attended the high school and subsequently took his degree from the Agricultural College at Wageningen, Holland. Soon following this event he came to the United States, landing at New York and thence direct to Ontario, arriving here on February 23, 1897. He purchased his present place, and soon went to improving it and in the good labor of handling it successfully he has been engaged since that time. The land is under the Owyhee ditch and is productive of large crops of alfalfa and fruit. Mr. van Limburgh is a man of much information, having profited much by his privileged course in the institutions of his native land, and he manifests an active interest in the affairs of his chosen country. He has taken his papers for citizenship and his fellows have chosen him for delegate to the County convention. In fraternal relations he is allied with the K. of P., Armour Lodge. No. 69 of Ontario.

The happy event of the marriage of Mr. van Limburgh and Miss Sophia Boode, a native of The Hague, Holland, was celebrated on October 21, 1900 and to them has been born one child, William J.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 580
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hatfield, James

James T. Hatfield - Three and one-half miles northeast from Owyhee is found the comfortable and valuable farm and home of the subject of this article. The estate is one of eighty acres of fine land, all covered by the Owyhee ditch and well cultivated and productive of abundant returns of hay, fruit and other valuable crops. Mr. Hatfield is one of the originators of the Owyhee ditch, and he labored faithfully on it from the time it was started until it was finished. Reverting to his personal history we note that James T. was born in Adair County, Missouri, on July 14, 1839, being the son of Andrew and Mary Hatfield. He removed with his parents while still a child to Putnam County, in the same state, and there remained with them until the time of his marriage, which happy event occurred on September 9, 1858. Miss Lucinda Sumpter then becoming his wife. In September, 1861 Mr. Hatfield enlisted in the Confederate Army under Price and participated in the battle of Lexington serving three months. Then he returned home and being convinced of the error of the cause of Confederacy, he did what few men would have the courage to do, that was own his mistake and offer his services on the right side. He enlisted in Company F, Ninth Missouri Volunteers and served in this capacity until the fall of 1863, being then honorably discharged. It was in the spring of 1863 that he joined a train of emigrants bound for the west with ox teams. Sixty-five wagons and on hundred and thirteen emigrants formed the train, and notwithstanding several attacks from the savages, they arrived in Austin City, Nevada, in due time without the loss of any of their number. He remained there until 1868 and then returned to Missouri on horseback. This was his home then until 1876, at which time he came to Battle Mountain, Nevada, there running a hotel, freighting and doing various other labors until 1888. When he came by wagon to Owyhee and thence to poise valley, returning to the Owyhee in 1890. He located a homestead and improved the land, which property he sold in 1901. At the same time he purchased the eighty acres where he now lives and has it improved in good shape. He also owns another farm of forty acres with his son.

To Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield there have been born five children, one of whom is still living. Emanuel Isaiah, who was born January 22, 1874. Mr. Hatfield is a Democrat and always native in the affairs of the County. He and his son have a large band of cattle and horses and are numbered with the leading stockmen of the section.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 579
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Tietsort, Henry

Henry P. Tietsort - The subject of this article is one of the venerable and capable men of the vicinity of Nyssa, being also a veritable pioneer of the pioneers, of the west having labored with great energy in many portions of the same, and has endured the privations, hardships and suffering incident to this kind of life. Henry P. Tietsort, was born in Cass county Michigan, on October 14, 1829, being the son of John and Angeline (Meyers) Tietsort. The parents were natives of Pennsylvania, but his grandparents came from Germany. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his native place and spent the years of his youth in labor on the farm. In 1859 he went to St. Joseph, Missouri and thence he came across the plains with mule teams, consuming four months in the trip. The train of thirty wagons landed at Red Bluff, California, and he went to freighting for a time and then mined. It was 1864 when he came to Boise Basin, Idaho, and he was also in Baker county, now Malheur, near Malheur City. He mined in various localities in the country, being pretty well over the western country, until 1892, when he located his present place of forty-three acres on the banks of the Snake, three miles southwest from Nyssa. Then there were but one or two houses between his place and Ontario. He opened up his farm, labored for the building of the Owyhee ditch and now has a good place, thirty-five acres of alfalfa, a food orchard and comfortable buildings.

