Horses and Mt. Jefferson from BIA 3
              on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. (Photo No.
              wascDA0109)
Photo courtesy of Gary Halvorson Oregon State Archives
Wasco County, Oregon
Genealogy Trails



A

Adcox, L. L.
B

Barnum, Ladru
Bell, Wells
Bennett, A. S.
Blakeley, George
Blakeney, John
Bolton, Grifford
Bradshaw, William
Brogan, Thomas
Browne, Daniel
Butler, Robert
Butler, Roy
C

Cartwright, John
Cates, Daniel
Chrisman, Levi
Clausen, F. C.
Collins, John
Crate, John
D

Davis, James
Dawson, Leon
Denny, O. N.
Dick, Frank
Doane, O. D.
Dufur, William
E

Egbert, Joseph
Esson, Achilles
Evans, Leander
F

Fargher, Horatio
Fleck, J. A.
Fleming, Frank
Frank, Sherman
French, Joshua
Fulton, John
G

Galloway, Francis
Gates, Daniel
Gates, N. H. (1)
Gates, N. H. (2)
Glenn, Hugh
Goodwin, William
Greene, Harry
Gunning, Frank
H

Hage, C. A.
Haslinger, George
Hayden, Thomas
Hill, William
Hunter, William
I - J

Jewell, Miranda
Johnson, James
Johnston, George
K

Keller, Andrew
Ketchum, Delaney
Kirk, J. B.
Klindt, Walter
Kuck, Henry
L

Lane, Louis (1)
Lane, Louis (2)
Litfin, Ben
M

Mariner, William
Mays, Frank
Mays, Franklin
McClure, Thomas
McInerny, J. P.
Menefee, Frank
Mosier, Jefferson
N

Nichol, Cook
Nichols, Benjamin
Nicholson, J. A.
O - P

Odell, John
Patterson, J. M.
Pepper, Carlton (1)
Pepper, Carlton (2)
Q - R

Root, Clyde
S

Savage, O. S.
Schadewitz, Henry
Schenck, John
Schenck, Naomi
Sinnott, Nicholas
Stadelman, Joseph
Stadelman, Peter
Southern, Charles
T

U - V

VanVactor, Sam
W

Walther, William
Williams, Edward
Wilson, Fred (1)
Wilson, Fred (2)
Wilson, Joseph
X - Y
Z


Goodwin, William

William J. Goodwin was born in Illinois in 1818 and came west to the Oregon Territory in 1849  He was married to Catherine Mary Roberts who was born in 1819 in Tennessee. Arriving in Clark County, they settled on Mill Plain and filed for a Donation Land Claim on August 15, 1850. William was sworn in as Clerk of the Probate Court of Clark County on July 1, 1850, and on December 2, 1851, he was issued a license to establish a ferry from the head of Lady’s Island to the mouth of Washougal River. An item in the Vancouver Independent relates the following: William Goodwin and family moved to The Dalles March 11, 1880, and leased The Dalles House for a term of three years.

On Jan. 19, 1885, William Ryan was granted a franchise to establish a ferry in the same area. In 1851, on December 2nd, a license was "granted" to William Goodwin to establish a ferry from the head of Lady Island to above the mouth of the Washougal River. Other licenses granted in that period were to David C. Parker on June 10, 1854, for the same area; James Carty, on Lake River slough and O.W. Bozorth on the Cathlapoodle - present Lewis River - on March 7, 1855.

Contributed by John Brassfield
Bolton, Grifford

GRIFFORD VIRGIL BOLTON.

An interesting story of earnest endeavor, intelligently directed, constitutes the life record of Grifford Virgil Bolton, who was for many years actively and prominently associated with banking interests
of The Dalles. Moreover, he was a native son of Oregon and throughout his life was a supporter of all the well devised plans and measures for the upbuilding of his city and state. His birth occurred near The Dalles in the year 1863, his parents being Daniel and Elizabeth (Fulwider) Bolton. Both were natives of Virginia and representatives of old families of that state. At an early day they journeyed westward to become residents of Oregon and took up their abode on a farm in the vicinity of The Dalles on Fifteen Mile creek, where occurred the birth of their son Virgil.

The latter in the acquirement of his education attended the public schools of The Dalles and then initiated his business career by entering the bank of French & Company when he was a youth of nineteen years. He first served in a clerical capacity but bent every energy toward acquainting himself with the banking business in principle and detail and his thoroughness, his industry and loyalty won him promotions from time to time until he soon became cashier and one of the chief executive officers of the institution. He continued to hold that position until his death, which occurred on the 7th of March, 1895, when he was but thirty-two years of age. Although he passed away at a comparatively early age he had accomplished much more than many a man of twice his years. He had made for himself a most creditable position in financial circles, enjoying an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as enterprise.

On the 28th of March, 1889, Mr. Bolton was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. French and they became the parents of two daughters: Carmel French, who is now the wife of Frank A. Ryder of Portland: and Nonearle French, who is at home with her mother. Mr. Bolton was always keenly interested in public affairs at The Dalles and recognition of his public spirit and his devotion to the general good was manifest in his election to the mayoralty. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an exemplary representative and his entire life was characterized by those qualities which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect. His widow is now living at Alexandra Court, in Portland and is well known in the best circles of the Rose City.

History of Oregon: Volume III
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Gates, Daniel

JUDGE DANIEL L. GATES.

The life of Daniel L. Gates is a story of one well spent in the upbuilding of his native state and in the advancement of the interests of his fellow citizens. He was born in Lane county, Oregon, May 7, 1857, a son of John and Sarah E. (Grice) Gates. The father was born in the blue grass section of Kentucky, coming of a family of early pioneers of that state. The mother was a native of Maryland and a member of the Grice family, whose names are frequently met on the pages of Maryland's history.

John Gates first came to Oregon in 1849, the journey being made by ox team across the plains. After a stay of two years he returned to the east by way of the Isthmus, but in a short time he again drove his team across the plains to Oregon and settled in Lane county. In 1859, shortly after the creation of Wasco county, he located there and for the succeeding thirteen years he was engaged in the stock business, at which he was quite a success. It was in 1872 that Mr. Gates moved his family to The Dalles. His wife died in 1860.

Daniel L. Gates was educated in schools of The Dalles and entered the sawmill business early in life, continuing in that line until 1886, when he became deputy sheriff of Wasco county. In 1890 he received the democratic nomination for sheriff, and although the county was strongly republican he was elected by a substantial majority, an evidence of the esteem in which he was held. His term of office is on record as being one of the most efficient the county has ever had.

In 1894 Mr. Gates purchased a large tract of timber land near Cascade Locks and went into the lumber trade. He also became interested in salmon business, operating two wheels on the Columbia river, and for a period conducted a mercantile business at Cascade Locks. During his stay in the latter place he was interested in the Cascade Locks Water Company, serving as secretary for a time. In 1910 he returned to The Dalles, where he had continuously maintained his residence, and for a period rested from business activities, but a man like Judge Gates is never permitted to fully retire, so in 1917 he was prevailed on to emerge from his retirement and accept the office of city recorder and he is now serving the people in that office with the same efficiency that has marked every movement of his business career.

In October, 1889, Judge Gates was married to Miss Alice DeHuff, of Portland, whose parents were also pioneers o£ this state. Three children have been born to Judge and Mrs. Gates, namely: Harold DeHuff and Albert L., of The Dalles, who are connected with the Motor Service Company, in which they are stockholders; and a daughter, Ruth, who died in 1914.

Judge Gates is a member of the Knights of Pythias and has filled all the chairs in that order. He is also a member of the Woodmen of the World; the Elks; and the Masonic order, being a Knight Templar and he will encase his feet in ice and cross the hot sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is popular with all classes of citizens and has ever taken a prominent part in all movements intended to promote the welfare of the people among whom he has spent his entire life.

History of Oregon: Volume III
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Nichol, Cook

COOK GARVEN NICHOL.

Cook Garven Nichol, a most enterprising and progressive merchant, located at Mosier, was born in Missouri in 1869. His father was a native of Texas county, Missouri, whither his parents had removed in pioneer times. They had previously been early residents of Kentucky and also became identified with the pioneer development of Missouri. The mother of Cook G. Nichol bore the maiden name of Reuh Mitchell and came of one of the old families of Tennessee, in which state her ancestors had settled in 1804.

Cook G. Nichol acquired a limited education in the rural schools of Texas county and at the age of seventeen years started out to make his fortune. He was empty-handed but worked his way to New Mexico and after many trying experiences reached Silver City. His early years were fraught with earnest toil and endeavor. Locating at Pinos Altos he there engaged in mining and through the succeeding eight years of his life followed mining in New Mexico, Arizona, Montana and Idaho. Having saved about thirty-five hundred dollars, he then went to Houstonia, Missouri, and purchased a lumberyard. For five years he conducted business at that place, during which time he doubled his capital; but on account of the health of his eldest son he removed to Montana, buying a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres and turned his attention to cattle raising. After eight years' hard work his ranch was greatly devastated by a flood, causing him the loss of one hundred and seventy-five tons of hay and three hundred head of cattle. He then sold his property at half price and started with his family for the Pacific coast. After looking around for an opening he decided upon Mosier, Wasco county, and in 1911 purchased a half interest in the general merchandise store which he now conducts. After a brief period he became sole owner by acquiring the interest of his partner. Not having the necessary capital with which to buy the half interest he called upon a banker at Hood river and stated his needs. After a conversation concerning his chances of success alone in the business the banker produced a letter from a bank at Houstonia, Missouri, which had been written to a bank at Lewistown, Montana, assuring that institution that Mr. Nichol was in every way worthy of accommodation. Upon the margin of the letter the bank at Lewistown had written: "We take pleasure in confirming the contents of this letter. "Accordingly credit was advanced Mr. Nichol and he purchased his partner's interest in the store, which he has since successfully conducted. In the intervening period of nine years he has built up an exceptionally good credit, a large trade and a well earned reputation. Mr. Nichol and his store are alike a credit to the town.

In 1896 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Nichol and Miss Belle Holly of Licking, Missouri, who belonged to an old New England family, the ancestral line being traced back to the family to which belonged Miles Standish. The Holly family were pioneers of New York before settling in Missouri. The grandfather of Mrs. Nichol remembers Chicago as a small village which he passed through, driving an ox team, when traveling to northern Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Nichol are the parents of two sons and a daughter: Bernard Eugene was educated in the graded schools of Mosier and at the Behnke-Walker Business College of Portland, Oregon. He obtained employment at the plant of Armour & Company in Portland as a bookkeeper and within a short time was to Butte. Montana, and is now branch manager for the company at Billings, that state. This rise in the business world was accomplished in less than three years of service; Robert Leo is a graduate in the Mosier high school; Mildred is a student in the grades. The family is widely and favorably known and the hospitality of the best homes of this section of the state Is freely accorded them. Mr. Nichol was very active in all the drives having to do with the World war and served on the committee that put Mosier over the top in the first bond drives, winning for the town the honor banner ahead of the entire twelfth district, which embraced California, Oregon and Washing- ton. Every public enterprise in his section expects and receives his aid in time and money and on no occasion has he been found a slacker. Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow and a Modern Woodman. He has never held public office in Oregon, despite many requests of his fellow townsmen that he accept nominations. He says he is a business man and knows nothing about politics nor has he any disposition to take up a new line. He is the owner of an extensive ranch in Deschutes county, where he is breeding and feeding selected cattle. This he manages in addition to his commercial pursuits, which for a number of years have classed him with the leading representatives of mercantile interests in Wasco county. Those who know him — and he has a wide acquaintance — speak of him in terms of high regard and recognize in him a forceful and resourceful man whose well defined plans for his own advancement and for the general good are carried forward to successful completion.

History of Oregon: Volume III
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Mays, Franklin

Franklin P. Mays, United States Attorney for the District of Oregon, is a native of the State, born in Lane county, May 12, 1855. His father, Hon. Robert Mays, now Mayor of Dalles city, was a native of Tennessee, but went to Illinois when a boy, and there attained mature years, being reared on his father's farm. In 1849 he was married to Miss Lodemma Fowler, and in 1852 they joined the tide of Western emigration, and after a wearisome journey of six months arrived at the Dalles; they went down the Columbia river to Portland, and in the spring of 1853, took up a donation claim in Lane county. In 1858, Mr. Mays removed to Wasco county and engaged in stock-farming. He is still in that business although since 1873 he has resided in the Dalles. Franklin P. Mays is the third of a family of eight children. His education was secured under the difficulties that strongly characterize every pioneer community; the school session seldom lasted as much as three months during the year, and the rest of the time he devoted to farm labor. Until he was seventeen years of age his opportunities were limited to the log schoolhouse, but he then entered Willamette University, as was graduated at the institution June 1, 1876. In the fall of 1877, he entered the office of Judge William Lair Hill, a distinguished jurist then at the Dalles; each summer he attended to his usual duties at the stock-ranch, but diligently continued his studies, and was admitted to the bar before the Supreme Court, January 9, 1880. He then formed a partnership with Judge Hill at the Dalles, which existed until 1886; in July of that year it was dissolved on account of the removal of Judge Hill to Oakland. The firm of May, Huntington & Wilson was soon after formed, and still exists at the Dalles.

In February, 1890, Mr. Mays received the appointment of United States Attorney, and since that date has temporarily resided at Portland.

He was married at the Dalles, January 31, 1884, to Miss Genevieve G. Wilson, also a native of Oregon, and a daughter of the late Judge Joseph F. Wilson, a pioneer of 1852, Judge Wilson became prominent upon the bench as Circuit and Supreme Judge, and also represented the State in Congress. Mr. and Mrs. Mays are the parents of two children: Wilson P. and Genevieve G.

Politically, Mr. Mays has been a staunch Republican from his boyhood, ever ready to advance his party's interests, but not an office-seeker. He was a delegate at large to the convention at Chicago, which nominated Benjamin Harrison in 1888, and was the State Delegate on the committee selected to notify Mr. Harrison of his nomination for President of the United States. He was the first native-born citizen of the State of Oregon elected as a delegate to attend a National convention, and the first native son to fill the position of the United States Attorney.

An Illustrated History of The State of Oregon
Rev. H. K. Hines, D. D.
The Lewis Publishing Company; 1893
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Patterson, J. M.

J. M. PATTERSON

Although one of the venerable citizens of The Dalles, J. M. Patterson figures prominently in public affairs as county treasurer, an office which he has filled with ability for seven years, and he is also an honored veteran of the Civil war. Of Scotch and Irish lineage, he was born in Ohio, November 26, 1845, and his parents, John and Eliza (Glenn) Patterson, were natives of Pennsylvania. They were married in the Buckeye state, to which John Patterson migrated when a young man, and there engaged in farming for a short period after which he began merchandising in which he continued until 1862, when he started for Oregon, making the journey by way of the isthmus of Panama. He located in Salem and assisted in building its first sawmill.  For three years he was identified with the operation of the plant and in 1865 vent to Iowa, becoming connected with the same line of business. In 1868 he disposed of his property in the Hawkeye state and returned to Oregon, purchasing an interest in the Salem sawmill, with which he had previously been identified. Mr. Patterson conducted the business successfully until his death in 1874 and his wife passed away about eight years later. Three of their children reached mature years, namely: J. M.; and Mrs. Angeline King and Mrs. Elizabeth Brown, who are now deceased.


In the acquirement of an education J. M. Patterson attended the public schools of New Concord, Ohio, where he also learned telegraphy and afterward went to Des Moines, Iowa. On September 9, 1861, when a youth of sixteen, he joined Company A, of the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry. He served for sometime in the ranks afterwards being transferred to the United States signal corps in which he served until the close of the war. He was released from military duty September 9, 1864, at the end of his term of three years, and then reentered the service as a civilian remaining with the telegraph corps of the United States Army until May 1, 1865, when he returned to private life. After the close of the war he took a course in a business college at Des Moines, Iowa, and in 1869 came to Oregon. For three years he was assistant postmaster of Salem and in April, 1885, journeyed to eastern Oregon, becoming a clerk on the Warmspring Indian reservation. A year later he came to The Dalles as bookkeeper for the A. M. Williams Company, with which he spent eight years, and then entered the First National Bank. Mr. Patterson was elected cashier of the institution, which he represented in that capacity for three years, and from 1901 until 1905 was postmaster. of The Dalles. He was secretary of the local Business Men's Association for three years and in 1908 purchased a fruit ranch near The Dalles.  For sixteen years he was the owner of the farm, devoting his attention to the production of cherries with varying success, and in 1927 sold the property. Meanwhile he had been called to public office, becoming treasurer of Wasco county in 1921, and at the end of his term of two years was reelected for a period of four years. The work of his department is performed with system and efficiency and his retention in the office proves that his worth is appreciated.

In 1872 Mr. Patterson married Miss Blanche Gray, whose parents, G. W. and Prudence Gray, are deceased. Mrs. Patterson was born in Iowa and passed away February 8, 1913. She had become the mother of four children, all of whom were born in Oregon. The son, Edward G., was married and at his death left two children, Dorothy and Prudence. Beulah, the second in order of birth, was educated in the local schools and for twenty-six years has been assistant postmistress of The Dalles. Her sister, Prudence, was educated in Salem. During the World war she was acting secretary of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce and has been clerk of the school board since 1921. William Glenn, the second son, went to France with the American Expeditionary Force, serving in the ordnance department of the army, and is now a traveling salesman for the Goodrich Tire & Rubber Company. He is married and resides in Portland, Oregon.

