Horses and Mt. Jefferson from BIA 3
              on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. (Photo No.
              wascDA0109)
Photo courtesy of Gary Halvorson Oregon State Archives
Wasco County, Oregon
Genealogy Trails


Death Notices & Obituaries

A

Armstrong, E. T.
B

Bauer, George
Bickel, George
Bills, Mary
Bill, Nicholas
Bolton, Herbert
Bowman, Unknown
Brown, John
C

Condon, Edward
Cowran, Peter
Crooks, Aaron
D

Dufur, A. J.
Dunsmore, Barbara
E

Ewing, Eddie
F

Felch, Minor
Foster, Norval
Frank, Charles
French, Daniel
G

Garrett, George
Goodwin, Catherine
Goodwin, Catherine (fun.)
Goodwin, William
Goodwin, William (note.)
Gordon, Thomas
H

Harman, William
Harriman, W. J.
Harrison, William
Hoffman, John
Hoffman, Unknown
I - J

Jackson, James
Jackson, Joseph
Job, Samuel
Johnson, Mrs. James
Jones, Owen
Jory, Stephen
K

Kennedy, Nancy
Kroft, Paul
L

Lewis, B. F.
Lynch, Mary
M

Mack, Julius
McCubbin, Abraham
McGill, Son
McFarland, Eliza
Melquist, N. J.
Mitchel, Otis
Mitchell, Benjamin
Moore, John
N

Nelson, Elizabeth
Nelson, Jessie
O - P

Parker, Thomas
Pettyjohn, Cecil
Pratt, S. B.
Q - R

Rees, Mary
Roach, Frank
Robertson, Mrs. William
Rutherford, Eva
S

Savage Children
Sexton, Guy
Smart, Stephen
Southern, Elizabeth
Spanish Joe
Stephens, Mabel
Strachan, Mary
Sullivan, Mrs. T. J.
T

Tarlton, William
Thompson, Asher
Thompson, Bessie
Thompson, Child
U - V

Vanbibber, J. H.
Vickers, Jackie
W

Wesley, Jim
Worthington, William
X - Y
Z


 

Goodwin, William

Wm. Goodwin, aged 85 years, father of Mrs.J. Draper residing at the corner of C and 20th  streets, died of senile decay at his daughter’s residence Tuesday. The funeral will occur today at 10:30 a.m. in the Christian Church. The body will be shipped from Noice’s undertaking parlors to The Dalles, Oregon, where it will be interred beside the deceased’s wife, who died in 1890. Mr. Goodwin was one of the earliest settlers on the Pacific coast having lived in Oregon and on Bellingham Bay for the last forty years.

Source: Unknown
Contributed by John Brassfield

Goodwin, William

Death Return

Name of Deceased: Wm. Goodwin
Date of Death: Dec. 10, 1902
Age Last Birthday: 85
Sex: Male
Color: White
Married, Single, Widow or Widower: Widower
Place of Death: Whatcom
Disease or Cause of Death: Uremia
Birthplace: Peoria, Ill.
Residence: Whatcom,W--
Occupation: Farmer
Father’s Name:
Father’s Birthplace:
Mother’s Maiden Name: York
Mother’s Birthplace:

State of Washington, County of Whatcom, ss.

            I hereby certify that the above is a true return of the Death, and of the other facts there recorded.

            Dated at Whatcom, Washington, this 17 day of Dec. 1902

L.R. Markley, M.D.

Source: Unknown
Contributed by John Brassfield

Goodwin, Catherine

GOODWIN—In this city Monday, May 27th, at 10 o’clock P.M. Catherine, wife of William Goodwin, aged 72 years. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at 2 o’clock this (Wednesday) afternoon.

Mrs. Goodwin has been a helpless invalid for more than fifteen years during which time she has received the constant and tender care of her bereaved husband. They were married February 17, 1839, or a little more than fifty years ago. About fifteen years ago she received a stroke of paralysis which rendered her helpless, but she has had the most affectionate care of both her husband and daughter, Mrs. H.H. Draper. Since that time she has had three other paralytic strokes, the last on the 20th of this month, being the immediate cause of her death. She joined the Methodist church in Oregon in 1858 and remained through life true to that faith. For fifteen years Mr. Goodwin has given his entire time to her, an example of devotion which puts to shame those doubters who think marriage is a failure, and illustrated that deep affection which abides through sickness and sorrow, through weal and woe, which promising to love, cherish and protect, smoothes the pathway of her who came to him a bright and happy girl, down the dark and desolate hills of helpless age, to the grave.

Source: Unknown
Contributed by John Brassfield

Goodwin, Catherine

Funeral Notice

Died in The Dalles, May 27, 1880

Mrs. Catherine Goodwin, (Mother of Mrs. H.H. Draper), aged 72 years.

Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church, Wednesday, May 29, at 2 o’clock P.M. Friends of the family invited.

Source: Unknown
Contributed by John Brassfield

Robertson, Mrs. William

Near Antelope, Wasco County, on the 21st of April, Wm. Robertson, wife and child were riding in a wagon down Antelope hill, the little one saw a rabbit, and in its delight slipped from the mother's hands and fell out of the wagon. Mrs. Robertson sprang out and pushed the child away from the wheels, saving its life, but at the sacrifice of her own. Her head was almost crushed before the team could be stopped, and she died shortly afterwards.

Source: Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Monday, April 30, 1877
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Tarlton, William

On Wednesday last, William Tarlton was found dead in Current crook canyon in southeast part of Wasco county. The cause of his death is unknown but he is supposed to have been thrown unknown but he is supposed to have been thrown from his buckboard while going down a steep hill and killed. Wednesday morning Mr. Tarlton had been at Antelope and had started for home on Muddy, which was the last seen of him until his body was found about 4 o'clock PM by Mr. Vandervert, lying by the side of the road Current creek canyon. Mr. Tarlton was an Englishman by birth and was about 40 years of age.