The marriage of Mr. Tietsort and Miss Lydia, daughter of Henry H. and Malissa Carman, of Nyssa, was solemnized on October 3, 1880, and they have become the parents of the following children: Mrs. Lizzie Davis of Okanogan County, Washington; Jay, of Okanogan County, Washington; Orville, Ada, Ray, Roy, Alta. Mrs. Tietsort's parents crossed the plains from Kansas by wagon to Boise in 1880. The mother died in 1899, July 15.

Mr. Tietsort was a participant in the Pitt River, and Selay Indian war in California in 1859, serving under General Kirby, and the whites were universally victorious in this conflict. He was also in a fight with the Indians in the Boise Basin in 1878 when many of the savages were slain. Mr. Tietsort has seen his share of danger and hardship on the frontier and now he is entitled to the quiet enjoyment of his place, whish his labor has provided.

Mr. Tietsort is also interested in a large tract of mining land situated across the river from his home, in Idaho.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 579
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Twycross, Ebenezer

Ebenezer A. Twycross - This worthy pioneer has always manifested the demeanor of the typical frontiersman and he is deserving of much credit for the arduous labors performed and the dangers encountered and the hardships and deprivations endured in the many years wherein he has devoted himself and his energies to the development of the country and making it fit for the abode of mankind, and therefore it is with pleasure that we accord to him consideration in this volume of his county's history.

Mr. Twycross was born in Massachusetts in 1836, being the son of Ebenezer and Mary Twycross natives also of the same state. He was educated in his native place and there remained until he had grown to manhood, when he took up the responsibilities of life for himself and at once engaged in farming, which occupation engrossed his attention until 1870 the year in which he came to the west. He settled first in Silver City, then took a homestead in Pleasant valley which he sold and came to his present location five miles west from, Jordan Valley. The has a fine estate of four hundred and eighty acres of land well improved and fertile. Mr. Twycross gives his energies to farming and stock raising and is one of the leading men of his section, being progressive and enterprising. During the trying times of 1878, when the savages endeavored to murder the toiling settlers of this vicinity, Mr. Twycross was one who fought bravely to defend the whites and has passed through much trial and hardship. He is of good standing among his fellows and is worthy of the confidence reposed in him.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 578
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hickey, George

George A. Hickey - This successful and intelligent stockman resides one-fourth of a mile from Juntura and in company with M. A. Masterson owns a fine quarter of land which they devote to raising hay for cattle of which they have one hundred head, besides other stock. In his walk Mr. Hickey has been up-right, capable, and always on the side of movements and issues which make for advancement and development of the country, being a capable albs worthy man.

George A. was born in Arkansas, on March 18, 1864, and there received his education and grew to manhood. It was when he had arrived at the age of twenty that he went west, visiting Colorado first. Thence he migrated to Idaho and later made his way into the John Day country, in this state. He worked for wages there for some time, and then came to Malheur County. He took a preemption four miles west from where he now lives, and later sold it, and bought the estate mentioned above.

Mr. Hickey takes an active part in politics as occasion leads, and is well esteemed by all and stands high in the community and wherever he is known.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 578
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Fletcher, Thomas