Mr. Patterson belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and is a past commander of J. W. Nesmith Post, No. 32. He is also connected with the Woodmen of the World and takes a keen interest in the affairs of these organizations. For more than four decades he has witnessed the panorama of progress in Wasco county and rejoices in what has been accomplished. His life has been rightly lived and although eighty-two years of age he is alert and vigorous, deriving contentment and happiness from the performance of useful work. By nature he is genial, frank and sympathetic and enjoys the esteem of a host of friends, by whom he is affectionately termed "Jerry."

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Barnum, Ladru

LADRU BARNUM

A product of Wasco county, Ladru Barnum has progressed with its development, giving his best efforts to every task that he has undertaken, and is now a forceful figure in financial circles of The Dalles, representing the First National Bank in an official capacity. He was born in 1877 in Moro and at that time Wasco, the "largest county in the world," as it was called, comprised in its area what is now Sherman county. His father, Henry Barnum, was a native of New York state and in his youth yielded to the lure of the west, sailing around Cape Horn. He came to this region when eastern Oregon was one great cattle range, unfenced for hundreds of miles. He filed on a homestead in Wasco county, becoming the owner of the land on which the town of Moro was afterward built. There he spent the remainder of his life, raising cattle and horses on an extensive scale, and his homestead is now the state and federal demonstration farm for eastern Oregon. Mr. Barnum was a broad-minded man of generous impulses and in his will provided for the maintenance of a school. For each of his children who a pupil at this school the district was to receive a bonus of seventy-five dollars per annum, provided he or she attended during three months of the school year. Mr. Barnum attained the full measure of success and in 1884 death terminated his useful and upright career. His widow, Mrs. Elmira (Masicker) Barnum, was born in Yamhill county, Oregon, and passed away in 1923. They were the parents of four children: E. E., a resident of The Dalles and one of the large wheat growers of this part of the state: Ladru; A. H., a breeder of registered Hereford cattle and one of the leading stockmen of Sherman county; and Mrs. Ora M. Peetz, whose husband is county commissioner and maintains his home in Moro.

Ladru Barnum attended the school established by his father and rode the range until he reached the age of twenty, becoming thoroughly familiar with the details of stock raising. When about sixteen he took part in the Moro rodeo, wearing chaps and riding wild steers, but the life of a cowboy was not to his liking and he determined to fit himself for a commercial career. He completed a course in the Portland Business College and for six months was a clerk in a general store in Klondike, Sherman county. Afterward he was employed in a similar capacity by the Moro Mercantile Company and in 1900 entered the service of the Wasco Warehouse & Milling Company of Moro as grain buyer, or chief field man. For twenty years he filled that important position, traveling throughout eastern Oregon and in addition he acted as manager of the bank operated by the company in Moro, assuming the duties of the latter office in 1903. Reared on a ranch, he has never lost his interest in agricultural matters and in 1912 was the prime mover in securing for the farmers of Sherman county a loan which saved them from what at one time looked like ruin, the amount obtained from eastern sources for that purpose being nearly three-quarters of a million dollars. On March 6, 1919, he came to The Dalles and has since been vice president and general manager of the First National Bank. Mr. Barnum has aided materially in making this one of the strongest and most important financial institutions of Oregon and is also vice president of the Bank of Moro, a director of the Bank of Wasco and of the Eastern Oregon Banking Company of Shaniko.

The First National Bank of The Dalles was organized in 1885 and started with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. Its first election was held December 28, 1885, and David P. Thompson was called to the presidency of the bank, of which John S. Schenck became vice president, while Hamilton M. Beall was chosen cashier. At that time George A. Liebe and Griffith E. Williams were selected as their associates on the board of directors. As a result of the annual election of January 12, 1892, J. S. Schenck became president of the bank and H. M. Beall continued as cashier. The latter resigned July 15, 1893, and on July 22, 1893, J. M. Patterson assumed the duties of cashier. On January 8, 1901, H. M. Beall replaced G. A. Liebe as vice president and Max A. Vogt became cashier. The capital stock remained unchanged until December 28, 1905, when it was increased to one hundred thousand dollars. W. C. Waldron tendered his resignation as bookkeeper and on July 25, 1904, F. W. Sims was selected to fill the position. H. M. Beall resigned as vice president on January 9, 1906, and G. A. Liebe was then recalled to that office, of which he was the incumbent until January 14, 1908. E. M. Williams was then elected vice president and F. W. Sims was made assistant cashier. On July 5, 1911, the surplus was increased to one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. J. S. Schenck died October 16, 1913, and on November 3, 1913, Max A. Vogt was elected president of the bank, while F. W. Sims was advanced to the post of cashier. Max A. Vogt died January 23, 1919, and on March 6, 1919, the following officers were elected: E. M. Williams, president; E. 0. McCoy and L. Barnum, vice presidents; and F. W. Sims, cashier. There were no further changes until June 15, 1927, when J. W. Hoech was elected a director and vice president. The present officers are: E. M. Williams, president; E. 0. McCoy and J. W. Hoech, vice presidents; L. Barnum, vice president and general manager; F. W. Sims, cashier; and W. H. Wilhelm, L. A. Littleton, Max Kasberger, J. F. Tureck and J. L. Secton, assistant cashiers. The directorate is composed of L. Barnum, J. W. Hoech, J. L. Kelly, E. 0. McCoy and E. M. Williams.

The statement issued by the bank at the close of business on October 10, 1927, showed a capital of one hundred thousand dollars; a surplus and undivided profits of one hundred and eighty-eight thousand, four hundred and forty-six dollars, deposits amounting to two million, four hundred and seventy-seven thousand, nine hundred and eighty-two dollars, and total resources of two million, eight hundred and ninety thousand, seven hundred and twenty-eight dollars.

In 1911 the old home of the institution was replaced by a new modern, class A bank building, five stories in height. It is made of pressed brick and stands in the center of the business district. The bank occupies all of the lower floor and the remaining stories of the building contain office suites leased by local business and professional men. The bank pays three per cent interest on savings accounts and has safe deposit boxes for rent. Up-to-date banking appliances facilitate the work and the service is adapted to every need. On January 13, 1927, the First National Bank of The Dalles took over all the deposits of the Wasco County Bank, making this one of the largest and foremost moneyed institutions in eastern Oregon.

Mr. Barnum was married June 30, 1900, in Moro to Miss May Kunsman, a native of Ohio and a daughter of John and Mary Kunsman, both of whom passed away in Oregon. Their younger children, Roy and Mary Kunsman, were reared by Mr. Barnum and carefully nurtured. Roy is engaged in business at Arlington, Oregon, and has a wife and one child, Barbara May. Mary is now Mrs. Newton Crosfield, of Wasco, Oregon, and has a son, Newton Ladru.

During the World war Mr. Barnum was head of the local Red Cross organization and food administrator for his county. He was chairman of every bond and stamp drive in Sherman county and also participated in the campaigns promulgated by the Young Men's Christian Association. For a considerable period he was chairman of the republican county committee of Sherman county and for seventeen years was its representative on the republican state central committee. While a resident of Moro he was a school director for eight years and also filled the offices of councilman and mayor. For four terms he was president of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce and acted as district trustee of the local Kiwanis Club for a similar length of time. He is also a member of The Dalles Golf & Country Club and a Knight Templar Mason, holding the thirty-second degree in that order. In the blue lodge he is past master and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He has been through all of the chairs in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is likewise connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a past patron of the Eastern Star. His wife belongs to the last named order, is past worthy matron and was active in the Grand Chapter. Enterprising, broad-minded and unselfish, Mr. Barnum has demonstrated his public spirit by actual achievements for the general good and the rules which govern his life are such as constitute the basis of all honorable and desirable prosperity.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Chrisman, Levi

LEVI CHRISMAN

No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon. He was born May 18, 1869, in Dufur, Wasco county, and his father, Campbell Ewing Chrisman, was a native of Pike county, Missouri, His natal day was January 4, 1835, and his parents were Joel D. and Margaret Chrisman, the former also born in Pike county, while the latter was a native of Ireland. In 1844, when their son Campbell E. was a boy of nine, they journeyed to Oregon in a covered wagon and located on a donation land claim of six hundred and forty acres, situated one and a half miles south of Dayton, in Yamhill county. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in 1852 and her husband remained on the ranch until 1872. He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later. He had a family of eight children: Gabrile, Ann, Elinor, Elizabeth, William, Campbell E., Chelnessa and Izza.

Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until 1859, when he moved to The Dalles. For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about 1862 purchased the property. He cultivated the farm until 1870 and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until 1887, when he retired. He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. On September 10, 1863, he married Miss Mary Adeline Murphy, who was born June 28, 1847, in Peoria, Illinois. Her parents, John E. and Frankie Murphy, were born in the east and came to Oregon in 1852, settling on a donation land claim near Independence, in Polk county. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel. He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years. The demise of Campbell E. Chrisman occurred May 15, 1908, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, a resident of The Dalles, and on February 20, 1922, his widow was called to her final rest. To their union were born seven children. Lulu, the eldest, was born on the homestead near Dufur and is the widow of Henry Taylor. She has two children: Mrs. Lulu P. Hay, who is the mother of a daughter, Norma Jean; and Henry Clay Taylor, who is married and has a son, Richard Clay Taylor. Hugh Chrisman is sheriff of Sherman county and has been the incumbent of the office for eight years. Levi is the next of the family and his brother Frank lives in Oakland, California. Eugene makes his home in Toledo, Oregon, and Fred is a resident of Bradley, California. Emma, the seventh in order of birth, died in infancy.

Levi Chrisman attended the public schools at The Dalles and the old Wasco Academy. For four years he was a railroad employe and in 1890 ventured in business for himself at The Dalles. In partnership with his brother Frank he opened a meat market, which he conducted successfully for sixteen years, also dealing in live stock. He was elected sheriff of Wasco county on the republican ticket in 1906 and his long retention in this office is an eloquent testimonial to the quality of his service. In the discharge of his important duties he is conscientious, efficient and fearless and during his tenure of office the percentage of crime in the country has been appreciably lowered. His record is unsullied and in length of service has never been equaled by any other sheriff in the state.

In 1893 Mr. Chrisman married Miss Edna C. Martin, who was born in Illinois, and died February 13, 1912. She had become the mother of five children. Edna, the first born, is the wife of Robert P. Johnson, of Portland, Oregon, and has two daughters, Margaret and Virginia. The other children of Mr. and Mrs. Chrisman are: Mrs. Neva M. Rasmussen, of Seattle, Washington; Robert, who was admitted to the bar in 1926 and is practicing in Wallowa, Oregon; Cecil, who is a junior at the University of Oregon and is preparing to enter the legal profession; and Elsie, who was graduated from the high school at The Dalles and is taking a course in a Portland business college. The children are natives of The Dalles and all have received the benefit of a good education.

Mr. Chrisman is a Knight Templar Mason and a Noble of Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland. In the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias he has filled all of the chairs and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has a wide acquaintance and draws his friends from all walks of life, possessing those qualities which inspire strong and enduring regard.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Stadelman, Joseph

JOSEPH STADELMAN

Although a native of the east, Joseph Stadelman has spent practically his entire life in Oregon, becoming one of the leading merchants of The Dalles, and his success has been commensurate with his industry and ability. He was born on Hempstead, Long Island, and when a child made the journey to the west with his parents, Joseph and Mary (Rath) Stadelman, who settled on a donation land claim near The Dalles in 1881. Here the father engaged in farming until his death in 1923 and the mother still lives at The Dalles.

Joseph Stadelman, Jr., attended the public schools of this city until he reached the age of twelve years, when he became a wage earner, obtaining work in the fruit and produce store of Seufert Brothers, local merchants. His next position was that of messenger boy for the Western Union Telegraph Company, with which he spent about six months, afterward becoming a clerk in the D. Herbring dry goods store. In the shop of Maier & Benton he learned the trade of a tinsmith, working for the firm for three years, and later was employed for six months in the hardware store of Mays & Crowe. In 1898 he became associated with his brother, P. J. Stadelman, a dealer in fruit and ice, acquiring a third of the stock. They also handled coal and wood and in 1909 erected a large plant for the manufacture of ice, afterward constructing a cold storage building, likewise of extensive proportions. In 1925 Joseph Stadelman disposed of his holdings in the Stadelman Ice Company and his brother has since been the owner of the business. On June 24, 1914, Joseph Stadelman and N. A. Bonn had purchased the hardware business of the Waither-Williams Hardware & Implement Company on Second street but did not take over the stock of implements. The store was established in 1887 by Grant Mays and L. E. Crowe. It was afterward conducted by the firm of Sexton & Waither and on the retirement of the senior partner the business was reorganized, at which time the style of the Walther-Williams Hardware & Implement Company was adopted. The firm of Stadelman & Bonn carries a complete line of hardware and the stock includes paint and oil, house furnishings, stoves and ranges, plumbers' supplies and glassware, as well as guns, ammunition, fishing tackle and other articles used by sportsmen. The stock is valued at thirty thousand dollars and the firm handles goods of the highest quality. This is one of the best hardware stores in eastern Oregon and its patronage is drawn from a wide territory. Throughout his residence in Oregon, a period of forty years, Mr. Bonn has been connected with this establishment and knows every phase of the trade. The partners are experienced business men of mature judgment and their commercial transactions have always balanced up with the principles of truth and honor, which constitute the foundation of success in every line of endeavor and without which no commercial organization can long endure.

Mr. Stadelman was married October 8, 1909, to Miss Nellie M. Gilhousen, a native of Kahoka, Missouri, and a daughter of John and Julia Gilhousen. For many years the father was engaged in farming in Missouri and since his retirement has resided at The Dalles. He has reached the eighty-eighth milestone on life's journey and his wife is eighty-four years of age but as alert and active as most women of fifty. To Mr. and Mrs. Gilhousen were born seven children, two of whom died in infancy. Those who survive are: William, who lives at The Dalles; Charles, of New York city; Paxton, a resident of Des Moines, Iowa; Ernest, of Portland, Oregon; and Nellie M. All are natives of Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Stadelman have a daughter, Joan Catherine, who was born February 14, 1914, at The Dalles and is attending high school.

The Stadelman residence was erected a few years ago and ranks with the finest in the county. It is a pressed brick structure of attractive design and has nine rooms in addition to a full basement. The house contains hardwood floors and is supplied with all modern conveniences. Mr. Stadelman is an accomplished musician as well as a capable business man and in 1891 played the cornet in the Third Regiment Band of the Oregon National Guard. Resolute and energetic, he has converted his opportunities into tangible assets and is esteemed for the qualities to which he owes his success.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Keller, Andrew

ANDREW KELLER

Along the path of opportunity open to all Andrew Keller arrived at the goal of success, placing his dependence upon the indispensable qualities of industry and perseverance, and is now living retired at The Dalles, which for forty-five years has numbered him among its loyal and valuable citizens. A native of Baden, Germany, he was born August 16, 1861. His parents, John G. and Annie Keller, were lifelong residents of that country, and in their family were nine children, five of whom survive.

Andrew Keller was reared on his father's farm and attended the public schools of Baden, afterward becoming a baker's apprentice. In 1877 he sailed for America in company with an uncle, J. S. Keller, who had emigrated to this country in 1849, when gold was discovered in California. Fortune eluded him and in the '60s he opened a meat market in Portland, Oregon. While thus engaged he revisited his old home. in Germany, returning to the United States with his nephew, and conducted the business in Portland until his death.

At the age of sixteen Andrew Keller severed home ties. His education was completed in the old Central school in Portland and while learning how to read and write English he was employed in his uncle's shop, working from four in the morning until it was time for school to open. When the pupils were dismissed for the day he returned to the market and frequently remained there until eleven o'clock at night in order to complete his tasks. In 1878 he entered the Force & Fieur Bakery on Washington street, between Second and Third, and spent two years with that firm. He went to California in 1880, following his trade for a few months in San Francisco, and in the same year returned to Portland. In 1883 he left the Rose city, locating at The Dalles, and for a short time was employed in the Newman bakery. Having accumulated sufficient capital, Mr. Keller ventured in business for himself and opened a high class bakery, of which he was the proprietor until 1907. After disposing of the enterprise he purchased an interest in the August Bigler brewery, with which he was connected until 1911, when he disposed of his interest and entered the field of contracting in partnership with Charles Johnson. From the start the undertaking was a success and among the notable structures which they erected in The Dalles were the Wasco warehouse and elevators, a large flour mill and the new home of the First National Bank, an imposing building which is five stories in height. In the execution of contracts they were prompt, reliable and efficient, displaying keen sagacity in the management of their affairs, and in 1920 Mr. Keller was able to retire.

Mr. Keller was married in 1882 to Miss Klootz, also a native of Germany, and their union was severed by her death in October, 1926. She had become the mother of five children. The eldest, Mrs. Emma Miller, who was born in Germany and is living in Lodi, California, has a family of three children: Lena, Grace and Otto. Annie, the second daughter, became the wife of William Ross, of Seattle, Washington, and is deceased. Josephine, a native of The Dalles, was married to Edward Boyd, a locomotive engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, living at The Dalles and they, have a son, Lloyd. Bertha, the next of the family, is the wife of Benjamin Pundt, of The Dalles. Otto, the fifth in order of birth, also a native of The Dalles, is married and has a daughter, Bertha, whose brother, Andrew, the first born, is deceased.