Source: Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Tuesday, April 22, 1890
Contriuted by Shauna Williams

Gordon, Thomas

Two young men, Joseph D. Walker and Thomas Gordon, living in Wasco County, who had been long been on bad terms, met on Monday. An old quarrel was renewed and several shots were fired on each side. Gordon was shot through the head and instantly killed. Walker was also seriously wounded, but is in custody. The trouble arose over the disputed possession of a tract of land.

Source: Evening Observer (Dunkirk, NY) - Thursday, October 30, 1884
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Hoffman, John

BANKROBBER DEAD

John Hoffman, Suspected of Robbing an Oregon Bank, Dies on His Way to Spot Where Money is Hid.

The Dalles, Ore., Oct. 16-The body of John R. Hoffman was found yesterday about a miles from the Tygh Valley store, on the Mays ranch, death being due to an overdose of morphine. The remains were found near a creek, where he had evidently lain down to rest and expired.

Hoffman was arrested about a year ago near Tygh by Wasco county officials, suspected of being the highwayman who held up the Woodburn (Ore.) bank in broad daylight  a few months previous. At his examination he was able to prove an alibi and satisfy the court that he had been on the ranch of Morrow & Keenan, near Grizzly, the day of the bank robbery.

It is believe by the county officers here that Hoffman was the right man and that he had a cache of money somewhere in the neighborhood of Tygh to which he was working back. A check for $75, issued August 23, 1906, by the First National bank of Prineville, was found on his person, indicating that he had been working in Crook county during the summer.

Source: Fairbanks Evening News (Fairbanks, AK) - Tuesday, October 16, 1906
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Sexton, Guy

COMMITS SUICIDE

Young Son of the City Marshal of The Dalles, Oregon, Takes His Life For Reasons Unknown.

The Dalles, Ore., Oct. 16-Guy Sexton, second son of City Marshal Sexton, committed suicide last night at his home in this city, by shooting himself in the temple with a pistol. No cause for the suicide is known. He was a well known young man, aged 21.

Source: Fairbanks Evening News (Fairbanks, AK) - Tuesday, October 16, 1906
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Jones, Owen

SLAYS BROTHER

The Dalles, Ore., Nov. 7- Dave Jones, Tygh Ridge rancher, has confessed shooting his brother and attempting to destroy the body by setting fire to a barn, Sheriff Harold Sexton of Wasco county said tonight.

Source: Helena Independent (Helena, MT) - Sunday, November 8, 1936
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Johnson, Mrs. James

Portland, Oregon, February 27. Mail advices from Pay creek, Wasco county, bring information that Mrs. Jas. Johnson, wife of a farmer on Dr. Baldwin's ranch, was burned to death on Tuesday night. She was standing near an open fire-place when her clothes caught fire and every stitch was burned off.

Source: Idaho Tri Weekly Statesman (Boise City, ID) - Tuesday, February 28, 1882
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Harman, William

Harman, William, blacksmith, North Water near Wolcott, res same [died, The Dalles, Oregon. May 15, 1890, aged 84.]

Source: 1843 Chicago Directory updated with death dates in 1896 (Chicago, IL)
Contributed by Kim Torp

McFarland, Eliza

MRS. Eliza MCFARLAND

A Former Resident of Richland County Dies in Oregon

Older residents of this community will remember Mr. and Mrs. Isaac McFarland, who resided in this city many years ago, but in the '50's removed to the west. The Dalles (Ore.) Chronicle of April 15, contains the following obituary sketch of Mrs. McFarland:

Mrs. Eliza McFarland, one of the oldest and best respected pioneers of this community, died at her home in this city Friday night after a prolonged illness at the age of 86 years.

Eliza Sirpless was the daughter of James and Mary Sirpless and was born in Washington village, Richland County, O., Jan. 7, 1817, and lived the earlier years of her life in that state. On May 21, 1832, she was married to Isaac McFarland. In the year 1850 they moved to Knox county, Illinois, and in 1852 the family crossed the plains to Oregon. Settling in Oregon City, Mrs. McFarland's husband and sons saw service in the Roque River, Indian War, moving in 1854 to the Dalles and making that their permanent home.

In Mrs. McFarland's home near Fort Dalles were held the first services conducted by a Methodist minister in this community, a half dozen persons attended each service. From these meetings presided over by the Rev. Mr. Kelley, long since dead, grew the prosperous parish of the First Methodist church of this city.

Mr. McFarland died in 1869. Of her eleven children but three survive-E.B. McFarland, of Portland; Albert McFarland, of Seattle, and Charles, of Wyeth.

Mrs. Eliza McFarland's mother died in 1850. Her father, James Sirpless, was married again to Mrs. Martha Ann McBride and to them were born five children, of whom three survive-Albert B. Sirpless and Mrs. Nellie Beeler, of Lawrence, Kas., and William E. Sirpless, of Greenwich.

Source: Unknown
Contributed by Unknown

Kennedy, Nancy

KENNEDY—Near Nansene, in this county, May 1, 1890, Miss Nancy Kennedy, aged 35 years.

Source: Times Mountaineer (The Dalles, OR) - Saturday, May 3, 1890
Contributed by Kathie Marynik

Mitchell, Benjamin

B. F. Mitchell Succumbs – Funeral This Afternoon for Late Mosier Resident

After an illness of more than eight months, B. F. [Benjamin Franklin] Mitchell died in Gladstone at 12:30 o’clock Thursday morning. Mr. Mitchell was brought to Gladstone last November from his home in Mosier, OR. Born in Iowa in November 1861, Mr. Mitchell was married November 15, 1897, in The Dalles to Effie L. Ponting, who survives. He has been a member of Willamette Falls camp no. 148, Woodmen of the World, for the last 37 years.

Besides the widow, Mr. Mitchell is survived by a son and daughter, Joseph Mitchell of Baker, and Mrs. Maude Petty of Camas, WA, who arrived here last Saturday. Two stepdaughters also survive, Mrs. Hester Rutherford of Highland, and Mrs. W. B. Stokes of Oregon City.