Thomas C. Fletcher - One of the earliest pioneers of this region of the country, a man whose life has always been dominated by wisdom prudence and upright principles,. having ever manifested also stanch virtues and a reliability that are becoming a good citizen and faithful man, the subject of this article is vie of the leading men of Malheur County, and a prominent resident of Ontario. Thomas C. was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, on October 11, 1841, being the son of Jewett and Elizabeth Fletcher.  When our subject was six years of age he had the misfortune to lose his father and he was soon thereafter taken by his mother to Lee County, Iowa, near Ft. Madison where he was reared on a farm attend the Common schools for his education. In the fall of 1861 when the stirring call came for men to defend the nation's honor and save her from the assault of treason's bards, he promptly enlisted in Company G Fourth Iowa Calvalry as bugler and was under General Curtis. Several skirmishes were participated in Missouri and then he was transferred to Sherman's army Sixteenth Corps, being immediately under A. J. Smith. He was in siege of Vicksburg and on account of sickness was sent home on a furlough, but after recovering was seen again in the ranks and took part in the battle of Ripley, Meridian, and Guntown besides many skirmishes. He enlisted as bugler until December 1864 being at that time honorably discharged, having never been wounded although he was in the hottest of the fight many a time.   Immediately subsequent to his discharge he went home and remained with his mother until the spring of 1865 when, he started across the plains with a train of ox teams, having one hundred men on account of the hostilities of the Indians. He drove a team to Virginia City, Montana. and then went to ranching, having taken tip a piece of land but this he soon sold, and turned his attention to freighting and working in a saw mill until 1869, at which time he went to the Willamette valley. In the spring of 1870 we find him on Rock creek, Spokane County, Washington, in partnership with Thomas Phillieo in the stock business. In 1874 he sold this business and went to Silver City, Idaho and in the following spring located in the Jordan valley. Stock business engaged his energies there and he was successful.   There, also, he was married on January 13, 1884 Miss Rosa, daughter of Joseph and Martha Merrill, becoming his wife at that time. Mrs. Fletcher's parents came via the Panama Canal to California in 1856 and thence in 1865 to Jordan valley, engaging in raising stock there. Mr. Merrill was in Baker County in 1864 and he was well known all over this country, having lived from that time fur twenty years on the old sheep ranch in Jordan valley. In 1884 Mr. Merrill went to Sonoma County, California, where they remain still. Mr. Fletcher and his wife went thither also in 1884, the hostile Indians in Jordan valley causing this move. But one year later he came back to Malheur County and here he has been since that time. He at once went at the sheep business when he returned here and until 1899 when he sold out, he was one of the leaders in that industry. He is at present living in a fine eight-room house in Ontario, having ample grounds that are fitted with orchards and gardens. In addition Mr. Fletcher owns numerous residences, and some business property in Ontario, which he rents. He also has a fine tract of land of forty acres near town that produces abundant returns, being well watered and carefully tilled.

To Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher there have been born three children, Robert E., Birdie E., Sylvina M. Mr. Fletcher is a member of the G. A. R. A. P. Hovey Post of Ontario. He is a Republican in politics and is active in the interests of good government and improvement of educational facilities. He and his wife are devout members of the Methodist Church and are faithful supporters of the faith. Mr. Fletcher was in the Indian war of 1878.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 577
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
King, William

Hon. William Rufus King - Among those granted representation in this volume, none is more worthy of notice, than the subject of this sketch. As a public spirited citizen he enjoys the confidence of the people and has become well and popularly known, not only throughout Malheur and adjoining counties, but throughout the whole state.

On October 3, 1864, near Walla Walla, Washington, David R. King and Elizabeth (Estes) King, became the parents of a boy, whom they named William Rufus. His parents were pioneers of Walla Walla, Washington. Arriving from Arkansas in 1860 his father being captain of a large immigrant train, crossing what was known as "the plains"-the journey being through the dangerous Indian countries between the Mississippi and the Pacific coast. At the age of nine years he moved with his parents to Weston, Oregon, and five years later, in 1878, to Jordan Valley, in this county.

After receiving his preliminary education in the common schools, he entered the Agricultural College, at Corvallis, Oregon, where he pursued his studies for three years. He returned again to the farm, but in 1889 left it to take up the study of law at the law school in Danville, Indiana.

After graduating with high honors in 1891, he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Indiana, and entered a law office in the city of Indianapolis. He remained there but a few months, when he returned to this County and opened an office for the practice of law at Vale, Oregon.

In 1892 Mr. King was elected state representative for Malheur County, on the Democratic ticket. Removing to Baker City in 1893 he was elected, in 1894, state senator for Malheur and Baker counties, receiving a majority of three hundred and eighty over Hon. C. A. Johns, the Republican nominee.