Mr. Keller is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His service as water commissioner covered three terms and for four years he was one of the councilmen of The Dalles, discharging his public duties in a manner that won strong approbation. The community has profited materially by Mr. Keller's constructive efforts and a useful, upright life has enabled him to win and retain the esteem of his fellowmen.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Stadelman, Peter

PETER JOHN STADELMAN

At an early age Peter John Stadelman manifested that spirit of energy and self-reliance which spurs the individual ever onward and upward and for thirty-five years he has been an outstanding figure in business circles of The Dalles. lie is also a financier of high standing and for a decade has been mayor of the city, which has made notable progress during that period. He was born in Hempstead, New York, and his father, Joseph Stadelman, was a native of the Austrian Tyrol. In 1869 he sailed for the United States, settling on Long island, and for a time followed the trade of a carpenter at Hempstead. Next he purchased a tract of land and raised garden truck, which he marketed in New York city. Learning of the opportunities afforded in the west, he sold the property and in 1881 came to The Dalles, Oregon. He leased the old Catholic mission donation land claim of six hundred and forty acres and devoted the remainder of his life to the cultivation of the farm. His wife, Mary (Rath) Stadehnan, was born in the state of New York and they became the parents of two sons, Peter John and Joseph, whose biographies are published in this volume. The father's demise occurred in March, 1923, but the mother still resides at The Dalles.

Peter J. Stadelman attended the public schools of this city until he was twelve years of age, when he became a newsboy, and carried the Oregonian, Portland's leading paper. At the same time he obtained a position in The Dalles post office, in which he spent about four years, serving under Michael Nolan, who was then postmaster and also the mayor of the city. Much of the work devolved upon Mr. Stadelman, who acted as assistant postmaster before he reached the age of sixteen. In 1893 he ventured in business for himself, opening a fruit and vegetable store at The Dalles, and a year later he broadened the scope of his activities. During the winter he cut ice from the nearby lakes and with the assistance of his brother peddled it in the summer. In 1898 the business was expanded to a wholesale and retail fruit and ice company, in which P. J. Stadelman owned two-thirds of the stock, and the remainder was held by Joseph Stadelman. They handled Oregon and California fruits for the eastern markets, also supplying the western markets with fruit from the east and south, and likewise became dealers in coal and wood. In 1909 they completed a large plant for the manufacture of ice and later erected a cold storage building provided with ten large rooms supplied with facilities for keeping perishable fruit. The building is usually filled with apples, which are secured in the fall and kept in cold storage until spring. In 1925 Joseph Stadelman withdrew from the concern and the business is now controlled by Peter J. Stadelman, who has admitted his sons, Wilbur and George P., to a partnership. To the Stadelman Company belongs the distinction of having the largest ice and cold storage plant in eastern Oregon. In 1927 the firm shipped over one hundred thousand dollars worth of cherries alone and in addition sent out peaches, pears, apricots, strawberries, apples and vegetables in large quantities. The cars are iced at The DalIes plant and the shipments extend throughout the eastern states. Each step in the development of this large enterprise has resulted from carefully matured plans and tireless effort, and in its conduct Mr. Stadelman brings to bear unerring judgment and marked administrative power. These characteristics are also displayed in the control of the Citizens National Bank, a local institution, of which he is the president. In 1920 he was one of the organizers of the bank, of which Dr. J. A. Reuter is vice president, and H. E. Green serves as cashier. Their associates on the board of directors are John Van Dellen, John Heimrich, Arthur Senfert, Dr. B. C. Olinger, H. L. Huck and George Abarr. The bank is capitalized at one hundred and sixty thousand dollars and its resources amount to more than one million dollars. This is a reliable, prosperous moneyed institution and the spirit behind its service is one of helpfulness. In 1907 Mr. Stadelman and his brother purchased from their father the old mission farm, which adjoins the city, and they still own the property, which they have converted into one of the finest ranches in Wasco county.

In 1904 Peter J. Stadelman married Mrs. May Hicks, a native of Wasco county and a daughter of Robert Kelly, who served as sheriff of the county for many years. Mrs. Stadelman passed away July 10, 1924, leaving two sons, Wilbur and George Peter, both natives of The Dalles and graduates of the local high school. Wilbur Stadelman attended the University of Oregon at Eugene for one and a half years and has charge of the fruit department of his father's business. His brother is a sophomore at the State University and a member of its football team, taking a prominent part in athletic sports. The sons are keenly interested in the business and give very promise of being able to continue it successfully when their father is ready to retire.

Mr. Stadelman is affiliated with the Chamber of Commerce and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In 1910 he became a member of the city council, with which he was identified for four years, and made an excellent record. On November 4, 1918, he was elected mayor of The Dalles and has since been retained in that office. The welfare of the city has ever been his first concern and his administration has been beneficially resultant. He is an earnest advocate of good roads and schools and his personality has been an inspiration to progress. Mr. Stadelman has never deviated from the course sanctioned by conscience and honor and belongs to that desirable class of citizens who constitute the strength and the motive power of every community in which they are found.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Pepper, Carlton

CARLTON LEE PEPPER

Canton Lee Pepper, practicing attorney-at-law in The Dalles, Oregon, was born on the 18th day of November, 1876, at Shenandoah, Iowa, where his father and mother, pioneers of the state of Iowa, were then living on a homestead. At the age of four years his family moved to Kansas, and in 1883 his father and mother again became pioneers, then moving to and settling in the Territory of Dakota. In 1890 the family moved to Piano, Illinois, where the father died, and where Canton Lee Pepper attended the public schools. In 1905 he graduated from the law department of Lake Forest University, and was then admitted to the bar in Illinois.

His father was Thomas Derth Pepper, who was born at Brimfield, Massachusetts, March 25, 1844, and served under General Burnside in the Civil war. The father died at Plano, Illinois on May 16, 1910. His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Minerva Hunt, was born at Bridgeport, Connecticut, January 7, 1840, and died at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 5, 1920.

The father of Thomas Derth Pepper was an early settler of the state of Massachusetts, whose brother, David Pepper, was a merchant and the owner of a large amount of property in Philadelphia and who was the founder of Strathmore College. He was a millionaire and philanthropist, and the father of George Wharton Pepper, present United States senator.

The father of Ellen Minerva Hunt was Reuben Hunt, one of the early settlers of Litchfield, Connecticut. Her mother was Emmeline Hunt, whose father, Amos Hunt, was a Yale graduate, as was also his father who was one of the first students to enter Yale College when it was founded in 1702.

The progenitor of the Hunt family was an officer in William the Conqueror's army. Following the battle of Hastings and the conquest of England in 1066, he received a large area of land in the north of England where he founded the Hunt family. In 1635, two brothers of the Hunt family, in company with twenty-three others, received a grant of land in New York, later a part of the state of Connecticut. One of the company, Sir William Hunt, settled in Canaan, Connecticut, and was the founder of the branch of the Hunt family of which the mother of Carlton Lee Pepper was a member.

At a reunion of the Hunt family held in 1885, three thousand descendants personally registered at the meeting. More than ten thousand registered by mail. The meeting being the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of the advent of the Hunt family in America. The Hunt family has produced a number of prominent people, among them being Governor Hunt of Arizona; Rockwell Hunt, historian of the University of California; and Russell Hunt and William Hunt, both artists. At one time the Hunt brothers operated a foundry in New York, which was the only one in America fitted for making cannon for the Revolutionary army.

Following his graduation from the Lake Forest University in 1905, in Chicago, Carlton Lee Pepper was admitted to the bar in the state of Illinois. In 1906 he moved to Portland, Oregon, where, for a period of nine months, he occupied the position of advertising manager for a large wholesale grocery house, going to The Dalles, Oregon, on July 1, 1907, where he entered into a partnership with S. W. Stark for the practice of law. Since the first day of July, 1907, he has continuously lived in and practiced law in The Dalles.

Soon after coming to The Dalles, Canton Lee Pepper was elected to the board of directors of the local Chamber of Commerce where he served for several years, and in 1915 he was elected to the office of and served as president of the Chamber. He was city attorney of The Dalles during the years 1914 and 1915. In 1917 he organized what is known as The Dalles National Farm Loan Association, since which time he has acted as secretary-treasurer of the Association, and is now filling such office. For five years he has been president of the Central Oregon District Association of Farm Loan Associations, which office he is also filling at the present time.

During the time Mr. Pepper has been living in The Dalles he has endeavored to perform his share of the civic duties falling on the ordinary individual living in a rural community, serving as needed on the various committees connected with the Chamber of Commerce and civic organizations. He has been active in fraternal affairs, being a member of the Masonic and Elk lodges of The Dalles, a Knight Templar, Royal Arch Mason and a life member of Al Kader Temple of the Shrine in Portland. He is Past Master of Wasco Lodge, No. 15, A.F. & A.M. in The Dalles.

On September 22, 1902, Mr. Pepper was married to Grace Clarkson, and his family now consists of himself, his wife Grace Pepper, and one daughter Ruthe Eleanor, of the age of nineteen years, now attending the State Normal School at Monmouth. Mrs. Pepper is the daughter of James and Margaret Clarkeon of Mendota, Illinois, where Mrs. Pepper was born, her father being born in Glasgow, Scotland, and her mother in Pennsylvania.

Mr. Pepper has been a member of the Kiwanis Club of The Dalles since its organization in 1921, being a charter member of the Club and its first secretary, which office he held for a period of three years following the organization of the Club. In 1924 he acted as delegate of the Club to the international convention held at Denver.

Mr. Pepper has one brother and two sisters. His sister, Mrs. A. W. Hunt, residing in Los Angeles, California, and the other sister, Mrs. James Motter, living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His brother, F.M. Pepper, is connected with the main office of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company in New York, where he has charge of the vocational training department of such institution.

While living in Illinois Mr. Pepper served six years as a member of the Illinois National Guard, being connected with the Signal Corps. In 1898 the Signal Corps of which he was a member was called for service in the Spanish-American war, but was recalled before reaching the front.

By choice and because of his father's views, Mr. Pepper is affiliated with the republican party. He is a member of the Congregational church at The Dalles. His chief recreational sports are golfing, fishing and hunting, which he enjoys at all times with a reasonable degree of success

Mr. Pepper's valued possessions are his family, relatives and his friends. His physical possessions are his law business, his property in The Dalles, and a wheat ranch in Sherman county.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Hage, C. A.

C. A. HAGE

That success is the legitimate outcome of persistent industry, backed by good judgment in taking advantage of opportunity, has been exemplified in the business career of C. A. Hage, of Mosier, Wasco county, Oregon, who has gained a wide reputation as a maker of high grade cider, his product being known from coast to coast. Mr. Rage was born in Bavaria, Germany, on the 8th day of February, 1868, and is a son of Jacob and Katie Hage, also natives of that country. His father was a farmer and a preacher of the Mennonite church. Both parents are deceased, the father dying in 1877 and the mother in 1887. They were the parents of eight children, Joseph, Otto, Bertha, Gustaf, Oswald, Elizabeth, Jacob and C. A., of whom Joseph and Gustaf are deceased.

C. A. Hage received a good education in the public schools of his native land, walking two miles to and from the schoolhouse, and from the age of nine years he also worked on the home farm every day outside of school hours. After leaving school he worked on farms in his home neighborhood for several years, and also resided for about seven months in Munich, the capital of Bavaria. In 1885, when seventeen years of age, he came to the United States, and went direct to Pekin, Illinois, near which place he worked on farms for four years. He went from there to Wisconsin, where he was employed at railroad work during the winter, which proved to be the coldest winter in the history of that state, the thermometer registering sixty-seven degrees below zero. In 1890 Mr. Rage went to Spokane, Washington, where he worked for the Northern Pacific Railroad until 1905, when he came to Wasco county, and located on one hundred and sixty acres of land which he had bought in 1901 and which was located about four miles south of Mosier. The land was covered with oak grubs and after clearing off about ten acres and finding that the soil was not adapted for fruit raising, he sold the place and in 1912 bought fifty-five acres of land adjoining the town of Mosier on the west. This was raw land, being covered with timber, brush and stones, but the soil was good and the location ideal, so he at once erected a good house and in the fall of that year started an apple cider plant. He bought a small power cider press and during that season made one hundred barrels of cider. Owing to the lack of a ready market, most of this cider turned to vinegar, but as the superior quality of his product became better known his market gradually increased and during the subsequent years has grown to enormous proportions, so that in 1925 he made twenty-five thousand gallons of cider, for all of which he found a ready market. In 1918 Mr. Hage bought a large, modern press, added a boiler to the plant, and from time to time has made other additions to the plant, so that he is now the owner of one of the best equipped cider factories in. this section of the country, the mill now having a capacity of two thousand gallons a. day, equivalent to forty fifty-gallon barrels. He ships his products to all states west of the Rocky mountains and, through the advertising which he receives from the many tourists who stop and buy the cider, he has received orders for it from every section of the country. During the past two years Mr. Hage has been making a new drink, composed of half cider and half cranberry juice, which has become exceedingly popular. He has a fine supply of pure spring water, which he keeps in storage tanks under pressure. His equipment includes a machine for washing the apples and one for washing bottles and jars, both of which are electrically operated. All of the containers are thoroughly sterilized before being filled, and the cider is sterilized before being bottled, so that it will keep sweet indefinitely until opened. He always provides in spring time for the tourists' trade with about ten thousand gallons of cider, all being put up in glass, from one pint to five gallon containers, handsomely labeled. Mr. Hage erected the buildings and installed all of the equipment himself, being an all-round mechanic, stone-mason, carpenter and machinist, and can personally operate any part of the plant. His home is surrounded by a splendid lawn, the grounds having been laid out and improved by him, and he now has one of the most attractive homes in this locality. He is a keen lover of nature in all of its forms and has made a game sanctuary of his property, from which hunters are excluded, and during the months of cold and deep snow, he feeds the wild birds, which recognize him as a friend and protector and flock to his place. Shade trees and flowers abound on the place and Mr. Hage has as far as possible indulged his love for the beautiful in nature. He is unmarried, his home being kept by his sister-in-law, whose husband, Mr. Hage's brother, assists in the operation of the ranch. Mr. Hage is a man of kindly and genial manner, hospitable and courteous to all who come :his way, and many tourists have found his place a real oasis, where they can rest and refresh themselves on their travels. Throughout the community he is held in high regard by his fellowmen and is considered one of Wasco county's best citizens.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

McInerny, J. P.

J. P. McINERNY

Strong, courageous and resolute, J. P. McInerny surmounted many obstacles, never losing sight of his objective, and was long numbered among the leading merchants of The Dalles, but is now enjoying a well earned rest. He was born May 9, 1847, in County Clare, Ireland, of which country his parents, Patrick and Mary McInerny, were also natives. They came to the United States in 1865 and established their home in Chicago, Illinois, where the father spent the remainder of his life.

J. P. McInerny received a good education in Ireland, which he left when a youth of eighteen, and afterward attended the Bryant & Stratton Business College of Chicago, from which he won a scholarship in 1868. In the same year he went to Toronto, Canada, and while in that city assimilated the details of the dry goods trade. On his return to Chicago he opened a dry goods store but lost everything in the memorable fire of 1871 and was obliged to start life anew. Choosing the Pacific coast region as the scene of his labors, he went to San Francisco, California, in 1872 and obtained a position in the store of J. J. O'Brien, at that time the foremost dry goods merchant of the city. In 1872 Mr. McInerny moved to Los Angeles, California, and was employed as a clerk by Eugene Meyer & Company, the owners of the largest dry goods establishment in that city. Later Mr. Meyer went to the eastern coast and became one of the prominent bankers of New York city. Tn February, 1878, Mr. McInerny journeyed to Oregon, locating at 'Ike Dalles, where he has since made his home. For one and a half years he was a salesman in the dry goods store of Max Vogt & Company and in the fall of 1879 embarked in merchandising as a member of the firm of Herbering & McInerny, handling dry goods exclusively. They established a high standard of service, giving to each patron good value for the amount expended, and their employes were always courteous and obliging. As a result the business steadily increased and the store became a vital factor in the life of the community. Mr. McInerny formulated well devised plans for the development of the business and devoted his energies to its conduct until 1925, when he retired from the firm.

In 1881 Mr. McInerny married Miss Josephine Bettengen, a native of Corvallis, Oregon, and a daughter of Albert and Carolyn Bettengen, both of whom were born in Luxemburg, France. Mr. Bettengen emigrated to the United States about the year 1850 and spent some time in New York, afterward going to California by way of the isthmus of Panama. For a few years he was a hardware merchant of San Francisco and in 1855 came to Oregon. Locating at Corvallis, he there engaged in the hardware business for nine years and in 1864 allied his interests with those of The Dalles. For many years he was the owner of a hardware store in this city and also became well known as a tinsmith. He passed away in this city in 1897 and his wife died in 1893. Mr. and Mrs. McInerny became the parents of seven children: Mrs. Mary Hansen, who is the mother of three children, Carl, John and Doris, and who lost two sons, Lawrence and Leo; Joseph, at home; Josephine, who is Mrs. Paul McCoy, of The Dalles, and has two sons, Paul and Owen; Francis, deceased; Gertrude, who died in infancy; Leo, who is married and lives in San Francisco; and Edwin, a talented singer, who is making records for the Victor Company and resides in New York city.