Funeral services will be held from the chapel of Holmans & Pace this afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. Paul de F. Mortimore of the Gladstone Christian Church will officiate, and Woodmen will have charge of services at the graveside at Mountain View Cemetery.

Source: Oregon City Morning Enterprise (Oregon City, OR) - Friday, February 21, 1930
Contributed by Kathie Marynik

Rutherford, Eva

The little daughter [Eva Pearl] of Mr. and Mrs. Rutherford was burned to death Friday afternoon. The father was away, and the mother left the children, a little girl of two and a half years, and a baby, alone while she went for the cows. Upon returning, she saw to her horror her little girl enveloped in flames. The fire was quickly extinguished but the child was too badly burned to live and expired almost immediately.

Source: The Dalles Optimist Boyd News (The Dalles, OR) - Thursday, October 25, 1906
Contributed by Kathie Marynik

Moore, John

Died-  At Celilo, Wasco County, Oct. 22d, John Moore, a resident of Newakum, Lewis County, W.T., aged 48 years.

Source: Weekly Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Saturday, November 1, 1862
Contributed by S. Williams

Bauer, George

The Dalles, Ore. – George H. Bauer, aged 54 years, recently died at his residence at Eight Mile. He had been ailing since early spring and was confined to his bed two weeks. He came to The Dalles from Washington county, Ore. 17 years ago. He came to the state from New York about 34 years ago and settled near Hillsboro. He leaves three children.

Source: The Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA), Friday, September 6, 1907
Contributed by Robyn Greenlund

McGill, Son

A boy about 11 years of age, a son of Mr. McGill, residing at Oak Grove, Wasco county, died last week from the effects of poison. While at school he and some other boys dug some roots and ate them, and it is supposed that he got hold of some white camas, which is very poison. He was taken sick before he got home, and told the others that he had eaten the roots to make him sick so that he would not have to work. The doctor was sent for but was unable to do anything to save him. He died in about a week after eating the roots.

Source: The Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Saturday, June 19, 1875
Contributed by Robyn Greenlund

Job, Samuel

Obit: Died at his home in Wamie, Waso County, Or., Aug. 7, 1887, Samuel Job, in his 76th year.
The subject of this notice was born in White County, Tenn., Sept. 22, 1812 and moved to Clay County, Mo.; in early life. There he married a Miss. Rosanna Roberts, who survives him. He moved to Clackamas county, Or., in 1852, lived there twelve years, thence to Linn county, thence to this county, where he ended his pilgrimage. They had born to them one son, who died at the age of 17 years. He leaves an aged companion and an aged sister and a host of friends who will remember his many acts of hospitality as an old pioneer.

Source: Morning Oregonian, (Portland, OR) - Friday, August 12, 1887
Contributed by Candi Horton

Pettyjohn, Cecil

The desperado who was killed at The Dalles by Artie Harriman while the latter was defending his ranch home, was positively identified as Cecil Pettyjohn by his half-brother, Thomas Pettyjohn.

Source: The Ontario Argus (Ontario, OR) Thursday, June 19, 1913
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Dufur, A. J.

A Prominent Oregonian

Death of the Hon. A. J. Dufer, Founder of the Town of Dufur

The Dalles, Or., June 6 – The Hon. A. J. Dufur, for many years a prominent resident of Oregon, died at the residence of his daughter, in Dufur, 15 miles south of The Dalles, yesterday afternoon.  He had been failing for several years, and his death was not entirely unexpected.  The funeral services will take place in Dufur tomorrow, and the remains then taken to Portland for interment Saturday in Lone Fir cemetery.  He left three sons and one daughter, all residents of this county.
- -
(A. J. Dufur was born September 17, 18[?], in Williamstown, Vt.  He lived in that state till 1855, when he emigrated to Wisconsin, where he remained four years, being elected member of the Wisconsin legislature in 1857.  In 1859 he started across the plains, and reached Portland in the fall, settling on Columbia Slough.  For many years he was a resident of East Portland.  In 1872 he moved to Wasco county, and with his sons founded the present town of Dufur.  He resided in Wasco county off and on since that time, but for the last eight years lived continuously with his daughter.  Mr. Dufur was chosen a member of the Oregon legislature in 1862: served two terms as president of the State Fair Association, and in 1876 was commissioner for Oregon to the Centennial exposition.)

Source: The Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Friday, June 7, 1895
Contributed by The History of Today

Condon, Edward

Died – Edward G. Condon died in Dalles City, Feb. 29th, aged 18 years. The deceased was a young man of more than ordinary promise. His death was sudden and unexpected, although he had been sick for some weeks with pneumonia. He was [?] of Rev. Thomas Condon, of that place.


Source: Willamette Farmer (Salem, OR) - Saturday, March 9, 1872
Mack, Julius

Eastern Oregon Pioneer

Julius O. Mack, one of the best known residents of Eastern Oregon, died at his home at The Dalles Sunday afternoon, after a short illness, from pneumonia.  Mr. Mack was about 50 years of age.

Source: The Bend Bulletin (Bend, OR) - Friday, May 15, 1903
Lewis, B. F.

B. F. Lewis, a pioneer of Lake county, died at The Dalles, this state, on the 28th ult. From a stroke of apoplexy.  Lewis was a well-known character in this county, and will be remembered as the driver of the Lakeview-Paisley stage about fifteen years ago.  He had been in his usual health until stricken, and died almost instantly.  Since 1893 he has resided in the Dalles, making his home with his daughter, Mrs. Jas. Moore.  Another daughter, Mrs. C. A. Graces, of Prineville, also survive him.

Source: Lake Co. Examiner (Lakeview, OR) - Thursday, October 11, 1900
Southern, Elizabeth

Mrs. Elizabeth Southern died last Saturday at the residence of Horace Rice, of this city, aged 71 years. The deceased was the mother of C.H. Southern and Mrs. George Rice of Boyd, and widow of Martin Southern, also of Boyd, who died about 22 years ago. She had only been ailing for about ten days. She was an exceptionally good Christian woman and the esteem in which Aunt Beth, as she was familiarly called, was held was witnessed by the large concourse of friends and neighbors that followed the remains to their last resting place yesterday in the Bolton cemetery, near Boyd. The funeral services were held at the Boyd church and were conducted by Troy Shelly, of Hood River, an old-time friend of the deceased.