In his services in the legislature he exhibited the same devotion to the interests of the people as he did to his own affairs in private life. His whole legislative career was marked by such honest and fearless aggressiveness, coupled with a keen perception and sound, conservative judgment, that he became a recognized leader of the reform forces in the legislature and throughout the state. The confidence reposed in him was so great that, in 1898. He was chosen by the allied Democratic Repulist and Silver Republican forces, as the nominee against Hon. T. T. Geer, for the governorship of Oregon. Although Mr. King was defeated in his race for governor, he made such a clean, honest energetic campaign, that he greatly reduced the large Republican majority in Oregon, won many warm friends throughout the state and increased his already enviable reputation as a leader in public affairs.

After his removal to Baker City he formed a law partnership with F. M. Saxton under the firm name of King & Saxton. On account of the large practice this firm soon enjoyed in this and Harney counties. Mr. King decided to return to Malheur County, and in 1899, established himself in Ontario, where he now has one of the finest and best equipped law offices in eastern Oregon, and enjoys a large and lucrative practice.

Fraternally he is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Baker Lodge, No. 47; of the K. of P., Lodge No. 46, of Ontario; of the Woodmen of the World ; and of the Royal Arcanum.

On December 6, 1892, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss L. Myrtle King, of Danville, Indiana, to which union two children have been born, Eldon P. King and Myrtle M. King.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 576
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Divin, Robert

Robert M. Divin - This venerable citizen and esteemed gentleman and resident of Vale is one of the substantial men of Malheur County and is well and favorably known throughout the precincts of this region, being a man of stanch integrity, and always manifesting those qualities of worth and merit that redound to the good of all. Mr. Divin was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, on December 17, 1831, being the son of Irbin F. and Hannah Divin. The father died when our subject was two years of age, having removed with the family to Washington County, Arkansas, where the death occurred. There were but few settlers in that section then, and there Robert M. lived and attended school in the rough log houses of the time, gaining a training there from which fortified him for the battle of life. He remained with his mother until he had reached the age of manhood, and in 1851 he married Miss Mary J. Kellam, a native of Little Rock, Arkansas. He was occupied on a farm until 186o, then removed to the frontier of Texas among the savage Commanche Indians. Here Mr. Divin and his family endured hardships and deprivations and sufferings from the savages that are calculated to dry up the cup of joy from the human breast, but they bravely fought their way through them all. The father for three years being a member of the state home guards for the purpose of protecting the settlers from the devastations of these reprobate savages and in many fights and skirmishes he participated. In 1865 they returned to Arkansas and remained there until 1870 when he came west with his family via Omaha San Francisco and Portland to Clackamas County, Oregon. His mother came with him and in 1875. They located on upper Willow creek and there engaged in the stock business. Success attended the efforts of Mr. Divin and he had soon a large band of cattle and horses and three hundred acres of land. In the spring of 1897 he sold this property and came to Vale, where he resides at the present time. He owns here one-half block and a couple of fine residences.

To Mr. and Mrs. Divin there have been born ten children, but eight of these have been laid away in the graveyard, four of them passing away in eight days with that dread disease, diphtheria. Those remaining are Irbin F., married to Josephine Wisdom and at present engaged in the mercantile business in Vale; Ambrose S. married to Mollie Wisdom and engaged in the fruit business in Chico, California. Mr. Divin is a member of the Masonic fraternity and has also been active during his life in promoting the cause of education. During the times of Indian trouble here in 1878 he suffered his share with the other hardy settlers on the frontier. At the present time Mr. Divin has retired from the activities of the farm and is enjoying the retreat of his town residence and receiving the ministry of the competence that his thrift and industry have provided.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 576
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
King, Almer