Mr. McInerny was chosen a member of the board of water commissioners and for several years was one of the councilmen of The Dalles, exerting his best efforts in behalf of the city. He has passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey and enjoys the contentment of mind and tranquility of spirit which result from the knowledge of tasks well done and duties faithfully performed. For fifty years a resident of The Dalles, he has watched its growth with deep interest, contributing his share toward the city's development and progress, and an upright, useful life has won for him the unqualified esteem of all with whom he has been associated.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Fleming, Frank

FRANK S. FLEMING

Agricultural progress in Oregon has received marked impetus from the well directed efforts of Frank S. Fleming, a well known pioneer of Wasco county and one of its largest landowners. He was born in 1859 in Wayne county, Kentucky, and his parents, G. W. and Eliza (McBeth) Fleming, were natives of the same county. The father engaged in farming, also following the carpenter's trade, and was a lifelong resident of the Blue Grass state. He had a large family and five of the children survive, namely: Frank S.; Carrie, who lives in Tennessee; Lizzie, whose home is in Alabama; Minnie, a resident of The Dalles; and Vivian, of Hot Springs, Arkansas.

Frank S. Fleming received a public school education and aided his father in tilling the soil and harvesting the crops, also working on neighboring farms at intervals. In 1879, when a young man of twenty, he responded to the call of the west and hired out to break sod on a ranch near Wakeeney, Kansas, working for a year for his uncle. Mr. Fleming then went to Alamosa, Colorado, becoming a driver of mule teams, and for two years was connected with the construction department of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. On the expiration of that period he made his way to Bacon Springs, New Mexico, and with his own outfit of six mules hauled ties from that place to Flagstaff, Arizona, for the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. Next he journeyed to Grand Junction, Colorado, and secured the contract for grading the roadbed of the Denver & Rio Grande system. After the work was completed he took his outfit to Idaho and was engaged in freighting supplies for the Oregon Short Line until the road was extended to Pendleton. He then came to the Willamette valley and continued his activities as a railroad contractor. His work was principally along the coast and in 1885 he was obliged to make a change as the climate did not agree with him. Coming to Wasco county, he filed on a homestead and timber claim near what is now Maupin, situated on the old Canyon City road, a portion of which traversed the farm. For ten years thereafter he continued to engage in freighting, becoming widely known in that connection. This was before the construction of the South Central & Eastern Oregon Railroad and supplies had to be hauled by mule teams and pack trains hundreds of miles to the mines near Canyon City. The roads were unpaved and in the spring the wagons were often mired. The old-time freighters were resourceful and through the skillful handling of their mules and outfits nearly always managed to find their way out of a tight place. The big sheep ranches made use of large wool clips which were also hauled back to the railroad at The Dalles by means of the freight teams. About 1895 Mr. Fleming began to farm in earnest, planting wheat on the land on which he had previously cut hay for his own stock, and also sold a portion of the crop to other freighters who had mules to feed. Success rewarded his labors and from time to time he increased his holdings, which now comprise six thousand, five hundred acres of wheat and grazing land in Wasco county. Fifty per cent of the property is arable land, well improved. In its cultivation Mr. Fleming used the most advanced methods, keeping abreast with the latest developments along agricultural lines, and farmed with tractors as well as horses. In 1916 he leased the land and retired, erecting a modern home at The Dalles, where he has since resided.

In 1885 Mr. Fleming married Miss Eva Newton, a native of Fayette county, Iowa, and a daughter of William I. and Rachel J. (Leininger) Newton, who came to Oregon in 1883. They located in Antelope, Wasco county, and the father followed the carpenter trade. There he spent the remainder of his life, passing away in 1895, and Mrs. Newton's demise occurred at Scappoose, Oregon, in 1925. In their family were eleven children, seven of whom survive: Frank, a resident of Denver, Colorado; Henry, who lives in Medford, Oregon; Fay Newton and Mrs. Minnie Bennett, both of Scappoose; Mrs. Stella Menefee, whose home is in Seattle, Washington; Eva; and Delta, of Medford, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Fleming have two children, both of whom were born in Wasco county. The daughter, Leo Dorcas, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Linfield College at McMinnville in 1910 and engaged in teaching until her marriage to Dr. Olaf Larsell, who is an instructor in the Portland Medical School. They are the parents of three children: John, Franklin and Robert. The son, Jesse R. Fleming, was graduated from the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis in 1913 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. He is associated with his father in the management of the large wheat ranches and operates independently a valuable farm of two thousand, one hundred acres, which he has brought to a high state of development.

The father is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to the local camp. His activities as road supervisor covered twelve years and for thirty years he was a school director. Mr. Fleming has served his district to the extent of his ability and is a broad-minded, public-spirited citizen who would be a valuable acquisition to any community. He has experienced many phases of frontier life in the west and occupies a high place in the esteem of his fellowmen.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Greene, Harry

HARRY E. GREENE

Harry E. Greene is one of the efficient officers of the Citizens National Bank, an institution which means much to The Dalles, and brings to the discharge of his important duties the knowledge and wisdom acquired by twenty-three years of practical experience in financial affairs. He was born November 28, 1877, and is a native of Chicago, Illinois. His father, Horace 1). Greene, was a native of the state of New York and served throughout the Civil war with the Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry, gallantly defending the Union cause. He became one of the prominent insurance men of Chicago and there passed away in 1912. His widow, Mrs. Susan A. (Walters) Greene, was born in Walworth, Wisconsin, and still makes her home in Chicago. She has reached the venerable age of eighty-four years and is the mother of six children: Mrs. Effie Dawson and Arthur Greene, of Chicago; Walter, who lives in Lansing, Michigan; Harry E.; and Roland Greene and Mrs. Ruth Ives, residents of Chicago.

In the acquirement of an education Harry E. Greene attended the public schools of the Windy city and also took a commercial course. For a few years he worked in the Chicago office of the Indiana Natural Gas & Oil Company and his next position Was with the Armour Packing Company. He remained with the latter corporation until 1901 and then left Chicago. Coming to Oregon, he entered the Portland establishment of Allan & Lewis, the oldest firm of wholesale grocers on the Pacific coast, and was with the house for two years. In 1903 he came to The Dalles and for two and a half years had charge of the office of the Edward C. Pease Company, the owners of a department store. It was in 1905 that Mr. Greene accepted the position of teller in the Bank of French & Company, the oldest in eastern Oregon, and later was made its assistant cashier. He remained with the institution for fifteen years and was elected cashier of the Citizens National Bank in 1921, at the time of its organization. In this capacity he has since served, contributing materially toward the success of the institution by able, conscientious work.

The bank was opened for business January 3, 1921, with a capital stock of one hundred and sixty thousand dollars. Sixteen thousand dollars was oversubscribed and paid up. The statement issued at the close of business on October 10, 1927, showed a capital of one hundred and sixty thousand dollars, a surplus and undivided profits of fifty-nine thousand, one hundred and seventy-one dollars and deposits of eight hundred and seventy-four thousand, three hundred and forty-three dollars. The deposits have now reached the sum of eight hundred and eighty-eight thousand, one hundred and ninety-nine dollars and the total resources amount to one million, one hundred and seventeen thousand, one hundred and eight dollars. The institution transacts a general banking business and the policy followed in its conduct is one which inspires public trust and confidence.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Blakeley, George

GEORGE CLARENCE BLAKELEY

George Clarence Blakeley, a pharmacist of state-wide repute, enjoys the distinction of being the oldest established druggist in The Dalles, which for more than forty years has numbered him among its useful and influential citizens. His talents have been exerted as readily for the public welfare as for his own aggrandizement and his record reflects credit upon an honored family name. A native of Oregon, he was born in Brownsville, Linn County, August 29, 1855, and represents one of the oldest and most prominent families of the state. His great-grandfather, Charles Blakeley, was a native of Ireland and when a small boy came to the new world with his parents, who were among the colonial settlers of Virginia. As a soldier in the Revolutionary war Charles Blakeley aided in winning American independence and afterward went to Tennessee. The remainder of his life was spent in that state and when eighty years of age he was called to his final rest. He was the father of Joseph Blakeley, who was also a patriotic citizen and fought in the War of 1812. In 1838 he migrated to Platte county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until his demise, and for twenty-six years served as a circuit judge.

His son, James Blakeley, father of George Clarence Blakeley, was born November 26, 1812, in Knox county, Tennessee, and received his education in the district schools of that state. He remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age and in 1834 married Miss Sarah Dick, who was born November 24, 1815, in Knox county, Tennessee. Mr. Blakeley followed agricultural pursuits in his native state until 1838, when he went to Missouri and filed on a homestead. He cleared and developed the tract, on which he resided until 1846, when he disposed of the property and started for Oregon, joining a large wagon train, of which he was chosen captain. In the fall of 1846 he arrived in Linn county and entered a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, settling where the town of Brownsville is now located. Here he built a small log house and zealously applied himself to the arduous task of clearing the land and preparing it for the growing of crops. In order to obtain a plow he had to go to Oregon City, a distance of seventy-five miles, and made the trip with a team of oxen. There were no bridges or roads and two weeks were required to complete the journey. In 1847 he produced his first crop of grain and this was probably the first yield in Linn county. A successful stockman, he raised marry head of cattle, horses and hogs and took large herds of cattle to the ranges in eastern Oregon. He fattened cattle for the market and drove them to California, disposing of them to the miners. Mr. Blakeley built the first flour mill in Oregon and in 1848 erected the first store in Brownsville. His trade was largely with the Indians, as there were few white settlers in the locality at that time. For several years he successfully conducted the store and then sold the business to George C. Cooley, his son-in-law. He enlisted in Company D, of the Second Oregon Regiment, and as a captain served throughout the Rogue River Indian war of 1855-56. After retiring from the field of merchandising Captain Blakeley resumed the occupations of farming and stock raising which he followed during the remainder of his active career. He represented Lina county in the state legislature and filled other public offices of importance, faithfully discharging every trust reposed in him. Captain Blakeley long survived his wife, who died June 14, 1888. On November 26, 1912, he celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of his birth and in commemoration of the event a medal was made, which is now in the custody of the State Historical Society. During the latter part of his life Captain Blakeley resided in the home of his son Henry in Brownsville and there passed away January 19, 1913. He was a man of exceptional worth and his death was mourned throughout the state. To Captain Blakeley and his wife were born eleven children: Mrs. Ellen Montgomery and Mrs. Catherine Lewis, who are deceased; William Blakeley, whose home is in Pendleton, Oregon; Mrs. George C. Cooley, who has passed away; Mrs. Margaret Smith, who lives in Montana; Caroline, deceased; Henry, a resident of Brownsville; James, of Baker, Oregon; George Clarence; Joseph, who makes his home in Pendleton; and Mrs. Sarah McFarlane, of Brownsville. In 1926 a splendid granite shaft fourteen feet tall was erected by Captain Blakeley's surviving children te the memory of their father at Main and Blakeley avenues, the original site of his claim. When the shaft was dedicated "Peggy" Chessman, the thirteen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merle Chessman of Astoria, delivered the following address of presentation:

"Mr. Mayor and friends: I have come here as the great-great-granddaughter of Captain and Mrs. James Blakeley, in whose memory this monument has been erected. It was placed here by their children to stand as a lasting tribute of love and honor to their parents, who settled on this spot when Oregon was almost a virgin wilderness and who made it their home for more than half a century.

"It is the wish of those who caused the monument to be raised that it become the property of the people of Brownsville, that they may ever remember the founders of their city. In a broader sense, it is dedicated to all these early-day pioneers, of whom Captain and Mrs. Blakeley were typical; those pathfnders who blazed the trail to Oregon, enduring the hazards and hardships of frontier life while they builded the foundations of the state, and the fruits of whose labors we of later generations enjoy.

"Acting for the Blakeley family, I am happy to p resent at this time to you, Mr. Mayor, as a representative of the city of Brownsville, a deed to the monument and the plot of ground upon which it stands, that the people of this historic town may have and hold it as theirs forever."

Following is a copy of Mayor Snyder's speech: 'In accepting, on behalf of the city of Brownsville, this document, conveying title to the property upon which we stand, I do so with the greatest appreciation and admiration, not for the intrinsic value represented, but rather for the motive that influenced the donors of the offering.

represented, but rather for the motive that influenced the donors of the offering. "The stately shaft before you, erected to the memory of a man and woman who represented a high type of American citizenship, speaks to you in a language more forcible and delivers the message in a more beautiful and impressive manner than can be conveyed by mortal tongue. It represents an expression of one of the fundamental principles of American citizenship. The great nations of the past have risen in prominence and influence, flourished for a period and passed into a decline. The beginning of this decline may invariably be traced to the loss of the patriotic spirit that predominated during the period of the nation's ascendancy.

"Reverence for an ancestor is a trait very closely allied and akin to patriotism. Just as long as expressions of this nature are in evidence we may rest assured that the spark of patriotism that in times of national peril has been the impelling force to call to the defense of the native land the flower of our sturdy manhood, needs but the call of necessity to fan to the flame that has assembled the mighty armies that have decisively repelled the invader, overwhelmingly put down internal opposition and emerged in triumph from an effort to end a struggle in which civilization itself was threatened.

"A mighty oak stood on the brow of the hill. During the course of years it had grown and developed, attaining the fullness of its sturdiness and splendor. In the strength of its fiber it withstood the storms of the succeeding seasons. In its allotted time strength declined; this, the peer of the forest, bowed before the grim reaper, and the spot upon which it had stood gave no evidence of a former greatness. During the period of its strength and vigor, in accordance with nature's plan, acorns had fallen from its branches, and in passing, the sturdy oak left behind a young and vigorous forest that gave mute testimony that a predecessor had fulfilled its destiny.

"Captain James Blakeley settled on a homestead, on a part of which we are now standing, at a time when the state of Oregon occupied a very meager position in the national government, when the settler faced the problems of existence under conditions most primitive.

"As a nation we are prone to worship at the shrine of heroes, individuals who have reached an eminence through achievements in political, industrial, military or other channels. The power of this republic does not lie in the accomplishment of a few supermen, but rather in the steadfastness, loyalty and, patriotism of the men and women who take up the every-day tasks of existence.

"This splendid column, beautiful in its simplicity, impressive in the significance of its purpose, of which the citizens of this community and county are justly proud, will stand as an inspiration for coming generations in perpetuating the memory of a man and woman who cheerfully assumed the obligation of taking a part in the subduing of the western wilderness, building a home amidst conditions which were at times most discouraging, giving to their country stalwart sons and comely daughters who have earned their rightful place in the affairs of this great state and whose influence and achievements are a living tribute to the memory of the man and woman whom we are her assembled to honor."

In the rural schools of Linn county George C. Blakeley obtained his rudimentary instruction and was next a pupil in the public schools of Brownsville. He attended Albany College for a year and for three years was a student at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis. Entering the educational field, he became a teaeher in the public schools of Brownsville and was made principal, filling the position for three years. He completed a pharmaceutical course and in 1876 went to Detroit, Michigan, becoming a traveling salesman for Frederick Stearns & Company, manufacturing chemists. For six years he represented the firm in that capacity and then went to Canada, spending a year in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1886 he returned to Oregon, locating at The Dalles, and in May of that year entered the employ of R. B. Hood, a local druggist. In January, 1887, Mr. Blakeley purchased the business, of which he has since been the owner. He carries a full line of drugs and medical supplies and the filling of prescriptions is one of the chief features of his establishment, which is not a cafeteria and soda fountain pharmacy. It is known as the Rexall Drug Store, whose trade exceeds the boundaries of the city, extending into the surrounding country. Enterprising, efficient and thoroughly reliable, Mr. Blakeley has won and retained a position of leadership in local drug circles and is also an astute financier. In 1919 he aided in organizing the Wasco County Bank and was elected president of the institution, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars and occupies an imposing building on East Second street. Mr. Blakeley is likewise a successful fruit grower and has a valuable cherry orchard of thirty acres. The ranch is located near The Dalles and irrigated with water from the city.

Mr. Blakeley was married January 29, 1887, to Miss Mary T. Gorman, a native of New York state and a daughter of John and Margaret Gorman. The family went to San Francisco, California, by the water route, making bhe voyage around Cape Horn, and in 1860 came to Oregon. For an extended period Mr. Gorman was engaged in the transfer business in Portland and his demise occurred in the Rose City in 1926, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-seven years. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gorman, two are now living: Mrs. Blakeley, and Mrs. Margaret Ordahl, a resident of Portland.

for the municipality needed reforms and improvements and is always ready to serve his community to the extent of his ability. When he became county judge of Wasco and Hood River counties the public funds were depleted and there was an indebtedness of two hundred thousand dollars. For eight years he was the incumbent of the office and during that period removed this burden of debt from the counties without increasing the taxation. During the World war he was chairman for four years of the committee in charge of the Red Cross activities in Wasco, Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties and succeeded in raising a large amount of money for the organization.