Source: The Dalles Daily Chronicle (The Dalles, OR) - Tuesday, May 8, 1900
Nelson, Elizabeth

This certainly seems to be the harvest time for the grim reaper who is choosing for his garner the ripened sheafs and the aged pioneers and fathers and mothers of this vicinity are rapidly passing away.

The last to be called was Mrs. Elizabeth Nelson, who died at the home of her son-in-law Wm. Hastings, at Boyd last evening about 7:30 o'clock. She had been ill but a week, the infirmities of age probably being the cause of her demise, for she had reached three score and twenty years. Elizabeth McKeand was born in Wigtownshire, Scotland January 9, 1822 and was married to James Nelson October 27, 1846. Together they came to American in December 1879 and to Oregon in 1880, settling on Dutch Flat, where Mr. Nelson died on the 7th of July 1900. Since that time she has made her home with her daughters Mrs. W.J. Harriman and Mrs. Hastings, dying at the home of the latter. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, of whom 6 are living - Jessie Nelson of The Dalles; Thomas Nelson of Portland; Mrs. Wm. Hastings of Boyd; Mrs. Ben Nicholson of California; D.D. Nelson of Dutch Flat; and Mrs. W.J. Harriman of Endersby. The funeral will take place tomorrow at Eight Mile.

Source: The Dalles Daily Chronicle (The Dalles, OR) - Wednesday, March 19, 1902
Harriman, W. J.

Easter morn dawned anything but brightly for W.J. Harriman and his family of seven children, for at 8 pm the evening before, the dread destroyer had entered their home and removed from the circle the wife and mother. A week before she was comparatively well, having but a slight cold, which seemed to develop into grippe, but which, when the physican was called, proved to be pneumonia. It will be remembered that Mrs. Harriman had but a few weeks ago recovered from a siege of typohoid fever, and her constitution was not strong enough to withstand the awful disease, which finally snatched her from a husband and family of seven children, the oldest of whom is 15 and the youngest 10 months. Realizing that she must go she expressed anxiety concerning her children and gave directions about them.

Jane H. Nelson was born in Glasserton, Wigstownshire, Scotland December 6, 1864. She came with her parents to American in December of 1879 and in March 1888 was married to W.J. Harriman and they made their home at Endersby until they removed to this city last fall. In 1887 she united with the Congregational Church, which was organized at Fairview by the late E.P. Roberts.

The funeral took place at the family home on the East Hill this afternoon at 2 pm and was conducted by Rev D.V. Poling. Pallbearers were Messrs W.H. Moody, E.M. Williams, P.W. Wilson, Levi Chrisman, W.A. Johnston, and G.C. Blakeley.

Source: The Dalles Daily Chronicle (The Dalles, OR) - Wednesday, April 6, 1904
Nelson, Jessie

Mrs. Jessie Nelson, age 67 years died at the home of her son near Fairbanks Saturday morning after an illness of more than a year. Funeral services were held this morning at the residence and the burial took place in the 8 mile cemetery. The deceased was a native of Scotland and was well known and highly respected in the community which she resided.

Source: The Dalles Chronicle (The Dalles, OR) - Monday, January 17, 1916
Bolton, Herbert

Death Claims Herbert Bolton

Community is Saddened by Death of Prominent Young Business Man

The sad news of the death of Herbert S. Bolton was made known yesterday afternoon.

Mr. Bolton was suddenly taken ill Monday afternoon in his office at the court house with an acute attack of peritonitis. His condition gradually became worse until the end came yesterday afternoon. When all hope for his recovery was given up, word was sent to relatives, who surrounded his bedside when the spark of his young life passed away.

Herbert Bolton was 28 years of age. He was born June 1, 1887 in Goldendale, but moved to The Dalles with his parents when a small lad. A severe attack of typhoid fever, 10 years ago, left him in a weakened condition and he never had been strong since then. His sudden illness Monday, however, was entirely unexpected and the announcement of his death was a shock to the entire community. He leaves a young widow and one small son, Herbert S., Jr. The deceased was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Bolton of this city and was a brother of Mrs. Grant Mays of Portland and Mrs. B.C. Olinger of this city. He was recently appointed manager of The Dalles Abstract company to succeed his father, who retired. He was formerly a deputy sheriff of Wasco county.

Source: The Dalles Chronicle (The Dalles, OR) - Thursday, May 25, 1916
Kroft, Paul

Paul Kroft, ex-Mayor of The Dalles

The Dalles, July 23 – Paul Kroft, at one time Mayor of The Dalles, died this afternoon of heart disease, aged 51 years.  He leaves a wife and several children.  The funeral will be conducted by the Woodmen Wednesday afternoon.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Tuesday, July 24, 1900
Melquist, N. J.

The Dalles, Or., Jan. 9 – (Special) – N. J. Melquist, who died of heart failure Sunday, had been in the employ of the O. R. & N. at The Dalles for 21 years and worked until quitting time the day before his death.  He was born in Sweden, April 17, 1857.  He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Elvida Flynn, and two sons, Charles and Joseph, all of this city.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Monday, January 11, 1909
Dunsmore, Barbara

Barbara Dunsmore, 78, Mosier Pioneer, Dead

The Dalles, Dec. 29 (Special) – Mrs. Barbara Bills Dunsmore, 78, one of Wasco county’s early residents, died Thursday at her home east of Mosier.  Mrs. Dunsmore came to Mosier with her parents in 1875.  She married Robert Dunsmore in 1876.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Annie Erhart, Portland; Lurine Dunsmore, Mosier; three sons, Edward, The Dalles; Clarence, Maupin; Henry, Portland.