Almer G. King - The subject of this review is one of the well known and representative men of Malheur County and is to-day entrusted with the responsibilities of one of the main County offices and has made a record for himself of faithfulness, integrity, and capabilities, that places him secure in the esteem and respect of the entire population of the County. Almer G. was born in Waverly, Iowa, on December 6, 1866, being the son of George and Littie (Kimball) King. In 1870, the family came west via San Francisco and Portland to a place opposite Fort Vancouver, on the Columbia, where they resided for a time and then removed to Pendleton, afterwards going to The Dalles in 1872 where they remained until 1882. In that place, our subject was educated in the public schools and then took the entire course in the Wasco Independent Academy, but did not graduate as he was detained from passing the examinations. In 1882 he came to Malheur, at that time a part of Baker County, and engaged to handle cattle for Thomas R. Davidson and fourteen years he remained with him never losing a day, and for the last half of this time he was foreman. In 1892 he went to Payette, Idaho, and conducted a livery stable for one year then went to Westfall Malheur County, and operated as a farmer for a time. It was in the spring of 1896, that Mr. King was nominated for County assessor on the Democratic ticket and was elected with a handsome majority, being the only one on that ticket who was elected. At the close of a two years' term he was put in nomination for the office of clerk of the County and was elected and at the expiration of that term he was nominated for a second term and elected. Thus demonstrating his popularity the County and his standing among his fellows. His long term of public service has been characterized by faithfulness, ability, and accommodation to the people and this has given him an enviable prestige throughout the entire County.

The marriage of Mr. King and Miss Alma B., daughter of Joseph A. and Clementine Morten, was celebrated on September 2, 1890. Mrs. King's parents live in the vicinity of Ontario and were early pioneers of the country, coming as soon as the sixties.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 575
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Rieger, Erwin

Erwin A. Rieger - The subject of this sketch is one of the younger men who have achieved brilliant success in the business world of the west, being located in Ontario, where he has an important interest in the Oregon Forwarding Company. one of the largest general merchandise establishments of the eastern part of Oregon, which owes much of its unbounded success to the keen business ability- and fine executive force of Mr. Rieger. The birth of Erwin A. occurred in Ludwigburg, Germany, on January 28, 1873, being the son of Frederick J. and Mary (Kiesel) Rieger. The father was a leading attorney of his country, and our subject received a good education in the common schools and in the Heilbronn King Carli College, then studied law and was admitted to its practice in his native town at the age of twenty-one. Soon after this import-ant event, he bade the fatherland adieu, took farewell of friends and embarked for the United States. The spring of 1894 marks the date of his landing in New York, having sailed in the steamer Scandia. From the metropolis he came direct to Ogden, then to Parma, Idaho. He visited these places and others for the purpose of getting acquainted with the American people and their ways, and also he devoted some time to farming, then went to Haley, Idaho, and thence to Salt Lake City, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits with his brother. It was in 1896 that he came to Ontario and here in 1902 he entered into partnership with Mr. Beckman, the firm being known as the Oregon Forwarding Company. That name was changed to Beckman and Rieger in January, 1902, and in April of the same year the old name was again assumed. They carry a large and complete line of goods in all of the following lines, gents' furnishing goods, dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, hardware, farming implements, and crockery and other lines as well, making their establishment one of mammoth proportions. The business is alone in a large brick building, being the most commodious in the town, and they also use in storing their goods five large warehouses. The trade of this company reaches in great directions to every point of the compass and they have builded for themselves a patronage and reputation that surpasses doubtless, that of any competing establishment in the entire country.

On November 27, 1901, Mr. Rieger married Miss Sylvia, daughter of George and Nellie (Stevens) Lyells, early pioneers of Baker City. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the A. F. & A. M., Acacia Lodge, No. 118, of Ontario being secretary of the same: also of the Eastern Star: and the A. O. U. W., No. 87, of Ontario. Mr. Kiesel, an uncle of our subject, owns a large interest in the company but lives at Ogden, Utah. Mr. Rieger has a fine residence in a pleasant portion of the town and with gracious dignity his estimable wife presides there, making it a center of refined hospitality. Mr. Reiger is a man of ability, as his successful work will show. He manifested this first in acquiring, in an exceedingly short time, mastery of the intricate English language, as well as in all of his business operations.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 574
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Worsham, Robert