Mr. Blakeley joined the Masonic order, with which, his father was also affiliated, and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter and past eminent commander of the commandery. Mr. Blakeley is one of the Nobles of Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland and a life member of The Dalles Lodge of Elks, of which he is a past exalted ruler. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeley are charter members of Columbia Chapter of the Eastern Star and also belong to the Country Club. For a year Mr. Blakeley was the executive head of the Rexall Club, an international association, which draws its members from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. He was the first president of the club elected west of the Rockies and on his retirement from the office in 1916 was presented with a handsome watch, suitably inscribed, as a testimonial of appreciation of his services. Mr. Blakeley was the second president of the Oregon Pharmaceutical Association and served for fifteen years on the state board of pharmacy. In addition to his attractive residence in The Dalles, he has a fine home at Seaside, where he spends a portion of each summer, and is one of the disciples of Izaak Walton. He is also a devotee of golf and an expert player. Worthy motives and high principles have actuated Mr. Blakeley at all points in his career and throughout eastern Oregon he is admired and respected.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Kirk, J. B.

J. B. KIRK

An expert mechanic, as well as a capable executive, J. B. Kirk has developed an industry of much importance to The Dalles and also to the agriculturists of this district. He was born August 28, 1868, in Neosho, Missouri, and in the maternal lines is of Scotch and French descent. His parents were William H. and Harriet (Crane) Kirk, the former a native of Dumfries, Scotland, while the latter was born in Illinois. About the year 1850 William H. Kirk crossed the Atlantic and lived for some time in Illinois. In 1858 he started for Salt Lake, Utah, and spent the following winter at old Fort Laramie in Wyoming. He was in the employ of the firm of Russell & Waddell, government contractors, and carried supplies to the soldiers at the fort. In the spring of 1859 he went to Iowa, where he engaged in farming for about a year, and in 1861 enlisted in the Second Illinois Cavalry. For three years he was a soldier in the Union army and after receiving his honorable discharge returned to Illinois, where he was married in 1866. He then migrated to Missouri, locating on a farm, which he cultivated for a few years, and next followed agricultural pursuits in Kansas. In 1882 he went to the territory of Washington, making the overland trip in a wagon drawn by a team of horses, and filed on a homestead in Lincoln county. Mr. Kirk cleared and developed the ranch, on which he lived until his retirement in 1909, and afterward moved to Seattle, Washington, where he passed away on the 5th of February, 1918. His widow resides in Davenport, Washington, and has reached the venerable age of eighty years. To their union were born seven children:  J. B.; Mrs. Harriet McInnis, whose home is in Spokane, Washington; William H. Jr., who lives on the old homestead at Almira, Washington; Mrs. Mary Burke, of Spokane; Mrs. Effie A. Nelson, who resides in Seattle; Mrs. James Goodwin, of Davenport, Washington; and Mrs. Viva Hansell, who is living in La Grande, Oregon.

In the acquirement of an education J. B. Kirk attended public schools in Missouri, Kansas and Washington, after which he learned the machinist’s trade, serving his apprenticeship in Walla Walla, Washington, and Portland, Oregon. He worked as a journeyman machinist until 1896, when he enlisted in the United States navy, and was sent to the Philippines. Mr. Kirk was a seaman on the old battleships, Monitor and Monterey, and served until the close of the Spanish-American war. He then secured work at his trade and in 1905 ventured in business for himself, opening The Dalles Iron Works, of which he has since been the owner. His shop is equipped for all kinds of machine work but he specializes in tractors. He also manufactures the Kimball cultivator, used largely by the farmers of Wasco county and all other sections of the northwest. In 1907 he opened the first garage at The Dalles and at that time there were but two automobiles in the entire county. Mr. Kirk discontinued the garage in 1918 and has since devoted all of his attention to the machine shop. No inferior piece of work ever leaves the plant and under his wise management the industry has constantly expanded.

In 1899 Mr. Kirk married Miss Lillie H. Johnson, a native of Sweden. At the age of eight with her parents she came to the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Kirk have five children. Bonita, the eldest was born in Portland, Oregon, and was graduated from the high school at The Dalles. For two years she attended the University of Oregon and is now the wife of Roscoe Roberts. They reside in Wasco county and are the parents of a son, Roscoe Kirk Roberts. William L. is also a native of Portland and a graduate of The Dalles high school.  He is married and assists his father in the conduct of the business. Grant, the second son, was born in Corvallis, Oregon. He completed a course in The Dalles high school and is employed in the office of the Equitable Corporation of Portland. Elbert, a native of The Dalles, was graduated from the local high school and aids in the operation of his father’s machine shop. Letha, the fifth in order of birth, was also born at The Dallas and is a junior in the high school.

Mr. Kirk is identified with the Masonic order, is Junior Warden of Wasco Lodge, No. 15, A. F. & A. M. and Eminent Commander of Columbia Commandery, No. 13, K. T., and is a Noble of Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland. He is a past patron of the local chapter of the Eastern Star and his wife has filled the office of matron. An enthusiastic Kiwanian, he is an ex-president of the local club and also an energetic member of the Chamber of Commerce. The cause of education finds in Mr. Kirk a strong advocate and for ten years he has served on the school board. Unselfish, broad-minded and public-spirited, he exerts his efforts as readily for the general welfare as for his own aggrandizement and is a citizen of worth to the community.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Schenck, Naomi

MRS. JOHN S. SCHENCK

In 1846 William M. Pike undertook the long and hazardous overland journey to The Dalles and is a California and Oregon pioneer who has an intimate knowledge of events that have shaped the destiny of the coast. A native of St. Louis, Missouri, she was born November 13, 1843, and her maiden name was Naomi Lavinia Pike. Her parents were William M. and Harriet (Murphy) Pike, the latter a native of Tennessee. The father was a nephew of General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, the noted American explorer, who commanded an expedition to the western frontier in 1806. He was the discoverer of one of the highest summits of the Rockies and the mountain was later named Pike’s Peak in his honor

In 1846 William M. Pike undertook the long and hazardous overland journey to California, traveling in a prairie schooner, but died en route. His widow was left with two small children to provide for and continued with the main body of emigrants until they reached the northern trail leading to Oregon. She took the southern route, going to California with the ill-fated Donner party, whose members were snowbound in the Sierra Nevada mountains, and nearly all of them died of starvation. Leaving her two babies in the camp, Mrs. Pike joined the relief party of seventeen persons, less than half of whom were able to reach Sacramento. Mrs. Pike suffered incredible hardships and when the rescue party returned to the camp her younger daughter, Catherine Elizabeth, was dead. The other child, Naomi L., at that time three years old, was rescued by an Englishman named John Rhodes, who was a member of the relief party organized in Sacramento and who had promised the mother to accomplish this ask. Wrapping the child in a blanket, he strapped her to his back and started for Sacramento, a distance of forty miles. His pockets contained some dried heel, which he soaked in water obtained by melting snow, and this food nourished the little girl until she was returned to the arms of her mother. The daughter was the youngest surviving member of the Donner party and the terrible experience left an ineffaceable impression upon her mind. In 1849 her mother remarried, becoming the wife of M. C. Nye, who had migrated to California in 1841. He secured a Spanish land grant in the Sacramento valley and Marysville was afterward built on that ranch. Mr. Nye took his bride and stepdaughter to the east in 1849, by way of the isthmus route, and returned to California in the following year. He was a prosperous merchant and the executive head of the firm of Nye, Foster & Company, known to all of the ‘49ers who sought gold in the Marysville district and along the Columbia river. In 1853 he revisited the east, going by way of the isthmus of Panama, and returned by the overland route with a fine outfit, including a carriage, made especially for his wife and stepdaughter to ride in and drawn by horses and six teams of oxen. The wagons were loaded with supplies and men were hired to care for them.  Mr. Nye then settled down to ranching in the Sacramento valley, where he remained until 1881, raising cattle and horses, and then disposed of his holdings in California. Coming to Oregon, he located at Prineville and here spent the remainder of his life, devoting his attention to the sheep business. His demise occurred about the year 1884 and Mrs. Nye passed away at Hood River, Oregon, in 1870.

Naomi L. Pike attended the public schools of Marysville and continued her studies in the old Benecia Academy, now known as Mills College, a noted school for women. In 1864 she was married to Dr. B. W. Mitchell, who had opened an office at The Dalles in that year, and here resided until his death in 1871, becoming recognized as the leading physician of this locality. In 1877 Mrs. Mitchell became the wife of John Sylvester Schenck, who was born in Auburn, New York, a son of Sylvester and Eliza (Hughes) Schenck, whose ancestors were members of the Dutch colony of New York and aided materially in developing that part of the country.

John S. Schenck was reared in his native state and received a public school education. In 1862 he yielded to the lure of the west, locating at The Dalles, and for several years was local agent for the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, terminating his connection with the corporation in 1883. At that time he turned his attention to financial affairs, establishing the banking house of Schenck & Bell, which he conducted at The Dalles for two years. In 1885 the First National Bank was organized at The Dalles and Mr. Schenck was elected its first president, serving in that capacity until his death in 1913. Sagacious, farsighted and efficient, he placed the institution upon a paying basis and under his able administration it became one of the strongest and most reliable banks in this part of the state. The home of the bank is a five-story structure, which covers a quarter of a block and constitutes the city’s chief architectural adornment. It was planned and erected by Mr. Schenck against the advice of many, for at that time it was the general opinion that The Dalles would never grow sufficiently to warrant so elaborate a building. In addition to this achievement, Mr. Schenck rendered timely assistance to many of Wasco county’s leading agriculturists, who owe their success to his spirit of helpfulness and faith in the future. A stanch republican, he was a delegate to conventions of the party, sometimes acting as chairman, but never held public office. In Masonry he attained the thirty-second degree, belonging to the Scottish Rite Consistory, and was a charter member of Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He was also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and took a keen interest in the activities of these organizations. To all movements for the benefit of his city he was quick to respond and its progress was a matter in which he took much personal pride. His was an exemplary life of conspicuous usefulness and his passing was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. Mrs. Schenck occupies the fine old home, which was erected at The Dalles in 1881, and is also the owner of a valuable farm of twelve hundred acres, situated in the Grass valley of Wasco county. Time has dealt kindly with her and although eighty-four years of age, she appears much younger, being exceptionally well preserved. She has lived to witness notable changes, as pioneer conditions have been replaced by the advantages of modern civilization, and her reminiscences of the early days are interesting and instructive. Mrs. Schenck possesses the admirable qualities of the true pioneer and enjoys the unqualified esteem of all who have been brought within the sphere of her influence.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Davis, James

JAMES ALEXANDER DAVIS

On the roster of Wasco county’s public officials appears the name of James Alexander Davis, whose work as assessor has won for him high encomiums, and as a capable educator he also performed pubic service of value. He was born June 6, 1862, in Jefferson county, Tennessee, and his parents, Alexander E. and Martha (Scruggs) Davis, were also natives of that state. His mother was reared in Greeneville, Tennessee, and among her schoolmates was Andrew Johnson, who became the seventeenth president of the United States. Alexander E. Davis enlisted in the Confederate army, offering to take the place of his brother, who had several children, and was killed during the siege of Vicksburg. His widow after remarried, becoming the wife of S. V. Moser in 1874, and five children were born to them: William A. and John P., residents of Portland, Oregon; Charles Edward, of Oakland, California; Robert G., who is a locomotive engineer in the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company and lives in Roseburg, Oregon; and Walter J. Moser, of Starbuck, Washington.

An only child, James A. Davis was but fourteen months old at the time of his father’s death and, in compliance with an agreement entered into during the Civil war, was reared by the brother whom Alexander E. Davis had replaced in the Confederate service. The favorite playground of James A. Davis was in the vicinity of the mill owned by his uncle, with whom he often rode on the carriage that conveyed logs to the saw, and when a boy of eight he had the misfortune to lose a leg in this sawmill, which was in operation at Greeneville. In spite of that handicap he walked regularly to the nearest schoolhouse, a distance of three and a half miles, often trudging through the snow in the winter. Afterward he attended Oakhill Academy at Leadvale, receiving instruction from George T. Russell, and later took a postgraduate course under the same teacher, who had migrated to Roseburg, Oregon.

Mr. Davis studied law at Emory & Henry University but before he had finished his course in that institution his mother was obliged to seek a more healthful climate and he came with the family to the Pacific coast, reaching Oregon on the 4th day of May, 1884. The change proved beneficial to Mrs. Moser, who resided in the west for many years, passing away in 1915, and her husband’s demise occurred in 1918.

In Sheridan, Yamhill county, Oregon, Mr. Davis began his career as an educator, remaining there for two years, and in 1886 proceeded to Roseburg, where his studies were directed by Professor J. B. Homer, now a member of the faculty of the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis. For more than twenty years Mr. Davis engaged in teaching, constantly advancing in the profession, and was principal of the high school at Oakland, Oregon, for two years, during which he established the first school library in Douglas county. He had charge of the Yoncalla high school for four years and came to Wasco county in 1905. For two years he was principal of the high school at Antelope and in 1907 came to The Dalles. He was appointed deputy county assessor by J. W. Koonts and acted in that capacity until 1913, when he became assessor, filling the position for four years. In 1921 he was reelected to the office, in which he has since been retained, and has served for a longer period than any other county assessor in Oregon. Mr. Davis has devoted deep thought and study to his work and enjoys the confidence of the voters and taxpayers of Wasco county. Methodical and conscientious, he has made his department a model of efficiency, inaugurating the system whereby assessment notices and tax receipts are made out at one time, and this system, under various forms, is now in use throughout the state. In commercial affairs he has also demonstrated his ability, opening an insurance office in 1917, and soon established a profitable business.

In October, 1891, Mr. Davis married Miss Ruth Bridges, a native of California and a daughter of the Rev. Daniel and Euselia (Owens) Bridges, who crossed the plains in a covered wagon during the ‘50s, settling in Scio, Oregon. Rev. Bridges was a Methodist minister and one of the early circuit riders of Linn county. Later he went to Missouri, where he remained until his demise, but his wife passed away in Oregon. To their union were born thirteen children, seven of whom survive: Mrs. Emma Miller; Mrs. Laura Applegate; W. C. Bridges, a resident of Drain, Oregon; Mrs. Amanda Smith; Mrs. Ruth Davis; Isom C. Bridges, of Oregon City; and Mrs. Martha Looney, who lives in Jefferson, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of four sons. Harold L., the eldest, who was born October 18, 1894, in Oakland, Oregon, and is a high school graduate, is a writer of note and acts as deputy assessor of Wasco county. Percy V., the second son, is deceased. Dudley Quentin, also a native of Oakland, born December 16, 1901, enlisted in the United States navy and was in the service of his country for three years. He is married and has one child, James Quentin, who was born July 2, 1924, at The Dalles. Richard Harding, who was born September 6, 1911, and is a junior in the local high school, has a talent for music and plays in the high school band and also in an orchestra.

During the World war Mr. Bridges devoted much of his time to patriotic activities and furthered the success of the various drives. In politics he is a stanch republican and for three years was clerk of The Dalles school board. He takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a past noble grand of five lodges. In the Woodmen of the World and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he has filled all of the chairs and is also connected with the Neighbors of Woodcraft. Mr. Bridges has discharged life’s duties and obligations to the best of his ability and occupies a high place in the esteem of his fellowmen.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Nicholson, J. A.

J. A. NICHOLSON

Fifty years have passed since J. A. Nicholson first came to Wasco county and during this period he has held a place among the extensive and successful ranchers of this section of the Columbia River Valley, having through his persistence and well-directed efforts gained a competency which has enabled him to retire from active pursuits, and he is now living in Boyd. Mr. Nicholson was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, on the 15th of October, 1847, and is a son of John and Nancy (Frew) Nicholson, both of whom also were natives of Pennsylvania and were of Scotch descent. The father, who was a successful farmer, was also active in local public affairs, having served as a justice of the peace, a notary public and a member of the school board. He and his wife spent their last years on their farm and both are deceased. They became the parents of seven children, namely: J. A.; Sarah, who still lives in Pennsylvania; Mrs. Nellie Gregg, of Pennsylvania; Mrs. Annie Carroll, deceased; Homer, deceased; Charles, who resides at Bend, Oregon; and Mrs. Mary Sproules, deceased.

J. A. Nicholson received the advantage of a good education in the public schools of his native state, and remained at home until 1873, when he went to Illinois, where he was employed at farm work for one year. He then went to Sacramento, California, and from there to Live Oak, Sutter county, that state, where he worked on a ranch for three and a half years. In 1878 he went to Salem, Oregon, from which place he drove a band of sheep to Wasco county, wintering them on Pine creek, near the John Day river. In the following spring he came to The Dalles and soon afterward filed on a preemption claim of one hundred and sixty acres of land seven miles southeast of Dufur. In order to pay current expenses he went to work for the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company at The Dalles, but later went to his land and proved up on it, after which he returned to his railroad job and for four years was employed as a watchman in the car shops and lumber yard at The Dalles. In 1891 he took up the active operation of his ranch, raising grain, and in partnership with Menzo Selleck, also bought one hundred and sixty acres additional. They operated together until 1896, when they dissolved partnership, after which Mr. Nicholson made his home with his brother, Charles, until 1909, when he went to Sherman county, this state, where he remained about ten years. After his marriage, in 1910, he again took up his residence on the farm, to the operation of which he devoted his attention closely until April 4, 1919, when he leased both of his farms and moved into Boyd, in order to afford better educational advantages for his children. He is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of well improved land, which is devoted mainly to the raising of hay and grain.