Source: The Sunday Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Sunday, December 20, 1934
Wesley, Jim

One of the old landmarks of The Dalles was removed Thursday morning.  Jim Wesley, an Indian, who has been in and about The Dalles since the early pioneer days, passed over to the happy hunting ground.

Source: Daily Capital Journal (Salem, OR) - Monday, February 1, 1897
Vanbibber, J. H.

DIED.    VANBIBBER--On the 15th of August, 1864, at Vicksburg City, Nevada Territory, Mr. J. H. Vanbibber, formerly of Dalles, Oregon.

Source: The Walla Walla Statesman (Walla Walla, W. T.) - Friday, November 11, 1864
Contributed by Unknown FoFG: 68.98
Strachan, Mary

THE DALLES. Or.. Feb. 3. (Special.)Mrs. Mary Y. Strachan, 68, died at Dufur Saturday. She had been a resident of Dufur for 42 years and was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, coming to America in 1881. Sho was a member of the Rebekah and Eastern Star orders. Of her six children, five survive her. They are: Mrs. J. M. O'Brien of Wapanitia; Miss Lexie Strachan of Kansas City. Mo.; David R. Strachan, Miss Jean Strachan and Thomas R. Strachan. The latter two are University of Oregon graduates. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon from the residence in Dufur, Rev. P. P. Underwood officiating. Interment will be in the Oddfellows cemetery in Dufur.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Saturday, February 2, 1924
Contributed by Robyn Greenlund

Roach, Frank

Took an Ovedose

Domestic Trouble Drives a Dalles Man to Suicide

The Dalles, Or., Sept. 25 - Frank Roach, formerly a railroad conductor, but for several years a resident of this city, died this morning from an overdose of chloral, taken with suicidal intent. Domestic trouble is supposed to have been the cause of his act.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) - Tuesday, September 27, 1892
Contributed by Robyn Greenlund
Frank, Charles

THE DALLES, Or., April 19 – (Special) – Charles Frank, a well-known resident of this city, died this morning after a prolonged illness from paralysis.  Mr. Frank was a native of Switzerland, where he was born March 29, 1849.  He had lived in this country since 1875, coming first to Wisconsin and later to Iowa before moving to Oregon, which he did in 1883, settling at Monroe, in the Willamette Valley.  In 1888 he moved to North Dalles, and since 1900 has been a resident and business man of The Dalles.  He had been twice married and leaves four children, Rudolph, Charles and Katherine Frank, of this city and Louis Frank of Iowa.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) – Friday, April 20, 1906
Hoffman, Unknown

We are informed that a man named Hoffman committed suicide lately at the Dalles by blowing out his brains with a pistol.

Source: The State Republican (Eugene City, OR) - Saturday, April 26, 1862
Spanish Joe

On the 9th inst., a man named “Spanish Joe” was killed at the Dalles, by a spanish woman.  He was drunk, and on attempting to force his way into the house she shot him with a revolver.

Source:The State Republican (Eugene City, OR) – Saturday, December 20, 1862
Jackson, Joseph

The Mountaineer says that a man named Joseph Jackson committed suicide lately by throwing himself into the Columbia river.  He was employed on the Des Chutes Railroad, but lately had been getting drunk quite frequently.  He was an Englishman, and aged about forty five years.

Source: The State Republican (Eugene City, OR) – Saturday, March 28, 1863
Worthington, William

Prof. W. L. Worthington died at The Dalles, yesterday.

Source: The Daily Astorian (Astoria, OR) –  Friday, April 27, 1883
Pratt, S. B.

S. B. Pratt, a saloonkeeper at Antelope in Wasco Co., was killed by E. T. Glisan recently; cause, jealousy.

Source: The Oregon Scout (Union, OR) - Saturday, September 12, 1885
Lynch, Mary

Died
At Antelope, Nov. 7, 1885, Mary Luella, daughter of Hughey and Flora Lynch.

She was buried from the Episcopal church, cove.  The parents, even in their affliction, know that it is “well with the child,” still they can but say with the Royal Psalmist, “My soul cleaveth to the dust.”

Source: The Oregon Scout (Union, OR) - Saturday, November 14, 1885
Thompson, Child

A little daughter of Mr. John Thompson, of the Dalles, aged about three years, accidentally fell into a bucket of hot water, which was prepared to wash the floor, on Wednesday noon of last week, and was so terribly scalded that she died on Thursday.

Source: Willamette Farmer (Salem, OR) – Saturday, September 7, 1872
Stephens, Mabel

A family prayer service was held for the memory of Mabel D. Stephens, 68, a resident of The Dalles who died in the early morning hours of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 surrounded by family.

She was born March 9, 1933 in Hard Rock, Ariz., to Deneh D. and Betty Badoni. She married Roy Edward Stephens in Independence, Ore., on Aug. 9, 1957. She was a devoted wife and caring mother and worked for years as a packer at Diamond Fruit.

She is survived by her husband Roy, and by her children; daughters Laura Tufti, Erma and her husband, Armando Garcia, sons Lonnie, Johnnie and his wife, Julie, Michael and his wife, Della; a niece, Margaret, and her husband, Regi Johnson; brother Joseph Badoni; aunt Annie Badoni; 10 grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, and numerous extended family members in Arizona.

She was preceded in death by her parents and one grandchild, Senka Stephens.

Arrangements were by Columbia Cremation and Burial.

Source: Hood River News (Hood River, OR) - Tuesday, September 25, 2001
Foster, Norval

Norval Ivans Foster, 83, a resident of Hood River, died Friday, Sept. 21, 2001 at the Oregon Veterans Home following a battle with cancer.

He was born Aug. 21, 1918 in Vernal, Utah to Walter and Lenora (Jewitt) Foster. He served in WWII as an aerial navigator with the Army Air Corps.

He owned and operated Foster Saw Shop on Tucker Road in Hood River, selling and maintaining chain saws in the local forest products industry for many years.

He is survived by his wife, Lillian, of Hood River, stepsons Roger and Lyle Baxter of Hazel Dell, Wash., and daughters Gail Washausen of Chandler, Ariz., Susan McClement of Bremerton, Wash., and Edith Fleck of Hood River. He was preceded in death by a son, Draden.