Robert W. Worsham - This enterprising and representative citizen of Malheur County has the distinction of being one of the early pioneers of Oregon, while also he was among the very first in many mining regions where he endured the almost overwhelming hardships there encountered and wrought with a strong hand and courageous heart, doing well his part in the great development of the west. Robert W. was born in Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky, on April 30, 1839, being the son of Robert and Emeline (Elgin) Worsham. He was reared on a farm and in the winter months attended school. In 1852 he came with his parents across the plains and settlement was made in Clackamas County, near Oregon City. The trip was without danger or special incident except four of their number died with the cholera, although the train was small consisting of only eighteen wagons. The father had a large family and the first winter in Oregon City was a time of trial. Flour sold for thirty dollars per barrel and potatoes for live dollars per bushel. Of meat they had none except what game they killed the father took a half section of land and settled down to make a home, and in 1859, our subject went to the Similikameen mines and then on the Thompson river, in British Columbia whence lie went to Eraser river and from there to the Canal rivet in the Cariboo district.

He followed prospecting and mining and many is the fight he had with the Indians and finally he was obliged to leave the region on account of their hostilities. In 186o he bought a farm and settled down near the home place and on April 11 1861, occurred the happy event of the marriage of Mr. Worsham and Miss Lucy E., daughter of Joseph T. and Hannah E. Wingfield, of Oregon City. In 1862 he went to the Florence mines in Idaho, and later to the Oro Fino mines, being successful in both places. Then he returned home and spent a little time on the farm, after which lie opened a butcher business in Oregon City, remaining there until 1877, when he came to Malheur and bought a stock farm of one hundred and sixty acres four miles southeast from Malheur post office. He has added as much more since and now has a well improved estate and finely stocked, having also good house and barns and other buildings. In 1878 it is of note that Mr. Worsham was scout for the government in the Indian troubles which then occurred. He has followed stock-raising and farming and mining- since coming here and has some fine quartz properties at the present time. Mr. Worsham has been superintendent for the Eldorado mines for eight years.

The following children have been born to F him and his estimable wife : Adelbert, deceased; Florence E., wife of John B. Woodcock; James T. married to Effie E. Craig; Laura, deceased; David K., married to Sadie  Bowman; Charles, deceased; Claud R.; Walter N. The married children all live in the vicinity of Malheur. Mr. Worsham has a good home in Malheur and he dwells there at the present time. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church and they are devoted in the support of their faith.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 574
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Glover, G. B.

G. B. Glover - The stockmen of Malheur County are the men who have brought the County to the front by their arduous labors and wise manipulation of the resources here found, and as a prominent one of this distinguished class the subject of this article is well known, being also a worthy pioneer, who wrought here with a firm hand and endured the hardships incident to that life, while his keen foresight and enterprise led him to see the value of the country that he was opening.

Mr. Glover was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi on December 20, 1841, and at the age of fourteen went with his father and the balance of the family to Arkansas, where he remained until the breaking out of the terrible Civil war and then enlisted in the Confederate army, doing valiant military service until the close of the conflict. He then returned to his home, and in 1870 came to Jackson County, Missouri and thence, five years later, he journeyed to what is now Malheur County. He located where he now lives, eighteen miles north-west from Jordan valley, at Cow Creek lakes, took land and engaged in farming and stock-raising. Success has attended his thrifty and wisely bestowed labors and he now has a valuable estate of eleven hundred and forty acres of land. "The Lakes." as the estate is called, is one of the most beautiful, as well as valuable, in southeastern Oregon. He has it well improved. and it is made a comfortable and attractive rural abode. Mr. Glover has one hundred and fifty cattle and other stock. He is always active in the political matters of the County and state and is an influential and prominent citizen.