On April 12, 1910, at The Dalles, Mr. Nicholson was united in marriage of Miss Marcia Maie Rust, who was born in Colusa, California and is a daughter of Lot Morol and Martha Lethalena Harriet (Cooper) Rust, of whom the former was named after Lot Morol Merrill, who was three times governor of Maine. The Rust family has long been established in this country, the American progenitor having come over as a passenger on the “Mayflower” in 1620, and Mrs. Nicholson traces her ancestry back in direct line to John Paul Jones. Mr. Rust made the voyage around Cape Horn to California in 1857 and for ten years was engaged in gold mining. He then sent east for his fiancee and they were married in Sacramento on November 24, 1867. Mr. Rust farmed for some years in Colusa county, California, and in July, 1881, he came to Oregon, driving through with a covered wagon and six head of horses. He arrived in Wasco county on November 1st and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, one and a half miles south of Moro, on which he engaged in farming. He also ran freight teams, hauling wool and grain to The Dalles, and became a man of prominence in his community. His death occurred on his ranch, July 19, 1907, and his wife passed away October 18, 1918. They became the parents of five children, namely:  Pearl A., who was born in Colusa, California, is the wife of M. A. Leslie, of North Yakima, Washington; Ruby B., who married C. W. Fairchild by whom she had five children, and later married Lester Pettys, of Sherman county, Oregon; Lot W., of Sherman county; Maude E., who is the wife of J. F. Watson, of The Dalles, and Mrs. Marcia M. Nicholson. The last named was educated in the public schools at Moro, Oregon, and remained at home until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson are the parents of two children, James Alexander, who is a graduate of the Boyd high school, and Jereld Rust, who is in the eighth grade, stands exceptionally high in his studies and during the past six years has never missed a day nor been tardy at school. Mr. Nicholson has been a lifelong supporter of the republican party and has always shown the proper interest in public affairs, though never an aspirant for office. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which they give liberal support. Mr. Nicholson is a man of scrupulous honesty in all of his dealings, is hospitable and charitable, and possesses to a marked degree the traits of character which commend a man to the favor and good opinion of his fellowmen.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Lane, Louis

LOUIS LINCOLN LANE

The Dalles has directly benefited by the constructive activities of Louis Lincoln Lane, an enterprising business man of wide interests and a worthy scion of one of Oregon’s old and honored families. He was born July 24, 1861, in Harrisburg, Linn county, and is of English lineage. His great-grandfather was one of the colonial settlers of Virginia and proved his loyalty to American interests by gallant service in the Continental army during the Revolutionary war. His son, David Lane, was born in Virginia and fought in the War of 1812. For a time he lived in Indiana and in 1852 started for the west as captain of a wagon train. He made three journeys across the plains, piloting emigrants each time, and on the last trip died of cholera.


His son, Andrew W. Lane, the father of Louis L. Lane, was horn in 1830, while the family was living on the bank of the Wabash river in Indiana, and was a third cousin of Joseph Lane, the first territorial governor of Oregon. Andrew W. Lane, was a wheelwright and made wagons. For a number of years he conducted a shop at Harrisburg, Oregon, and in 1865 embarked in the same line of business at Springfield, Lane county, remaining there until 1876. After disposing of the business he purchased a ranch on the McKenzie river in Lane county and located near the present site of Leaburg. His tract was covered with a dense growth of timber and through patience and industry he succeeded in clearing a portion of the land. In 1879 he sold the property and moved to Wasco county, purchasing a relinquishment to a farm near Tygh valley. Two years later he sold the place and went to Lassen county, Ca1ifornia. He was the proprietor of a wagon shop at Susanville, California, for a time and in 1889 went to Kansas, where he resided for several years and then returned to Oregon, spending the remainder of his life in The Dalles. His wife, Indiana (Smith) Lane, was also of English stock and her forebears were early settlers of Tennessee. Her father came to Oregon in 1847 in a covered wagon and located ten miles from Albany on a donation land claim of six hundred and forty acres in Linn county. He cultivated the ranch until about 1863, when he returned to the east, and made his home in Illinois until his death at the advanced age of ninety-nine years. Mrs. Lane died at Brownsville in 1876 and was long survived by her husband, who passed away at the home of his son, Louis L. Lane, in 1916, when eighty-six years of age. They were the parents of thirteen children: Cynthia, who died in infancy; Alice, deceased; Louis L.; Agnes; A. W., who lives in California; Norris M. Lane, Mrs. Hattie M. Stewart and Mrs. Belle Williams, all of whom reside in Oregon and five who died in infancy.


Louis L. Lane attended the public schools of Springfield, Oregon, and afterward served an apprenticeship under his father, becoming an expert blacksmith and wheelwright. He worked in his father’s shops in Oregon and California and in 1891 embarked in business for himself in Bakeoven, Wasco county. In September, 1894, he disposed of the business and came to The Dalles, opening a wagon and blacksmith shop, which he operated for several years in partnership with his brother Norris. When the latter withdrew from the firm Louis L. Lane conducted the shop alone, turning out high-grade work, and his wagons and stage coaches were used throughout Oregon for years. They were prize winners at the fairs and expositions held in this part of the country and constituted important factors in the industrial progress of the state. In 1906 Mr. Lane sold the business and formed a partnership with F M. Sexton, with whom he has since been associated under the firm style of Land & Sexton. They carry a full line of shelf and heavy hardware and the stock includes stoves, glassware, crockery, sporting goods and automobile accessories. Their store is situated at the corner of Second and Jefferson streets and affords a floor space of ten thousand square feet. The firm operates an extensive plumbing and tinsmith shop, and also sells the John Deere farm implements, which are stored in another building. The partners have established an extensive trade at The Dalles and also enjoy a large country patronage, which is drawn from Wasco and Sherman counties. They are thoroughly conversant with the details of the business in which they are engaged and their enterprise and probity are well known. The firm owns and operates a blacksmith and wagon shop at The Dalles and also owned a productive farm of two hundred and eighty acres, forty of which are planted to fruit.


In 1884 Mr. Lane married Miss Hattie E. Miller, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Josiah and Marietta (Post) Miller, who were born in the same state. The father was a Union soldier, and lost his life in the service of his country. They moved to California and became the owners of a large stock and dairy ranch in Lassen county. After the death of Mr. Miller his widow remarried, becoming the wife of H. I. Washburn and both passed away at Mount Vernon. Mr. Washburn was also a veteran of the Civil war, a member of the G.A.R. and served during the entire duration of the war. Mr. and Mrs. Lane have a daughter, Gladys May, who is the wife of E. J. Gilpin of Chehalis, Washington. She has two children: Dewey, who was horn at The Dalles in 1919 and resides with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Lane, by who he has been adopted and Jean, born in 1922.

Mr. Lane belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and his fraternal affiliations are with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World and the United Artisans, In politics he in nonpartisan, supporting the candidate whom he considers best qualified for office, and his public spirit has been expressed as councilman. The growth and progress of the city is a matter in which he takes much personal pride, and his worth to the community is uniformly conceded.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Crate, John

JOHN B. CRATE

Among the most interesting features of the Oregon Daily Journal are the articles of Fred Lockley, who wrote the following account of the life of John B. Crate, the oldest pioneer resident of The Dalles:

“When did you come to The Dalles? I asked of Mr. Crate. ‘I came here in May, 1850, just seventy-five years ago this month,’ he replied. ‘My father worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company. In 1838 Dr. McLoughlin sent him up to Stuart lake in British Columbia, to bring down the furs from their post there. He was given command of ten three-ton boats. He piloted the leading boat himself and the others followed the lead of his boat. These boats made the round trip each summer from Stuart lake to Fort Vancouver. Coming down the Columbia, they shot the rapids at the cascades, but on the return trip they had to make a portage there. They carried their loads around the cascades at what is now Cascade locks and towed their boats or carried them around the swift water. At the big eddy, sometimes called The Dalles rapids, they made another portage, carrying their loads clear beyond Celilo falls. They put their boats into the river above Celilo and paddled them to the mouth of the Okanogan, where they put their trade goods on pack horses and took them over the divide to the waters of the Frazier river, where they had boats in which they took the goods to Stuart lake. Father stayed with this work for some years—in fact, until 1846, when they transferred him to Fort Walla Walla, now called Wallula.

“‘In 1847 Peter Skene Ogden detailed my father and another employe named Champagne to take H. H. Spaulding down the river to Fort Vancouver. This was immediately after the killing of Dr. Marcus Whitman, Mrs. Whitman and the other white people at Wai-lat-pu mission. The Indians fired at my father and the other two men from the bank but did not hit them. They brought the news of the massacre to the Willamette valley, and soon the whole valley was humming with excitement like a hive of angry bees. My father and Champagne joined their own people from French prairie to go up to Wai-lat-pu to punish the Indians. They fought with the volunteers from French prairie until the Cayuse war was over. Then they returned to the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company at Fort Walla Walla.

“‘In 1847 my father took up a place called Crates Point, which my mother left during the trouble with the Indians in 1849 and went to Oregon City. She was at Dr. McLoughlin’s mill on the island at what they sometimes called Willamette falls when I was born on April 27, 1850, and when I was a few weeks old she returned to our place here. My mother’s name was Sophia Berchier. She pronounced it “Bushey.” She was from the Red river of the north. She lived to be ninety-four years old. When she was coming here by the old Hudson’s Bay trail my brother Ed, who retired from the Portland police force recently after forty years of service, was born. The Indians attacked the party when Ed was one day old, so mother had to grab him up, catch her horse and get away from there as fast as the animal could travel.

“‘My father, Edward Crate, was a French Canadian. In the fall of 1849 he purchased from the Hudson’s Bay Company a boat which he operated on the river between The Dalles and Fort Vancouver. He took emigrants from The Dalles to Oregon City while the men of the party drove their cattle overland to the Willamette valley.  Father had the contract to transport the soldiers from Vancouver to The Dalles in 1852, when the United States government built the fort here. After this for three years he stayed on his land at Crates Point and farmed the place. In the summer of 1856 he operated his boat between Celilo and Wallula. Father acted as pilot on the first boat than ran from Celilo to Wallula and thence to the mouth of the Snake river. I believe Captain Gray was skipper of the boat.  After serving as pilot on this river for a while father returned to his ranch, later going to the newly discovered gold mines in Idaho, near where Lewiston now is. Father and mother had fourteen children, seven of whom are now living.

“‘When I was eighteen—that would be in 1868--I started riding the range. In 1872 1 was riding for Ben Snipe, whose horses ranged all over the Yakima country and along the Columbia. He had about twenty thousand head of cattle. In 1875 my horse fell with me and broke in a lot of my ribs, so I came to The Dalles and went to work fur John Michaelbach, who ran a butcher shop here in those days. In 1880 my brother Ed and I purchased the shop. After a few days I bought Ed’s interest and he went to Portland to work for O’Shea Brothers, the meat packers. Ed soon went on the Portland police force. I ran the butcher shop for some years and sold out when I was appointed a member of the police force here. Ed Word, later with the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, and I were put on the police force the same day.  He was day man and I had the night shift. There were thirty-two saloons here then. Yes, I have had to take guns away from hundreds of men. You see, when they get drunk they hardly know what they are doing and they frequently get ugly and pull their guns. If I didn’t take the gun away they might kill someone, or someone might shoot them in self-defense. I served on the force over twenty years. Yes, I have lots of friends. The lawbreakers and bootleggers don’t like me, but the wolves and coyotes don’t like a watchdog, and for the same reason.

“‘Was I ever city marshal? Yes, when Gibbons, the city marshal was shot and killed I was appointed in his place. Did I ever have any fights? Look at the knuckles of my right hand. I couldn’t tell you how many times I have broken my knuckles fighting with drunken men or gangs of men who resisted arrest. No, I never used a gun or a billy. One morning at about five o’clock I was called to a saloon to stop a fight between Frank Summers, a gambler, and a small man. Summers, who weighed about three hundred pounds, was holding the small man with one arm around his neck and beating him with the other arm. I managed to separate the two men and dragged Summers outside the saloon. While I was taking Summers to the jail he promised to behave if I would take him to his room instead, which I did, and left him there. In the melee Summers lost his hat and a man named Gentry took it up to his room. The gambler told Gentry he was going to get his gun and kill me. Meanwhile I had gone downtown and was told later on that Summers was back in the saloon and boasting of what he intended to do. I returned to the saloon and when I reached the swinging door Summers opened fire. The first bullet hit me in the left breast, an inch above the heart, and penetrated my body. I grabbed a heavy chair of oak, using it as a shield, and closed with Summers, who fired two more shots before I was able to knock him down with the chair. I took away Summers’ gun, handing it to my deputy, who had arrived on the scene by that time, and then fainted from loss of blood. They took me to a hospital and probed for the bullet, but the probe ran clear through me and when they took off my shirt the bullet fell to the floor. I had to stay in the hospital for over a month. The fight took place at The Dalles in 1902 and Summers was sent to the penitentiary for a term of five years.’”

Mr. Crate was married. June 1, 1882, to Miss Elizabeth Bill, a native of Steuben county, New York, and a daughter of Nicholas and Mary Bill, both of whom were born on the Rhine, in Germany. About 1850 they came to the United States, settling in Steuben county, New York, and there Mr. Bill engaged in farming until 1875. He then sold the place and migrated to Oregon, arriving at Hood River on November 15, 1875. There he spent the winter and in the spring of 1876 came to Wasco county, taking up a preemption claim and homestead of one hundred and sixty acres near Mosier. He removed a portion of the timber, which he cut, and sold the wood. Mr. Bill cultivated the ranch until his demise in 1880 and his wife passed away a few days later. They had ten children, seven of whom survive: Mrs. Mary Britten, who makes her home at The Dalles; Mrs. Barbara Dunsmore, of Mosier; Mrs. Eva Hall, who lives in Portland, Oregon; Elizabeth; George C., of Calistoga, California; Mrs. Louise Shepard, a resident of Oakland, that state; and Henry A. Bill, also of Oakland. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Crate were two children. Violet was born in 1884 and died in infancy. The other daughter, Anna Lucille, who was horn at The Dalles and has become a well known concert singer, is the wife of James W. Purcell, who is manager for the Ellison-White Chautauqua Company and travels extensively in the interests of the firm. Mr. and Mrs. Purcell reside in Portland, Oregon, and are the parents of two sons: James W. Jr., a student at Reed College in Portland; and James Bardell Purcell, a junior in high school.

A lifelong resident of Oregon, Mr. Crate has an intimate knowledge of the history of the state, to which he is deeply attached, and his conversation is enriched with interesting reminiscences of the past. He has been loyal to every trust reposed in him and faithful to every duty and the years have strengthened his position in public esteem.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Frank, Sherman

SHERMAN J. FRANK

Sherman J. Frank is another of the sons of Oregon who have seen no good reason for leaving their favored state. He has here lived a busy and useful life, during which he has been rewarded with a satisfactory measure of success, and is now one of the respected and popular citizens of the Hood River valley. Mr. Frank was born at The Dalles, Oregon, February 2, 1877, and is a son of Leonard and Etta (Dailey) Frank, both of whom were natives of Geneseo, Illinois. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Frank, who was of German descent, came overland to Oregon in the early '70s and located on a tract of land a few miles southwest of Hood River, in Oak Grove district. It was heavily timbered land and there he built a sawmill, which he ran for about a year, at the end of which time he sold out and returned to Illinois, where he spent his remaining years, dying about 1900. Leonard Frank learned the trade of a saddle and harness maker under his father, whom he accompanied to Oregon. He ran his father's sawmill near Hood River until about 1876, when he sold it and moved to The Dalles, where he opened a harness and saddlery shop, in which business he met with marked success, having from eighteen to twenty employees during the greater part of the time. Among them were a number of Spaniards, who were experts in silver inlay work on saddles and bridles, and Mr. Frank's saddles were famous all over the range country of the northwest. He continued his business until his death, which occurred in 1884. To him and his wife were born two children, Sherman J., of this review, and William, who was in the moving picture business in Hollywood, California, and died there in 1925. Some time after the death of her husband, Mrs. Frank became the wife of G. J. Fancy, and to them was born a daughter, Etta, who now lives in Eugene, Oregon. Mr. Frank took an active interest in the welfare of his community and in the early days served as chief of the fire department at The Dalles. He was a member of the Masonic order.

Sherman J. Frank received a good education, attending the public schools at The Dalles and old Wasco Independent Academy, under Professor Gatch, where he was a schoolmate of Congressman N. J. Sinnott, Judge Fred W. Wilson and other noted citizens of The Dalles. He later went to Portland and took a commercial course in Armstrong's Business College. He then returned to The Dalles and learned the trade of saddle and harness making under his father, continuing there until 1903, when he moved to Hood River and established a harness shop, which he ran until 1909, when he sold it and bought a twenty-acre apple orchard near the town. He lived there until 1915, when he sold the place and bought twelve acres of land on the Belmont road, adjoining the city limits of Hood River, and entered the employ of the Dupont Powder Company, having charge of the distribution of explosives in the eastern Oregon territory. For several years Mr. Frank also ran a dairy, keeping a herd of purebred Guernsey cattle, and retailed milk in Hood River.