No public funeral services will be held; the family will observe private services of remembrance.

Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of the Gorge, 751 Myrtle Street, The Dalles, OR 97058 or to the Parkinson's Foundation or the Oregon Veterans Home. Arrangements were by Columbia Cremation & Burial.

Source: Hood River News (Hood River, OR) - Tuesday, September 25, 2001
Rees, Mary

Died – We clip the following from the Dalles Times-Mountaineer, of Nov. 4th, concerning the death of Mrs. C. W.  Rees, who was well known in this city:  On Wednesday last, Mrs. Mary Abigail Jans, wife of Rev. C. W. Rees, of this city, died very suddenly from an attack of crysipeiss.  She  was a very exemplary christain lady, and a member of the First Baptist church.  The community will suffer quite a loss in the death of Mrs. Rees, and she was always active in every good deed and work.  She was buried from the Baptist church, Friday.  Rev. Jno. A. Gray, of Portland, delivered the funeral discourse.  A large concourse of friends followed the cortege to the cemetery, where the remains of Mrs. Rees were laid to rest until the final summons come at the judgment day.  Mrs. Rees was about 38 years of age, and leaves a husband and eight children.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, November 11, 1882
Crooks, Aaron
Jory, Stephen
Harrison, William


A Wasco County Tragedy

Two Men Shot and Killed by a Neighbor.  The Perpetrator Shot by a Mob.  An Innocent Man Hung

A Dalles correspondent of the Oregonian gives the following particulars of an affair by which four men met violent deaths in and near Prineville lately: For some time since, Lucien Langdon and J. H. Crooks have lived close neighbors on Willow Creek, about 18 miles northwest of Prineville in the upper end of Wasco county, and 125 miles from The Dalles.  It seems that there was a piece of land lying between the farm of Langdon and that of Crooks, which was claimed by both parties, but had been fenced by Langdon, and was under his control at the time of the shooting.  There had been a long and bitter feud existing between the two families, which finally culminated last Wednesday, the 15th inst., by Langdon shooting Crooks and a man named J. Jorry.  On this day Crooks and Jorry went to the disputed land, and began cutting down a tree, but before they had finished their work Crook's wife called them to dinner.  As the two men laid down their axes beside the tree and started to their meal, they little thought they were going to their last dinner as it proved to be.  Upon returning to finish felling the tree, which was already half cut down, Crooks and Jorry found Langdon there ahead of them, industriously chopping on the other half of the tree, with his shotgun leaning against the tree beside him.  When within about forty feet of where Langdon was chopping, they halted, and, it is alleged, had quite a parley with Langdon, who suddenly picked up his shotgun and fired both barrels at the two men, killing them instantly.  Friday evening the deputy sheriff, with a posse, went to arrest Langdon.  They arrived at his house in the evening, when they saw a man at the rear of the house in the act of mounting a horse to leave.  He had just started his horse into a gallop, to enable him to leap a ditch, when the officer and his men stopped him and ordered him to dismount, which he did, and Langdon – as it proved to be – said, “I was just starting for Prineville to give myself up.”  He said he understood the people were going to lynch him, and he wanted protection from the authorities, which the deputy sheriff promised him.  Telling Langdon's wife that her husband should not be harmed while in his charge, the officer and his party started with their prisoner for Prineville, where they arrived about 12 o'clock the same night.  Langdon was taken to the Culver hotel, kept by Samuel Jackson, and was put in the parlor, where he was guarded by the sheriff's posse, numbering eight men.  He had just lain down on a lounge which was in the room, and perhaps gone to sleep, when, about 3 o'clock Saturday morning, twelve or fifteen masked men rode to the hotel, dismounted and after holding a brief consultation on the porch outside, walked into the house.  Notwithstanding the sheriff's party was well armed, they permitted themselves to be overpowered by the mob without making any resistance.  The deputy sheriff says they threw a blanket over his head and then the shooting began, the fire being kept up until the unfortunate man lying on the sofa was shot to death, by this devilish, lawless people.  The deputy sheriff cannot be too severely censured for not resisting the mob; or at least making an effort to save the life of his prisoner, to whose wife he had given his word that no harm should come to him.  I now come to the worst part of this hellish piece of work, the killing of Wm. Harrison, an entirely innocent party, in a most brutal and inhuman manner, a deed worthy the most cruel and savage Apache Indian.  Harrison had worked for Langdon, and at the coroner's, it is alleged he said “it is a good thing Crooks and Jorry had been killed.”  For these few words uttered, it is said, while partially drunk, he lost his life.  It seems that Harrison was stopping at the Culver House, when Langdon was brought into town, and must have aroused when the shooting was going on, as the mob was seen to drag him from the house with a rope around his neck.

They had thrown a riata around his neck, fastened the end to the pommel of a saddle, mounted their horses and galloped down the road to the Crooked river bridge, a distance of about a quarter of a mile, where they hung their victim from a stringer of the bridge.  Harrison was heard to say before leaving the hotel: “Gentlemen, I had nothing whatever to do with this affair,” and, as the unfortunate young man uttered these words, he was jerked off his feet and dragged to his doom.  There can be no doubt but that Harrison was choked to death long before his murderers reached the bridge.  Harrison at one time worked for the O. R. & N. Co., running out of The Dalles as a brakeman on a freight train.  He is spoken well of by those who knew him.

It has since transpired that some of the parties guarding Langdon, said the day before he was killed, that Langdon would not live lone after he was caught.

It is the opinion of some who are conversant with this terrible tragedy that the deputy sheriff's posse not only allowed themselves to be overpowered without resistance, but took part in the shooting.

This part of the country is filled with a lot of desperadoes.  Stock raising is the principal business, and a small but vicious class, known as “cowboys,” are becoming as desperate and lawless as their brethren in Arizona and New Mexico.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, March 25, 1882
McCubbin, Abraham

Abraham McCubbin, one of the early pioneers of Clackamas county, but for several years a resident of Wasco county, died on the 12th ult., aged 70 years.  A wife, one son and three daughters survive him.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, April 8, 1882
French, Daniel

Daniel M. French, a prominent banker of The Dalles, died in that city yesterday.