The marriage of Mr. Glover and Mrs. Elizabeth (Shea) Keenan was solemnized in Wagontown and they have become the parents of the following children: Wren, deceased, Holmes, Frances, John, Violet and Elaire. Mrs. Glover is a Canadian by birth, and had by her former husband two children, Anna and Theresa. Mr. Glover has always manifested uprightness in his business life, and the manner in which he has managed his business interests reflects credit upon him and demonstrates him to be a man of ability and wisdom.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 573
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Ward, George

George E. Ward - No work that purports to chronicle the careers of the leading citizens of Malheur County would be complete were there omission to mention the estimable gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, and whose labors have been fruitful of much good to this portion of the County, as well as adjacent vicinities, having been instrumental in originating the famous Owyhee ditch and in furthering the plans for its completion, while also in general development of the country he has clone very much. George E. Ward was born in Quebec, Canada, on September 14, 1852, being the son of George P. and Elizabeth (Sherman) Ward. He was reared on a farm and in a hotel and was educated in the common schools of his native place. In 1879 he came to Silver City. Idaho and there he engaged in the sheep business, remaining in the same for five years. Then he sold out and vent to Umatilla County in this state, bought a hand of sheep and brought them to the Owyhee River and since that time he has continuously devoted his attention to the sheep business. He has a stock ranch in Grant County and one on the Owyhee River and is one of the leaders in this important line of industry, having brought to bear in its prosecution a wealth of ability, energy and wisdom that have given him an excellent success. His three brothers were associated with him in the Owyhee ditch project. Four others were brought into the enterprise and later it was incorporated and Mr. Ward has remained in it, giving his, wisdom, energy and money to make of it the unbounded success that it is at the present time. In political matters Mr. Ward is allied with the Republicans and has always devoted the proper amount of attention to the affairs of the County and state. He believes implicitly in the principles of protection for the industries and citizens of this republic and always labors for that end. He has now much stock and is esteemed as one of the leaders of the prominent men of the County.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 573
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
McCain, James

James McCain - The estimable pioneer whose name initiates this paragraph was a man of energy faithfulness, and integrity, and he wrought here for the development and substantial progress of the County, with a strong hand and with display of wisdom which gave him a brilliant success both in the established confidence of his fellows and in the financial holdings that came to him. It was a sad day when he was called from the walks of life and associations of his family.

James McCain was born in New York in 1833, and there he remained for the first twenty years of his life, and then came to Wisconsin. There on July 24, 1854, occurred his marriage with Miss Eliza Tamson, a native of England, who came at the age of fifteen with her parents to Wisconsin from her native land. In 1866 the young couple crossed the dreary waste of plains and mountains to Boise valley, locating about sixteen miles from Boise. They took up farming and stock raising and later re-moved to Reynolds creek and four years later went thence to Cow creek, remaining until 1878, when they were driven out by hostile Indians. At this time they lost about seven thousand dollars worth of stock, mostly horses. They then removed to their present place, two miles east from the town of Jordan Valley. At this place they acquired title to two hundred and seventy-three acres of land. Here, on July 11, 1893, occurred the death of Mr. McCain. He left his widow and two children, Ellen, wife of John Huff, of Riverside; James B., a stockman. There was one other child, Thomas, deceased.

Mrs. McCain has married Mr. G. A. McGovern, and they reside on the home place, which is supplied with all necessary improvements and provided with a good stone residence. Mr. McGovern was born in Canada, on April 18, 1854, and is a man of good standing and well respected.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 572
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Beers, Ransom

Hon. Ransom Beers is one of the oldest pioneers of this section and a man of enterprise and energy, having wrought in all the arduous and trying occupations of the frontier life, being eminently successful in them all, as well as having done much here for the up building of the County, while his life of uprightness and integrity, with manifestation of sound principles, has commended him to the confidence and esteem of all who have the pleasure of knowing him.

The birth of our subject occurred in Ohio, near Columbus, on March 27, 1831, and his parents were Conrad and Jemima (Zin) Beers. He was reared on a farm and received his education in the primitive log schoolhouse of that section and day. At the early age of ten, his mother died and he knew the sorrows of that sad event mingled with his boyhood days. Until the fall of 1852 he remained with his father, and then he removed to Henry County, Iowa, and the following spring set out across the plains in a train of twelve wagons to. California. Four months later he was digging gold in Placerville, having completed the trip with-out special incident. Eleven years were spent in that section in mining and success crowned his efforts. Then, in the spring of 1864, he went by ship to Portland, and thence to Mormon basin, where he engaged in placer mining until 1872, being also successful in that venture. Mr. Beers rented his mines in that basin and opened a store which occupied his attention until 1874, when he came to his present place, which is five miles southeast from Malheur. Here he owns one-half section of land, well improved and stocked. He has a fine eight-roomed residence, a good barn and a nice bunch of cattle. Mr. Beers took this land from the raw country and has made all these improvement, being one of the most successful farmers and stockmen of the country.