On October 24, 1904, in The Dalles, Mr. Frank was united in marriage to Miss Annie O'Brien, who was born at Happy Home, Klickitat county, Washington, and is a daughter of L. and Margaret (Macken) O'Brien, both of whom were natives of Ireland. Her father came to the United States in young manhood and located on a homestead in Klickitat county, where he engaged in the stock business, running cattle and sheep, and as he prospered he bought more land, until today he is the owner of several thousand acres of fine farming and grazing land in that county. A few years ago he leased his holdings and, retiring from active business, is now living in Goldendale, Washington being now ninety-five years old. His wife is deceased. Mrs. Frank, who is an only child, was educated in St. Mary's Academy, at The Dalles. Mr. Frank is a keen sportsman, loving to hunt and fish, and every autumn he takes his guns to eastern Oregon, and never fails to secure his limit of deer. He is a man of cordial and friendly mariner, enjoys a wide acquaintance throughout this section of the state, and is held in the highest respect and esteem.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Fargher, Horatio

HORATIO FARGHER, an Oregon pioneer, was long an outstanding figure in agricultural affairs of Wasco county and is spending his declining years in Dufur, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life. He was born March 13, 1847, in Ramsey, on the Isle of Man, where his parents, Thomas Cannell and Susan (Christian) Fargher, always resided. In their family were seven children, two of whom survive — Horatio and Arthur Wellesley, both of whom are living in Wasco county.

Reared on his father’s farm, Horatio Fargher received a public school education and aided in the work of cultivating and improving the homestead, becoming well acquainted with agricultural pursuits. In 1867, when a young man of twenty, he responded to the call of adventure and shipped as a sailor on the Cairnsmore, a Scotch sailing vessel, which was built in a shipyard on the Clyde river and owned by a local firm. On this boat, which was a wheat carrier, Mr. Fargher made two round trips from Liverpool to San Francisco, via Cape Horn, and left the ship in 1868 on reaching the latter city. Soon afterward he revisited his home and in March, 1870, returned to the United States in company with his father and brother, crossing the Atlantic on the steamship Erin of the National line. After his arrival in New York city he went by rail to Sacramento, California, and thence by boat to San Francisco. From there he journeyed to Portland by the water route, as there were no railroads in Oregon at that time. He followed steamboating on the Columbia river in the vicinity of Portland for five years, working on freight and passenger boats, and in 1874 started for Alaska with a party of gold seekers. When they reached the Stikeen river their supply of food was exhausted and they were obliged to abandon the project. In 1875 Mr. Fargher decided to locate in Wasco county and preempted land six miles south of Dufur. He took up both timber and rock claims and subsequently acquired additional tracts, becoming the owner of four thousand acres of land in the county. For many years the ranch was used chiefly for grazing purposes and Mr. Fargher was numbered among the most successful sheep raisers in this part of the state. Afterward he became a prosperous grain owner and continued his farming and stock raising operations until about the year 1915, when he sold the ranch to his sons. At that time he removed to Dufur, erecting a modern residence, in which he established his home, but still supervised the management of his ranch. In 1922 he retired from farming and divided the property among his children. The son, Walter Fargher, is now cultivating this extensive tract of land and, like his father, is an expert agriculturist, whose labors count for the utmost.

On November 7, 1889, Horatio Fargher was married to Miss Emma Roth, who was born in Minnesota and completed her education in the old Wasco Academy at The Dalles. Her parents, John M. and Margaret (Unselt) Roth, were natives of Germany. The father’s birth occurred in 1839 and the mother was born in 1849.  John M. Roth came to the United States in 1861, casting in his lot with the pioneers of Minnesota, and soon after the outbreak of the Civil war enlisted in the Union army, in which he served for three years. In Wisconsin he married Margaret Unselt, who had made the voyage to the new world in 1851 in company with her parents and lived for some time in the city of Madison. Mr. Roth followed the occupation of farming in Minnesota until 1875, when he came to Oregon and purchased a large, tract of land on Tygh Ridge in Wasco county. For about twenty years he was there engaged in ranching and then disposed of his holdings. At that time he became the owner of a farm in the state of Washington but subsequently returned to Oregon and made his home at The Dalles. There he lived retired until his demise in 1923 and his wife passed away October 23, 1916.

Mr. and Mrs. Fargher have a family of seven children. Susan, the eldest, became the wife of Harry Whitten and their home is in Wasco county. They have two daughters, Dorothy and Kathleen Whitten. Albert Fargher married Nadine Stevens, by whom he has two daughters, Vannan and Margaret Fargher. Marguerite is Mrs. Charles Pamment, of Dufur, and has become the mother of two children, Dorcas and George Pamment. Walter Fargher married Frances Morley and they reside on the old homestead. They have two children, Malcolm and Pauline Fargher, Stanley wedded Grace Fraley, by whom he has two sons, William and Horatio Fargher.  Cecil Fargher, the sixth in order of birth, was graduated from the medical department of the University of Oregon and also completed a course in the Portland Medical College. Victoria Ellean, who completes the family, won the A. B. degree from the University of Oregon in 1927. She specialized in physical culture and gymnasium work and excelled in athletic sports while attending high school and the university.

All of the sons are Masons and the father is a member of Morris Lodge, No. 129,  F. & A. M., at Dufur. The mother is connected with the Eastern Star, belonging to the chapter at The Dalles. Mr. Fargher was a member of the school board for six years and his efforts have been exerted as readily for the general welfare as for his own aggrandizement. He has lived in Wasco county for more than a half century, witnessing a notable change in the appearance of this region, and is deeply attached to the country and state of his adoption. His success was gained by hard work and good management and throughout life he has adhered to a high standard of conduct, thus winning and retaining the esteem and goodwill of his fellowmen Mr. and Mrs. Fargher are members of the Church of Christ and by precept and example try to follow in the steps of the Master.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Fleck, J. A.

J. A. FLECK

Few men have held a higher place in public esteem than did the late J. A. Fleck, whose splendid, well improved ranch lies on the west side of The Dalles. He was enterprising and progressive in all of his affairs, being painstaking and thorough in whatever he undertook, and his labors were distinctive in their results, for he earned a reputation as one of the most successful fruit raisers in the Pacific northwest. In his private life he exemplified the highest type of citizenship and was regarded as one of the representative men of his section of the state. Mr. Fleck was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1853, and was a son of Joseph and Katherine Fleck, both of whom were natives of that country and there spent their lives. The father learned the trade of a brickmason and eventually became the owner of a brickyard.

J. A. Fleck secured a good education in the public schools of his native land and remained at home until 1879, when he emigrated to the United States, locating in Portland, Oregon. He remained there a few months and then went to work in the machine shops of the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company, in The Dalles, where he was employed for several years. He then turned his attention to farming, taking up a homestead on Chenoweth creek, six miles west of The Dalles, onto which he moved in 1887. He built a house and farmed that place until 1893, when he sold it and bought sixty acres of the old Catholic mission farm, along the west city limits of The Dalles. After building a house, he engaged in fruit raising, giving his attention chiefly to grapes, and was the first man in eastern Oregon to plant grapes on a commercial scale. He planted twenty different varieties, all of which were standard, and now has fifteen acres planted to this luscious fruit. When he first located here the land was mostly covered with pine timber and oak grubs and a vast amount of hard labor was required to put it in shape for cultivation. Much of his land was also planted to other fruits, which he later sold, and during the ensuing years he bought and sold a number of tracts. He gave intelligent and thoughtful direction to the care and cultivation of his grapes, in the growing of which he took great pride, and some idea of the success which crowned his efforts may be gathered from the fact that he won many prizes at various fairs and expositions in various parts of the country. He won a gold medal at the Lewis and Clark exposition at Portland in 1905; at the Pan-American exposition at Buffalo, New York, in 1901, he won a gold medal on his Pond prunes; at the World’s fair, at St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904, he won a silver medal on his grapes; at the Oregon state fair, at Salem, in 1908, he won seven first prizes on fruit and a number of second prizes; at the same fair in 1909 he won six first prizes on fruit, and at the Alaska-Yukon fair at Seattle, Washington, in 1909, he won the grand sweepstakes on grapes, besides which he won many other prizes and ribbons at county fairs in this state. Mr. Fleck continued his close attention to his ranching interests until his death, which occurred September 13, 1917, an event which was deeply regretted throughout the community, for he was a man of unusual strength of character, stood for all that was best and uplifting in life and by his individual efforts had contributed to the general welfare and prosperity of his locality. Cordial and unaffected in manner, he made many loyal friends and throughout the range of his acquaintance commanded confidence and respect.

On May 29, 1887, Mr. Fleck was united in marriage to Miss Katie Herke, who was born in Hesse Nassau, Germany, and is a daughter of Anthony and Gertrude (Kremer) Herke, also born in Germany, the mother’s ancestral home having been at Frankfort-on-the-Rhine. Anthony Herke came to the United States in 1870 and located at Athanam valley, near Yakima, Washington, where he took up a homestead, which was mostly covered with timber. He was one of the pioneer settlers in the Yakima valley, as may be inferred from the fact that as late as 1879 there were but thirty-six families resident in the territory now included in Benton, Yakima and Klickitat counties. He cleared off most of his land and engaged extensively in raising vegetables, which he traded to the Indians for cattle and horses, there being no other markets near by. Ready money was scarce and in order to support his family he went to work at The Dalles. While there, he was notified of the death of his wife, which occurred July 5, 1879, and he at once started to walk home, a distance of about one hundred miles, which he covered in two days, arriving in time for the funeral.  He took an active interest in the development of his locality and helped to open up the stage road to The Dalles, known as the Canyon road, by which the freight from his district was hauled to The Dalles. In the early days he worked away from home much of the time, mostly at The Dalles, which even at that time was a busy and thriving town. He helped to construct some of the first buildings in the town of Yakima and lived to see the Yakima valley transformed into one of the richest and best agricultural sections of the west. During the early years there the family passed through many trying experiences, one of which occurred during the Indian scare of the early ‘70s.   While Mr. Herke was away from home, his place was attacked by Indians, who broke down the front door with an ax. The children, who were at home with their mother, escaped through a trap door into the cellar, thence out into the brush, in which they hid all night until the Indians disappeared, after sacking the home. Mr. Herke was one of the first to make use of irrigation in the Yakima valley and, through his enterprising and energetic efforts, became a well-to-do man. At his death, on December 26, 1908, he left several fine ranches, which are still owned in the family. To him and his wife were born six children, namely: P, J., who lives at Donald, in the Yakima valley; Mrs. Katie Fleck; Antone, who lives on the old homestead in the Yakima valley; Gertrude, who also resides at the old home; Frank, of the Yakima valley; and Joseph, who lives on the upper homestead ranch. Mr. and Mrs. Fleck became the parents of nine children, as follows: Gertrude, who became the wife of George E. Moore and is the mother of eight children, Catherine, Gertrude, John, George, Mary Alice, Robert, Helen and Mildred; Mary Ann, who remains at home; Emma Josephine, who is the wife of Lee Mead, of Boardman, Oregon, and is the mother of three children, Paul, Helen and Catherine; Helen, who is teaching school near The Dalles; Joseph, who is operating the home place in partnership with his mother, and is married and has three children, Kenneth, Ellen and Mildred Jean; Rosina, who is employed as a stenographer in The Dalles; Catherine, who is the wife of O. W. Kortge and they have four children, Madeline, Winifred, Uldene and Bernard; Antone, who died on December 11, 1915; and Francis, who remains at home and assists his mother in the care of the vineyards and farm. Mrs. Fleck attended the Sisters Academy at Yakima and completed her studies in St. Mary’s Academy at The Dalles. All of her children also attended St. Mary’s Academy, from which four of them graduated, and at one time all nine children were attending school. Mrs. Fleck is a woman of kindly and hospitable disposition, gracious and friendly in manner, and throughout the community she has a large circle of warm and devoted friends.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Wilson, Fred

JUDGE FRED W. WILSON

In that department of the Oregon Journal reserved for the impressions and observations of Fred Lockley, a well known jurist of The Dalles was thus characterized in the issue of July 11, 1927.

“Said Detective Joe Day to me when I met him recently, ‘They spoiled a mighty good river man when they made Fred Wilson a judge.’ When I interviewed Judge Fred W. Wilson recently I told him what Joe Day had said. He nodded and said: ‘I think Joe is right. I loved the river as a boy and a young man and I have never gotten over my first love. I am a native son of The Dalles, but it happened I was born away from home. I was born at College Hill, near Cincinnati, where my father’s people lived, on September 10, 1872. Judge C. H. Carey was also born at College Hill.

“‘My father, Judge Joseph G. Wilson, was born at Acworth, New Hampshire, December 14, 1827. His people were Scotch Presbyterians and came over from Scotland, settling at Londonderry, New Hampshire, in 1719. In 1828 he moved with his parents to Cincinnati and when he was fourteen he attended Cary’s Academy. Later he was a student at Marietta College, in which he completed a course in 1846, and after his graduation taught in Farmer’s College near Cincinnati. He graduated from the Cincinnati Law School in 1852 and was admitted to the bar. In the same year he came to Oregon and soon afterward became clerk of the supreme court, serving from 1852 to 1855. From 1860 to 1862 he was prosecuting attorney and from 1862 to 1870 he was circuit judge. My father was the first circuit judge east of the mountains, with jurisdiction extending from the summit of the Cascades to the eastern boundary of the state. His nephew Samuel I. Wilson is president of Maryville College in Tennessee.

“‘My mother, Elizabeth (Millar) Wilson, was born in South Argyle, New York, June 8, 1830. Her father, Rev. James Millar. was a Presbyterian minister and, with Rev. Wilson Blaine, organized the United Presbyterian church at Albany, Oregon. He came to Oregon in 1851. He built what was known as the Octagon House at Albany as a boarding school for girls. He was killed while a passenger aboard the Gazelle when it blew up at its dock at Canemah in April, 1854. My mother taught school here in Oregon prior to her marriage with my father, which occurred in 1854. Her brother, James Franklin Millar, was killed by the Apache Indians in Arizona. Her sister Mary, who married United States Senator J. K. Kelly, lives in Washington, D. C.

“‘My uncle, James K. Kelly, went to California in 1849. He practiced law in San Francisco till the spring of 1851, when he came to Oregon City and formed a partnership with A. L. Lovejoy. In 1852 the legislature designated my uncle, J. K. Kelly, Reuben P. Boise and D. R. Bigelow as code commissioners to compile the first code of Oregon. My uncle served as a member of the legislative council from 1853 to 1857 and was president of the council for two terms. During the Indian war of 1855 he served as lieutenant colonel of the regiment of volunteers commanded by Colonel J. W. Nesmith. He was a member of the constitutional convention held in 1857 and was a member of the Oregon state senate from 1860 to 1864. In 1870 he was elected United States senator from Oregon and in 1878 became chief justice of the supreme court of Oregon. My mother’s other sister, Ella, married General Cuvier Grover, a brother of L. F. Grover, who served as governor of Oregon and as United States senator from Oregon. She lives in Rome.

“‘In 1870 my father was nominated for congress and was defeated by J. H. Slater. He was nominated again in 1872 and was elected. He died at Marietta, Ohio, on July 2, 1873, when I was nine months old.  Mother, with her four children, came back to our home at The Dalles. Shortly thereafter President Grant appointed mother postmaster at The Dalles. Mother was the first woman to be appointed to a post office of presidential class in the United States. She served for twelve years.

“‘The old river captains were my heroes. I became purser aboard the Regulator and was later purser of The Dalles City. Mother wanted me to be a lawyer. One day when I came in from the run one of the officials said, “I see you have resigned.” I told him that was news to me, so I went to headquarters to see what the trouble was. They told me mother had come in and said; “Fred has quit.” She resigned for me without even consulting me, for she knew that of my volition I would never leave the river. I studied law with Huntington & Wilson at The Dalles and was admitted to the bar in 1896. In 1908 1 was elected district attorney for Wasco, Hood River and Crook counties and served four years. Upon the death of Judge Bradshaw I was appointed circuit judge. This was on June 27, 1917, ten years ago, and I am still holding that position.

“‘I was married in 1914 to Content Elton. My wife was born in Bridgeport, South Dakota, and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elton. We have two children. Our son, Joseph G., named for my father, is nine years old and our daughter, Elizabeth Elton, six years of age, is named for her grandmother.

“‘Not long ago I was talking to Captain Arthur Riggs. He is one of the few old-time river men who knows the upper river thoroughly. During his many years on the river he has studied out the various places along the river where Lewis and Clark camped. He and I both think it would be a wonderful thing if Joe Teal and some other well known citizens of Portland organized an excursion to make the trip from Lewiston to the sea, marking with a bronze tablet every one of those old camps made by Lewis and Clark. The Woodland, a government boat here in Portland, could be used for the trip. I believe such an excursion would prove popular and of great historic value. I am hoping to see the day when some company will put on the river an excursion boat to run from Portland to The Dalles. I believe it would be a popular feature with tourists, as much so or even more so than the boat trips on the Hudson. It would add a spice of adventure to the trip, to shoot the rapids. Captain Archie Geer brought one hundred and twenty-five passengers over the rapids in the Bailey Gatzert. Boat lines on the Hudson have proved not only popular but profitable, and the same condition should exist here on the Columbia.’”