Source: Daily Eugene Guard (Eugene, OR) – Monday, January 13, 1902
Savage Children

Out in Tygh valley diphtheria has been raging this winter.  Albert and Brazil Savage have lost ten children of this disease; the former losing six children and the latter four.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, February 21, 1880
Garrett, George

George D. Garrett, an unmarried man about forty years old, fell in an apoplectic fit at the Welcome saloon The Dalles, Friday evening and expired.  The fit was caused by excessive drinking.  His mother lives in Washington D.C., and his brother is body servant to Ben Holladay.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, November 20, 1880
Felch, Minor

Drowned!

Minor Felch Drowned in Trout Creek, Wasco County, Or.

The sad news has been brought here, that Mr. Minor Felch met his death by drowning, during a freshet in Trout Creek, Wasco county, Jan. 15th.  From the Dalles Times of a recent date we take the following account of the melancholy occurrence:

“Mr. Minor Felch had stopped over night on Jan. 14th at the residence of Mr. J. M. Friends, a half mile lower down the creek than his own residence.  Early on the morning of the 15th, after breakfast, Mr. Felch started home, in order to do which he had to cross Trout Creek, which had become so swollen by the flood that it was a raging torrent.  This was the last seen of Mr. Felch.  The horses which he rode, in about an hour returned to the barn, having been in the water, as he was drippingly wet.  Immediate search was made for Mr. Felch, but the only sign of his fate which could be found were his footprints leading to the creek and up and down it a considerable distance, as though he had been hunting for a ford and then back to the barn.  Here Mr. F. procured a horse and proceeded to the stream, as the tracks could be plainly discerned in the light covering of snow.  The place where the horse entered the creek could be  readily seen, and also where he floundered out and returned to the barn.  Nothing was seen of Mr. Felch until Monday evening following, when his dead body was found lodged against the bank about a half mile from the place where the horse entered the stream.  Our informant stopped with the corpse Monday night, but he left the next morning before the inquest was held.  The facts he related to us are all which is known of the sad fate of the young man, and a coroner’s inquest would hold nothing further regarding his death, as none but the dumb animal was a witness of his last struggle.”

Mr. Minor Felch was about 28 years of age, unmarried, and came to Oregon from Wisconsin, where his parents and three sister still reside.  He came to Eugene about seven years ago, and had since resided here until last summer, when he moved to the vicinity where he met his fate, for the purpose of engaging in sheep farming  He had purchased a ranch and built a cabin, but had not yet purchased any stock.  In 1876 he was appointed night watch of this city, and for three years faithfully performed the duties incident to that position; but his health becoming bad from night work he retired and for over a year studied telegraphy with Mr. Levi Ad[?], agent of the O & C.R.R.  In the spring of 1880 he concluded to revisit his old home in Wisconsin, when his near relatives viewed him for the last time.  He was noted for honor and fidelity, and but few in this city heard of his sad end without a pang of regret, and pity that [?] so upright and noble should be cut off while yet in the prime and vigor of manhood.  He was a member in good standing of Eugene Lodge, No. 11, A.F. & A.M.  From a letter to Mr. B. C. Van Houten we learn that the remains were kindly taken in charge by Mr. Chas. Van Houten, who lives near the scene of the drowning, and decently deposited in the grave.  Would it not be a kindly act for the people of this city, and the Lodge of which he was an honored member, to remove his remains from the sage brush plains of Wasco to the cemetery adjoining our city?

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, February 12, 1881
Jackson, James

Shocking Accident

Mr. James Jackson, of Wasco county, had been to a neighbor’s for grain on the 7th inst.  On his way home he stopped at a saloon, bought a bottle of whisky and became intoxicated.  He was last seen in that condition near Mr. Wm. Farley’s, when he was assisted to cross a ditch, and as he had a gentle team, said he could to home all right.  This was about sundown March 7th, and he was then within two miles of where he lived.  A short time after dark, Mr. Darius Adams, (at whose house he made his home) heard the rattle of the wagon, and went to the door, and heard the horses struggling as if in trouble.  Mr. Adams and others immediately went to his assistance, and found the wagon turned over, and Mrs. Jackson underneath, dead – his neck, one arm, and one leg broken, and otherwise badly bruised.  Mr. Jackson was about forty years of age, has a sister living in the valley, and has been here eight or nine years.  The Dalles Times says he was an industrious and good citizen.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, March 26, 1881
Ewing, Eddie

Frightened to Death

The Dalles Times tells of a boy named Eddie, aged about eight years, a son of Mr. F. M. Ewing, living on Three Mile creek in that county, who died on Monday last from fright produced through the cruel fun of his schoolmates.  Some large boys chased the little fellow a long distance, and then caught and threatened him with knives if he dared tell the teacher, causing such a shock to the nervous system that he never rallied.  Our informant states that for two weeks before his death he suffered extremely, at times being delirious and calling out for the boys to let him alone.  The matter should be inquired into by the proper authorities.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, May 14, 1881
Smart, Stephen

Died – At the Dalles, October 22, 1881, Stephen Smart, aged 48 years.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, November 5, 1881
Armstrong, E. T.