In fraternal relations Mr. Beers has been for thirty-nine years a member of the I. O. O. F., and is one of the charter members of the Baker City Lodge, No. 25. In 1868 the people of the section where he resides called him from the pursuit of his private enterprises, and elected him to represent the County in the state legislature. And in that capacity Mr. Beers manifested the same thoroughness, good judgment, ability, and faithfulness, that have ever characterized him and he filled the office with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituency. He was elected on the Democratic ticket. We desire to say that Mr. Beers started out in life with no capital except his hands and' a good stout heart and he has accumulated a fine property because of his thrift and industry. He still owns the mines in the Mormon Basin. In the time of the famous Centennial, Mr. Beers went to visit the exposition in Philadelphia. In 1900 also he went to the east, but in all his travels Mr. Beers disclaims having found ally place which pleases him as well as his western home. He is now spending his golden days in the quiet enjoyment of his portion, which he has wrought out with his own hands, and he is one of the highly esteemed and respected men of the County, being beloved by all. Mr. Beers has always cast his lot with the ways of celibacy, being content to enjoy its quieter walk than the responsibilities of the connubial relations.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 572
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Biggs, Dalton

DALTON BIGGS
Residence and office, Ontario, Oregon. Born in Louisiana, Missouri, December 18, 1874. Son of James D. and Lucy C. (Hatch) Biggs. Married Phebe Lawry December 28, 1899. Attended public school in Kirkwood, Mo., 1883; McCune College, private school, Louisiana, Mo., 1883-87; public school, Bowling Green, Mo. 1888; Pike College, Bowling Green, Mo., 1889-92. Bead law in office of George W. Emerson, Bowling Green, Mo., 1894-96. Admitted to bar in Missouri June 1897; January 1898, formed partnership with George W. Emerson, which continued until 1900. Came to Burns, Oregon, September 17, 1900; formed partnership with J. W. Biggs, which continued until 1906. Admitted to bar in Oregon May 1901. Moved to Ontario, Oregon, 1906, continuing practice of law to date. Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, Pike County, Mo., 1898-1900. Member of Masonic and K. of P. Fraternities. Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Brooke, William

WILLIAM HENRY BROOKE
Residence, Ontario, Oregon; office, same. Born May 26, 1880, at Brighton, Wisconsin. Son of James and Charity (Gulick) Brooke. Attended schools at Brighton, Wis., graduating from there in June 1896. Entered Rochester Academy, Rochester, Wis., 1896 and graduated in 1899. Taught school near Burlington, Wis., 1899-1900, and attended College of Commerce at Kenosha, Wis., 1900-01. Entered Law Department of the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 1901 and graduated in 1904 with degree of Bachelor of Laws. Was admitted to Supreme Court and United States Circuit and District Courts, of Wisconsin in June, 1904. Came to Oregon in the fall of that year and was admitted temporarily to practice, on his certificate. Admission was confirmed in 1905. Admitted to United States District and Circuit Courts of Oregon in 1907. Formed partnership with Will E. King, under firm name of King & Brooke, which was dissolved in 1907. Almost immediately entered into partnership with F. M. Saxton, under firm name of Brooke & Saxton, which lasted until May 1909. Practiced alone for six months and then entered into term as District Attorney does not expire until January 1913. January 1, 1910, he formed a partnership with B. L. Eddy, where partnership with V. W. Tomlinson under firm name of Brooke & Tomlinson, which continues to date. Member of Oregon Legislature in 1908; Chairman of Irrigation and Member of Judiciary and Mining Committees in 1909 session. Member Masonic, I.O.O.F., K. of  P., W.O.W. and F.O.E. Fraternities. Republican.


History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

 

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