Judge Wilson is a graduate of Whitman College, 1891, and Johns Hopkins University, 1893. In 1926 Whitman College conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws and he is now a member of its Board of Overseers. In 1916 he was chosen exalted ruler of the local lodge of Elks and is also connected with the Knights of Pythias. He is an adherent of the republican party and lends the weight of his support to all measures of reform, progress and improvement. In 1924 Judge Wilson was elected president of the State Bar Association of Oregon and in his administrative plans for reorganization and greater strength were begun which have since been perfected.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Cates, Daniel

DANIEL L. CATES

Conscientious and efficient, Daniel L. Cates has thoroughly demonstrated his worth as a public servant and for eleven years has been city recorder of The Dalles.  He is a loyal Oregonian and a member of one of the honored, pioneer families of the state. The following account of his career was written by Fred Lockley and published in the Oregon Journal under date of November 29, 1927:

“‘I was born in a log cabin on the Long Tom, near Starr’s Point, in Benton county, May 7, 1857,’ said Mr. Cates. ‘My father was John Cates, who was born on September 30, 1825, in Hopkins county, Kentucky. His father’s name was Alexander Cates. His mother’s maiden name was Nancy Phipps and she was also a Kentuckian. My father left the Blue Grass state in 1844, when he was nineteen years of age, and went to Missouri with an uncle, John Newton. They settled near Linneus, in Linn county, and there father was married February 14, 1847, to Sarah Ellen Grice, who was born in Baltimore, Maryland. She was a daughter of Daniel Grice, who went from that state to Kentucky and later located in Linn county, Missouri.  Father and his brother-in-law, Daniel Grice, built houses. In those days all lumber, including the flooring, was dressed by hand. Father had taken up a place in Linn county and in addition to working at his trade, raised corn and tobacco.

“‘In April, 1850, father started for the gold fields of California, crossing the plains with F. B. Flournoy and his relatives. They took the usual emigrant route during the first part of the trip and went by way of the cut-off to Fort Hall. The Nemaha river was crossed on rafts built by members of the party and at Salt creek they were detained for two days. After crossing the Salt river they struck the Platte in Nebraska at the foot of One Hundred Mile island. There were few accidents on the trip, though in the early part of it an exciting incident occurred in the Pawnee country. One morning a man came riding toward them at top speed on a fine grey horse and warned them of Indians who had attacked a train in advance of them.  Three parties of emigrants had left Missouri at about the same time, the Flournoy train, the one attacked by Indians and what was called the Ohio train. The last consisted of forty men without a woman or child among them. There were two Indians in sight in an elevated position, signaling to the band that led in the attack and informing them of the movements of the whites. The Ohio train rushed in from the rear on horseback and soon reached the Indians. The wagons of the Flournoy train were placed in a double row and the party advanced as rapidly as possible. After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured. The Flournoy train followed the route to the crossing of the Portneuf, which runs into the Snake river, and then traveled to the south, crossing the Raft river. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles. Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St. Mary’s river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road. At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river. The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, 1850, camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in 1846. They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it.

“‘The Sierras were crossed and they soon reached Nevada City, where father worked for a while at four dollars a day. Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan. After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. he averaged eight dollars a day. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day. As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses. They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, 1851, the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father’s partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of 1851. Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

“‘In the fall of 1851 father went to Grass valley and followed the carpenter’s trade. He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat. After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way. He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn’t get hurt. However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives. The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon. He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting.

“‘Father’s baggage consisted of a pair of blankets, a carpetbag and a six-shooter.  He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars. The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars. After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers. The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans. In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry. At St. Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F. Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage.

“‘Father had been gone nearly two years and had never received a letter from home, so he didn’t know whether his wife was alive or dead. At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton. He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day.

“‘In the spring of 1853 father started overland for Oregon, leaving Linn county on April 10 with a company of ten wagons. In the party were father’s cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board. Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows. In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard. The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains.  The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs. They took the south side of the Platte. A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr. Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn’t face it. They turned around and drifted with the storm.

“‘One night a buffalo cow and calf came into the camp, and as the members of the party had just killed a fat antelope, they stopped over next day and jerked the meat of the two buffaloes and the antelope. On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen. Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse. Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it. Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station. After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built. They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life. After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee’s encampment, now Bingham Springs. Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes. After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley. They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley. On September 9 they reached Foster’s famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses.

“‘In crossing the plains father lost both cows and one of the steers. On leaving Portland he went to Wapato lake, in Washington county, Oregon, and lived in the house of Isaac Peet. In 1854 father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county. Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. Later he built one for Dorris Young and also erected a grist mill on the Tualatin river for Parsons & Gibson. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland. From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section. Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place. Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs. Ferguson. He was paid forty dollars for the job. Mrs. Ferguson wove homespun cloth.

“‘In the fall of 1859 father sold the ranch and moved east of the mountains. He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle. He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur. Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from “Big Steve” Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of 1862, leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old. The hard winter of 1861-62 nearly wiped father off the map financially. He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring.

“‘In 1863 father made arrangements with Jake Broadwell to run the farm and took us to the Griffin place, on the Long Tom. Mrs. Susan Griffin, my mother’s sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of 1863 with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. Hearing of Aunt Susan’s death, he came and got us, taking us up to Eight Mile, near The Dalles. My sister did the housework. When J. C. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years. After that Sarah went to The Dallas and stayed at the home of Pete Ruffner. My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state. He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars.

“‘Afterward father moved to The Dalles and turned his attention to the lumber industry. He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T. Peters. While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles. In 1873 father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon. The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father’s death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in 1909. My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in 1849. On May 10, 1870, she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in 1924 at Cascade Locks. My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in 1854 and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, 1860, in Wasco county, Oregon. She became the wife of W. H. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, 1922.’”

In the acquirement of an education Daniel L. Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S. P. Barrett. From 1878 until 1882 he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located. His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L. Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. His commission house was located on East Second street at The Dalles, where Mr. Cates remained until 1886, when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years. In 1890 he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him. In August, 1892, he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks. About five hundred men were at work and in 1896 the locks were completed by J. G. and I. N. Day. At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years. Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land. He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure. A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, 1909, returned to The Dalles. Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In 1917 he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder. His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated.

On October 9, 1889, Mr. Cates married Miss Alice DeHuff, who was born February 23, 1865, in Portland, Oregon. Mrs. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was horn in Holland in 1615 and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in 1652. The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America. On April 30, 1679, Jan Stryker married Swantje Jans, who was the widow of Dornelis de Potter, of Brooklyn, and died in 1686. On March 31, 1687, Jan Stryker was again married, his third union being with Teuntje Teunis, of Flatbush, the widow of Jacob Hellakers, of New Amsterdam. She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In 1654 he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York” he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland. The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, 1664, a member of the Hempstead convention of 1665, and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, 1673. His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker. Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family.

Pieter Stryker, their ninth child, was born November 1, 1653, in Flatbush, New York, and on May 29, 1681, married Annetje Barends. She died June 17, 1717, and his demise occurred June 11, 1741. He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from 1720 until 1722, and was made captain of a foot company in 1689. On June 1, 1710, he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey. It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey. Pieter and Annetje (Barends) Stryker had eleven children.

Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, 1684, and in 1704 married Margarita Schenck. She was a daughter of Johannes Schenck, of Bushwick, Long island, and died in August, 1721. His second wife was Sara Bergen, a daughter of Michael Hansen Bergen, of Brooklyn, New York. She was baptized June 2, 1678, and married February 17, 1722. Her death occurred July 15, 1760, and her husband passed away August 17, 1770. He was a member of the Kings County militia.  Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second.

Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, 1705, at Flatbush, Long island, and about 1723 married Antje Deremer. About 1730 he removed to Somerset county, New Jersey, and on November 9, 1750, both he and his wife joined the Dutch Reformed church of New Brunswick, New Jersey. His second wife was Cabrina Buys and on August 17, 1766, both were members of the church at Millstone, New Jersey. Death summoned him on December 28, 1774. He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second.

His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, 1740, and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops. His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, 1763, and on March 25, 1786, he responded to the final summons. His wife was born March 15, 1746, and died November 4, 1795. John and Lydia (Cornell) Stryker were the parents of ten children.

James I. Stryker, the ninth, was born October 25, 1780, and on March 7, 1804, married Ann Margaret Friese. She was born November 5, 1782, and died about 1826 in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, 1825. Their family numbered eight children.

The seventh, Henry Francis Stryker, was born April 20, 1821, in Auburn, New York, and in Plattsville, Grand county, Wisconsin territory, was married December 13, 1843, to Mary Ann Hart. She was born July 3, 1827, in Montgomery county, and was a daughter of William and Clarissa Hart. Mrs. Stryker died December 2, 1860, in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband’s death occurred in that city on December 21, 1861.

Their oldest child, Emily Frances Stryker, was born October 18, 1844, in Southport, Wisconsin, and at Portland, Oregon, was married May 10, 1864, to Peter Wolf DeHuff. He was born September 1, 1835, in York, Pennsylvania, and died June 20, 1916, at The Dalles, Oregon, while his wife passed away May 25, 1918, at Spokane, Washington. In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest. By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. Harold, the first son, was born November 20, 1890, at The Dalles and is cashier of the Mexico Development Company at Tia Juana. His brother Albert was born July 22, 1894, at Cascade Locks and is employed in a hardware store at The Dalles. The daughter Ruth was born August 29, 1892, at The Dalles and her life was terminated at Pendleton, Oregon, January 16, 1916. The fourth child died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Cates have two grandchildren, Albert Cates and Robert DeHuff Cates.

Mr. Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs. While a resident of Cascade Locks he aided in forming the Elks lodge of that place and is a life member of The Dalles Lodge, No. 1, of that order. He is a York Rite Mason and holds a life membership in Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland, while he also belongs to the local camp of the Woodmen of the World. In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Litfin, Ben

BEN R. LITFIN

Beginning his business career as a newsboy, Ben R. Litfin has steadily advanced and is now classed with the leading journalists of Oregon. He has devoted his life to the newspaper business and exerts a strong and beneficial influence as the owner and editor of The Dalles Chronicle, which has a record of thirty-eight years of continuous service. His birth occurred in Stillwater, Washington county, Minnesota, on the 2d of February, 1887, and his father, Frank Litfin, is a native of Germany, in which country he learned the millwright’s trade. In 1873 he made the voyage to the new world and for a time was employed as a wheelwright in Wisconsin, afterward going to Minnesota. In the early days he aided in building many sawmills in the lumber districts of Wisconsin and Minnesota, becoming an expert at his trade, which he followed until a few years ago, and since his retirement has lived in the city of St. Paul.  His wife, Emma (Kollertz) Litfin, was born in Logansport, Indiana, and passed away in 1924. To their union were born three children: Frank, who lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan; Joseph, a resident of Hudson, Wisconsin, and Ben H.

The last named was reared and educated in his native state.  Said Mr. Litfin when conversing with Fred Lockley, one of the editors of the Oregon Journal: “I earned my first money selling papers when I was ten years old. I also picked up quite a bit of money shining shoes. When I was older I carried a route on the Daily Gazette. I started what has proved to be my life work when I was fifteen years old by landing a job as printer’s devil at three dollars a week. By the time I was nineteen years old I was getting eight dollars a week and was a pretty fair compositor.

“When I was nineteen I went to Yakima, Washington, with a pal of mine and from there we went to Seattle. I had a union card and thought I could land a job, but work was scarce. We had enough money to buy a ticket for each of us to Portland, Oregon, after which we found that our total resources amounted to seventy-five cents.  The conductor on the train when we asked his advice said, ‘Go to the Oregon Hotel and say I sent you; they will put you up for the night.’ In the morning my pal got in touch with his aunt, so he was “hunkydory,” and I was out in the cold. Next morning at 4:30 o’clock I arrived at the Oregonian office and went into the mailing room.  The man operating the Dick mailer was having trouble with it. He said, ‘Can you operate this mailer?’ I told him I could and he said, ‘Well, get to work then.’ After I had cleaned up the mailer he took me out to breakfast and told me that he thought I could land a job on the Telegram. The foreman of the Telegram put me to work in the ad alley.”

In December, 1906, Mr. Litfin made the journey from Portland to The Dalles and became connected with the Chronicle, which at that time was owned by a stock company. His proficiency in setting type and in make-up work was soon recognized and at the end of a year he was made foreman of the plant, on which he secured an option in 1909.  Soon afterward Mr. Litfin and his partner, H. G. Miller, purchased the paper from the Chronicle Publishing Company and remained its proprietors until 1915, when C. Hedges, of California, acquired the business. Mr. Litfin was retained as manager and acted in that capacity until 1920, when he was joined by W. P Merry in purchasing the business from Mr. Hedges. Mr. Merry, a Portland business man, was a silent partner in the enterprise and in 1923 sold his holdings therein to Mr. Litfin, who has since owned the paper. Established in 1890, it now has a large circulation and ranks with the leading dailies of eastern Oregon. The paper has United Press leased wire service and is connected with the Audit Bureau of Circulations. After acquiring full ownership of the Chronicle, Mr. Litfin installed up-to-date machinery at a cost of twenty-five thousand dollars and now has a thoroughly modern printing plant, equipped to do all kinds of job work. He also publishes the Weekly Chronicle, a ten-page journal, filled with good reading matter. This is one of the best smaller town weeklies in the state and has a large list of subscribers, drawn from the rural districts of eastern Oregon.

Mr. Litfin was married July 20, 1916, to Miss Elizabeth Knappenberger, the former now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Litfin have become the parents of a son, Richard, who was born September 9, 1918, at The Dalles and is attending the public schools.

Mr. Litfin is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and in 1915 was the youngest exalted ruler ever elected by the members of The Dalles Lodge. He also belongs to the local lodge of Masons, the Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis Club and The Dalles Golf and Country Club. His standing as a journalist is indicated by the fact that he has been chosen vice president of the Oregon State Editorial Association, which office he is now filling, and is also vice president of the Northwest Circulation Managers Association. An eloquent advocate of good roads, he is largely responsible for the building of the Sorosis boulevard - a beautiful road overlooking the city and the majestic valley of the Columbia. His editorials are forceful, timely and well written and through the columns of his papers he has fostered many movements for the development and betterment of the community and the state of his adoption. Mr. Litfin is a man of high ideals, with the courage to uphold them, and his worth is uniformly recognized.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Dick, Frank

Frank G. Dick, an outstanding figure in legal circles of The Dalles, has been particularly successful as a trial lawyer, becoming well known in this connection, and is also classed with the leading agriculturists of Wasco county. His life from an early age has been one of unremitting industry and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. He was born March 10, 1885, in Polk county, Iowa, and his parents were Franz and Franie O’Brien, the former a native of Germany, and of Portuguese descent, while the latter was born in Dublin, Ireland. His father became an able lawyer. In 1885 he came to the United States but returned to Europe the same year. Frank G. Dick never saw his father and his mother died in 1891, when he was a child of six, leaving him in the care of her relatives.

Mr. Dick was reared by a family named O’Brien and obtained his early education in the public schools of Iowa, which he attended during the morning session. In the afternoon he was obliged to work and this program was continued until his grammar school course was completed. For one and a half years he was a high school pupil and in 1908 came to The Dalles where he pursued a special course of study under the tutelage of Rev. G. S. Clevenger, a former teacher at Princeton University. He obtained a position as clerk in the drug store of George C. Blakeley in which he spent half of the day, and during the remainder studied law in the office of Bennett & Sinnott, at that time the leading firm of attorneys in The Dalles. Judge Bennett has passed away and his partner, N. J. Sinnott, is now a member of congress. Mr. Dick also took a correspondence law course and in May, 1913, was admitted to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon. For fifteen years he has engaged in general practice at The Dalles and during that period has handled at least fifty per cent of the criminal cases tried in Wasco county as well as in several adjoining counties in eastern Oregon and Washington. He is a formidable adversary in legal combat, marshaling his evidence with the precision and skill of a military commander, and seldom fails to convince his audience of the justice of the cause he pleads. His offices are located in the Vogt building and his clientele is extensive and lucrative. Several years ago Mr. Dick began to invest his savings in Wasco county land and he now has a wheat ranch of seventeen hundred acres. Scientific methods are utilized in its cultivation and he also owns a desirable home in The Dalles.

Mr. Dick was married October 20, 1915, to Miss Louise Cramer, who was born in Nebraska.  Her parents, Fred and Johanna (Vogt) Cramer, were natives of Germany and came to the United States about 1857, locating in Wisconsin. Later they moved to Nebraska and about 1892 migrated to Oregon. Mr. Cramer engaged in farming near Forest Grove and was also a cigarmaker. There he began the manufacture of cigars and also established a factory of the same kind at Oregon City. In 1901 he transferred his industrial operations to The Dalles and operated a cigar factory in this city until his death in 1903. His widow has reached the venerable age of eighty-two years and still resides at The Dalles. Her daughter Louise was educated in Oregon and became a dressmaker. Endowed with more than average ability, she was placed in charge of the dressmaking department in the Williams store at The Dallas and filled the position until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Dick have four sons all of whom are natives of The Dalles. William was born in 1916, John H. in 1918, Roger L. in 1922 and Edgar in 1924.


Mr. Dick belongs to The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias of which he is past chancellor commander and his interest in the development and prosperity of the city is denoted by his affiliation with the Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the local Golf Club and also enjoys the sport of hunting. Along professional lines he is connected with the Wasco County and Oregon State Bar Associations. His time and money were donated toward the building of good roads in the district in which his ranch is situated and to all movements for the advancement of his community and the development of this section of the state he lends his hearty support. Possessing a strong will, an energetic nature and self-reliance, Mr. Dick has overcome adverse circumstances, bending them to his will, and is accorded the respect which world ever yields to the self-made man and useful citizen.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

 

 

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