Dead – Says the Dalles Times of Dec. 7th “Mr. Armstrong, who was taken to the pest-house a few days ago, on his arrival from Baker City, died yesterday morning from the effects of that terrible disease, smallpox.  Mr. Armstrong is about 62 years of age, and was en route to Eugene City, to visit his daughter, Mrs. Frank Rankin.  He leaves a son somewhere in Illinois, and has six brothers, two of whom are in this county.  His brother in this city took charge of his remains, and had them interred in our city graveyard.  The pest-house is situated in a most undesirable locality, and it is impossible to make convenient sanitary arrangements regarding it.  It is no crime to be afflicted with this disease, and while the general health demands that cases shall be quarantined and isolated, yet pest-houses should be made as comfortable as possible to the suffering victims.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, December 10, 1881
Parker, Thomas

Froze – The Standard says that a young man by the name of Thomas Parker, whose step father, mother and family reside near Oregon City, was frozen to death in attempting to go from the nine mile post to the Dalles.  Another young man by the name of Welch froze his feet so badly that they will have to be amputated.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, February 22, 1879
Thompson, Bessie

Died
At Hay Creek, Wasco county, Bessie, daughter of William and Libbie Thompson, of diphtheria, February 17, 1879, aged 5 months and 27 days.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, March 1, 1879
Thompson, Asher

Died
At Hay Creek, Wasco county, Feb. 25th, 1879, of diphtheria, Asher, son of William and Libbie Thompson, aged 6 years, 2 months and 13 days.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, March 15, 1879
Bowman, Unknown

Accidentally Killed – From a letter received from Alex, Wasco county, that a Mr. Bowman, formerly of Pleasant Hill, was accidentally killed on the 2d inst.  He was engaged in digging a hole to bury a large rock, when it caved in on him killing him instantly.  He leaves a wife and four children thus suddenly bereft of a husband and father.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, March 15, 1879
Cowran, Peter

Peter Cowran, a plasterer, engaged on the Umatilla House at the Dalles, died on the night of the 4th, inst. of apoplexy.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, October 18, 1879
Vickers, Jackie

Died – Near Lone Rock, Wasco county, Oregon, November 12, 1879, Jackie, son of J. W. and N. B. Vickers, aged 12 years, 3 months and 7 days.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, December 6, 1879
Mitchel, Otis

Careless Pistol Handling - Last Thursday Otis Mitchel a stepson of S. H. Jones, of Goldendale, W.T., was killed near Waldron, in Wasco county, Oregon.  He and a young Mr. Eads were at the home of his uncle, Isaac Chapman.  They were handling a pistol, which was accidentally discharged in the hands of Eads, killing Mitchel instantly.  The young man was 20 years old, and the mother is heart-broken over the calamity.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) - Saturday, January 20, 1883
Sullivan, Mrs. T. J.

A Mrs. T. J. Sullivan died suddenly at The Dalles, from the over-indulgence of whisky.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) - Saturday, February 10, 1883
Brown, John

Mr. John A. Brown, formerly sewing machine agent in this city, died at the residence of Mr. H. Baxter, at Kingsley, Wasco county, one day last week.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) - Saturday, February 24, 1883
Bickel, George

Last week Geo. Bickel, a half brother of Fred Bickel, the confectioner of First street, entered a barber shop at the Dalles, adjoining the O. K. Saloon, and picking up a razor, deliberately cut his throat from ear to ear.  With the blood streaming from the ghastly wound, Bickel rushed out of doors and one the street and fell in front of the express office, where he expired in about five minutes.  Deceased was formerly interested in the New York Hotel, in this city, but his health failing him he retired and left with intention of going to California.  He must have returned on the steamer Elder without the knowledge of his friends or relatives, and started for The Dalles Monday morning.  His sickness had no doubt culminated in temporary insanity.  Decedent was aged about 34 years.  He leaves a wife and several children at Oregon City.  The remains will be brought down for interment.  - Bee

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 28, 1879
Bills, Mary
Bills, Nicholas


Another Horrible Murder

For the past few months in Eastern Oregon there seems to have been a current of crime and devilish deeds floating in the atmosphere.  Every week of two comes the news of a dreadful murder in that section.  The murderers have all been arrested, with one or two exceptions, and the chances are favorable for two or three hanging parties before the year is out.  The Dalles Times, of June 1st, give the following account of the last murder:

Yesterday afternoon a boy came riding to town as fast as his horse could carry him, and brought the painful news that Nicholas Bills had killed his wife.  The particulars, as near as we could learn are as follows:  Mr. and Mrs. Bills had not lived together for some years, the former residing here with his younger children and the latter in the East.  Lately Mrs. Bills came out to Oregon for the purpose of seeing her family.  She had been stopping at her family.  She had been stopping at her daughter's – Mrs. Robert Dinsmore – about twelve miles from this city, near the Sandy wagon road.  About two months ago, when she first came out here, she and Mr. Bills had a quarrel.  An elder brother had left the paternal roof some time ago, and was staying with his sister, Mrs. Dunsmore.  The father was so cross that the young man thought he could do better away from home.  There were three children at home – Jacob 16 years old, a girl 12, and the youngest, a boy of 10.  On the morning of the tragedy, Mr. Bills sent his youngest boy to Dinsmore's to tell the old brother to come home.  The boy came back and told the father that his elder brother had refused.  Mr. Bills and his son Jacob were building fence about a quarter of a mile from the house.  After eating dinner, Mr. Bills went down to Dinsmore's house and came back and got his shotgun and bowie knife, and again proceeded to Dinsomore's house.  Immediately on entering he shot his wife twice in the stomach, and then stabbed her with the knife.  It was done so suddenly that the inmates had no time to interfere.  The elder brother grabbed the shotgun out of his father's hand and clubbed it over his head.  The father immediately fled.  Our informant was the son of the murdered and murderer, and arrived in town about 4 o'clock, having left Mr. Dinsmore's house about 2.  He was in such an excited state that it was impossible to learn any definate particulars.  He said, as he left he saw his sister washing the body of murdered mother.   A warrant was immediately issued for the arrest of Bills, and the Sheriff sent one of his deputies in pursuit.  Up to the time of going to press no arrests were made.

The following is a description of Bills: About 58 or 60 years of age, 6 feet, 1 inch in height, high cheek bones, weighs about 180 pounds, no beard or whiskers, face kept smoothly shaven, dark blue eyes and speaks fair English.

On the following night Mr. Bills committed suicide after leaving a letter addressed to the Editor of the Mountaineer stating the cause of his actions.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, June 12, 1880


 Information in brackets [ ] is based on other outside sources, and was not present in the original source.


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